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Radio's Revolution: Don Hollenbeck's CBS Views the Press

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CBS Views the Press ranks as one of the most important radio programs in U.S. journalism history. The pet project of Edward R. Murrow, Don Hollenbeck’s fifteen-minute program aired weekly over WCBS in New York City from 1947 to 1950 and won a Peabody, a George Polk and other major journalism awards. The provocative program was broadcasting’s Declaration of Independence fro CBS Views the Press ranks as one of the most important radio programs in U.S. journalism history. The pet project of Edward R. Murrow, Don Hollenbeck’s fifteen-minute program aired weekly over WCBS in New York City from 1947 to 1950 and won a Peabody, a George Polk and other major journalism awards. The provocative program was broadcasting’s Declaration of Independence from newspapers—the first time a network dared trade roles with the powerful press to become the critic of newspapers, not merely the subject of newspapers’ criticism. Radio’s Revolution brings together twenty historically significant transcripts of CBS Views the Press, with Loren Ghiglione providing the historical context and insight into Hollenbeck’s approach.  Hollenbeck tackled the toughest topics, from racism to McCarthyism, and many in the media applauded his conscience and courage. But powerful New York newspapers, including William Randolph Hearst’s flagship Journal-American, attacked Hollenbeck’s program as pro-Communist and anticonservative. In 1954 Hollenbeck got caught in the middle of the televised confrontation between CBS’s Murrow and Senator Joe McCarthy. Still under assault by Hearst columnists, separated from his third wife, worried about losing his job at CBS, and suffering from alcoholism and depression, Hollenbeck killed himself.


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CBS Views the Press ranks as one of the most important radio programs in U.S. journalism history. The pet project of Edward R. Murrow, Don Hollenbeck’s fifteen-minute program aired weekly over WCBS in New York City from 1947 to 1950 and won a Peabody, a George Polk and other major journalism awards. The provocative program was broadcasting’s Declaration of Independence fro CBS Views the Press ranks as one of the most important radio programs in U.S. journalism history. The pet project of Edward R. Murrow, Don Hollenbeck’s fifteen-minute program aired weekly over WCBS in New York City from 1947 to 1950 and won a Peabody, a George Polk and other major journalism awards. The provocative program was broadcasting’s Declaration of Independence from newspapers—the first time a network dared trade roles with the powerful press to become the critic of newspapers, not merely the subject of newspapers’ criticism. Radio’s Revolution brings together twenty historically significant transcripts of CBS Views the Press, with Loren Ghiglione providing the historical context and insight into Hollenbeck’s approach.  Hollenbeck tackled the toughest topics, from racism to McCarthyism, and many in the media applauded his conscience and courage. But powerful New York newspapers, including William Randolph Hearst’s flagship Journal-American, attacked Hollenbeck’s program as pro-Communist and anticonservative. In 1954 Hollenbeck got caught in the middle of the televised confrontation between CBS’s Murrow and Senator Joe McCarthy. Still under assault by Hearst columnists, separated from his third wife, worried about losing his job at CBS, and suffering from alcoholism and depression, Hollenbeck killed himself.

4 review for Radio's Revolution: Don Hollenbeck's CBS Views the Press

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Dr. Ghiglione chose twenty historically significant transcripts of the most important and representative broadcasts by Don Hollenbeck for CBS Views the Press. He then wrote a brief commentary before each delineating its historical context with an explanation of Hollenbeck’s courageous if blunt approaches. Ghiglione’s transcript selection coupled with his own narrative results in a well-executed, if frightening, explanation of the press and its influence on our beliefs and politics in the early C Dr. Ghiglione chose twenty historically significant transcripts of the most important and representative broadcasts by Don Hollenbeck for CBS Views the Press. He then wrote a brief commentary before each delineating its historical context with an explanation of Hollenbeck’s courageous if blunt approaches. Ghiglione’s transcript selection coupled with his own narrative results in a well-executed, if frightening, explanation of the press and its influence on our beliefs and politics in the early Cold War years. His choice of transcripts and his excellent commentary make it a short segue to comparing the influence of today’s media, including newspapers, magazines, broadcasting, etc. on our everyday belief system.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie

    The book is made up of scripts from Hollenbeck's radio shows from the late 1940s and early 50s. For those who don't know who he was but saw the movie about Edward R. Murrow "Good Night and Good Luck" Hollenbeck was the one who committed suicide. He was so far ahead of his time. Amazing!! The book is made up of scripts from Hollenbeck's radio shows from the late 1940s and early 50s. For those who don't know who he was but saw the movie about Edward R. Murrow "Good Night and Good Luck" Hollenbeck was the one who committed suicide. He was so far ahead of his time. Amazing!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Creolecat

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gazmend Kryeziu

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