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Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally

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In October 2003, Patti Digh's stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later. The timeframe made an impression on her. What emerged was a commitment to ask herself every morning: What would I be doing today if I had only 37 days left to live? The answers changed her life and led to this new kind of book. Part meditation, part how-to guide, part memoir, Li In October 2003, Patti Digh's stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later. The timeframe made an impression on her. What emerged was a commitment to ask herself every morning: What would I be doing today if I had only 37 days left to live? The answers changed her life and led to this new kind of book. Part meditation, part how-to guide, part memoir, Life is a Verb is all heart. Within these pages, Digh identifies six core practices to jump-start a meaningful life: Say Yes, Trust Yourself, Slow Down, Be Generous, Speak Up, and Love More. Within this framework she supplies 37 edgy, funny, and literary life stories, each followed by a 'do it now' 10-minute exercise as well as a practice to try for 37 days - and perhaps the rest of your life.


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In October 2003, Patti Digh's stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later. The timeframe made an impression on her. What emerged was a commitment to ask herself every morning: What would I be doing today if I had only 37 days left to live? The answers changed her life and led to this new kind of book. Part meditation, part how-to guide, part memoir, Li In October 2003, Patti Digh's stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later. The timeframe made an impression on her. What emerged was a commitment to ask herself every morning: What would I be doing today if I had only 37 days left to live? The answers changed her life and led to this new kind of book. Part meditation, part how-to guide, part memoir, Life is a Verb is all heart. Within these pages, Digh identifies six core practices to jump-start a meaningful life: Say Yes, Trust Yourself, Slow Down, Be Generous, Speak Up, and Love More. Within this framework she supplies 37 edgy, funny, and literary life stories, each followed by a 'do it now' 10-minute exercise as well as a practice to try for 37 days - and perhaps the rest of your life.

30 review for Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I'm not a big reader of non-fiction books. And I'm definitely not a reader of self-help books. Yet Life is a Verb is both of these things and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The secret to my enjoyment? After each chapter there are two boxes, one called Action, the other, Movement. I was happily reading along, enjoying Patti Digh's voice and storytelling when I got to the first action box. As I recall, that box told me to set the timer and dance for five minutes. Ummm, no. Not going to happen. I stopped I'm not a big reader of non-fiction books. And I'm definitely not a reader of self-help books. Yet Life is a Verb is both of these things and I thoroughly enjoyed it. The secret to my enjoyment? After each chapter there are two boxes, one called Action, the other, Movement. I was happily reading along, enjoying Patti Digh's voice and storytelling when I got to the first action box. As I recall, that box told me to set the timer and dance for five minutes. Ummm, no. Not going to happen. I stopped reading the book for several days, stymied by my refusal to follow instructions and my inability to keep reading without doing what I'd been told. Then I realized: no one was looking over my shoulder, checking my progress. No one had told me to read this book. It wasn't an assignment. And if I enjoyed Digh's stories and thoughts, I was free to read them and not "take action." The truth of the matter is that this book may change my actions. But I'm a thinker first, a born ponder-er. After lots of that, I'll act. So I read this book and didn't follow a single instruction. That's freedom for a recovering rule-follower like yours truly. Here's why I kept reading: 1) This book is beautiful. It's like reading someone's carefully crafted scrapbook, but with better writing and fewer candid family photos. There's art, there's color. The fonts change and shift based on whose thoughts you are reading. Lovely, moving, funny quotes are scattered throughout. For the visual experience alone, this book is worth your time. 2) Life is a Verb was alternately encouraging and convicting. I would read some chapters and think "Hey! I already do that. That's good." Others? My thoughts were more along the lines of, "Hmmm. Good point. I stink at that. Do I want to do better?" Had the book been just encouraging or just convicting, I would never have finished it. The former makes me feel like the book isn't offering me anything, the latter like I'm a failure. 3) Digh is a lovely and engaging storyteller. If you set aside the self-help portion of the book (as I did), the book reads like a series of personal essays. I found I could relate her stories to my own life and while she and I don't see the world in exactly the same way, she challenged me to think - and I always like a book that makes me think. 4) This was definitely the right book at the right time. January being a time of new beginnings - of looking back and planning forward - makes this book a great read for this month. Reading Digh's words will make you take a look at your life and how you are living it. Are you being as intentional as you'd like? Are you who you want to be? How can you get there? If you're in the mood for a book to ponder, to think about, to let settle into your consciousness, Life is a Verb is worth checking out. Maybe you'll even find yourself grabbing a journal and a pen to do some of those Action boxes. (If so, let me know how that goes...)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Candice Hayden

    Okay, the title sounds like one of those silly, self-help, self-indulgent works that abound in the marketplace. But Patti Digh is different. She moves in. She hangs out on your sofa. She lets her life hang out, warts and all. She makes you feel "normal" because she is so real. She dares to share the messiness of her own life, her own "imperfect, red-headed freckled-ness" that you want her to permanently move into your guest room with her two kids and "Mr. Brilliant", her sweet, innocuous, bookst Okay, the title sounds like one of those silly, self-help, self-indulgent works that abound in the marketplace. But Patti Digh is different. She moves in. She hangs out on your sofa. She lets her life hang out, warts and all. She makes you feel "normal" because she is so real. She dares to share the messiness of her own life, her own "imperfect, red-headed freckled-ness" that you want her to permanently move into your guest room with her two kids and "Mr. Brilliant", her sweet, innocuous, bookstore owner husband. Through all this imperfection, these bumps in the road, the near death experiences on planes next to self-absorbed colleagues, she dares you to embrace it all. With her Mrs. Beasley glasses, she wiggles herself into your heart like a quirky best friend, has the courage to tell you that you have green stuff in your teeth, and still loves you. Unless, of course, you are a self-absorbed lout, and then she has the courage to pull out the big scissors and cut the cord. I adored this book and will invite Patti Digh over sometime so we can take silly pictures of ourselves standing in our own shadows. Read the book and you will "get it".

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Rare is the read that leaves me feeling as though I need to write a THANK YOU note to its author. By the time I was reading the last page, I so wanted to consider the author and I good friends. This book will never stray far from my side. It is everything we ALL need to be reminded of if we truly desire living an intentional life. And its author...Ms. Digh...is a storyteller extraordinaire. Her fluidity, her prose, her sheer understanding of being mindful...beyond impressive. Every chapter held Rare is the read that leaves me feeling as though I need to write a THANK YOU note to its author. By the time I was reading the last page, I so wanted to consider the author and I good friends. This book will never stray far from my side. It is everything we ALL need to be reminded of if we truly desire living an intentional life. And its author...Ms. Digh...is a storyteller extraordinaire. Her fluidity, her prose, her sheer understanding of being mindful...beyond impressive. Every chapter held my complete attention and moved something within. I am grateful, I am more aware, and I highly recommend this book to ANYONE and EVERYONE.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Digh worries that we are not living our lives. This book is her attempt to share six ways of living intentionally: (1) With intensity by saying yes (2) with inclusion by being generous (3) with integrity by speaking up (4) with intimacy by loving more (5) with intuition by trusting yourself and (6) with intention by slowing down. Brilliant. I read this again in December of 2017.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    On the one hand, the author did seem very sheltered, viewing life from quite a privileged position, and her attempts to be open minded and not judge 'different' people seemed a bit patronising sometimes. But on the other hand, the author is incredibly open and honest about her journey, admitting her judgementalism, her struggles. She is also full of enthusiasm. She is who she is, and doesn't pretend to be anyone different. The book wasn't really what I expected - it was more a sort of set of mem On the one hand, the author did seem very sheltered, viewing life from quite a privileged position, and her attempts to be open minded and not judge 'different' people seemed a bit patronising sometimes. But on the other hand, the author is incredibly open and honest about her journey, admitting her judgementalism, her struggles. She is also full of enthusiasm. She is who she is, and doesn't pretend to be anyone different. The book wasn't really what I expected - it was more a sort of set of memoirs, in which the author tells us what she has learnt from various experiences. I found some of the stories made me warm to her, while others were dull. But I hadn't particularly wanted to read a memoir. I was more interested in the idea of 'what would I be doing if I only had 37 days to live?' - but this theme didn't seem to come through very strongly at all. There were random exercises (which I didn't bother doing, because I'm sure I could make up some for myself which I would find more useful) that readers are supposed to do for 37 days, but that is the only reference to 37 days throughout the book. The story that stood out to me the most was of the time when the author was a teenager, working in her school library, and an irate customer comes to her complaining that there are no psychology books. She says she thinks there are some, and the customer complains she has looked and found none at all, and she wants to speak to an adult. The author explains the adults are in a meeting and asks where the customer was looking. Turns out the customer was looking under the letter 's' - and the author responds to this by suggesting that they try the 'alternative spelling', and goes to 'p' and finds the books for the customer. That impressed me - I suppose because I don't know many people who would respond this way. Most would tell the customer (with some satisfaction!) that her spelling was incorrect, and then mock her afterwards behind her back. But this girl responded as she did to allow the customer to save face, and as an adult she says she is glad she did this. (The cynical part of me wonders whether the story is true - I've never heard of libraries filing topics alphabetically! Surely everyone uses the Dewey Decimal System! But still, even if the story is invented - or remembered creatively - it is a good one, that makes a very important point, I think, in a society where people tend to revel in one-upmanship.) As a whole, the book seemed rather haphazard - a haphazard set of memoirs, about the author's own journey through life. Although the book had moments where I warmed to the author, I don't feel inspired to read any more books by her.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jess Michaels

    My original reading was below. I bought in paperback and read slower, savored it more and I love it even more!! I've been on this "happiness" "live a full life" kick, so I picked this book for our book club. I thought a lot of the advice was so great and fun (I was very excited about spatulas for weeks). But I read the thing all in a short period of time, so it also ended up being overwhelming. Bottom line, it's a good book, but buy it in paperback and savor rather than power through.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I love Patti Digh, and appreciate the changes she's brought to my life. I take this book to my own private luncheon at Golden Corral on Tuesdays, and leave feeling nourished on so many levels.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    It took me a long long time to finish this book but I enjoyed the wisdom very much each time I picked it up.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    I needed a kick in the proverbial pants and this book landed in my hands - perhaps the book angels pushed it out, but sometimes a trip to the bookstore reveals just what you need. Realigning self and life are daunting tasks and often we forget where we have landed on the game board. I needed this book to remind me that I was responsible for my own life, my own joy, my own intentions. Patti Digh is good medicine and her sassy questions, suggestions, and methods for awakening art as life/life as a I needed a kick in the proverbial pants and this book landed in my hands - perhaps the book angels pushed it out, but sometimes a trip to the bookstore reveals just what you need. Realigning self and life are daunting tasks and often we forget where we have landed on the game board. I needed this book to remind me that I was responsible for my own life, my own joy, my own intentions. Patti Digh is good medicine and her sassy questions, suggestions, and methods for awakening art as life/life as art were a breath of fresh air. Periodically, I take this book down and open to a random page just for a tune-up. My father used to say that as you age, the grind of the world takes the edge off joy. He would remind me often not to lose the edge and that it would be harder to hone it - boy, I think of that useful nugget of advice often. Sometimes a new whetstone is just the ticket and this book helped me hone my blade and resist the carborundum of life's wear and tear. He used to smile and say, "Illegitimi non carborundum."

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Bails

    I read this book in 2009. I found it at the library. I pretty much read from beginning to end. It's probably intended more for women than men, but when it doesn't necessarily seem applicable, I just move on. I like her lively, personal, quirky style. She tries to give the reader applications. I bought this book as I thought it was one I should own and that I could mark up. I also bought Creative is a Verb because I like her bouncy writing. My daughter would like to write and I want her to read t I read this book in 2009. I found it at the library. I pretty much read from beginning to end. It's probably intended more for women than men, but when it doesn't necessarily seem applicable, I just move on. I like her lively, personal, quirky style. She tries to give the reader applications. I bought this book as I thought it was one I should own and that I could mark up. I also bought Creative is a Verb because I like her bouncy writing. My daughter would like to write and I want her to read these books to give her encouragement and to provide a model. Digh's books have been serious, thought-provoking yet fun to read. They are easy to read but being easy doesn't make them simple. Much like Breathnach's and Cameron's, Lamott's books, her's are encouraging the reader to find his own style, and live the best life immaginable.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    Loved it! Fun, inspirational, encouraging, and uplifting. Patti Digh’s personal stories provide metaphors for the actions she suggests you take at the end of each section. Not everyone will find something in every story that resonates, however those who follow through with the Action and Movement activities are sure to learn a little bit more about themselves. Attitude is everything. Those who want to get something from this book will do so. Those who aren’t in a place where they are willing to tak Loved it! Fun, inspirational, encouraging, and uplifting. Patti Digh’s personal stories provide metaphors for the actions she suggests you take at the end of each section. Not everyone will find something in every story that resonates, however those who follow through with the Action and Movement activities are sure to learn a little bit more about themselves. Attitude is everything. Those who want to get something from this book will do so. Those who aren’t in a place where they are willing to take a look at their lives won’t get anything out of it (but may enjoy the stories nonetheless.) I read it on my Kindle, where the pictures didn’t show up very well. I got a print copy from the library to look at the wonderful collages the author has added. If such things are important to you, you might want to purchase a hard copy (or do what I did and enjoy both!)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Raugust charette

    Meh. The book had a great beginning and I liked the writing. I think I just got bored, but I gave 3 stars because the first half of the book stayed with me. I highlighted, made notes, wrote in the margins... Then I think my life was just too chaotic to really care about the freakin portfolio advice. I was done after that, but finished it just to make sure I didn't miss any nuggets that I couldn't live without.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelly McCloskey-Romero

    I read this book, a section a day, all summer long. It is a beautiful reminder of all that is important in life - connecting with others, being a good and honest person, being creative, being true to oneself - all in an engaging, funny, practical format. I plan to return to it again and again, especially the exercises at the end of each short chapter. This book is truly a gem and I'm so glad that it was at the heart of my summer!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I have to say I like the idea of this book better than the actual book. Not to be petty but I didn't feel like it was that reflective, etc. I didn't feel like it took you deep enough if that makes any sense. I guess I am already "awake" and try to "live intentionally" so it did not give me any "A-has".

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    It was an entertaining read. There were really enlightening passages. My only criticism, sometimes the author's descriptions seemed materialistic instead of aiding the scene. Sometimes that was entertaining, but depending on the message accompanied with the passage it was distracting. Otherwise, I found I was able to relate to most of the passages and felt motivated.

  16. 4 out of 5

    TL

    This is a fun book from a creative, artsy type of author. But the whole vibe of the book seems cliched and old - it's been rehashed too many times. All the graphics in the book were a bit too busy and unappealing for me. Maybe other women really enjoyed this book, but I felt it was just another feel-good, vision board sort of book that's been cluttering bookstore shelves for years.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Rusk

    If I get any more motivated I'll just have to leave the planet! Who needs shrinks, why waste money on hocus-pocus? Get Patti's book, curl up and read it like you mean it. You cannot help but be a different person when you are finished...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pat Edwards

    Best read a little at a time -- not one a day! Maybe one a week. Or maybe it takes longer for me to absorb and practice. A lot of great quotes and useful exercises because we all need more reminders to get out of our ego-heads.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    a good book for those who like journaling and want to keep their "childlike wonder" about them. kinda like SARK but with more guts to it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cat Rayne

    Life is a Verb is a beautiful book, full of inspirational quotes, quirky art and several personal stories by the author. The premise of Patti Digh was formed by a person she knew who was diagnosed with cancer and passed away 37 days later. Her consideration, along with all of us, is we do not know when we are in our Day 38 as it were, and should live our lives fully, and mindfully. The book is designed beautifully, and it will make you think. The exercises are fun, and prompt you to experience l Life is a Verb is a beautiful book, full of inspirational quotes, quirky art and several personal stories by the author. The premise of Patti Digh was formed by a person she knew who was diagnosed with cancer and passed away 37 days later. Her consideration, along with all of us, is we do not know when we are in our Day 38 as it were, and should live our lives fully, and mindfully. The book is designed beautifully, and it will make you think. The exercises are fun, and prompt you to experience life day by day. It was read over a duration of a few months, not in a 37-day timeframe, but still offered important “life lessons” that are good reminders. The companion stories were good, but not being a mother, nor a woman with much maternal instinct, they seemed like the voice was for someone else, someone more like the author, not a general work for everyone

  21. 4 out of 5

    Guida Brown

    I’ve owned this book for years, and I’m now on a quest to write a curriculum to help others live their best lives. This book is a great guide to doing that. I didn’t do the exercises as outlined, one each day, and I was a little disappointed that they focused so much on one activity — journaling. Still, the concepts of the book and how it’s laid out are perfect for anyone who really wants to live life to the fullest. I’m a bit surprised by some of the negative reviews: that it reads like a diary I’ve owned this book for years, and I’m now on a quest to write a curriculum to help others live their best lives. This book is a great guide to doing that. I didn’t do the exercises as outlined, one each day, and I was a little disappointed that they focused so much on one activity — journaling. Still, the concepts of the book and how it’s laid out are perfect for anyone who really wants to live life to the fullest. I’m a bit surprised by some of the negative reviews: that it reads like a diary, for example. Yeah, because it’s broken into THIRTY SEVEN DAYS. That seems pretty obvious from the cover. As self-help books go, I enjoyed it and would highly recommend it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carol Tardiff

    If you're interested in taking a little journey inward and getting some cool ideas on how to expand and grow get this book. Be prepared to, at the very least, be wholly entertained by Patti's short stories, drawn from her own experiences. Patti's sense of humor, acquired wisdom and creative outlook on life draw you in, sometimes shake you up but most of all, make you want to jump up and grab your own lovely life by the horns. There are exercises at the end of each chapter... do them or don't... If you're interested in taking a little journey inward and getting some cool ideas on how to expand and grow get this book. Be prepared to, at the very least, be wholly entertained by Patti's short stories, drawn from her own experiences. Patti's sense of humor, acquired wisdom and creative outlook on life draw you in, sometimes shake you up but most of all, make you want to jump up and grab your own lovely life by the horns. There are exercises at the end of each chapter... do them or don't... it's still very much worth the read. Bonus: sprinkled throughout the book are awesome little quotes that you will want to copy and paste all over your walls!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    I actually didn't finish this book, it wasn't for me. I read it out of curiosity on recommendation and I think I couldn't fully appreciate it because it's not where I am in life right now. I agree with Gail's comments completely. However, it is in a great format that I think all self-help books should follow- easy to hold and lots of space in the margins to write notes.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    A friend recommended this to me saying that the exercises were fun and a great inspiration for writing (I've been in a writing rut for a while). This book is beautiful, and I'm sure it can be really helpful to someone with more time or who just clicks with the book more than I did. The book is fine, just not quite for me and where I'm at right now.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ross

    This the book we invited our learners to read this month for Community of Learning. I really enjoyed the narrative, prompts to reflect, and encouraging acts for the next 37 days. There are too many gems to name and the text could be used as writing prompts for middle and high school students. Powerful!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tami Sparks

    I really enjoyed this book. It makes you stop and think about life and each other. I did not do all the writing exercises and 37 day challenges at time of reading, however I am now going back and taking on several of the challenges over the next year. Some great life lessons in here!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Hon

    I had so much fun with this book!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lee F.

    This book is to savor and reread...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I put this on my to-read list because I loved the title. On a trip to the library some time ago, I found it in the online "card catalog" and noted the call number. It wasn't on the shelf at that time. My latest trip to the library - I found it on the shelf and brought it home. I wasn't really in the mood for a self-help book. But this one is beautiful. There are the usual self-help stories with morals. The illustrations were all done by readers of her blog, 37 Days. I guess it's time to explain I put this on my to-read list because I loved the title. On a trip to the library some time ago, I found it in the online "card catalog" and noted the call number. It wasn't on the shelf at that time. My latest trip to the library - I found it on the shelf and brought it home. I wasn't really in the mood for a self-help book. But this one is beautiful. There are the usual self-help stories with morals. The illustrations were all done by readers of her blog, 37 Days. I guess it's time to explain why 37 days. Because that's how long somebody very important to her took to die, from diagnosis to dearly departed. Now, back to the illustrations. Some were pretty cool, but after a while it started to bug me that every one included text - the title of the blog-of-the-day - and the mantra of 37 days. It began to seem obsessive. Also very left-brained. Several of the stories were familiar themes. Often I knew what the moral would be as soon as the story began. That's not necessarily a bad thing. A few stories stood out: Save Face for Someone Else - at age 12, holding down the desk at the library while the regular staff was in a meeting. How do you deal with a customer who is angry that she can't find any books on psychology? And you discover she is searching the "S" drawer. Close the Boardroom Closet told about how she cleaned her desk. I've done something similar, but her outcome was more outrageous than mine. The book is also chock-full of inspirational quotes. I was enjoying the one that read "A ship in port is safe, but that's not what ships are built for." Then I gasped in recognition - the quote was attributed to Grace Hopper. Check out her Wikipedia entry; she's a remarkable woman. The assignments did not appeal to me. Nearly all of the "Action Items" called for you to do timed free writing - and the topics to write on were very narrowly defined. If I'm going to spend time writing, I'd like it to be topics of my own choice. The "Movement" suggestions were just long-term assignments to apply the moral of that particular blog post. One exception - she suggested doing 37 squares and filling in one a day with an illustration of the word NO, as in deciding not to do what everybody expects of you. I might actually do something along those lines, although it won't be for 37 Days. The book is structured with 6 themes (each one starts with the letter I, or the syllable in.) There are six stories for each theme. Then there's a closing story to wrap it all up. And the assignments call for 37 days of repetition. Nope, I don't think I will. There were parts I liked, and a lot of really good messages. But not what I happen to need right now. And when I'm ready for a self-help book, I'll probably go back to The Happiness Project.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book was ok. For me personally, it didn't live up to the promise of the introductory remarks, but there are good lessons to be gleaned from the author's experiences. In Digh's own words, "As I wrote these stories for my daughters, patterns and through-lines started appearing, one after another. Finally I stepped back to see the whole: Six practices for living more intentionally emerged from my three-year exploration. This 'guidebook for living' outlines those six practices - intensity, incl This book was ok. For me personally, it didn't live up to the promise of the introductory remarks, but there are good lessons to be gleaned from the author's experiences. In Digh's own words, "As I wrote these stories for my daughters, patterns and through-lines started appearing, one after another. Finally I stepped back to see the whole: Six practices for living more intentionally emerged from my three-year exploration. This 'guidebook for living' outlines those six practices - intensity, inclusion, integrity, intimacy, intuition, and intention - challenging us to live them now, before it's too late." The book's vignettes are accordingly divided into six sections, one for each of her practices for living. It is indeed interesting to consider how we might live out our days were we cognizant of the fact that we have, say, only 37 more. At some point, each of us will be faced with this reality, though of course we won't know it. That time might even be now. Being mindful and living intentionally are truly admirable and important goals that I can wholeheartedly embrace. However, I felt a definite disconnect between some of Digh's stories and day-to-day reality. Although her written illustrations were often brilliant (for example, using the true story of her Ford Bronco's turn signals failing without her knowledge to express a very real concern that often our true intentions go unknown by those around us), the 'Action' and 'Movement' activities at the end of each story seemed mildly interesting at best, time wasting at worst. Several of her vignettes seemed to be reaching or almost contrived in an effort to lead neatly to the life lesson she had preconceived. That being said, I had an easy time reading the book all the way through and I enjoyed many of the thought-provoking metaphors. Note: I read this on my iPad via the Kindle for iPad app. Though they didn't interfere with my reading experience, there were many typos. The images and quotations - and the traditional book has many - often interrupted the flow of the writing due to odd placement and formatting. I would venture to guess that the manuscript was put through some sort of automatic converter that made the book viewable on Kindle, without much time and attention given to the unique formatting needs of a digital reader.

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