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Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916) was born Mary Everest in England and spent her early years in France. She married mathematician George Boole. She was the author of several works on teaching and teaching mathematics in particular. This short book, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, is meant to be read by children and introduces algebra and logic. She uses the word “algebra” broa Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916) was born Mary Everest in England and spent her early years in France. She married mathematician George Boole. She was the author of several works on teaching and teaching mathematics in particular. This short book, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, is meant to be read by children and introduces algebra and logic. She uses the word “algebra” broadly, defining it as a “method of solving problems by honest confession of one’s ignorance”. Using this definition, Boole introduces, in a conversational manner, the concepts of logic and algebra, illustrating these concepts with stories and anecdotes, often from biblical sources. At times, her discussion seems somewhat mystical, speaking of the imagination and angels as messengers which guide one toward the next step in a logical investigation. Boole ends the book with a reminder that algebra’s essential element is “the habitual registration of the exact limits of one’s knowledge” and a call for the public to keep this principle in mind when encountering any situation. (Summary written by Patricia Oakley)


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Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916) was born Mary Everest in England and spent her early years in France. She married mathematician George Boole. She was the author of several works on teaching and teaching mathematics in particular. This short book, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, is meant to be read by children and introduces algebra and logic. She uses the word “algebra” broa Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916) was born Mary Everest in England and spent her early years in France. She married mathematician George Boole. She was the author of several works on teaching and teaching mathematics in particular. This short book, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, is meant to be read by children and introduces algebra and logic. She uses the word “algebra” broadly, defining it as a “method of solving problems by honest confession of one’s ignorance”. Using this definition, Boole introduces, in a conversational manner, the concepts of logic and algebra, illustrating these concepts with stories and anecdotes, often from biblical sources. At times, her discussion seems somewhat mystical, speaking of the imagination and angels as messengers which guide one toward the next step in a logical investigation. Boole ends the book with a reminder that algebra’s essential element is “the habitual registration of the exact limits of one’s knowledge” and a call for the public to keep this principle in mind when encountering any situation. (Summary written by Patricia Oakley)

30 review for Philosophy and Fun of Algebra (Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    This is a fascinating read if for no other reason than Boole is thinking about algebra in ways foreign to more modern thinking. We would call it "Thinking outside the box." In reality, Boole's reasoning is indicative of a trait more common to past generations, that of considering ideas from many different perspectives, of acknowledging the unknown and factoring it into our equation, of applying this broader perspective to life. She was not so much thinking outside the box as we, in our time, hav This is a fascinating read if for no other reason than Boole is thinking about algebra in ways foreign to more modern thinking. We would call it "Thinking outside the box." In reality, Boole's reasoning is indicative of a trait more common to past generations, that of considering ideas from many different perspectives, of acknowledging the unknown and factoring it into our equation, of applying this broader perspective to life. She was not so much thinking outside the box as we, in our time, have constrained ourselves—sometimes consciously, sometimes unwittingly—within the box, and the box is often small and narrow. For all our celebrating of "thinking outside the box," we are very much the same, interchangeable parts in a large mechanism. Yes we have our outliers who truly think in original ways, and they have made great contributions in many fields, but for the common people, original thinking is discouraged, not allowed. Sadly, this book and many others with great lessons in them are slipping into oblivion. Not so much because the actual documents are being lost, as because we, in our generation, simply are not taking the time to read from them and learn. This is to our own detriment. Boole uses many examples from Hebrew and Christian perspectives. These need not be construed as a push to get people to believe in these religions. She uses them as algebraic hypotheses and because they are her background.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anthony M.

    British Author Mary Everest Boole was a nineteenth century individual of her time. She was progressive in her thoughts on teaching, but stuck also on regressive religious thinking. While expounding algebra as a scientific method, she also wants the reader to accept Christianity as true without regard to the scientific method. She describes algebra as appealing to the logos, or formal logical thinking, but throws in the ethos or religion. Some of her assertions on certain topics have later been p British Author Mary Everest Boole was a nineteenth century individual of her time. She was progressive in her thoughts on teaching, but stuck also on regressive religious thinking. While expounding algebra as a scientific method, she also wants the reader to accept Christianity as true without regard to the scientific method. She describes algebra as appealing to the logos, or formal logical thinking, but throws in the ethos or religion. Some of her assertions on certain topics have later been proven by science to be questionable or untrue. Yet, it is interesting to read a nineteenth century woman's view on philosophy, mathematics, and science--moreover it interesting that many humans in our modern society still have the same mixed (logical and illogical) thinking so that we have delusional folks with bombs created through science.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Jackson

    Really interesting, and a great introduction for children. Unfortunate that it is laden with Christian propaganda.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Two Readers in Love

    I'm reading a book on George Boole and became interested in his wife Mary Everest Boole, who was also a mathematician and author. Her uncle was George Everest, the surveyor and geographer after whom Mount Everest was named. She wrote several books on mathematic and logic education for children and also on parapsychology. She was the first female member of the Society for Psychical Research. One of her daughters, Ethel Voynich, was the author of the novel "The Gadfly"; Ethel married fellow revolu I'm reading a book on George Boole and became interested in his wife Mary Everest Boole, who was also a mathematician and author. Her uncle was George Everest, the surveyor and geographer after whom Mount Everest was named. She wrote several books on mathematic and logic education for children and also on parapsychology. She was the first female member of the Society for Psychical Research. One of her daughters, Ethel Voynich, was the author of the novel "The Gadfly"; Ethel married fellow revolutionary Wilfrid Voynich, who later became a bookseller and the name behind the "Voynich manuscript." The long rabbit hole of an introduction is by way of giving you some idea of my gratitude to Project Gutenberg for making an electronic copy of this public domain book available for free. After reading George Boole's biography I was hungry to read more primary source material, and it is quite hard to find Everest-Boole in print.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jerrod

    Might have just as easily been called the Theology and Fun of Algebra... but turn of the 20th century can't be too surprised that Philosophy and Christian theology are seen as one and the same. Still very interesting concepts. Might have just as easily been called the Theology and Fun of Algebra... but turn of the 20th century can't be too surprised that Philosophy and Christian theology are seen as one and the same. Still very interesting concepts.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leiloni Schulz

    This book taught me more about life than it it did about algebra but it was an interesting read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Iris Hulsker

    Loved the book. Sure, it is an old fashioned one, and a reader should be open for some religious references, but this book teaches basic logic and common sense ( if you do not have one :) )

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Mario Mendiola

  9. 4 out of 5

    Johann Fourie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Une

  11. 4 out of 5

    Olimpia

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alfredo

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kemptons Reads

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jens

  16. 5 out of 5

    Todd Huffine

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Roy

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

  19. 4 out of 5

    Al Sheblee

  20. 4 out of 5

    K. R. B. Moum

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clifford

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Martin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tasneem

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alli

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan Moore

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pasparto

  29. 5 out of 5

    Will

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

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