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God of War: The Official Novelization

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The novelization of the highly anticipated God of War 4 game. His vengeance against the Gods of Olympus years behind him, Kratos now lives as a man in the realm of Norse gods and monsters. It is in this harsh, unforgiving world that he must fight to survive… and teach his son to do the same. This startling reimagining of God of War deconstructs the core elements that define The novelization of the highly anticipated God of War 4 game. His vengeance against the Gods of Olympus years behind him, Kratos now lives as a man in the realm of Norse gods and monsters. It is in this harsh, unforgiving world that he must fight to survive… and teach his son to do the same. This startling reimagining of God of War deconstructs the core elements that defined the series—satisfying combat; breathtaking scale; and a powerful narrative—and fuses them anew.


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The novelization of the highly anticipated God of War 4 game. His vengeance against the Gods of Olympus years behind him, Kratos now lives as a man in the realm of Norse gods and monsters. It is in this harsh, unforgiving world that he must fight to survive… and teach his son to do the same. This startling reimagining of God of War deconstructs the core elements that define The novelization of the highly anticipated God of War 4 game. His vengeance against the Gods of Olympus years behind him, Kratos now lives as a man in the realm of Norse gods and monsters. It is in this harsh, unforgiving world that he must fight to survive… and teach his son to do the same. This startling reimagining of God of War deconstructs the core elements that defined the series—satisfying combat; breathtaking scale; and a powerful narrative—and fuses them anew.

30 review for God of War: The Official Novelization

  1. 5 out of 5

    The Tattooed Book Geek (Drew).

    4.5 stars. As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress... I’ll preface my review with this statement, I’m a massive God of War fan. From its initial release on the PlayStation 2 all the way back in 2005 through to the recent 2018 PlayStation 4 instalment that this book is the novelization of. I mean, the book even has the exact same cover as the video game!📖🎮 Set in ancient Greece and full of the gods and monsters of Greek mytholo 4.5 stars. As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress... I’ll preface my review with this statement, I’m a massive God of War fan. From its initial release on the PlayStation 2 all the way back in 2005 through to the recent 2018 PlayStation 4 instalment that this book is the novelization of. I mean, the book even has the exact same cover as the video game!📖🎮 Set in ancient Greece and full of the gods and monsters of Greek mythology God of War was a fantastic series and called to me. The setting, the creatures, the epic boss fights, Kratos, the main character, angry with a fiery rage, hell-bent on vengeance against the God’s, the sweet weaponry that he wielded, I mean, c’mon the Blades of Chaos are amazing! and, I’m not gonna lie, the gratuitous violence and copious bloodshed appealed to. Then, with the latest release, the setting changed. Kratos had quenched his thirst for vengeance and ancient Greece was no more. Instead, the series moved on, forward in time to a new Norse setting and something strange happened to Kratos. He was always a great character but he was also rather one-dimensional and then with this instalment of God of War he changed. With the passage of time Kratos had aged, he had traded in the Blades of Chaos for a single axe, the Leviathan axe, his anger whilst still there was now more measured, he was more reflective, thoughtful and as a character, he was far more complex than ever before. The God of War series is one of favourite gaming series and, for this latest release, along with the likes of Bioshock (1, 2 & Infinite), Dead Space (1 & 2), Fallout 3, the GTA series, Horizon Zero Dawn, Red Dead Redemption, going old school now, Shadow of the Colossus and even further back Goldeneye and The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time it is one of the best games that I have ever played, it’s not just a video game, it’s an experience. The setting, the mythology, the monsters, the locations, the dialogue, the weapons, the RPG (Role-playing-Game) elements and expanded gameplay, Kratos and then, this time, the cutscenes, the storytelling and the emotions that the game evokes in the player too. Yes, the visceral violence that is synonymous with the franchise is still there but then there is added depth too. God of War has such a heartfelt, personal and poignant story with Kratos and his son, Atreus leaving their isolated forest home to fulfil Kratos’s promise to his deceased wife, to honour her last wish and scatter her ashes from the top of the highest mountain peak in all of the nine realms. The simple story that turns into an epic journey spanning various realms and the fraught relationship between the father and son who have never really bonded is a testament to the power of storytelling in the video game medium with some amazing voice acting by Christopher Judge (Teal’c from Stargate SG1) as Kratos. Saying all that, after being offered a copy of the God of War book to read and review (which, I have to admit that I had no idea was even a thing until I received the press release email) half of me was chomping at the bit to accept and thinking ‘how cool is this‘ but the other half was rather more apprehensive about accepting it. You see, with no disrespect to either the book or Barlog the game had set such a high standard (I’d go as far as to call it a masterpiece) that I had to ask myself what could the book possibly add to the game and would it be a worthy addition or an unnecessary extra that simply left me yearning to pick up the controller and replay the game. Well, after finishing the book I have to admit that Barlog has done a damn fine job with the God of War novelization and he brings the game to life in the form of a tremendous book. I loved it and in my opinion, if you are a fan of the game then you’ll be a fan of the book. Obviously, the book tells the same story as in the game. Kratos and Atreus journey forth from their home to scatter Faye’s (the wife of Kratos and the mother of Atreus) ashes from the highest mountaintop in all the realms. There’s a lot packed into the game of God of War. Along with the main story, there is a whole plethora of other content available with plenty of lore and a variety of side quests to discover throughout the world. As such, the book is far more linear in its approach focusing solely on the main story and missing out the lore and side quests. This, however, is totally understandable and Barlog can’t be faulted for his focus on the main story. Had he written about everything else that is included in the actual game then the book would have been double the size in length and probably well over 800 pages. Instead, what we get is a streamlined narrative featuring the major points of the main story that manages to keep the core of the game intact and works well. It is a long and arduous trek to the highest mountain peak spanning various realms with plenty of obstacles along the way and many battles against a variety of foes (including Trolls, Hel-walkers, Draugr, Ogres, Elves, Wulver, a Dragon, demi-gods and a god) to overcome. Kratos and Atreus are both consumed by grief by the loss of Faye. They are in turmoil and the loss is a wound that is raw and still bleeds. Atreus wears his heart on his sleeve and often shows his emotions. Whereas, with Kratos, apart from the anger shown he is very stoic, grieving in his own way and mourning silently but the grief, for the pair is palpable on the pages. Kratos doesn’t know how to be a father to Atreus struggling with the role and at its core, that’s what God of War is about. The building and the development of the relationship between the two, the growth of Kratos as he learns to be a father, Atreus maturing from the child who started the journey and showing that he is strong enough to complete the task, trusting each other, working together and finally both Kratos and Atreus coming to terms with their true nature. In general, the action in God of War is decent enough but there’s a couple of occasions where more description and detail would have been welcomed in the encounters and fights. It’s a tough one though as the action in the game is very visceral. Subsequently, if Barlog had taken that gaming action and written it in the same visceral way then the God of War book would have been very dark and it wouldn’t have been as accessible as it ultimately is. The settings in the book are recognisable as the locations in the game. Likewise, the characters in the book are the not only reminiscent of the characters from in the game, they ‘are‘ the characters from in the game. Kratos, Atreus, the head of Mimir, Brok and Sindri (the bickering dwarven brothers), Freya and Baldur and their actions, the dialogue between them and their personalities are all on point and Barlog has done a great job of transferring them to the book. The book offers fans of the game something extra in the form of a worthy companion piece that sits beside the game as a welcome addition to the God of War franchise evoking the spirit of the game. For those who don’t play video games (I know, the horror but alas, some people don’t) and have no prior knowledge of Kratos and the God of War gaming series then you will also still find a good adventure and story inside the pages of the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    milou ☕️

    Spoilers for if you haven't played the game!!! ↠ 5 stars, I wish that I could give it more -- "No. We are not men. We are far more, which makes our responsibilities far greater," his father corrected. Could this boy even comprehend what that meant? "And you must be better than me. Understand?" Atreus stared at the knife, then at his father. He nodded absently. "Say it," Kratos demanded. "I will be better." Kratos, the God of War, has left behind Olympus and his vengeance. For years he has been l Spoilers for if you haven't played the game!!! ↠ 5 stars, I wish that I could give it more -- "No. We are not men. We are far more, which makes our responsibilities far greater," his father corrected. Could this boy even comprehend what that meant? "And you must be better than me. Understand?" Atreus stared at the knife, then at his father. He nodded absently. "Say it," Kratos demanded. "I will be better." Kratos, the God of War, has left behind Olympus and his vengeance. For years he has been living in the realm of the Norse Gods hidden far away from the world. Believing that his past is well behind him Kratos has married again to a woman named Faye and they have son together, Atreus. Faye is the one who taught Atreus the most like hunting and archery while Kratos mostly went hunting by himself, which meant that he was pretty much absent for most of Atreus' life. When Faye unexpectedly dies years later Kratos is suddenly left behind with his son, with who he shares a troubled bond. Before Faye died she had told Kratos that she wanted her ashes to be scattered from the highest peak in all of the realms. Kratos thinks that Atreus is inexperienced and young, and not ready to partake such a venture, but he has no other choice than to take him with him. Kratos needs to honor the wishes of his late wife. Together they leave behind their secluded home in the forest and set out towards the mountains. Atreus, my precious sugar muffin, is determined to proof his father wrong and to show him that he's perfectly capable to come along and that he can fight alongside him. Now that he has lost his mother Atreus feels the strong need to develop a bond with his father since he barely knows the man who has been mostly absent during his life. He just wants to be accepted and appreciated. Atreus does his best to show Kratos exactly how much his mother has taught him and that he has his anger and sickness under control. He is a quick learner and listens to what his father tells him, to improve his skills. "When fear seizes you, Atreus, that is the moment you must become fearless." Atreus has never ventured further than besides the forest that surrounds his house and this is the first time that he sees what Midgard has to offer, which surprises him. Atreus becomes the one who translates all of the ruins that they encounter since Kratos has never learned how to describer Norse ruins. Apparently languages come easy to Atreus and all of his mother's lessons proof useful on the road. Kratos begins to rely on him. Atreus is filled with kindness, which he has from his mother, and he easily befriends everyone that they encounter. He sees the good in everyone and always wants to save as much people or creatures as he can, which Kratos doesn't always understand. As they travel across the Lake of Nine they encounter the World Serpent, Jörmungandr, which is still the best part. The serpent speaks to them in the ancient tongue and reading about that part still gave me some chills. A giant snake, so huge it consumed the entire sky before them, rose up out of the water, then lowered its head, tilting it to one side to eye Kratos and the boy suspiciously. Their road leads them high into the mountains of Midgard! When they finally made it onto the mountain they come across, Mimir, the smartest man alive. "I'm going to cut off your head now, so you will be silent." "Fair enough." Kratos decapitates Mimir at his request and let his head dangle on his belt. Mimir tells them that the highest peak of all the realms isn't in Midgard, but in Jotunheim. That means that they still have a long way to go before they scatter Faye's ashes. Only from there Mimir joins them, and the head proves to be of much value since he knows the answer to every question. If she can't bring it back to life, can we keep the head anyway?" "No. But you may feed it to the fish." Mimir is the one who makes the most jokes of everyone and who doesn't hesitate to show his disdain for the gods. His conversations with Kratos and Atreus are funny and never failed to make me laugh, even when I read about them. "It looked like the World Serpent was gonna eat us!" Atreus said. "My fault. A misplaced click or two created some confusion. He thought I said you were friends of Odin. You will have to forgive me. Trust is, I have never spoken the ancient tongue while sober." The journey continues and it takes us to different realms! Midgard! Alfheim! There is this part where Kratos has to travel into the light of Alfheim to collect the Bifröst while Atreus waits for him. In the game it appears that Atreus was only waiting there for a few hours at least, where in the book it was almost a day and Atreus fought of plenty of Dark Elves during his father's absence. And Helheim I have a feeling that I can easily sit here writing about my love for this game and this book, but I don't want to extend this review for that much longer. Still I want to mention some of the characters that make this story memorable and that played a part in it. The dwarven brothers Brok and Sindri. The little man slid from his hiding place, stopping beside Atreus. "Ya see what my touch brung!" Brok boasted with a broad smile. "Adequate," said Kratos. "Adequate he says..." The Goddess Freya, the Witch in the woods. "You should know the gods of these realms do not take kindly to outsiders. Trust me, I know." The God Baldur The Demi-God Modi And the Demi-God Magni The relationship between Kratos and Atreus started of problematic. Kratos wanted to show Atreus that he cared and that he could be a good father to him, one that he deserves, but he didn't know to. The God of War was scared. Kratos wants to make up for all of the time that he has lost with Atreus when he had been absent during his son's life. "Can I... turn into an animal?" Atreus asked. "Can you turn into an animal? No... no, I don't think so," Kratos responded. "[...] Are you sure I cannot turn into a wolf?" "You are welcome to surprise me." During their journey Atreus and Kratos grow closer to another, especially after Kratos tells him about where he came from and the reason why Atreus is sick. Kratos doesn't doubt his son's abilities any longer and is more than happy to let Atreus fight along side him, without questioning him. It creates a strong bond between them. God of War is one of my all time favorite videogames and I've replayed it a couple of times since it released last April. In my opinion it has everything that a phenomenal videogame requires and I'm immensely invested into this world and its characters. I wasn't aware that a book about this game was being made, but when I discovered it on twitter a couple of days ago I could only jump into this world again. The book is just as mind-blowing as the game. I think I'll return to this world again and again. Everyone should give this game a chance, you will not regret it! "Is this what it is to be a god? Is this how it always ends? Sons killing their mothers... their fathers?" And now we patiently wait for the next game to be created and be released within 4-5 years from now....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rafael

    I have been a fan of God of war since it came out, played all the games in all the platforms, the story is amazing, and when i heard there was a novelization of the last game I did not hesitate in getting it. An Old battered Kratos is in strange lands, ancient Norway in the realm of Midgard, his life has changed, now he lives in seclusion and entirely in charge of a small boy, his son, Atreus, after the death of his wife (the boy's mother). They embark on a journey to spread her ashes at the high I have been a fan of God of war since it came out, played all the games in all the platforms, the story is amazing, and when i heard there was a novelization of the last game I did not hesitate in getting it. An Old battered Kratos is in strange lands, ancient Norway in the realm of Midgard, his life has changed, now he lives in seclusion and entirely in charge of a small boy, his son, Atreus, after the death of his wife (the boy's mother). They embark on a journey to spread her ashes at the highest peak of the nine realms. Kratos past will never stop hunting him and he has sworn for the wellbeing of his son to maintain his past a secret, deferent paths and creatures will slowly unveil his past and his capabilities while a whole new world of gods and mythology unveils. this book was great and surprisingly fun, due to work and grownup life I barely have time to read even less play, so when I found this it was a jackpot!, the book has an excellent plot with an unexpected ending and revelation, I’ve listened to this story in audible the narrator is superb perfect voice acting, I extremely recommend this if you are a God of war fan. .

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ryk Good

    Excellent reading by a familiar voice (for those who have played the game). I love how they go into detail on Kratos and Atreus' feelings for each other, and how, during one particular section, you are able to see what Atreus went through while waiting for Kratos. Also, the epilogue adds a cliffhanger that you don't want to miss. Excellent reading by a familiar voice (for those who have played the game). I love how they go into detail on Kratos and Atreus' feelings for each other, and how, during one particular section, you are able to see what Atreus went through while waiting for Kratos. Also, the epilogue adds a cliffhanger that you don't want to miss.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Arjen

    THIS. IS. MIDGARD.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cori

    I found myself pleasantly surprised! This game novelization was well done. The narrator was a pleasure to listen to, the father/son dynamic between Kratos and Atreyus was heart-wrenching and heart-warming, and the pace was non-stop. Well done. I'd rate this a PG-13 for violence and gore as well as some swearing, including multiple uses of the F-bomb. I found myself pleasantly surprised! This game novelization was well done. The narrator was a pleasure to listen to, the father/son dynamic between Kratos and Atreyus was heart-wrenching and heart-warming, and the pace was non-stop. Well done. I'd rate this a PG-13 for violence and gore as well as some swearing, including multiple uses of the F-bomb.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Esmée

    "When fear seizes you, Atreus, that is the moment you must become fearless." ★★★★✩ I was given this book by Titan Books in exchange of an honest review. I am a gamer and love playing games for their stories. God of War has been on my to-play list ever since the fourth game was announced, only to find out that it is Playstation only (I am a PC gamer). A bummer, but that makes this novelization of God of War 4 even better for me to experience the story. Going in this book, I knew next to nothing abo "When fear seizes you, Atreus, that is the moment you must become fearless." ★★★★✩ I was given this book by Titan Books in exchange of an honest review. I am a gamer and love playing games for their stories. God of War has been on my to-play list ever since the fourth game was announced, only to find out that it is Playstation only (I am a PC gamer). A bummer, but that makes this novelization of God of War 4 even better for me to experience the story. Going in this book, I knew next to nothing about Kratos, the God of War. I knew he's a Spartan god, son of Zeus, and at the time of this book he has been living in Norway for some time. But it really hasn't been a problem while reading this. The events of this book aren't related to anything from the past as this is a story on its own. Ofcourse, there are references or flashbacks to certain moments of Kratos' past, but they are explained briefly for the reader to understand them and aren't always that relevant for the story as a whole. Something I really like is how true the book is to the story of the game. I never played the game, but a friend of mine has and we have been discussing the story itself and aspects of it while I was reading it. He even sent me the 'full movie' of in-game cutscenes (Click here to watch it) after I finished the book, so I could watch that to get a great visual of the story. At the time of writing this review I have watched 30 minutes of the nearly six hour long video. It made me realise how vivid the discriptions are, as so far most have been almost the same or atleast quite similar as I imagined it in my head while reading. Really well done. The story itself flows really well. All the aspects of the story are in great balance. The character arcs, the traveling, the general pace of the story, the worldbuilding and the fighting scenes work really well together and flow over into eachother to create a really good story. Sometimes, things like fighting scenes can read a bit clunky in novelizations of movies and games, but in this book it is really enjoyable. They aren't stretched out over pages, but aren't rushed over in a few lines either. Something else what stood out to me is how minimal the amount of active characters was. I have read books with a ton of characters and names and even though I can handle that easily, I takes alot of brainpower to keep track while trying to read casually. In God of War you follow the main characters Kratos and his son Atreus and you circle back and forth between only six other characters as part of the plot. I really like that, as you go "oh, there they are again!" or "oh, we are going to them again!". You remain familiar with these characters along the ride, but without them being main characters. It was really nice to read a book with that, as I could read this fairly casual compared to books with a dozen very important characters. What I think I liked the most was how this book dragged you, as the reader, along on the father-son journey to honor their mom/wife's last wish. It was really amazing to see them grow and cope with their emotions while on the dangerous adventure. It was heartwarming, really. I really want to learn how their story will go on, as the ending was more of a "to be continued.." In my opinion, you can enjoy this book very well without having played any of the God of War games or being a gamer at all. It is a great fantasy taking place in Norway, including the amazing Norse mythology. It has all sorts of mythical creatures, the Norse gods and the nine realms and all of that is written so well, you don't need any knowledge about it before hand. Everything is explained along the way, so everyone can enjoy it. I would recommend this book to everyone who loves a good (fantasy) story, not just to gamers and players of God of War Read more reviews on my blog: https://ezziesbookshelf.wordpress.com

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Potter

    Disclaimer*** I have *not* played this game yet. Okay, I loved the narrator, he was great after I got used to the Scottish accent. At first I couldn't understand half of what he read. But I still wish they had gotten Terrence Carlson to narrate the books. Now, the story. This is easily the best novel of the bunch! Unlike the previous ones, this book actually reads like a book instead of reading like an abridged video game. I loved the depth, I loved the development, and I loved the twists in the st Disclaimer*** I have *not* played this game yet. Okay, I loved the narrator, he was great after I got used to the Scottish accent. At first I couldn't understand half of what he read. But I still wish they had gotten Terrence Carlson to narrate the books. Now, the story. This is easily the best novel of the bunch! Unlike the previous ones, this book actually reads like a book instead of reading like an abridged video game. I loved the depth, I loved the development, and I loved the twists in the story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Volga

    Very good book, for those who have played the game the audio version is narrated by the actor who plays mimir, and he is an absolute blast! My only complaint is that there is a lot of information missing from the game including lore, side quests, maybe Mr Barlog cut it because it the core story is long enough, but still I would have liked more information into this brilliantly crafted world.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pinkerton

    Play the game.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Volga

    Very good book, for those who have played the game the audio version is narrated by the actor who plays mimir, and he is an absolute blast! My only complaint is that there is a lot of information missing from the game including lore, side quests, maybe Mr Barlog cut it because it the core story is long enough, but still I would have liked more information into this brilliantly crafted world.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hatim Qa

    As a fan of the series, this novelization was everything I wanted and more. It had a few glimpses that weren't tackled in the game itself which made it worthwhile even though some might argue the opposite. I listened to the audio version and I can't praise the voice of Mimir enough! As a fan of the series, this novelization was everything I wanted and more. It had a few glimpses that weren't tackled in the game itself which made it worthwhile even though some might argue the opposite. I listened to the audio version and I can't praise the voice of Mimir enough!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dawie

    I believe my balls might have grown throughout the reading of audio book... A different side of Kratos I do not yet know.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Actual review coming soon but BOY do I have questions. Actual Review: Just to get one thing out of the way: I bought the audiobook 100% because Alistair Duncan AKA Mimir does the narration and I could listen to him talk forever. He's my third favorite character in the game. I acknowledge this is Embarrassing Stan Behavior, but it is what it is. His narration voice is still good and I still love Mimir, so he's the reason this review is a two-star. As for the book itself...WELL... In my Lore and Leg Actual review coming soon but BOY do I have questions. Actual Review: Just to get one thing out of the way: I bought the audiobook 100% because Alistair Duncan AKA Mimir does the narration and I could listen to him talk forever. He's my third favorite character in the game. I acknowledge this is Embarrassing Stan Behavior, but it is what it is. His narration voice is still good and I still love Mimir, so he's the reason this review is a two-star. As for the book itself...WELL... In my Lore and Legends review, I said the best part of the book were the parts that contained information not in the game, because everything else got a bit repetitive. The novelization has a similar problem, but different outcome. The best parts of the book are by and large the parts that contain information not in the game--Faye's pet hawk, more translations for what the World Serpent (whose name I cannot spell, sorry, big guy) says, better descriptions of the wall murals, finding out what Atreus was doing while Kratos was in the light of Alfheim, that kind of thing. Some of the "getting inside the head of the character" bits were also good (like the extra heartbreaking detail that Atreus latched onto Freya because he missed his mother...ouch...). The worst parts, meanwhile, are the parts that more directly adapt the game, or attempt to. This is not because they get repetitive. It's because there are some utterly baffling characterization choices and plot changes that really drew me out of the experience, doubly so as someone who has a 100% completion saved file on the game proper. There are some differences I'm not going to address here because I acknowledge that they are probably because a) I interpreted the character differently from the author, which happens in interpretative works and that's normal, and b) my interpretation is based on gameplay that the author probably hadn't seen, and the actor performances absolutely shape the way different characters come across (ESPECIALLY Kratos). YMMV, all that jazz. But I do want to address some particular changes I noted while listening that can't be chalked up to varying interpretations and just do not make sense to me. I'll be putting these behind a spoiler cut so this review isn't ten years long, but the tl;dr is that several moments from the game that are actively important to its emotional themes and impact are either removed or changed to the point of being different scenes, and it's incredibly jarring. But for specifics... (view spoiler)[- The book starts on the hunting expedition and not Faye's funeral. This was probably for time constraints, but it does kind of remove the somber, contemplative game start that made the GoW opening so emotionally impactful (especially compared to the other games). - When Atreus first has a visceral reaction to hearing voices in Alfheim, Kratos's response is characterized as being irritated, only becoming concerned when Atreus mentions he's screaming in pain because he's hearing voices. Compare to the game, where Kratos's immediate concerned reaction is a) notably soft for a guy who curb stomps draugr and b) one of many small signs that he truly cares for his son, he's just bad at expressing it. - They also cut down the dialogue after Atreus accuses Kratos of not caring about Faye while they're in Alfheim. You know that whole exchange? Where Kratos admits he's mourning, Atreus apologizes for not seeing it, and Kratos acknowledges that he knows there's no way Atreus would be able to know that and how difficult this entire situation has been for him? That one? The closest Kratos comes to apologizing for his bad habits and the (actually quite mature) resolution to their first major conflict? Yeah, that's cut almost entirely. Kratos gets his moment of saying "Do not mistake my silence for lack of grief. Mourn how you wish; leave me to mourn on my own" and then it's just? Dropped? No back and forth? No acknowledgment that they mutually understand the other's suffering? It just keeps going directly from that line to them going to Tyr's temple. I'm still baffled by this decision. That's one of the best moments of the game. Why would you cut that?! - When they encounter an injured Modi after Atreus learns he's a god, it's not Atreus who tells him to move or they'll pick up where Thor left out, but...Kratos? Who also laughs when Modi is unable to stand to attack them. It's really weird and also makes him telling Atreus not to kill Modi seem contradictory. - They also remove the part where Atreus yells at Sindri for not doing anything about his relationship with Brok, which makes Sindri's eventual reunion with him abrupt and unexplained. - Characterizing Kratos as being uncaring about Freya and Baldur's conflict and only intervening because Atreus cares about her feels sharply contrasted to the fact that he actually seemed really chill with Freya in the game after she saved Atreus and very much read as invested in the conflict SPECIFICALLY because it mirrored his own past. - Speaking of, the novelization changes Kratos's final line to Baldur from "The cycle ends here. We must be better." to "You chose this end", therefore robbing the scene of its thematic relevance to Kratos's character development since GoW III and his desire to spare others from the cycle of violence that destroyed his life, and instead it's like...yeah, okay, he killed Baldur because if he didn't Freya would die and that'd make Atreus sad I guess? Literally robs the entire death of any emotional impact (save what impact is left from Baldur's final words, which still get me a bit). - All dialogue is removed from the scene where Atreus and Kratos spread Faye's ashes, instead replaced by Atreus thinking about how he shouldn't cry because that wouldn't be godlike and he wants his father to respect him as a fellow god, which turns an emotionally touching scene that's the culmination of their quest and shows how they've actually become closer as individuals into "Toxic masculinity and the kind of mentality that's gotten Kratos where he is...is good, actually." (hide spoiler)] Also Kratos's eyes are described as grey and not gold, which doesn't affect anything on a thematic level but it bothers me. Especially since Fallen God's first issue has just been released and yep...those are VERY gold eyes. In conclusion: I would gladly listen to Alistair Duncan read me myths for approximately the rest of my natural life, and I still love the game. One of the best I've ever played, can't wait for the sequel But as an adaptation, this doesn't have any of the game's magic, and many of the changes it made actively harmed the narrative rather than just being necessary alterations to fit a new medium. Can't say I recommend this one unless you, like me, really like Mimir and are okay with paying $13 on libro.fm to listen to him talk for ten hours. (And if you are, that's valid.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mert

    4/5 Stars (%75/100) I've watched a lot of videos about God of War and even played it a bit myself. Since I am interested in both Norse mythology and God of War series, this game really excited me. I loved the actors, gameplay, music and more. I've looked at the book version (in Turkish) but did not finish it completely. Then, I've come across this audiobook which was free at that moment. I saw that Alastair Duncan narrated the story and could not be happier. He is the voice of Mimir in the game a 4/5 Stars (%75/100) I've watched a lot of videos about God of War and even played it a bit myself. Since I am interested in both Norse mythology and God of War series, this game really excited me. I loved the actors, gameplay, music and more. I've looked at the book version (in Turkish) but did not finish it completely. Then, I've come across this audiobook which was free at that moment. I saw that Alastair Duncan narrated the story and could not be happier. He is the voice of Mimir in the game and I liked him so much that I decided to use Mimir as my username (I also loved Mimir in the original mythology but you get the idea). He narrates the story with his brilliant Scottish accent and witty marks. It was super fun to listen even though the book got boring in some parts and it is really long in general. Overall, I found it really interesting and fun to listen. I think Barlog did a nice job making the game into a novel. Recommended!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    This was a fun 8 hours of listening as I relived Game of the Year 2018. But it doesn't add anything to GOW lore or story. It takes from the game script line for line to the point where it feels oddly rigid. I only rate it so highly for the deep pangs of nostalgia it ignited in my gamer spirit. I don't think someone who has not seen or played the game before would enjoy it nearly as much. This book did little to capture the dramatic beauty and visual detail the game encompassed. This audiobook mi This was a fun 8 hours of listening as I relived Game of the Year 2018. But it doesn't add anything to GOW lore or story. It takes from the game script line for line to the point where it feels oddly rigid. I only rate it so highly for the deep pangs of nostalgia it ignited in my gamer spirit. I don't think someone who has not seen or played the game before would enjoy it nearly as much. This book did little to capture the dramatic beauty and visual detail the game encompassed. This audiobook might make a long drive less boring, but playing the game itself is hands down the better experience.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Wish it had been more of the stories that Mimir told during the game, but it was still great to listen to the audiobook with the voice actor who did Mimir. His voice is so soothing and yet captivating.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Carey Nelson

    God of War as a concept was not something I gave attention to. There were games followed by more games at first headline grabbing then declining into convoluted iteration as the series grew older. Most of all, I did not have a Playstation. Christmas 2017 my beautiful wife gifted me a Playstation 4 and a couple months later reviews for a new game called God of War simultaneously clamored to give more effusive praise to it. Amazing! Perfect! A story about father and son! A thoughtful, tasteful rebo God of War as a concept was not something I gave attention to. There were games followed by more games at first headline grabbing then declining into convoluted iteration as the series grew older. Most of all, I did not have a Playstation. Christmas 2017 my beautiful wife gifted me a Playstation 4 and a couple months later reviews for a new game called God of War simultaneously clamored to give more effusive praise to it. Amazing! Perfect! A story about father and son! A thoughtful, tasteful reboot of a franchise formerly known "press X to have sex" game mechnics. Norse Mythology! Hold up, Norse Mythology? Neil Gaiman! Marvel Comics! Vikings! God of War is one of my all time favorite games. It is polished and lovingly crafted so that I felt that the creators thought about and designed every single moment. But this is not a review of God of War, this is a review of what it's like to live with someone who plays God of Wait that's the intro to Girlfriend Reviews. . . my bad. There is a story in God of War. The story has twists, poignant moments, and most of all: creates a framework on which to hang a masterful game. Even the banal video-game-y moments of the game (paddling a canoe to your next location) are made charming by incidental dialogue between the characters. You've never heard a fable until you've heard Kratos mangle it. There is a story in God of War: The Official Novelization. The story has twists, tries for poignant moments, and most of all: I could not bring myself to care. This is a ghost of God of War. The novelization manages to visit most of the main moments from the game all while sapping the life and magic from it. I don't want to be down on this book. God of War is a game about father and son made by a studio with a director thinking a lot about how his life has changed since becoming a father. His father wrote the novelization, and that is a very special thing indeed. But maybe play the game instead.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marta

    I started reading this book in the hopes that it will provide a more nuanced and detailed telling of the game's story, maybe expand it a little. After a few chapters, I realized that wasn't the case. Aside from a few (and far between) additional story-building paragraphs, the novel feels like a word-for-word copy of its original source, inferior at that. Where the game used subtlety to express the characters' emotions and the gravitas of certain events, the book seems a little heavy-handed, deli I started reading this book in the hopes that it will provide a more nuanced and detailed telling of the game's story, maybe expand it a little. After a few chapters, I realized that wasn't the case. Aside from a few (and far between) additional story-building paragraphs, the novel feels like a word-for-word copy of its original source, inferior at that. Where the game used subtlety to express the characters' emotions and the gravitas of certain events, the book seems a little heavy-handed, delivering simple, matter-of-fact descriptions. The plot is guided very mechanically and without embellishment, the events are rushed through, without much detail to them, the characters' thoughts are put entirely on display for the benefit (or lack thereof) of the reader. It all boils down to one thing: where the game had the approach of "show, don't tell", the novel was simply about "just telling" everything. Maybe that's why I wasn't so eager to finish this book, it's like the author doesn't trust the reader to infer the story's meaning and does it for them, and where's the fun in that? All in all, the book is not bad, but with the story it had as its source it had the potential to be so much better. Also, no Valkyries? I understand that that plotline was not part of the main story, but since it was quite an important quest in the game, it should've gotten more attention than a brief mention between the lines.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Irraya

    This book will probably be loved by someone who has played the game. For someone who hasn't, maybe not as much. This is my opinion on how the book stands on its own. It's set as a series of short parts where the father and son go on certain quests, finish them, and move onto another. While I understand the setting in the game, it doesn't flow as well in the book. It doesn't have a strong storyline to follow. The story mixes Greek and Norse mythology. While it was fun to begin with, I ended up disl This book will probably be loved by someone who has played the game. For someone who hasn't, maybe not as much. This is my opinion on how the book stands on its own. It's set as a series of short parts where the father and son go on certain quests, finish them, and move onto another. While I understand the setting in the game, it doesn't flow as well in the book. It doesn't have a strong storyline to follow. The story mixes Greek and Norse mythology. While it was fun to begin with, I ended up disliking it towards the end. Think of it this way - you have a song you've grown up with and you know the words and tune of it. Then someone decides to record the song, but while most of the words are the same, they change some, and rearrange the rest, and to top it off, they change the music entirely. It felt like that. While at first I enjoyed hearing about these characters famous in Greek and Norse mythology, the changes to their storylines didn't gel with me. Both Atreus and Kratos seem to change through the book. They're likeable one instant, and annoying another.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tanja Glavnik

    So here's the thing. I watched the entire God of War gameplay on Youtube (twice, but who's counting), so I knew the story going into this novelization. I was excited in reading the book because I'd previously read the first and second, and generally liked them, and because I was so fond of the storyline of the 2018 game, I figured the book had to be good, right? Plus, it was written by the father of the game's director, which gave it an added 'oomph'. Sadly, however, this wasn't the case. Don't get So here's the thing. I watched the entire God of War gameplay on Youtube (twice, but who's counting), so I knew the story going into this novelization. I was excited in reading the book because I'd previously read the first and second, and generally liked them, and because I was so fond of the storyline of the 2018 game, I figured the book had to be good, right? Plus, it was written by the father of the game's director, which gave it an added 'oomph'. Sadly, however, this wasn't the case. Don't get me wrong, the story IS still there ... but it is incredibly dry and lacks most of the emotion evoked by the game. I understand that one is a visual medium and the other is a written book, but the game itself STARTED out as a written one before it was translated onto screen, so I don't know where it went so horribly wrong. (view spoiler)[Obviously a lot of the side stuff is left out completely, which is understandable as the world in the game is pretty massive for exploration sake, but because this is all left out, when Atreus mentions that Mimir had said something about the Valkyries, as a reader you HAVE to be confused. Because there ARE no Valkyries in the book - the entire subplot was thrown out - and the throw-away line makes absolutely zero sense for someone who's never seen the game or played it, because ... what about the Valkyries? The statement goes something like 'if what Mimir said about the Valkyries was true ...' But Mimir doesn't say anything about the Valkyries, in the book. He does in-game (and a lot!), but the book leaves it all out, and shoving that one statement in at the end only confuses the reader. Most importantly for me, however, a lot of things just didn't make sense. Kratos is pictured here as someone who screams a whole lot, which, if you watch the God of War game (2018 that is), isn't quite correct. The number of times he actually screams can probably be counted on the fingers of one hand, MAYBE two if you're lucky. Saying he screams at Magni that he'll never surrender when the impact is SO MUCH STRONGER as, in-game, he looks at the Aesir god with complete calm and quietly says no, is bizarre. It also makes Kratos seem like a lunatic half the time, whereas in-game he comes across as skilled, controlled, confident and someone to rely on. Some characterization changes also baffle me, in the sense that at one point, Mimir is mentioned to make a snarling face or something knowing Kratos can't see him (him being a head dangling at his belt), implying that he REALLY doesn't like Kratos at all, and only comes to respect him towards the very end of the book. In-game, this NEVER seems to be the case, as Mimir is honestly grateful for Kratos rescuing him from Odin and his torture, and helps the pair along in any way he can. It also doesn't make sense character-wise, because if Mimir doesn't like Kratos, why would he offer himself up to Baldur to spare him and the kid? Equally baffling is the choice of leaving important elements of cut scenes from the book that then translate into the dialogue not making sense. The most glaring example of this would be the pivotal moment in Alfheim where Kratos tells Atreus not to mistake his silence for lack of grief. His part of the speech IS still in the book, but it's haphazardly slapped onto an exchange that has nothing to do with Faye, Atreus and Kratos, or any of their relationships, but it's just sort of packed onto there as if the author suddenly remembered this was important, had to happen in Alfheim, and so put it there. But there's no lead-up, Atreus doesn't argue with Kratos before-hand, and the sentence sort of just hangs there in the air while you're left wondering why Kratos is offering this information out of thin air. A similar thing happens in a few other important scenes, and the emotional punch of them spreading Faye's ashes in Jotunheim loses the strength it had in the game because the giants are mentioned ... briefly. As in, the book literally says 'they look out over the giant graveyard, turn around, and go home'. Uhm, excuse me, but they literally enter a DEAD world, which they learn is ATREUS' world, FAYE'S world, the giants are basically enemies number one for Odin that they kept hearing about ... and all they get is a footnote. One thing that also stood out to me was how the author made a stylistic choice to have everyone speak the same way - which is to say, the Kratos way, without abbreviations. If you listen closely to the game (ignoring the fact Mimir obviously has a Scottish accent), every character you encounter speaks in a way that flows, very naturally, very compact, using the I've, you're, we're, etc. Of them all, only Kratos stands out because he notably uses I have, you are, we are, and so forth. This sets him apart from others in this Nordic world, highlighting his own heritage and showing us that he's an outsider, far from home. This is jarring in the book because EVERYONE SPEAKS LIKE KRATOS DOES, and it ruins his uniqueness, and makes him the same as the rest. He is not. He is the LAST person to accuse of being the same as others. But anyway, this is getting long. (hide spoiler)] I did enjoy that we got to see into the head of Kratos and Atreus, specifically Kratos with regards to his son, his emotions about his wife Faye, more of his thought process that you could usually only infer through some motion (or non-motion) he made (or didn't make) in the game. However, I think that this is plagued by more problems than solutions, and actually manages to ruin what's probably one of the best stories told by a game in the last ten years or so. So do yourself a favour, and play the game - or watch gameplays on Youtube. I promise you won't be disappointed.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chitalu Andrew Kabalika

    Pretty Good The book is pretty good but not breath taking. I enjoyed it because it offers some perspective on the characters in the game. You get to see just what is going on in Kratos and Atreus' heads. However, it pales in comparison to the richness of the interactive medium and sadly it does not add much to the story the game tells in a far superior manner. Still, it is an interesting addition for those who seek more of God of War after the game. Recommended for those wanting more. Pretty Good The book is pretty good but not breath taking. I enjoyed it because it offers some perspective on the characters in the game. You get to see just what is going on in Kratos and Atreus' heads. However, it pales in comparison to the richness of the interactive medium and sadly it does not add much to the story the game tells in a far superior manner. Still, it is an interesting addition for those who seek more of God of War after the game. Recommended for those wanting more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    This book is a good adaption of a story I was already in love with. But it only gives a slightly better insight into the relationship between Kratos and Atreus and their thought processes. It’s nothing groundbreaking but it’s worth a read if you’re already a fan of the game. It’s also worth listening to the audiobook for Alastair Duncan’s (Mimir) voice alone.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Still felt like someone sat down and transcribed what they saw on screen but I'm not complaining. Well done, almost felt like you were playing the game. Not a fan of the ending, but I suppose they need to make a trilogy somehow. Still felt like someone sat down and transcribed what they saw on screen but I'm not complaining. Well done, almost felt like you were playing the game. Not a fan of the ending, but I suppose they need to make a trilogy somehow.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Glen Gilpin

    Boy!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    It's not a particularly well written book but the game is amazing. Alastair Duncan could narrate my shopping list and make it sound cool. It's not a particularly well written book but the game is amazing. Alastair Duncan could narrate my shopping list and make it sound cool.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hidalgo

    A very good tale and adaption of the video game. Lets you get more inside the characters heads and having one of the voice actors from the game narrating helps tremendously.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayacan Kaya

    Boy!!!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    Nothing new beyond the game.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Polley

    I wasn't really sure what to expect from this book as I don't really like video games and I have never read a novelisation of a game before. However, I was pleasantly surprised. I really liked the relationship between Kratos and Atreus and enjoyed the dialogue between them. I didn't really like the game feel where something jumps out at you every two seconds and as I have no knowledge of the game, I did struggle to follow along as some points. I'm curious as to where Atreus will end up so I woul I wasn't really sure what to expect from this book as I don't really like video games and I have never read a novelisation of a game before. However, I was pleasantly surprised. I really liked the relationship between Kratos and Atreus and enjoyed the dialogue between them. I didn't really like the game feel where something jumps out at you every two seconds and as I have no knowledge of the game, I did struggle to follow along as some points. I'm curious as to where Atreus will end up so I would be open to reading more in this series.

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