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Jog On: How Running Saved My Life

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Divorced and struggling with deep-rooted mental health problems, Bella Mackie ended her twenties in tears. She could barely find the strength to get off the sofa, let alone piece her life back together. Until one day she did something she had never done of her own free will – she pulled on a pair of trainers and went for a run. That first attempt didn’t last very long. But Divorced and struggling with deep-rooted mental health problems, Bella Mackie ended her twenties in tears. She could barely find the strength to get off the sofa, let alone piece her life back together. Until one day she did something she had never done of her own free will – she pulled on a pair of trainers and went for a run. That first attempt didn’t last very long. But to her surprise, she was back out there the next day. And the day after that. She began to set herself achievable goals – to run 5k in under 30 minutes, to walk to work every day for a week, to attempt 10 push-ups in a row. Before she knew it, her mood was lifting for the first time in years. In Jog On, Bella explains with hilarious and unfiltered honesty how she used running to battle crippling anxiety and depression, without having to sacrifice her main loves: booze, cigarettes and ice cream. With the help of a supporting cast of doctors, psychologists, sportspeople and friends, she shares a wealth of inspirational stories, research and tips that show how exercise often can be the best medicine. This funny, moving and motivational book will encourage you to say ‘jog on’ to your problems and get your life back on track – no matter how small those first steps may be.


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Divorced and struggling with deep-rooted mental health problems, Bella Mackie ended her twenties in tears. She could barely find the strength to get off the sofa, let alone piece her life back together. Until one day she did something she had never done of her own free will – she pulled on a pair of trainers and went for a run. That first attempt didn’t last very long. But Divorced and struggling with deep-rooted mental health problems, Bella Mackie ended her twenties in tears. She could barely find the strength to get off the sofa, let alone piece her life back together. Until one day she did something she had never done of her own free will – she pulled on a pair of trainers and went for a run. That first attempt didn’t last very long. But to her surprise, she was back out there the next day. And the day after that. She began to set herself achievable goals – to run 5k in under 30 minutes, to walk to work every day for a week, to attempt 10 push-ups in a row. Before she knew it, her mood was lifting for the first time in years. In Jog On, Bella explains with hilarious and unfiltered honesty how she used running to battle crippling anxiety and depression, without having to sacrifice her main loves: booze, cigarettes and ice cream. With the help of a supporting cast of doctors, psychologists, sportspeople and friends, she shares a wealth of inspirational stories, research and tips that show how exercise often can be the best medicine. This funny, moving and motivational book will encourage you to say ‘jog on’ to your problems and get your life back on track – no matter how small those first steps may be.

30 review for Jog On: How Running Saved My Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Banks

    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. A great book for those with anxiety... who think they might be tempted to run! As someone who has grappled with anxiety for several years, and has found running to be a really effective way of managing the symptoms, I was naturally drawn to this book. And indeed, though the author's experiences of anxiety differ from my own, there was so much that I found myself agreeing with (and thinking 'thank goodness someone else I received a copy of this book from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. A great book for those with anxiety... who think they might be tempted to run! As someone who has grappled with anxiety for several years, and has found running to be a really effective way of managing the symptoms, I was naturally drawn to this book. And indeed, though the author's experiences of anxiety differ from my own, there was so much that I found myself agreeing with (and thinking 'thank goodness someone else knows how it feels!'). It's about Bella Mackie's own experiences with running; something she took up after her divorce. She describes how initially, it was just a short few minutes around the block, but how over time, she started going further and further, and opening herself up to not only new places, but new experiences too. The big question is, who is this book for? I personally feel that if you're an anxious person (or suffer from any other mental health issues), then you'll find this insightful. It explains really well how that particular form of exercise can help you to detach from your problems (for a while); how it almost becomes a form of mindfulness and a welcome break from all the things that are dragging you down. What I particularly liked was the author's honesty and lack of pretension. I was a bit worried it was going to be a bit 'look at me, I'm now an amazing runner, regularly entering marathons' etc. (the running world can be a bit competitive!) - but to my relief, she simply focuses on the benefits of running; whether you're jogging for five minutes, or heading out for a four-hour slog. On a more personal note - I too started running, back in April (after a particularly splendid panic attack in Australia that left me literally vomiting!). Like the author, I was initially just heading out to the local park to do a few laps. Then I swiftly grew to love that peace; the sense of giving my mind a rest for a while and just letting my body take over. It's an empowering thing; and I think Bella Mackie captures that perfectly here. If you're curious about the benefits of running for mental wellbeing, I'd recommend giving this book a read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This was okay. I really appreciated hearing Bella Mackie's story of how she found a mechanism for helping her deal with her crippling anxiety, and found the stories that she included of others genuinely informative. However, this book is really very repetitive, and I found that especially noticeable listening to it on audiobook. At times I thought I had already listened to some of the sections before! I also didn't particularly love Mackie's delivery, although I'm definitely happy that she narra This was okay. I really appreciated hearing Bella Mackie's story of how she found a mechanism for helping her deal with her crippling anxiety, and found the stories that she included of others genuinely informative. However, this book is really very repetitive, and I found that especially noticeable listening to it on audiobook. At times I thought I had already listened to some of the sections before! I also didn't particularly love Mackie's delivery, although I'm definitely happy that she narrated this herself. There are some good tips in here though, and I found it motivating for me particularly at the moment for my 10K training.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This book is all about how running can be an excellent medicine. Most people think of running as something which is good for the physical body in terms of weight management, toning and generally looking good. This is why most people equally think of running as some kind of punishment or something they have to endure to get the desired after effects. What a lot of runners have discovered for themselves is how good running is for the mind. It is well documented that runner’s high is due to the bod This book is all about how running can be an excellent medicine. Most people think of running as something which is good for the physical body in terms of weight management, toning and generally looking good. This is why most people equally think of running as some kind of punishment or something they have to endure to get the desired after effects. What a lot of runners have discovered for themselves is how good running is for the mind. It is well documented that runner’s high is due to the body’s own endorphins and it makes sense that something that we have evolved to do, and were built for, makes us feel so good after doing it. Often our bodies are capable of much more than our mind allows us to believe. For me, running is meditation and I honestly love running. There is nothing that beats being out at night, in the cold air, flying down steep hills and the sense of achievement when you brace yourself for the uphill and make it; our bodies are a marvel. What Mackie is really good at is explaining that, like her, you can run from nothing. She started not even being able to run for 1 minute and she built it up from there. Her tone is quite conversational, and it feels like you’re just having a chat with a mate who is occasionally witty and makes you unexpectedly snort. Although with this came a lot of repetition and circular narrative and I found myself feeling déjà vu a number of times as she came back around to the same discussion point; it didn’t really follow a linear path. It also felt like it could have been condensed into a shorter book as essentially her advice is to run and the other people she asked agreed too. Like I always say ‘I’ve never gone for a run and afterwards thought “I wish I hadn’t done that”’

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jakki Frances

    I've given up on this book. While the blurb sucked me in; the content could do so much better. For me there was too many cold facts and not enough personal connection between the reader and author. I took up working out for the first time a year ago to help deal with anxiety and depression and while I totally see and feel the changes and acknowledge the link between mental health, physical health and exercise - I'd have liked to know more about the journey and feelings behind this book more than I've given up on this book. While the blurb sucked me in; the content could do so much better. For me there was too many cold facts and not enough personal connection between the reader and author. I took up working out for the first time a year ago to help deal with anxiety and depression and while I totally see and feel the changes and acknowledge the link between mental health, physical health and exercise - I'd have liked to know more about the journey and feelings behind this book more than the numbers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Chowdory

    Truth - I actually nearly stopped reading this with a 2 chapters left because for some reason it didn't really resonate with me. I think how Mackie charts how running helped her come to terms with her anxiety and develop coping mechanisms was excellently done. However, you should know I hate running. Like, I will literally do ANYthing but run. Lift weights, attempt to do a pull-up, pilates, hell I will climb and hike mountains (I'm scared of heights) instead of run. So there were bits of the eva Truth - I actually nearly stopped reading this with a 2 chapters left because for some reason it didn't really resonate with me. I think how Mackie charts how running helped her come to terms with her anxiety and develop coping mechanisms was excellently done. However, you should know I hate running. Like, I will literally do ANYthing but run. Lift weights, attempt to do a pull-up, pilates, hell I will climb and hike mountains (I'm scared of heights) instead of run. So there were bits of the evangelicasizing of running in this book that I'm just not on board with. The side notes of other peoples' stories, and stats and general development of science of mind and body needing to be in sync was really good but yes, I didn't really enjoy it. I also feel that there were bits glossed out on - about food, about her strength training, all alluded to in a few sentences and then moved on. Not the best book on 'running' out there. But probably the best I've seen describing the crippling affects of anxiety. As someone who does suffer from depression and has had some very severe episodes in my life, the description of cycles and 'no way out' really resonated with me. And the very calm assertion that these things 'don't leave' you 'don't get over them' was well done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie Dixon

    Refreshing, inspirational and I am now ready to go for a run

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katey Lovell

    This book is a combination of memoir and running/mental health guide. I found the sections where Bella shared her own experience of running - from initially pacing up and down an alleyway to increasing her distance to an impressive 13k - to be honest, relatable and quietly inspiring. In much the same way as Bryony Gordon, Bella is a person who decided to run, therefore she runs. The tips for beginner runners at the end of the book are sensible and realistic for complete beginners and/or those wi This book is a combination of memoir and running/mental health guide. I found the sections where Bella shared her own experience of running - from initially pacing up and down an alleyway to increasing her distance to an impressive 13k - to be honest, relatable and quietly inspiring. In much the same way as Bryony Gordon, Bella is a person who decided to run, therefore she runs. The tips for beginner runners at the end of the book are sensible and realistic for complete beginners and/or those with little confidence in their abilities. There were large sections in the first half of the book that described a variety of mental health issues. I read this book during an anxious period and skimmed these sections as they heightened my own anxiety. That said, for people who have little or no knowledge of anxiety/depression/PTSD and more, the detailed medical explanations may offer an insight.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    3.5 stars I really enjoyed this, definitely a must read for those who want a basic introduction to the ins and outs of mental health! I love how evident the authors love of running is throughout and her explorations into how she has seen it change her life. While detailing how wonderful running is, Mackie makes sure to stress that exercise doesn't have to be about losing weight or subjecting your body to a daily gruelling workout. Since I picked this fairly short read up I've seen my enjoyment f 3.5 stars I really enjoyed this, definitely a must read for those who want a basic introduction to the ins and outs of mental health! I love how evident the authors love of running is throughout and her explorations into how she has seen it change her life. While detailing how wonderful running is, Mackie makes sure to stress that exercise doesn't have to be about losing weight or subjecting your body to a daily gruelling workout. Since I picked this fairly short read up I've seen my enjoyment for running increase so much, realising that I can run simply because I love it and not because there needs to be a goal, a finish line or a lower dress size.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

    In honour of mental health awareness week I thought I'd finally get around to reading this. If, like me, you're a runner (ew, but Bella made me feel okay about saying this), or struggle with your mental health in some way, I'd really recommend this book. With candour, unfiltered honesty, and humour, Bella recounts how running has helped as a tonic for her anxiety and depression. Although running is a very personal activity, I saw many of the reasons I choose to run, the challenges, the highs/low In honour of mental health awareness week I thought I'd finally get around to reading this. If, like me, you're a runner (ew, but Bella made me feel okay about saying this), or struggle with your mental health in some way, I'd really recommend this book. With candour, unfiltered honesty, and humour, Bella recounts how running has helped as a tonic for her anxiety and depression. Although running is a very personal activity, I saw many of the reasons I choose to run, the challenges, the highs/lows etc. reflected in Bella's story, which shows that in running there is something for everyone. Right, I'm going to go for a jog now!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Fee Walker

    Although you would be correct in thinking this book is all about running it’s actually so much more. Yes she talks about how running has helped her anxiety but what she fundamentally does is help you understand what anxiety is and how to spot it. Somehow just knowing what it is and giving it a name can be a game changer. Now when I have instructive anxiety fuelled thoughts I can immediately identify those thoughts as exactly that - anxiety thoughts and I can instantly shut them down. You should Although you would be correct in thinking this book is all about running it’s actually so much more. Yes she talks about how running has helped her anxiety but what she fundamentally does is help you understand what anxiety is and how to spot it. Somehow just knowing what it is and giving it a name can be a game changer. Now when I have instructive anxiety fuelled thoughts I can immediately identify those thoughts as exactly that - anxiety thoughts and I can instantly shut them down. You should also follow her on Instagram as like evidenced in the book she has quite a good sense of humour too ... the only think I wish is that she shared more info on how she can run every day and stay injury free?!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Britta

    Amusing, got me on track with my running.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judith Weston

    I'm a runner and have run for 7 years with my friend through the trials and tribulations of life. Like Bella, I'm not a serious runner, like her, running is vital to my health. This memoir is moving and inspirational. Life has got in the way of running but after reading this I went for a run this morning and am now back on track.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    Not the book I thought it was a definitely not for me. Dull, uninspiring and a slow read. I am just getting into running and thought it would be just the book for me...oh no! Struggled through one whole chapter and kept trying to read on but haven’t picked it up again. This was a book club book and only one out of ten has finished it - this hasn’t happened before.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jo Weston

    Really honest and thought provoking read. Bella's own mental issues were quite considerable. Even if yours aren't the same as hers there is a lot to be taken from this book as we all have ups and downs, even if only temporary and finding a constant in your life that sees you through, in her case running, demonstrates that we can help ourselves. Read in Mental Health Awareness Week.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah D

    A refreshing, honest and raw book about what it is to run, and what it is to be your own swirling world of worry. Mackie's words have such an honest and clear approach that you can only sit, understand and want to jog, run, support in any way for your own mental health. Jog on is a must read to understand your own brain and how to maybe run with those around you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Taryn Brickner

    Straight up downloaded a 5K beginners app and went for a run today after finishing this book. Definitely would recommend.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adele

    I tentatively purchased Jog On to help with my attempts to regain, if not a love, a tolerance for running again. I say tentatively because one of the things that frustrates me with recently published non-fiction books is the certainty from the author that they have authority to write about their chosen topics based on personal experience alone. Bella Mackie's thankfully bucks this trend. Mackie has a distinct, informal style which from the get go makes it feel like you're listening to someone yo I tentatively purchased Jog On to help with my attempts to regain, if not a love, a tolerance for running again. I say tentatively because one of the things that frustrates me with recently published non-fiction books is the certainty from the author that they have authority to write about their chosen topics based on personal experience alone. Bella Mackie's thankfully bucks this trend. Mackie has a distinct, informal style which from the get go makes it feel like you're listening to someone you like talk about something they are truly passionate about which is energising. Her simple yet spot on descriptions of anxiety and the myriad of different forms it can take will make any reader who has felt similarly feel for a special moment that they are not alone in the dark. The deep understanding of feelings around anxiety and her ability to put that down on to paper can only come from someone who has not only felt it themselves, but has gone a step further and understands it academically and empathetically too. The mix of personal anecdotes, case studies and referenced research makes this not only an inspiring and educational book, but also one that is sensitively and responsibly written. A few parts really resonated with me; I commend Mackie for her ability to recognise her own privilege on her journey with mental health. Something we assume, or want to believe, most people have considered about these days but we rarely see evidence of people facing (side note: if you want to read a truly jarring example of someone who has never questioned their own privilege track down the interview with Daisy Ridley in the Guardian from Dec 19 - eek). I loved the quote by Amy Poehler "Good for her, not for me". A neat reminder to stay on your own track but congratulate others that are on a different one to you, which can so often be hard to do without comparisons being made. And lastly the earnest advice in the last chapter to have faith was written as such heartfelt plea it made me cry. Because Mackie really, really gets how you're feeling. If you want someone to tell you running is a short term fix for your long term problems, this isn't the book for you. You'll probably be looking for a long. Time. The overriding message to encourage the reader to move more and to make this a permanent change, part of a cocktail (healthy though, so, mocktail?) of positive steps to a genuinely happier you is commendable. It may not be for everyone, but it's for me, and I'll be recommending to others that may need to be reminded that life can be a little better if they put in some hard work and wait to see a reward.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    I’ll admit, I tried running many years ago; my other half is a runner but I decided it wasn’t for me. Not in the great outdoors on the pavement. I don’t mind it on a treadmill but I’m not a natural runner. I’m more a Joe Wicks/Ministry of Sound/Davina/Nell McAndrew workout routine advocate. I envy anyone who can and does love running. I suppose this is part of the reason why I was attracted to reading Jog On. I don’t deny exercise is good for your mental health and I wanted to know more about ho I’ll admit, I tried running many years ago; my other half is a runner but I decided it wasn’t for me. Not in the great outdoors on the pavement. I don’t mind it on a treadmill but I’m not a natural runner. I’m more a Joe Wicks/Ministry of Sound/Davina/Nell McAndrew workout routine advocate. I envy anyone who can and does love running. I suppose this is part of the reason why I was attracted to reading Jog On. I don’t deny exercise is good for your mental health and I wanted to know more about how running saved Bella Mackie’s life. But this book was so much more than a woman discovering a love for running. So so much more. The chapters are entitled like markers on a run “1K”, “2K” etc. By the end of “3K”, I wanted to wrap Bella up and tell her everything would be ok. I know it wouldn’t help her but her story is so raw and heartbreaking. The anecdotal narrative is brilliantly written and seamlessly blending in the factual research that’s relevant to the personal point Mackie was making worked so so well. I felt the parts of the book talking about mental health issues in general was well researched and put into a simple understandable language. It helped me realise how different and yet similar disorders can be. The different coping mechanisms both Mackie and those who contributed anecdotally were. I will definitely be trying bagpipe music when I feel the urge to either resign or virtually kill a work colleague. Yes you read that right, it’s not a totally serious hard read, some of the accounts shared did bring a smile to my face. At the end of the book, Mackie has supplied a multitude of web links, resources and references for further reading and additional support both for running and for mental health. I will be investigating a number of the websites and books over the coming weeks and months. Mackie knows what she’s talking about from a non-medical point of view and openly admits everyone is different so I’m going to find out more for my own mental health. I’ll admit, the past few years have been mentally tough for me, with a serious health problem, the heightened stresses of work, the insecurity I’ve felt around my position at work and not to mention the pressure of lockdown, both as a parent and as a worker. This book has given me serious food for thought about my own mental state and how I deal with the stuff life throws at me. It’s a real eye opener and thought provoking read. I applaud Bella Mackie for such an open and honest account of her journey.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Whatthelog

    Jog On by Bella Mackie is a non-fiction book about mental health (specifically anxiety and depression) and how running can help. I hate exercising - I hate the pain, I hate getting sweaty, and I hate the fact that I'm not good at it. However, I have been told multiple times that exercising would help. So I picked up this book hoping that it would convince me to start picking it up. And it kind-of did? Reading about the author's personal experiences and the scientific facts to back it up has made Jog On by Bella Mackie is a non-fiction book about mental health (specifically anxiety and depression) and how running can help. I hate exercising - I hate the pain, I hate getting sweaty, and I hate the fact that I'm not good at it. However, I have been told multiple times that exercising would help. So I picked up this book hoping that it would convince me to start picking it up. And it kind-of did? Reading about the author's personal experiences and the scientific facts to back it up has made me think about exercising a lot more. There were a couple of areas that I thought really worked. Firstly, the author has a really charming way of writing. She's very down-to-earth and often jokes about herself. Secondly, she isn't a professional runner. She admits to being bad at running! She doesn't compete or do marathons. And that makes this book a lot more accessible. If she had been someone who was amazing at running, I would have just despaired at never being as good as her. Finally, she does talk about other things that can help mental health, such as going outside and medications. At no point does she promise that running will 'cure' someone of a mental health condition. However, I think this book could have been a lot shorter. There were some areas where the author repeated herself, and many of the people that she interviewed didn't really have much more to add to the general narrative of 'running will help with mental health'. It would have been interesting to hear from specific people who have tried other forms of exercise (though I do recognise that this would have expanded the remit of the book). Overall, this book was okay! It has made me think more about exercising as a way of helping with my mental health, which is pretty great.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pavan Amara

    I enjoyed this book a lot more than I thought I would! A friend wanted me to read it, but I misjudged it, thinking it would be another self-indulgent misery memoir. Eventually, I did give in and read it...and I loved it! It’s very honest, funny throughout, and really relatable. And, it breaks through so many mental health stigmas. It can’t have been easy to write, but it’s a beautiful book. I particularly love that it encourages practical ways forward, and feels bright and hopeful! It’s triggere I enjoyed this book a lot more than I thought I would! A friend wanted me to read it, but I misjudged it, thinking it would be another self-indulgent misery memoir. Eventually, I did give in and read it...and I loved it! It’s very honest, funny throughout, and really relatable. And, it breaks through so many mental health stigmas. It can’t have been easy to write, but it’s a beautiful book. I particularly love that it encourages practical ways forward, and feels bright and hopeful! It’s triggered me to make some changes. I used to run a lot in school (and loved it), I lived for long-distance - it made me feel so good. But then, as an adult I forgot about all that and became too engaged in other things. For the first time in years, while I was reading this book yesterday, I thought back to how much I used to love running and how it sorted my head out every time. So, I found my old trainers (which are 14 years old!) and am going to give it another go! Such a great book for giving hope, I really loved it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Braine

    Talking openly about mental health has really grown in the last decade. But I can clearly remember a frustrating period where depression was the only topic discussed. In the last few years anxiety has poked its anxious little head up and now there are many books about people’s experiences with anxiety, and it’s great to read similar experiences and coping mechanisms. Maybe I’ll write my own some day. I could relate to a lot in this, both her history of anxiety and how helpful exercise has been f Talking openly about mental health has really grown in the last decade. But I can clearly remember a frustrating period where depression was the only topic discussed. In the last few years anxiety has poked its anxious little head up and now there are many books about people’s experiences with anxiety, and it’s great to read similar experiences and coping mechanisms. Maybe I’ll write my own some day. I could relate to a lot in this, both her history of anxiety and how helpful exercise has been for her. It was actually pretty meta listening to an audiobook about running for mental health while I was running for mental health. I had planned to finish it while running my first half marathon. But it didn’t quite pan out that way. Though a great book, it’s not without faults. It’s a bit of a one trick pony and becomes a bit repetitive by the end. And I balked when she started dissing healthy eating and the practice of wellness. There’s a lot of bullshit associated with Wellness. But people often throw out the baby with the bathwater. She ridiculed the idea of giving up “staples like sugar”. A staple! My lord. And she didn’t seem to have much truck with meditation but gladly, further on in the book, she mentioned someone who found great help through meditation. Personally I’ve found running to be a great addition to a complete mental health regime whereas it seems to be the main resource for Bella Mackie. Good read. But bit samey in parts.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cara Press

    Jog on is a really interesting part memoir part exploration of the impact exercise use can have on your mental health. Mackie’s narration is funny and well balanced. The regular use of references, both scientific and anecdotal, build the book from just recounting her personal experiences to looking more deeply at why and how running has helped her. I would say the book is quite repetitive, I got proper deja vu at some points as she uses the same examples of turns of phrase a lot and circles back Jog on is a really interesting part memoir part exploration of the impact exercise use can have on your mental health. Mackie’s narration is funny and well balanced. The regular use of references, both scientific and anecdotal, build the book from just recounting her personal experiences to looking more deeply at why and how running has helped her. I would say the book is quite repetitive, I got proper deja vu at some points as she uses the same examples of turns of phrase a lot and circles back on herself. It felt like the book could have been a bit shorter and a bit more directed in its delivery. Aside from that it’s a nice read and defo has inspired me to see exercise in a different light!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fern Adams

    Great book idea but I felt the delivery was a little flat and repetitive. Mackie took up running when she was struggling with her mental health and found it really helped clear headspace, routine and made her feel better. She is great at promoting that running is really accessible to anyone who is able bodied to take up, the problems with how exercise is advertised and yet how important it is and the need to get help for mental health. I found her really likeable. Unfortunately the writing just Great book idea but I felt the delivery was a little flat and repetitive. Mackie took up running when she was struggling with her mental health and found it really helped clear headspace, routine and made her feel better. She is great at promoting that running is really accessible to anyone who is able bodied to take up, the problems with how exercise is advertised and yet how important it is and the need to get help for mental health. I found her really likeable. Unfortunately the writing just didn’t hold up to the ideas and messages with many passages being almost direct repetitions from previous chapters.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mayar El Mahdy

    I think Trump broke people. Being in a country with an unstable ruling patterns hardens you, though. Some of you only had peaceful presidential inaugurations and no coups, and it shows! This is more notes on mental health and personal experience that it is a book about running. It's not something you read while listening to Eye of The Tiger, rather it is best suited to Evereybody Hurts . It's a good book, though. I enjoyed it to a degree and could grasp the message. I also liked how it's not patr I think Trump broke people. Being in a country with an unstable ruling patterns hardens you, though. Some of you only had peaceful presidential inaugurations and no coups, and it shows! This is more notes on mental health and personal experience that it is a book about running. It's not something you read while listening to Eye of The Tiger, rather it is best suited to Evereybody Hurts . It's a good book, though. I enjoyed it to a degree and could grasp the message. I also liked how it's not patronizing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jess Wilson-Leigh

    I found this book difficult in the first few chapters, maybe the extensive listing of mental illnesses and the way they manifest hit a bit too close to home as I found it quite dry and hard to get through. Or maybe it was my mood at the time of reading but I put it down after a few chapters and didn’t pick it up again for a couple of months. Glad I tried a second time though! It’s well researched, v accessible and just generally quite feel good.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pauliina (The Bookaholic Dreamer)

    At the end of Feb 2019: I struggle with anxiety (especially in relation to my studies 😱) and I have been trying to take up running. So I'm thinking about setting a crazy goal for myself for March: run 50 miles/80km. My library just acquired an audiobook of Jog On so it can join on my first couple of runs of March! ****************** 4th March 2019: Jog On was an excellent audiobook companion on my runs. Bella Mackie has gone from crippling anxiety that wouldn't let her leave the house, to running 10 At the end of Feb 2019: I struggle with anxiety (especially in relation to my studies 😱) and I have been trying to take up running. So I'm thinking about setting a crazy goal for myself for March: run 50 miles/80km. My library just acquired an audiobook of Jog On so it can join on my first couple of runs of March! ****************** 4th March 2019: Jog On was an excellent audiobook companion on my runs. Bella Mackie has gone from crippling anxiety that wouldn't let her leave the house, to running 10k every morning. But her tale isn't one of those smug 'look how awesome I am and this is how you can be me' -type of running books. Mackie is real, raw and honest throughout and the book is filled with loads of amazing details from research. I loved listening to Bella Mackie's journey and it definitely empowered my own. BRB, I'll just pop for a run real quick.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily Topping

    I enjoyed this, it was hard work at times as it definitely brought some of my anxious thoughts out and made me consider them but it was also useful as I related to a lot of things, including the struggling to leave the house. At times I thought it was a bit link reference and statistic heavy but it was an enjoyable read all the same. I found it dragged a bit towards the end but it’s definitely encouraged me to get back out running when I’ve recovered from injury.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    I liked this book. I found it slightly repetitive but saw Bella’s experiences with running and anxiety mirrored in my own. Personally, running regularly has helped ease my anxiety somewhat and increased my self confidence, and Bella puts pen to paper well. It’s also refreshing to read a book about running that’s honest about the difficulties of running as a beginner.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Johnson

    Honest, open and incredibly real. Bella focuses on generalised anxiety disorder, alongside other mental health conditions, stating how running has become her machine in assisting her in living a less troubled existence. She really hits home the reality of living with daily anxiety, and offers some brilliant advice, guidance and at times humour, to help in dealing with a restless mind. Now where are my trainers...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Some great insights from an author who has experienced poor mental health - and describes what she has gone through in a very real way. Enjoyed the links to running; however felt that parts rambled on a bit too much for my liking. Good references at the end which I will look into.

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