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A high society murder. A spirited lady detective. Can she out-class the killer before an innocent person takes the fall? London, 1923. Olive Belgrave needs a job. Despite her aristocratic upbringing, she’s penniless. Determined to support herself, she jumps at an unconventional job—looking into the background of her cousin's fiancé, Alfred. Alfred burst into the upper crust A high society murder. A spirited lady detective. Can she out-class the killer before an innocent person takes the fall? London, 1923. Olive Belgrave needs a job. Despite her aristocratic upbringing, she’s penniless. Determined to support herself, she jumps at an unconventional job—looking into the background of her cousin's fiancé, Alfred. Alfred burst into the upper crust world of London’s high society, but his answers to questions about his past are decidedly vague. Before Olive can gather more than the basics, a murder occurs at a posh party. Suddenly, every Bright Young Person in attendance is a suspect, and Olive must race to find the culprit because a sly murderer is determined to make sure Olive’s first case is her last. Murder at Archly Manor is the first in the High Society Lady Detective series of charming historical cozy mysteries. If you like witty banter, glamorous settings, and delightful plot twists, you’ll love USA Today bestselling author Sara Rosett’s series for Anglophiles and mystery lovers alike.Travel back to the Golden Age of detective fiction with Murder at Archly Manor. 


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A high society murder. A spirited lady detective. Can she out-class the killer before an innocent person takes the fall? London, 1923. Olive Belgrave needs a job. Despite her aristocratic upbringing, she’s penniless. Determined to support herself, she jumps at an unconventional job—looking into the background of her cousin's fiancé, Alfred. Alfred burst into the upper crust A high society murder. A spirited lady detective. Can she out-class the killer before an innocent person takes the fall? London, 1923. Olive Belgrave needs a job. Despite her aristocratic upbringing, she’s penniless. Determined to support herself, she jumps at an unconventional job—looking into the background of her cousin's fiancé, Alfred. Alfred burst into the upper crust world of London’s high society, but his answers to questions about his past are decidedly vague. Before Olive can gather more than the basics, a murder occurs at a posh party. Suddenly, every Bright Young Person in attendance is a suspect, and Olive must race to find the culprit because a sly murderer is determined to make sure Olive’s first case is her last. Murder at Archly Manor is the first in the High Society Lady Detective series of charming historical cozy mysteries. If you like witty banter, glamorous settings, and delightful plot twists, you’ll love USA Today bestselling author Sara Rosett’s series for Anglophiles and mystery lovers alike.Travel back to the Golden Age of detective fiction with Murder at Archly Manor. 

30 review for Murder at Archly Manor

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Burnett

    Murder at Archly Manor is the fabulous start to a new series starring the very likeable and highly entertaining Olive Belgrave. Despite her posh upbringing, Olive is penniless and needs a job. Hired by her aunt to investigate a man her cousin has decided to marry, Olive attends a weekend party and witnesses a murder. She must solve the crime before someone else becomes the next victim. Rosett has clearly done her research and the time period – fashions, word usage, and Archly Manor itself – is e Murder at Archly Manor is the fabulous start to a new series starring the very likeable and highly entertaining Olive Belgrave. Despite her posh upbringing, Olive is penniless and needs a job. Hired by her aunt to investigate a man her cousin has decided to marry, Olive attends a weekend party and witnesses a murder. She must solve the crime before someone else becomes the next victim. Rosett has clearly done her research and the time period – fashions, word usage, and Archly Manor itself – is expertly detailed. This is a fun new series that I highly recommend. For more reviews, check out my Instagram account, https://www.instagram.com/thoughtsfro....

  2. 4 out of 5

    LORI (Dollycas) CASWELL

    Dollycas’s Thoughts Olive Belgrave didn’t plan to become a detective, but she needed a job and when asked to look in the background of her cousin’s fiancé, Alfred, she can’t refuse. Before she can really delve into his history the man falls to his death at a party right before her eyes. There was someone else on the balcony so now her investigation is expanded into looking for a killer. Everyone the party is now a suspect and the murderer is determined to get away scot-free. *** I liked Olive right Dollycas’s Thoughts Olive Belgrave didn’t plan to become a detective, but she needed a job and when asked to look in the background of her cousin’s fiancé, Alfred, she can’t refuse. Before she can really delve into his history the man falls to his death at a party right before her eyes. There was someone else on the balcony so now her investigation is expanded into looking for a killer. Everyone the party is now a suspect and the murderer is determined to get away scot-free. *** I liked Olive right away. A strong woman for the 1920’s, wanting to be independent. She is smart, inquisitive and well educated, although no real work skills, she just needs to find the perfect job. Her cousin’s Gwen’s telegram arrives when she is almost out of money. Her other cousin Violet has taken up with a man they know nothing about and he is very evasive about the details of his upbringing. Violet is in love and doesn’t care, but her mother and sister sure do, They decide to pay Olive to investigate Alfred Eton and that puts Olive one step closer to the independence she seeks. These characters and the rest in the story are very cleverly written. I worry about Olive’s father because of her overbearing stepmother. The group that attends the party thrown by Sebastian Blakely, Alfred’s godfather and noted photographer, are a hodgepodge group of aristocrats and hangers-on, and any of them could be guilty of the murder. The mystery turns out to be much more that it seems at first. Twists and turns take us the reader and Olive in many different directions. While complex, the author has a very comfortable writing style that allows the reader to really take the journey with these characters. At times I forgot the story is set in the 1920’s even though the author hit all the right notes for the time period. I found myself totally immersed in the tale. I did enjoy all the descriptions of fashion and hairstyles of the era. This series is off to a roaring start. A delightful look at high society London in the ’20’s. Fun characters, an extraordinary setting and a well-plotted mystery made for a truly entertaining read. I am looking forward to more High Society Lady Detective stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Treece

    Rating: 4 stars Set in the 1920's England with an energetic, stylish likable h whose mother was American--insisting that she attend a women's college in the US!-- and whose father is a British vicar of the impoverished gentry, this book was just up my alley. Unlike Phryne Fisher from the Kerry Greenwood books, Kerry Greenwood, Olive is far more, ahem, respectable and relatable to the less liberated in terms of scandalous and very modern behavior. That does not make Olive or this book less interes Rating: 4 stars Set in the 1920's England with an energetic, stylish likable h whose mother was American--insisting that she attend a women's college in the US!-- and whose father is a British vicar of the impoverished gentry, this book was just up my alley. Unlike Phryne Fisher from the Kerry Greenwood books, Kerry Greenwood, Olive is far more, ahem, respectable and relatable to the less liberated in terms of scandalous and very modern behavior. That does not make Olive or this book less interesting, it just offers a perspective from a more conventional character just as brave sans gold revolver and who is more than capable of sorting the facts and doing detective work credit . Although, I was side-tracked by the actual killer a couple of times, I will admit the author did throw me off the scent even if I was NOT surprised by whom it turned out to be in the end. Looking forward to more of this series, and there is a love interest, Jasper, a childhood friend with his own secrets and a nemesis, Lady Pamela, who is the epitome of arrogance, snobbery and vindictive spite. The other interesting and fascinating characters add flavor and pizazz to this series that I hope to see more of in the next books.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in The High Society Lady Detective series. Olive Belgrave has left her family home and struck out on her own in London. She has been unsuccessful at finding a position despite her education. She gets a desperate telegram from her cousin, Gwen Stone asking her to visit Parkview. Gwen’s flighty sister, Irene has gotten herself engaged to Alfred Eton. Violet’s mother, Caroline and Gwen are not fans of the man and he has provided few details on Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in The High Society Lady Detective series. Olive Belgrave has left her family home and struck out on her own in London. She has been unsuccessful at finding a position despite her education. She gets a desperate telegram from her cousin, Gwen Stone asking her to visit Parkview. Gwen’s flighty sister, Irene has gotten herself engaged to Alfred Eton. Violet’s mother, Caroline and Gwen are not fans of the man and he has provided few details on his background. Caroline wants to hire a private investigator, but she does not wish to associate with any unsavory types. Olive volunteers to dig into Alfred’s history and the family insists on paying her. Sebastian Blakely, society photographer and Alfred’s godfather, is hosting a weekend party which allow Olive to ask subtle questions. The party is off to roaring start until one of the guests ends up dead and Violet is the prime suspect. Olive must expose the killer before her cousin is hauled off to the hoosegow. Murder at Archly Manor gives us a lively main character in Olive. Her father recently remarried a woman who prefers Olive to be out of the house and keeps pushing her to marry the local curate (he is odious). Olive was attending college in America until her father lost the money on a scheme. Olive is smart, pretty and fashionable which is the last thing a woman of the house wants in a governess. I found Murder at Archly Manor easy to read thanks to the authors breezy writing style and steady pacing. Sara Rosett captured the era with the hairstyles, attitudes, language (slang) and fashions. I wish the author had provided more background information on Olive and key details on other characters (last names for example). The murder takes place around the thirty percent mark which I felt was a little late in the story. There are several suspects and good clues to aid readers in solving the whodunit. Murder at Archly Manor is a light, humorous historical cozy mystery that will transport you back to the roaring 20s. The next novel in The High Society Lady Detective series is Murder at Blackburn Hall.

  5. 5 out of 5

    JoAn

    Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in the High Society Lady Detective series and I hope this will continue for some time. I found Ms. Rosett's writing to be descriptive and smoothly paced as the characters were introduced to the reader. I like Olive and cheered her on as she tried to find a way to make a living in London during the 1920s. Being from a higher society, but not the "upper crust", Olive has a few years of college under her belt but no marketable skills. She needs Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett is the first book in the High Society Lady Detective series and I hope this will continue for some time. I found Ms. Rosett's writing to be descriptive and smoothly paced as the characters were introduced to the reader. I like Olive and cheered her on as she tried to find a way to make a living in London during the 1920s. Being from a higher society, but not the "upper crust", Olive has a few years of college under her belt but no marketable skills. She needs a job to support herself as she left home after her father remarried. Her Aunt Caroline and cousin, Gwen, hire her to establish the background on Alfred Eton who has become engaged to Violet, Gwen's sister. To learn more about him, Olive and Gwen attend a weekend party at Archly Manor. Unfortunately, the first night of the party, Alfred is pushed off a balcony and now Violet is the police's number one suspect. With a deftly plotted story, many shady characters attending the party, and enough twists and turns to cloud motive, means and even opportunity, it's an intriguing story that I was completely wrapped up until the end. It's obvious that Ms. Rosett did her homework for this historical novel and I was fascinated by the little details about the life and times of London and the countryside after the war. I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley. All of the above opinions are my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Listened to this one on audio tape and really enjoyed it. 4.5* from me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gail C.

    I received an advanced digital copy of Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett from NetGalley and Kobo Writing Life in exchange for an unbiased review. This is the first book in a proposed series by Sara Rosett featuring Olive Belgave, a member of high society in 1920’s England, with one foot in the world of the “bright young things” and the other in the world of work as she tries to make her own way in the world. This is a solid new entry in the world of historical cozy fiction that introduces w I received an advanced digital copy of Murder at Archly Manor by Sara Rosett from NetGalley and Kobo Writing Life in exchange for an unbiased review. This is the first book in a proposed series by Sara Rosett featuring Olive Belgave, a member of high society in 1920’s England, with one foot in the world of the “bright young things” and the other in the world of work as she tries to make her own way in the world. This is a solid new entry in the world of historical cozy fiction that introduces what could turn into an interesting series. Olive is hired to investigate her cousin’s new fiance, Alfred Eton, and his background by her aunt who has serious concerns about the truth of who he presents himself to be. Most of her investigation centers around her attendance at a weekend house party being held by Sebastian, a famous high-society photographer and purported Godfather to Alfred. As the book unfolds, Olive witnesses Alfred’s murder by a person strongly resembling Violet, her cousin, Alfred’s fiancee. Olive and Gwen, Violet’s sister, are convinced Violet is innocent although she seems to be the primary suspect for the inspector in charge of the case. In an effort to prove him wrong and discover the identity of the real murderer, Olive pursues several lines of inquiry throughout the houseguests and in London. There are clues and red herrings sprinkled liberally throughout the book with ample opportunity for the reader to determine the perpetrator. The mystery was easy to solve, and it was interesting to continue reading to see if the solution was consistent with the clues as presented. While the book has good potential, the characters were not as fully developed as I would have liked. It was difficult to develop strong feelings toward Olive. She didn’t have enough depth to provoke any emotion within me as a reader. The same is true for the other more prominent secondary characters. It would be interesting to learn if Gwen and Violet, along with secondary characters such as Jasper, a childhood friend of Olive’s; Olive’s stepmother who presents some major changes in Olive’s life, not all of them positive; and Olive’s aunt and uncle develop more depth in future novels as at present they do not have enough depth to be compelling figures. In summary, if you like books that are set in the roaring twenties, this series may hold some interest for you, particularly if the character development continues as the books progress. I would like to read at least one more book in the series before deciding if the series is one I would want to continue reading.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    A good intro a new cozy series set in 1920's England. Love the premise of this series, I mean what's not to like with 1920's England??? This story was a little slow going for me but I have since read book 2 and it was super good. A new series to add to my reading list!

  9. 4 out of 5

    A.M.G. ☮Hippie/Fantasia☮

    Rating: 4.4 / 5 This was positively delightful, in a benign sort of way--and by that I mean that you would enjoy it as a soothing cup of tea rather than a heart-stopping mystery. Considering that this was written by a modern day author though, she certain made good and accurate use of all the tropes associated with a typical whodunnit mystery! Now, I've never read a Miss Marple mystery from Agatha Christie, but I imagine that Olive Belgrave is following in her footsteps as a female detective--set Rating: 4.4 / 5 This was positively delightful, in a benign sort of way--and by that I mean that you would enjoy it as a soothing cup of tea rather than a heart-stopping mystery. Considering that this was written by a modern day author though, she certain made good and accurate use of all the tropes associated with a typical whodunnit mystery! Now, I've never read a Miss Marple mystery from Agatha Christie, but I imagine that Olive Belgrave is following in her footsteps as a female detective--set within the same time period, but written decades later. Trope-wise, apart from a keen and curious protagonist, we have the following: + a house party during which a murder happens + several likely suspects, all of whom must be suspected before they can be eliminated + a Downton Abbey setup with rooms, schedules (i.e. tea, dinner, billiards, etc.), and servants + attention to detail that the readers will likely forget but then come back to later and likely check by flipping back and forth throughout the pages + an atmosphere that encourages mystery--in this case, the 1920s Well, put all those together and make the character of Olive herself quite likable if not typical, and you've got what I would consider a good read on a crisp fall day, Earl Grey and biscuits recommended as an addition. Cheers!

  10. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Olive Belgrave refuses to spend one more minute under her father's roof where her bossy stepmother manages every aspect of Olive's life including trying to marry her off to the local curate. Olive would rather try to make it on her own as a career girl than marry someone she is not attracted to but in 1923 times are tough and jobs for down-at-the-heels Society girls are just not available. when her Aunt Caroline at Parkview Manor expresses concern about cousin Violet's new fiance, Alfred Eton an Olive Belgrave refuses to spend one more minute under her father's roof where her bossy stepmother manages every aspect of Olive's life including trying to marry her off to the local curate. Olive would rather try to make it on her own as a career girl than marry someone she is not attracted to but in 1923 times are tough and jobs for down-at-the-heels Society girls are just not available. when her Aunt Caroline at Parkview Manor expresses concern about cousin Violet's new fiance, Alfred Eton and mentions the possibility of hiring a private detective, Olive eagerly offers her assistance. She's certain her clever mind can easily put together the puzzle of Alfred's sketchy background. She is sadly mistaken but accepts an invitation to a house party at Archly Manor given by Alfred's godfather Sebastian to try to learn more about the mysterious man her cousin insists on marrying. During a fireworks show Olive and another guest witness Alfred on the balcony arguing with a woman and the next thing they know Alfred is lying dead on the ground. The police automatically suspect Olive's cousin Violet but Olive knows her cousin may be temperamental but she would never kill anyone, let alone the man she loves. Olive is bound and determined to save her cousin. The mystery part of the story is very engaging. The reader thinks they know who the suspects are given one big clue but a twist to the story makes it difficult to guess. I had three women in mind and Olive didn't suspect any of them. She wanted the obvious solution pretty badly based on her personal feelings. I wasn't totally surprised by the identity of the murderer even though I didn't guess. The murderer's motive seems pretty weak to me as a modern-day American. I don't see what the big deal was but I watched enough Downton Abbey to know the way Society thought back then. What I didn't like about this book was the roaring 20s setting. The 20s are just too wild for me. The champagne flows freely as does the cocaine. I also felt the plot pacing was rather slow in the beginning. I kept waiting and waiting for the murder that didn't happen until Chapter 9. I didn't really care who killed Alfred and was able to put the book down for the night. The plot pacing picked up in the second half as Olive begins her investigation. I picked up this series because I was curious about Parkview Manor. Sadly, Olive doesn't live there and only makes fleeting visits. The charming village of Nether Woodsmoor doesn't play any role in the story at all. It's mentioned a few times by name but unlike the author's Murder on Location series, this story lacks local color and I found that disappointing. I may be interested in reading the second book in the series because I did like Olive. Olive is a modern woman. She wants more out of life than being married to just anyone for the sake of being married. She's ready and able to give up the security and comfort of her lower gentry lifestyle to make her own way in the world. At first Olive is a bit naive about the way the world works but she doesn't give up. I admire her determination. She is intelligent and fair. Olive never presumes upon her status as the niece of a baronet. She loves her family and is very loyal. Sometimes Olive makes quick decisions that have repercussions but she mostly thinks things through first. I like Olive's relationship with Jasper, a family friend and Olive's childhood crush. I think she still has a crush on him and I think Jasper is beginning to see grown-up Olivia in a new light but he's a "Bright Young Person" and moves in different circles. I wonder though if he's still working for the Home Office and if Bright Young Person is a cover. Nothing in this story indicates that except when he shows up at a very convenient time. If he is merely the BYT everyone thinks he is, I really don't approve of his lifestyle and hope his feelings for Olive push him into something more. He'd make a great spy if he isn't already! Olive's family is so warm and loving. I like them all, except her stepmother. Aunt Caroline is the vague one, this gene passed on to the present Baronet. Like her grandson she is a sweetheart. However, Aunt Caroline is a little too old-fashioned. Violet is spoiled and bratty, shallow and superficial. She's engaged to a man she barely knows because he's handsome and fun to be with. He makes her happy so why not? Why not is because his background is sketchy. Who is Alfred Eton? Apparently he grew up in India and has no family left. Rather than accept this story, Violet's mother and sister are concerned. Gwen is a sweetheart. She's the Jane Bennet of the story but much more quick-witted. Gwen runs the household and handles household finances efficiently. Personally, I think she needs to have a frank conversation with her sister and if her sister still chooses to marry this man, so be it. Gwen will be there to help Violet if her heart gets broken. Divorce is still scandalous but it's becoming more common even among their class. I'm with Uncle Leo. He's a loving and hands-off father. He recognizes that his children are adults and need to make their own decisions. Times have changed and Society has relaxed their social rules a bit. Even if he thinks Violet is making a mistake marrying Alfred, it's her choice to make. I think Olive feels the same way but she has a curious mind so she's going to see what she can find either way. NOT knowing drives her crazy. I understand that completely! The party at Archly Manor is hosted by Sebastian, an eccentric artist and Bright Young Person. I both like and dislike Sebastian. I admire his passion for his art and how seriously he takes it but Sebastian is like an overgrown boy. He hasn't ever grown up and goes through life as if it's a joke. His Silver and Gold party is certainly quite elegant even if it's not staid. He invites too many people and doesn't mind party crashers which speaks to his generosity. In spite of bickering with his sister, Mrs. Thea Reid, I think he loves her - at least absence makes the heart grow fonder because she is a difficult person to like. Thea is snooty and demanding. She bosses around her governess and forces the governess, Muriel, to act as secretary, arranges the young woman's life for her without asking if that's what Muriel wants. However, I think Thea loves her children and is a pretty good mother for the time. Her husband is absent making me wonder what their relationship is like. Muriel seems to accept her lot in life meekly. It will soon be over when she marries Mr. Hugh Digby-Stratham. I'm not sure what he's doing at the party because he's too old and too much of a stuffed shirt to be a Bright Young Person. When Alfred is killed, all of these people become suspects. Given the way Society thought about people who were not "our kind," I HIGHLY doubt they'd be so eager or cooperative with the police. Likewise, the servants would never reveal so much to their so-called "betters." The most realistic character in that respect is Lady Pamela. Lady Pamela is a mean girl, a 1920s version of Caroline Bingley. You know the type... she's a Bright Young Person who always gets her way, especially with men. Her father is titled, wealthy and she is beautiful. Lady Pamela thinks she's above Olive and even Gwen and Violet. Lady Pamela certainly won't cooperate with Scotland Yard. Olive (and I) would love for Lady Pamela to get her comeuppance. It would be nice if she were the killer. I think she's too obvious. Someone else has an alibi but is it airtight? Muriel was of course upstairs with the Reid children who were in bed. Paul is a mischievous little scamp. I wonder if he holds the clue to crack the case? As much as Society wouldn't cooperate with the police, the servants wouldn't either. The servants in this book are too happy and eager to talk to the "upstairs" people. The chief suspect is Jane, the maid. She spills her secrets to Olivia and Violet pretty easily. However, she could be lying. She seemed like she wanted to get "above herself" and was acting "uppity." I sensed she had a secret. She was too happy even before Olive and Violet question her. Like most cozy mystery novels, the local police are incompetent. Police Inspector Jennings is quick to judge Violet as the killer. That would make his job quick and easy so he doesn't have to do any work. He's lazy at the expense of someone else's life. Inspector Langley is better at being fair and open-minded but I sense some impatience about him and a quick temper. I do trust him though but he has a tough task to find the real killer. Even though this novel didn't completely appeal to me, I may read the next one in the series to see if I like it any better. This series is perfect for fans of Downton Abbey and Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries on TV or other books with lady private detectives like Ginger Gold.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda Baker

    Sara Rosett takes us back to the Roaring 20's with the first book in The High Society Lady Detective Series. Olive Belgrave is from an aristocratic background but finds herself nearly penniless and needing a job. She and her father have always been close, especially since the death of her much-loved mother. However, financial reverses and the advent of a new and managing wife have driven a wedge between them. Olive is determined to set out on her own, and not be forced into a marriage with an ob Sara Rosett takes us back to the Roaring 20's with the first book in The High Society Lady Detective Series. Olive Belgrave is from an aristocratic background but finds herself nearly penniless and needing a job. She and her father have always been close, especially since the death of her much-loved mother. However, financial reverses and the advent of a new and managing wife have driven a wedge between them. Olive is determined to set out on her own, and not be forced into a marriage with an obnoxious curate, which the new stepmother thinks is just the thing. Olive has no marketable skills and has been pounding the pavements in London, with no luck. She is wondering how she is going to manage her room rent when she gets a call from her cousin, Gwen. Gwen's flighty younger sister, Violet, has gotten herself engaged to a young man of whom no one knows anything. Alfred Eaton appears to have plenty of money, but Gwen fears that he is a fortune hunter. She implores Olive to accompany her, and Violet, to a house party at the home of Sebastian Blakely who claims to be Alfred's godfather. No one can imagine Blakely as a godfather to any child, and he has never mentioned it before Alfred's sudden appearance. Gwen wants Olive to try to find out what she can about Alfred and offers to pay her for her efforts. When a murder occurs, and Violet is the main suspect, Olive discovers detection skills she never knew she had. Murder at Archly Manor introduces a very likable and determined heroine in the person of Olive Belgrave, along with other intriguing characters that I hope to see more of in future books. There is plenty of period atmosphere and mouth-watering descriptions of the fashions of the era. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this light-hearted, historical mystery. Thanks to the author for an advance copy. The opinions are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emma's Things to Read

    As Autumn nights draw in my go to genre of choice is a murder mystery. They are comforting bowl of soup and freshly baked bread on a cold day. Murder at Archly Hall totally fits the bill. Aristocratic, but down on her luck, Olive Belgrave is searching for employment in 1920’s London. Even her connections aren’t paying off when she receives a telegram to return to her family estate. Olive’s cousin Violet has become engaged to Alfred Eton, a young man whose life in the colonies and heritage remain a As Autumn nights draw in my go to genre of choice is a murder mystery. They are comforting bowl of soup and freshly baked bread on a cold day. Murder at Archly Hall totally fits the bill. Aristocratic, but down on her luck, Olive Belgrave is searching for employment in 1920’s London. Even her connections aren’t paying off when she receives a telegram to return to her family estate. Olive’s cousin Violet has become engaged to Alfred Eton, a young man whose life in the colonies and heritage remain a mystery and who may not be a suitable match. Aunt Caroline employs Olive to use her skills and social connections to investigate. Intrepid Olive heads off to an extravagant house party hosted by photographer Sebastian Blakely, Alfred’s wealthy but unlikeable godfather and friend to dig up some dirt on her cousin’s future husband, but as a firework display is underway a murder occurs. With cousin Violet as a prime suspect, Olive sets out to prove her innocence and find out exactly what has happened and why. Olive herself is by far the star of Sara Rosett’s book. Her narrative style is chatty and easy to read but doesn’t skimp on atmospheric detail. She reminds me of Daisy Dalrymple but with more fun and more sass. The story was compelling and I thoroughly enjoyed solving this country house murder. I’ll definitely look out for Olive’s future adventures and more books in the High Society Lady Detective series. Thanks to Kobo Writing Life and Net Galley for this free advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    For a light and relaxing read checked out the first in the historical series featuring Olive Belgrave, a penniless socialite through a misfortune, not her fault. The series takes place in the early 1920's set in London. The writing flows easily and the There even e characters are developed. This book took me back when I was reading about Miss Silver. It is similar in style. Olive accepts an offer from an Aunt to look into the history of a gentle that her daughter, Violet is determined to marry. A For a light and relaxing read checked out the first in the historical series featuring Olive Belgrave, a penniless socialite through a misfortune, not her fault. The series takes place in the early 1920's set in London. The writing flows easily and the There even e characters are developed. This book took me back when I was reading about Miss Silver. It is similar in style. Olive accepts an offer from an Aunt to look into the history of a gentle that her daughter, Violet is determined to marry. Along with another cousin, Gwen the three of them attend is invited to a weekend house party. at a count estate. While there Violet's fiance is tossed off a balcony and is killed. Evidence points to Violet and Olive become involved with the investigation. Plenty of twists and turns to hold your attention. There is even a romance starting. Will Olive find the answer to prevent Violet from being arrested? There are several suspects with motives. I highly recommend this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    A mystery that has a lot of flair and a spirited plot. Sometimes the mysteries I read don’t really give me much to go on while trying to figure out who did it. When everything is revealed at the end, I’m frustrated because twists and clues are divulged that were completely absent throughout the entire novel. However, this book is different, and if I would have paid better attention, I think I could have figured it out. Now I fear I’m programmed to just check out until the end. So, I’m reading th A mystery that has a lot of flair and a spirited plot. Sometimes the mysteries I read don’t really give me much to go on while trying to figure out who did it. When everything is revealed at the end, I’m frustrated because twists and clues are divulged that were completely absent throughout the entire novel. However, this book is different, and if I would have paid better attention, I think I could have figured it out. Now I fear I’m programmed to just check out until the end. So, I’m reading the second one in this series & maybe I’ll even take notes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vintagebooklvr

    I love historical mysteries, particularly when they get the atmosphere and details right. This one does. Though I thought there were a few too many details about what everyone wore. That is part of the appeal of the twenties, but not every character's dress needs to be explained. Breezy, bright detective and charming historical details. Also a clever mystery. There are red-herrings and twists. Who doesn't like a country house mystery set in the 20s? I know I do.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Selah Pike

    Delightful! I loved that Rosett included a list of the books she read for research—now m TBR has grown 😆

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lori S.

    3.5 Stars What's a girl to do when none of the jobs in the want ads are panning out? Take up the PI (Private Inquiries) business, of course. Olive's first job is to look into the background of her cousin Violet's fiance, Roger Eton, a young man who has few qualities Violet's sister, Gwen, and their mother, approve of and other less savory traits also. Olive's task is hampered by the lack of details in Roger's story at first, and made more complicated when the man is pushed over the side of a balc 3.5 Stars What's a girl to do when none of the jobs in the want ads are panning out? Take up the PI (Private Inquiries) business, of course. Olive's first job is to look into the background of her cousin Violet's fiance, Roger Eton, a young man who has few qualities Violet's sister, Gwen, and their mother, approve of and other less savory traits also. Olive's task is hampered by the lack of details in Roger's story at first, and made more complicated when the man is pushed over the side of a balcony during a long weekend house party. Olive Belgrade is an engaging character with a quick mind who gets along well with most people. I might pick up the next book in the series. Set in the English countryside and parts of London in 1923, the book is full of the latest fashions for both men and women, motor cars, hints of WWI still linger in the air, and the threat of flu still make people nervous and worried.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Loved this book and start to this series! Great mysteries in an historical era. Excited to read more!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rbucci

    Fun, easy read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    meghann

    This was the Barnes and Noble Nook serial read for the month of April. I really enjoyed this one. It was a light read with lots of twists and turns. The only thing that turned me off is the use of the term "lady detective". That and "lady cop" give me all the cringe. But it was a great story and I would definitely read the next book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rosanne Lortz

    Olive Belgrave is out of funds. Too attractive to get taken on as a governess and too unskilled to get taken on as a typist, she eventually receives the novel offer of private detective from her aunt. The mission? To find out more about her cousin Violet's unsavory fiance, Alfred. His uncouth manners show he's hiding something, but Violet is so enamored with him she doesn't even question his vague past and lack of connections.  When Olive travels to Archly Manor to monitor the shady Alfred at a h Olive Belgrave is out of funds. Too attractive to get taken on as a governess and too unskilled to get taken on as a typist, she eventually receives the novel offer of private detective from her aunt. The mission? To find out more about her cousin Violet's unsavory fiance, Alfred. His uncouth manners show he's hiding something, but Violet is so enamored with him she doesn't even question his vague past and lack of connections.  When Olive travels to Archly Manor to monitor the shady Alfred at a house party, it's not long before murder ensues. Determined to protect her cousin's reputation, Olive looks for her own clues alongside the Scotland Yard inspector only to uncover selfishness, secrets, blackmail, and other sordid details that point the finger in half a dozen directions. Will a trail of broken pearls lead the way? Can she find the murderer before death strikes again? This well-crafted mystery kept me guessing till the very end. Olive is a likable protagonist with sound instincts and a commendable sense of family loyalty. Both her longtime friend Jasper (a languid society gentleman who knows where to dig up information) and the thorough Inspector Longly were sympathetic characters who, I trust, will make an appearance in the next installment of the series.  I couldn't help comparing this book to Lauren Willig's The Other Daughter, which is also set during the 1920s. Olive's high society friend Jasper reminded me of Simon Montfort from Willig's book. As an outsider trying to infiltrate the Bright Young Things, Olive's own investigation was similar to the one Rachel conducted. But despite the similarities, the tone of these books was very different, with Sara Rosett penning a cohesive and compelling whodunnit while Lauren Willig's book had a far more literary and romantic quality. Both books are great examples of 1920s historical fiction.  Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions expressed in this review are my own. 

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Perry

    I liked this quirky historical mystery more than I expected I would; it’s premise is very close to Rhys Bowen’s Royal Spyness mysteries, of which I’m a great fan…these mysteries along with Georgette Heyer Regency romances are my favorite guilty pleasures these days. Now, in both series a young woman from a formerly wealthy family which now finds itself in sadly reduced circumstances discovers that she’s utterly unemployable in the England of the 1920s, needs a job desperately, & quite unexpected I liked this quirky historical mystery more than I expected I would; it’s premise is very close to Rhys Bowen’s Royal Spyness mysteries, of which I’m a great fan…these mysteries along with Georgette Heyer Regency romances are my favorite guilty pleasures these days. Now, in both series a young woman from a formerly wealthy family which now finds itself in sadly reduced circumstances discovers that she’s utterly unemployable in the England of the 1920s, needs a job desperately, & quite unexpectedly blunders into becoming a sleuth. When this book was offered at a reduced price (the Kindle 1st-of-a-series books often are used as bait this way), I, needing a bit of a change of pace anyway, thought I’d try it if for no other reason to see how much of a plagiarism it would be. Not too much of one, it turns out. While “royal spyness” Lady Georgiana never earns a penny as a detective; merely being one frequently dispatched by The Queen on errands that evolve into exciting adventures full of humor & whimsy, the protagonist of this story, Olive Belgrave, is not royalty & obviously intends to become a detective full-time to make her living, working among the ranks of high society of course. Because of her reputation within her family as one who has a talent for discovering the truth of matters, she is hired by her aunt to reveal the background of her cousin’s fiancé, who is obviously not a gentleman. During the course of her investigation, the fiancé is murdered at a rollicking party given by his alleged Godfather, a society photographer, at which Olive & her cousin are also in attendance. Thus, the detecting begins. I found the book to be well written & the mystery intriguing. Olive was a well-drawn character, smart & resourceful, though riddled with self-doubt. I enjoyed it, overall. Not nearly the good fun of her royal spyness though.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katreader

    MURDER AT ARCHLY MANOR by Sara Rosett The First High Society Lady Detective Book Unable to live with her domineering step-mother, Olive Belgrave moves to London, assured she can easily find a job and support herself. Unfortunately, Olive soon learns that jobs are much harder to find, even for an educated young lady in 1923. A call for assistance from a wealthy cousin turns into a job. After all, why pay a detective to ferret out information on a shady looking suitor when the money can be kept in t MURDER AT ARCHLY MANOR by Sara Rosett The First High Society Lady Detective Book Unable to live with her domineering step-mother, Olive Belgrave moves to London, assured she can easily find a job and support herself. Unfortunately, Olive soon learns that jobs are much harder to find, even for an educated young lady in 1923. A call for assistance from a wealthy cousin turns into a job. After all, why pay a detective to ferret out information on a shady looking suitor when the money can be kept in the family. Soon Olive is crashing a house party to glean information on the wily fiance. Circumstances change however when Olive sees a blonde woman shove him over a balcony to his death. Now instead of looking into his life, she's investigating his death and trying to prove her cousin innocent of his murder. The juxtaposition of the wealthy, the penniless aristocrats, and the hangers on, gives a compelling look at 1920s high society. Those Bright Young People with their fancy house parties and their questionable morals, extravagance, and superficial views of the world force readers to contemplate their own part in society. It's all a lark, or is it? The first High Society Lady Detective book takes a fascinating look at society in the 1920s while providing a clever mystery. I love the maps at the start of the book, certainly a nod to the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. With read herrings, plenty of suspects, and disreputable characters MURDER AT ARCHLY MANOR is a solid start to a new series. FTC Disclosure – The publisher sent me a copy of this book in the hopes I would review it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrée-ann

    I had the pleasure to listen to the audiobook version. I liked it very much. It's a pleasant change to the ''was there a murder? Well, I was just standing there and coincidentally, I am really good to resolve murder!''. Murder at Archly Manor, is well paced and fluid read. Nothing seems forced and the characters are well balanced. I also giggled at some moments, I imagine it was intended to be humor. It was hard to tell in the audio version, but things like ''There as been a murder! We will need s I had the pleasure to listen to the audiobook version. I liked it very much. It's a pleasant change to the ''was there a murder? Well, I was just standing there and coincidentally, I am really good to resolve murder!''. Murder at Archly Manor, is well paced and fluid read. Nothing seems forced and the characters are well balanced. I also giggled at some moments, I imagine it was intended to be humor. It was hard to tell in the audio version, but things like ''There as been a murder! We will need some tea, quickly please.'' has to be humor right? haha. You will defiantly find me with my face in the next book!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sue Em

    Sara Rosett has switched gears from writing article enjoyable cozy series about a contemporary military wife to a post-WWI English high society traditional mystery. My high expectations for this new series were exceeded in Murder at Archly Manor. Olive Belgrade is penniless due to disastrous investments of her father. Compounded by the fact that he has just remarried and she has been pushed from the nest. Looking for gainful employment with no skills except a high intelligence has proven to a dis Sara Rosett has switched gears from writing article enjoyable cozy series about a contemporary military wife to a post-WWI English high society traditional mystery. My high expectations for this new series were exceeded in Murder at Archly Manor. Olive Belgrade is penniless due to disastrous investments of her father. Compounded by the fact that he has just remarried and she has been pushed from the nest. Looking for gainful employment with no skills except a high intelligence has proven to a disappointment. Called back to her cousin's estate, she becomes enlisted, and paid for, in looking into the origins of the dubious fiancee of Violet, the younger sister. Of course, there's a house party and a murder, and Olive needs to prove Violet's innocence. Fun, well-written and a great start to a new series! Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    At the opening of Sara Rosett’s entertaining historical mystery set in 1923, Murder at Archly Manor, Olive Belgrave is getting a bit desperate. She is looking for a job so that she can set herself up in London, away from her father’s manor in rural England. (This is mostly because of her fear of being “managed” by her new step-mother.) Olive, who doesn’t have many practical skills, is turned down over and over. When she gets an invitation to visit from her cousin, Gwen, Olive jumps at it to get At the opening of Sara Rosett’s entertaining historical mystery set in 1923, Murder at Archly Manor, Olive Belgrave is getting a bit desperate. She is looking for a job so that she can set herself up in London, away from her father’s manor in rural England. (This is mostly because of her fear of being “managed” by her new step-mother.) Olive, who doesn’t have many practical skills, is turned down over and over. When she gets an invitation to visit from her cousin, Gwen, Olive jumps at it to get some respite from her increasingly dire situation. At least she’ll be able to get regular meals, at least for a few days... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mac Daly

    Olive Belgrave has been raised a lady, but unless she wants to live under the thumb of her new stepmother, she needs to make her own money. Unfortunately, she is not alone. In 1923, is it no longer scandalous for young aristocrats to make their own way. With few skills, even less experience and much competition, she is finding it hard to obtain gainful employment. When a relative falls in love with a questionable character, her cousin engages Olive to check into his background. It soon turns int Olive Belgrave has been raised a lady, but unless she wants to live under the thumb of her new stepmother, she needs to make her own money. Unfortunately, she is not alone. In 1923, is it no longer scandalous for young aristocrats to make their own way. With few skills, even less experience and much competition, she is finding it hard to obtain gainful employment. When a relative falls in love with a questionable character, her cousin engages Olive to check into his background. It soon turns into a murder investigation and Olive finds she has a talent for snooping. I thoroughly enjoyed this first book in the series and am looking forward to the next ones.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Nealy

    Reminded me of Downton abbey meets Poirot! The author mentions she read Agatha Christie for inspiration and you can tell! Very well written. The writing style has substance to it that other cozy mysteries lack. Although the mystery itself was not top notch and my hunch of who it was, was correct. I still enjoyed the story and the suspense, it felt more like a story about a girl making a life for her self in the 1920's instead of just a murder mystery which I liked! Looking forward to the next on Reminded me of Downton abbey meets Poirot! The author mentions she read Agatha Christie for inspiration and you can tell! Very well written. The writing style has substance to it that other cozy mysteries lack. Although the mystery itself was not top notch and my hunch of who it was, was correct. I still enjoyed the story and the suspense, it felt more like a story about a girl making a life for her self in the 1920's instead of just a murder mystery which I liked! Looking forward to the next one!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Dunnett

    A fast, enjoyable read but I'm wasn't convinced that Olive has a vocation as a private detective. I'll have to wait for the next book in the series to see if she can pull it off when the client isn't a member of her own family.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Cozy mystery. Loved everything about this story. All my guess as to who the murderer was were wrong. Would recommend. The only thing that bothered me was that the author made a mistake with a characters name.

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