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Feminism for the Americas: The Making of an International Human Rights Movement

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This book chronicles the dawn of the global movement for women's rights in the first decades of the twentieth century. The founding mothers of this movement were not based primarily in the United States, however, or in Europe. Instead, Katherine M. Marino introduces readers to a cast of remarkable Latin American and Caribbean women whose deep friendships and intense rivalr This book chronicles the dawn of the global movement for women's rights in the first decades of the twentieth century. The founding mothers of this movement were not based primarily in the United States, however, or in Europe. Instead, Katherine M. Marino introduces readers to a cast of remarkable Latin American and Caribbean women whose deep friendships and intense rivalries forged global feminism out of an era of imperialism, racism, and fascism. Six dynamic activists form the heart of this story: from Brazil, Bertha Lutz; from Cuba, Ofelia Domingez Navarro; from Uruguay, Paulina Luisi; from Panama, Clara Gonzalez; from Chile, Marta Vergara; and from the United States, Doris Stevens. This Pan-American network drove a transnational movement that advocated women's suffrage, equal pay for equal work, maternity rights, and broader self-determination. Their painstaking efforts led to the enshrinement of women's rights in the United Nations Charter and the development of a framework for international human rights. But their work also revealed deep divides, with Latin American activists overcoming U.S. presumptions to feminist superiority. As Marino shows, these early fractures continue to influence divisions among today's activists along class, racial, and national lines. Marino's multinational and multilingual research yields a new narrative for the creation of global feminism. The leading women introduced here were forerunners in understanding the power relations at the heart of international affairs. Their drive to enshrine fundamental rights for women, children, and all people of the world stands as a testament to what can be accomplished when global thinking meets local action.


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This book chronicles the dawn of the global movement for women's rights in the first decades of the twentieth century. The founding mothers of this movement were not based primarily in the United States, however, or in Europe. Instead, Katherine M. Marino introduces readers to a cast of remarkable Latin American and Caribbean women whose deep friendships and intense rivalr This book chronicles the dawn of the global movement for women's rights in the first decades of the twentieth century. The founding mothers of this movement were not based primarily in the United States, however, or in Europe. Instead, Katherine M. Marino introduces readers to a cast of remarkable Latin American and Caribbean women whose deep friendships and intense rivalries forged global feminism out of an era of imperialism, racism, and fascism. Six dynamic activists form the heart of this story: from Brazil, Bertha Lutz; from Cuba, Ofelia Domingez Navarro; from Uruguay, Paulina Luisi; from Panama, Clara Gonzalez; from Chile, Marta Vergara; and from the United States, Doris Stevens. This Pan-American network drove a transnational movement that advocated women's suffrage, equal pay for equal work, maternity rights, and broader self-determination. Their painstaking efforts led to the enshrinement of women's rights in the United Nations Charter and the development of a framework for international human rights. But their work also revealed deep divides, with Latin American activists overcoming U.S. presumptions to feminist superiority. As Marino shows, these early fractures continue to influence divisions among today's activists along class, racial, and national lines. Marino's multinational and multilingual research yields a new narrative for the creation of global feminism. The leading women introduced here were forerunners in understanding the power relations at the heart of international affairs. Their drive to enshrine fundamental rights for women, children, and all people of the world stands as a testament to what can be accomplished when global thinking meets local action.

30 review for Feminism for the Americas: The Making of an International Human Rights Movement

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lake Villa District Library

    [Re]INVEST in 2020: In March, celebrate Women's History Month! Find this book in our catalog! [Re]INVEST in 2020: In March, celebrate Women's History Month! Find this book in our catalog!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Excellent recovery of women's history and feminism in Latin America that doesn't flinch from the hard truths of racism, beliefs in national and language superiority, and classism. Highly readable. Read for LATIN AMERICA and the WORLD grad class. Excellent recovery of women's history and feminism in Latin America that doesn't flinch from the hard truths of racism, beliefs in national and language superiority, and classism. Highly readable. Read for LATIN AMERICA and the WORLD grad class.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cath

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rob Williams

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melody Mo

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mackenzie Martinez

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dean Ramser

  10. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

  12. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Luthe

  13. 5 out of 5

    Macarena

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Gorton

  15. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mark Healey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Russo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Caryce Tirop

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Robichaud

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary Alice

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thalia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Brown

  23. 4 out of 5

    Library of Dreaming (Bookstagram)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Morris

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angélica Bautista

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aida Rodríguez Campesino

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joseph T Marino

  30. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

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