counter create hit Up In Arms: How The Bundy Family Hijacked Federal Lands, Outfoxed the Federal Government, and Ignited America's Patriot Militia Movement - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Up In Arms: How The Bundy Family Hijacked Federal Lands, Outfoxed the Federal Government, and Ignited America's Patriot Militia Movement

Availability: Ready to download

“IT’S TIME! They have my cattle and now they have one of my boys. Range War begins tomorrow at Bundy Ranch.” These words, pounded out on a laptop at Cliven Bundy’s besieged Nevada ranch on April 6, 2014, ignited a new American revolution. Across the country, a certain type of citizen snapped to attention: This was the flashpoint the they’d been waiting for, a chance to help “IT’S TIME! They have my cattle and now they have one of my boys. Range War begins tomorrow at Bundy Ranch.” These words, pounded out on a laptop at Cliven Bundy’s besieged Nevada ranch on April 6, 2014, ignited a new American revolution. Across the country, a certain type of citizen snapped to attention: This was the flashpoint the they’d been waiting for, a chance to help a fellow American stand up to a tyrannical and corrupt federal government. Up in Arms chronicles how an isolated clan of desert-dwelling Mormons became the guiding light—and then the outright leaders—of America’s Patriot movement. The nation was riveted in 2014, when hundreds of armed Bundy supporters forced federal agents to abandon a court-ordered cattle roundup in the largest gathering of government-loathing organizations the FBI had ever witnessed. Then, in 2016, Ammon Bundy, one of Cliven’s 13 children, led a 41-day armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. Those events and the subsequent shootings, arrests, and trials captured headlines, but they’re just part of a story that has never been fully told. John Temple, award-winning journalist and author of American Pain, gives readers an unprecedented and objective look at the real people and families at the heart of this highly publicized standoff. Eye-opening and instantly gripping, Up in Arms offers a propulsive and thoroughly researched narrative populated by rifle-toting cowboys, apocalyptic militiamen, undercover infiltrators, and the devout and charismatic Bundys themselves. In its main storyline, the book chronicles Ammon Bundy’s transformation from successful Phoenix businessman to the leader of an armed insurgency. In engrossing and plainspoken prose, Temple uses the Bundy family’s story to illuminate the rise of the Patriot militia movement in America. A seasoned investigative reporter, Temple embedded himself in a corner of the West where many citizens believe they’re treated like colonial subjects, not full-fledged Americans. Neither mainstream nor conservative media outlets have contextualized the religious, political, environmental, and economic factors, decades in the making, that set the stage for these events. Up In Arms presents the Bundys and their supporters as they truly are: neither violent criminals nor folk heroes, but a diverse collection of American rebels who believe government overreach justifies the taking up of arms.


Compare

“IT’S TIME! They have my cattle and now they have one of my boys. Range War begins tomorrow at Bundy Ranch.” These words, pounded out on a laptop at Cliven Bundy’s besieged Nevada ranch on April 6, 2014, ignited a new American revolution. Across the country, a certain type of citizen snapped to attention: This was the flashpoint the they’d been waiting for, a chance to help “IT’S TIME! They have my cattle and now they have one of my boys. Range War begins tomorrow at Bundy Ranch.” These words, pounded out on a laptop at Cliven Bundy’s besieged Nevada ranch on April 6, 2014, ignited a new American revolution. Across the country, a certain type of citizen snapped to attention: This was the flashpoint the they’d been waiting for, a chance to help a fellow American stand up to a tyrannical and corrupt federal government. Up in Arms chronicles how an isolated clan of desert-dwelling Mormons became the guiding light—and then the outright leaders—of America’s Patriot movement. The nation was riveted in 2014, when hundreds of armed Bundy supporters forced federal agents to abandon a court-ordered cattle roundup in the largest gathering of government-loathing organizations the FBI had ever witnessed. Then, in 2016, Ammon Bundy, one of Cliven’s 13 children, led a 41-day armed takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. Those events and the subsequent shootings, arrests, and trials captured headlines, but they’re just part of a story that has never been fully told. John Temple, award-winning journalist and author of American Pain, gives readers an unprecedented and objective look at the real people and families at the heart of this highly publicized standoff. Eye-opening and instantly gripping, Up in Arms offers a propulsive and thoroughly researched narrative populated by rifle-toting cowboys, apocalyptic militiamen, undercover infiltrators, and the devout and charismatic Bundys themselves. In its main storyline, the book chronicles Ammon Bundy’s transformation from successful Phoenix businessman to the leader of an armed insurgency. In engrossing and plainspoken prose, Temple uses the Bundy family’s story to illuminate the rise of the Patriot militia movement in America. A seasoned investigative reporter, Temple embedded himself in a corner of the West where many citizens believe they’re treated like colonial subjects, not full-fledged Americans. Neither mainstream nor conservative media outlets have contextualized the religious, political, environmental, and economic factors, decades in the making, that set the stage for these events. Up In Arms presents the Bundys and their supporters as they truly are: neither violent criminals nor folk heroes, but a diverse collection of American rebels who believe government overreach justifies the taking up of arms.

30 review for Up In Arms: How The Bundy Family Hijacked Federal Lands, Outfoxed the Federal Government, and Ignited America's Patriot Militia Movement

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Became the guiding light? Who the heck are you kidding? They ravaged an ancient Native American depository. Tossed them around like skittles. All those barstards cared about was, what can we get. That's it. They rented land. Not free land. Government owned, let your livestock graze and pay a minimal fee. Minimal. Take it to your own land, and try to pay for their feed, and you'll go broke. See, I may be a democrat, but that minimal fee you should be paying, goes back into land development and re Became the guiding light? Who the heck are you kidding? They ravaged an ancient Native American depository. Tossed them around like skittles. All those barstards cared about was, what can we get. That's it. They rented land. Not free land. Government owned, let your livestock graze and pay a minimal fee. Minimal. Take it to your own land, and try to pay for their feed, and you'll go broke. See, I may be a democrat, but that minimal fee you should be paying, goes back into land development and resources. Where the Bundys messes up though, "in my eyes," were their willful disregard of everyone but themselves. I'd have been pleased to see the F.B.I. go in a shoot all the Bastard up! Really, F.B.I? You definitely screwed up Ruby Ridge...I lived 3 miles down the highway back then, but you give these jackasses a pass? Also, boo! America's Patriot Movement sounds grand, doesn't it? It's not. Racist, hateful s.o.b.'s who don't want to pay anything. Let's send them to a Chinese reeducation camp! Boo and hiss to this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    I really didn’t expect to like this book, but I was drawn into it and read it right through. It’s quite a saga about a ranch family in Nevada that’s been on the land for generations and gets into a dispute with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) over their cattle being on protected land, as it has been forever. It turns out that 80% of Nevada at that time controlled by the government, either part of a park or under BLM. Hard to believe. It gets pretty involved so I won’t go into the particulars I really didn’t expect to like this book, but I was drawn into it and read it right through. It’s quite a saga about a ranch family in Nevada that’s been on the land for generations and gets into a dispute with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) over their cattle being on protected land, as it has been forever. It turns out that 80% of Nevada at that time controlled by the government, either part of a park or under BLM. Hard to believe. It gets pretty involved so I won’t go into the particulars but it becomes a very heated situation when the BLM decides to show up to take the whole herd. They bring an entire command center and all kinds of agents and equipment, trucks, mobile pens, this is a multi-million project here just to grab farmer Bundy’s cattle. Cliven Bundy reaches out to his large family first and they all show up to circle the wagons and then they put out the word on their ranch website. The word gets out, and Cliven gets a call from a man who started a small militia to help people in his situation, and Cliven was asked if he wanted their help. He agreed after his son was roughed up and arrested. So the militia put out the word, and other groups passed it on. People from all over began leaving their homes and going by any means they could, heading for the Bundy ranch. You can see the buildup and problems coming already. I found it to be a well-researched book, and I enjoyed the writing. It certainly kept my interest all the way through. This is a good book for those that enjoy David and Goliath stories about people with a beef against the government. I liked the aspect of friends and neighbors who came together to help one another in a time of need, though I’m sure there will be those who feel that Bundy was in the wrong. I just enjoyed the book. My thanks for the advance electronic copy that was provided by NetGalley, author John Temple, and the publisher for my fair review. My BookZone blog: https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hollee Temple

    Obviously I have a personal connection to this book, but even if you don't, I believe the meticulous reporting and expert storytelling will blow you away. Consider this early review by Anthony Swofford, bestselling author of Jarhead: A Marine’s Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles: “With Up in Arms, John Temple delivers another fierce and searching portrait of an American sub-culture. His last book, American Pain, opened up the vault on painkiller pill mills, delivering a prescient harbin Obviously I have a personal connection to this book, but even if you don't, I believe the meticulous reporting and expert storytelling will blow you away. Consider this early review by Anthony Swofford, bestselling author of Jarhead: A Marine’s Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles: “With Up in Arms, John Temple delivers another fierce and searching portrait of an American sub-culture. His last book, American Pain, opened up the vault on painkiller pill mills, delivering a prescient harbinger of the opioid crisis. Now, his new and piercing look at the Bundy clan and the wider Patriot militia culture is a must-read for anyone trying to understand the continuing schism between rural and urban America.” So yeah, what he said!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Randal White

    An excellent examination of the "Sagebrush Rebellion" that is occurring today in the western United States. The author tells the story through the eyes of the Bundy family, ranchers in Nevada. Some ranchers/farmers/citizens of the western states are rebelling against the fact that the U.S. Government owns a huge portion of the land in these states. For example, in Nevada, the Federal Government owns 85% of the land. The land is controlled by various National Parks, National monuments, Wilderness An excellent examination of the "Sagebrush Rebellion" that is occurring today in the western United States. The author tells the story through the eyes of the Bundy family, ranchers in Nevada. Some ranchers/farmers/citizens of the western states are rebelling against the fact that the U.S. Government owns a huge portion of the land in these states. For example, in Nevada, the Federal Government owns 85% of the land. The land is controlled by various National Parks, National monuments, Wilderness areas, and by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The problem, as the ranchers see it, is that they cannot utilize the land as they want for grazing cattle. The government's position is that the land should be managed to prevent overgrazing and overuse of the available water. To add fuel to the fire, the government further limited land usage when it was discovered that certain rare plants and animals were on the land, and wanted to ensure their survival. Creatures like the desert tortoise (Nevada), the spotted owl (Oregon), and the Snake River salmon (Washington). To add to the conflict, many "Patriot" groups have joined with the ranchers to fight the government. Some of these groups were civilian paramilitary outfits, like the Militia of Montana and the Michigan Militia. These groups believe that Americans are losing control over the government to globalist forces. Life was changing, and, they felt, not for the better. By joining these groups of like-minded people and arming themselves, they felt like it was a way to regain control and to be part of something important. These groups have been around a long time. For example, the John Birch Society in the 1950's, and the Posse Comitatus in the 1970's. Enter Cliven Bundy. Bundy was a Nevada rancher who grazed his cattle on his land, as well as on BLM land. Which was allowed, as long as he followed BLM rules and paid for the usage of the land. Bundy strongly felt that the Federal government had no say over the use of the land, and that the proper authorities should be county government. Bundy stopped paying his BLM rental fees. This went on for years, with the fees and the nonpayment fines growing and growing. Finally, the BLM told Bundy that he had to remove his cattle from their lands. Bundy came up with the conclusion that the federal government was not allowed to own any land. He believed the Constitution was clear in this fact, specifically settling on a passage called the "Enclave Clause". However, the courts, all the way up through the Supreme Court, did not agree. Things were building to a head. Bundy would not budge in his beliefs. Also, the Patriot groups were growing, due to the election of Barack Obama as President. Before Obama's election, there were 148 Patriot groups in operation. In 2012, there were 1,360! And then along came Alex Jones, the voice behind "Infowars", an ultra conservative radio show. Jones took up Bundy's cause. He said that the Federal authorities were trying to instigate a confrontation with Bundy, With the result being Federal agents being killed in the confrontation, which would then allow Obama to declare martial law and bring in UN troops to run the U.S. His words caused the Patriot members to flock to Bundy's ranch, to protect him. There were hundreds of people camped out at the Bundy ranch to protect him and his cattle. Bundy began believing that he was the person chosen by God to save the United States from destruction. He surrounded himself with the Patriot group members, using them as bodyguards against the Feds. He was further encouraged by statements from U.S. Senator's Dean Heller and Ted Cruz. Cruz actually blamed Obama. The BLM then made a major miscalculation. It sent a man named Dan Love to resolve the situation. Love conducted a militaristic "round-up" of the Bundy's cattle from the BLM land. Overly aggressive, macho, sexist, and tone-deaf to common sense, Love triggered a armed standoff between the outnumbered BLM agents and the Bundy group. With the result being the BLM backed down. The book does an excellent job of describing the tense standoff. Then Bundy himself made some real bone-headed mistakes. He made some very racist remarks to the media. Which resulted in people turning against him and his crusade. It was a real mess. Things settled down for awhile. Then came the next case to become the Patriot's cause. Dwight and Steven Hammond were ranchers in Oregon. They came under the BLM's gaze for starting fires and poaching deer. The Patriot's (and the Bundy's) rallied to their defense. The result being another armed standoff. This one after the Patriot's took over the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge offices in Oregon. Cliven Bundy's son, Ammon, became a leader in this standoff. Ammon must have had some real mental problems. He thought that God was working through him to accomplish His purposes, so that Americans would have something to pass onto their children. The Malheur occupation did not become as big a cause as the Bundy ranch occupation. Only about 40 people were occupying the refuge. The government had learned since the Bundy ranch debacle. It took a more "hands-off" policy. It settled in for a long siege, the results being that the occupiers eventually gave up. Then came all the court cases. The Federal prosecution team decided that they could not use a lot of the evidence they had obtained, as it was poisoned by the conduct of the BLM agent Dan Love. The presiding Judge found out about this evidence, let the defense use it, The end results, I will leave untold, as it would spoil the book for the reader. I do like one of the statements at the end of the book. It sums up the situation then, as well as today's current news. "Paranoia and anger are contagious, and when they're fed by misinformation and misguided emotional appeals, everybody loses". That should be the advice we all could use today. An excellent book. I highly recommend to everyone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    HR-ML

    Cliven Bundy and 2 of his older sons Ammon & Ryan started a range war in Nevada. The US government owned 80% of Nevada's land. The US Park Service used some, as did the US military. The US, via the Bureau of Land Mgt (BLM), charged grazing rights for cattle and other ranchers. Cliven stopped paying this charge. He owned BLM $350K but over 20 yrs, with interest and penalties, It came to $1M. The case went to federal court. BLM estimated Cliven owned 900 head of cattle. Cliven mixed his Mormon belief Cliven Bundy and 2 of his older sons Ammon & Ryan started a range war in Nevada. The US government owned 80% of Nevada's land. The US Park Service used some, as did the US military. The US, via the Bureau of Land Mgt (BLM), charged grazing rights for cattle and other ranchers. Cliven stopped paying this charge. He owned BLM $350K but over 20 yrs, with interest and penalties, It came to $1M. The case went to federal court. BLM estimated Cliven owned 900 head of cattle. Cliven mixed his Mormon beliefs + his limited under- standing of the US Constitution to conclude the US government had no authority over him. He voiced ONLY the county sheriff had authority. The BLM commander Dan Love, was determined to round up and remove Cliven's cows to settle his debt. IMO, it seemed Cliven & Dan ea. had a male pissing contest to show how strong/ stubborn he was. Couldn't the BLM have put a lien on his property? or used some other means? This confrontation seemed unnecessary. The Bundy's used FB & other social media to champion their Patriot cause. Militias, such as Oath Keepers and others & Operation Mutual Aid & individuals flocked to the Bundy's ranch to support the cause. At times tension prevailed on strategy & how aggressive should the Bundy group be? The dispute was resolved, w/o injury or death. A few cows died- but man is always right? Ammon later read of the Hammonds in Oregon, a father & son, convicted to serve prison sentences, and slated to return to prison. Ammon saw a Patriot issue, but the Hammonds said, no thanks, we don't need your help. Ammon went anyway. He, his brother Ryan & their contingent took over a Oregon federal nature preserve for birds. They tried to stir up another range war, un- related to the Hammonds. This invasion of the federal nat. preserve resulted in 1 dead, 1 wounded & 16 people charged. This occupation lasted 41 days total. The Bundys were strongly opposed to the feds, there- fore they'd refuse: a Small Business Association loan? (Ammon already had one) & if qualified, they'd refuse Veteran's or Social Security benefits? Medicare? a clinic w/ federal funding? The Bundy fam. needed a good lawyer to get them up-to-speed on how the law really worked. Some of the players in this true story used the same language & posturing as as those who stormed the US Capitol 3 wks ago. Chilling.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Gail

    I’m basically in the worst reading slump of recent memory (thanks a lot, 80 hour work weeks.) So I’m setting this aside for hopefully another day, when I’ll pick it back up and feel the same spark I felt in the beginning. Thanks to Edelweiss and BenBella books for the drc!

  7. 5 out of 5

    C. S.

    I approach news stories about militia movements, survivalists, and sovereign citizens with the same fascination some people have for cults. I was too young to be consciously aware of Ruby Ridge, Waco, and the Oklahoma City Bombing, but I knew enough for those names to infuse me with nameless dread well before I found out what they actually meant. They hold a uniquely 90s sort of grunge dystopia, so when in 2014 some rancher who didn't want to pay his due held the nation breathless and those fami I approach news stories about militia movements, survivalists, and sovereign citizens with the same fascination some people have for cults. I was too young to be consciously aware of Ruby Ridge, Waco, and the Oklahoma City Bombing, but I knew enough for those names to infuse me with nameless dread well before I found out what they actually meant. They hold a uniquely 90s sort of grunge dystopia, so when in 2014 some rancher who didn't want to pay his due held the nation breathless and those familiar, dreaded names were whispered in the background, I was hooked. This is why I was so interested when I read the description of this book. I suppose the words "outfoxed" and "ignited" in the subtitle should have tipped me off that this book would have a much more generous view to the Bundys than I will ever have. In the opening chapters of Up In Arms, Temple paints a dramatically vague portrait of the people surrounding the Bundys that, while not in the strict editorial sense, left me with an overwhelming impression of passive-voiced language. Bad things happened, the text seems to say, around which the Bundys were present. "Few knew each other before April 2014. Some, like Eric Parker and LaVoy Finicum, stayed for a few hours. Others, like Booda Cavalier, remained for days, weeks, months. Some carried secrets that they didn’t want their new compatriots to discover, and some told lies. They’d all lived their lives mostly outside the spotlight, mostly on the margins of society. Before long, one by one, they would all become renowned or notorious members of the movement. Before long, several would be locked up, and three would be dead." As a narrative framing device, I have to admit, this passage works excellently. However, perhaps in an attempt to remain neutral, the text never really loses this sense of consequences being disconnected from the actions taken directly by the Bundys. Maybe it's just that the book is one very long assemblage of facts, that Temple has no message, and the narrative he attempts to frame the book with in the absence of one simply lends itself to that interpretation, but the Bundys come off more as the purest distillation of an archetype rather than just being parodies of themselves. That leaves insightful statements like the following to just kind of dangle there on their own, disconnected from any context relating to the Bundys: "Paranoia and anger are contagious, and when they’re fed by misinformation and misguided emotional appeals, everybody loses."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    This fascinating read that raises serious questions about America. A true story involving Tasers, hand guns, rifles, medieval broad swords, Cowboys and Youtubers, spies and double agents, and murder. A car chase in a National Park, gun fights, and roadside press conferences, surveillance helicopters, ATV's and pickup trucks. Who are these people who turned back the government with force, and walked free in court? How could this happen? There is so much more behind the “armed trespasser” narrativ This fascinating read that raises serious questions about America. A true story involving Tasers, hand guns, rifles, medieval broad swords, Cowboys and Youtubers, spies and double agents, and murder. A car chase in a National Park, gun fights, and roadside press conferences, surveillance helicopters, ATV's and pickup trucks. Who are these people who turned back the government with force, and walked free in court? How could this happen? There is so much more behind the “armed trespasser” narrative that defined this story in the headlines. Temple was the perfect author to flesh it all out. John Temple’s last project examined the opioid crisis, parallel to the story of a pain clinic in Fort Lauderdale called American Pain. That story centered around a clinic ran by a stripper, a few wanna-be gangsters, shady doctors, and the byproducts: junkies, and lots of money. It is a rock and roll crime tale in the fast lane, fit for the big screen. The story is rich in detail, Italian sports cars interwoven with cold facts of the pharmaceutical industry, and Big Pharma’s influence on our government and culture in general. The timing was right, and recent victories in court and the public opinion have validated the main points of Temple’s last work. While written in a similar style, Up in Arms is more complex: American Pain’s focal points and overlying message are obvious: most readers will not feel emotional connection to the main characters, but all agree that the opioid crisis is, simply put, just that. Up in Arms is different. The reader may or may not truly love or hate Ammon Bundy or Levoy Finnicum. The reader may or may not believe in the mission of government conservation projects. Getting deeper to what the message of what Up in Arms is really about, at a macro level, is something different for everyone; what does being American actually mean? You have to read the book yourself, and then decide. There is no right or wrong answer. Temple does a masterful job painting the picture of exactly what happened during a handful of events that took place in Nevada, Oregon, and elsewhere throughout the past decade. These events, which garnered selective national attention, are part of a long running series of conflicts known collectively as the “Range Wars”. People of all types of backgrounds and views will enjoy this book, and learn something from it. It tells the story of a little known part of our American history that is, and will always be, ongoing. My biggest critique of this work is also a testament to its strength as a piece of literature: I still don’t know where the author stands on these issues, politically or morally. The Ruby Ridge and Waco incidents are glossed over; however, library shelves are filled with books and documentaries about these topics. Examining them would have detracted from the readability of Up in Arms. Hopefully some readers of Up in Arms will be inspired to dig a little deeper into these events, and try to understand why some men and women decided they would rather die than let the Bureau of Land Management remove the Bundy cattle. Some have compared Temple's writing style to Hiaasen, which I think is a fair comparison, in terms of the presentation of the story lines. But the topic, mood, and identity of this work are unique to John Temple. He writes about real life suspense, emotion, life and death while simultaneously examining one of the hot button topics of this generation. Temple is able to do so while maintaining virtually invisible, not once injecting his opinion or perceptions. Overall, I would say the work is more like that of a sober Hunter Thompson, except Hunter would have written the story through his own eyes, with Hunter as a main character. Temple puts you there by yourself, and leaves you wondering what he thinks, and probably what you think as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Marricco

    This was a very interesting book to read. I kept shaking my head in disbelief of some of the things I read. We truly live in a very crazy world now.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Colleen DeHart

    I have to admit when I first heard of the topic of this book I wasn't very excited. Nothing about this screamed something I wanted to read. But, when I saw that John Temple had written it I thought it was worth a chance. His past books have always been so well-researched, engaging, and frankly very eye-opening to parts of our world that I knew about but didn't really KNOW. Sticking with his knack for the written word, this story grabbed me just a few pages in and kept my attention throughout. I I have to admit when I first heard of the topic of this book I wasn't very excited. Nothing about this screamed something I wanted to read. But, when I saw that John Temple had written it I thought it was worth a chance. His past books have always been so well-researched, engaging, and frankly very eye-opening to parts of our world that I knew about but didn't really KNOW. Sticking with his knack for the written word, this story grabbed me just a few pages in and kept my attention throughout. I strongly recommend you give this one a try, even if you are on the fence. You won't regret it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    An Inside Look at Issues Behind the News I had read a little about the Bundy family and the Patriot Militia Movement in the newspaper before reading UP IN ARMS but knew few details or background. John Temple is a storyteller and pulls the reader into the drama and lives of the key people in these stories. Like any reader, I tested this book with a chapter or two. Temple’s excellent writing pulled me into the book and I was hooked—and read to the end of the book. In the back of the book, Temple do An Inside Look at Issues Behind the News I had read a little about the Bundy family and the Patriot Militia Movement in the newspaper before reading UP IN ARMS but knew few details or background. John Temple is a storyteller and pulls the reader into the drama and lives of the key people in these stories. Like any reader, I tested this book with a chapter or two. Temple’s excellent writing pulled me into the book and I was hooked—and read to the end of the book. In the back of the book, Temple documents his sources of information and his journalistic skills. I enjoyed UP IN ARMS and recommend it. W. Terry Whalin is an editor & the author of more than 60 books Straight Talk From the Editor

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

    The author's painstaking research and attention to detail is obvious in the writing of this book. There were many facts that I only discovered after reading this! The author's painstaking research and attention to detail is obvious in the writing of this book. There were many facts that I only discovered after reading this!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    It can be hard to understand a point of view that is very different than yours. The Bundys, who lead two different events where they tried to "take down" the Bureau of Land Management, have a very specific interpretation of the Constitution that makes them believe the Federal Government cannot legally own land. This is at the core of their civil disobedience. This book made their background and beliefs clear, and details the standoff at the Bundy Ranch and the occupation of the Malheur Refuge. It It can be hard to understand a point of view that is very different than yours. The Bundys, who lead two different events where they tried to "take down" the Bureau of Land Management, have a very specific interpretation of the Constitution that makes them believe the Federal Government cannot legally own land. This is at the core of their civil disobedience. This book made their background and beliefs clear, and details the standoff at the Bundy Ranch and the occupation of the Malheur Refuge. It fills in the details of how others got involved, with a wide range of reasons. Some saw it as a way to incite the revolution they wanted to ignite, others as part of their cowboy/frontier heritage, some as part of the right wing conspiracy that the Feds are all evil. It also tells the story of how quickly the story can be seized and shaped by others. My point of view is quite different from those described in the book, but I have a better understanding of the ideas and emotions that are animating the right, the libertarians, and the militia movements.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Bonnstetter

    John Temple delivers both a beautifully written narrative and thought provoking prose with “Up In Arms.” With characters that are carefully drawn and multidimensional, he takes his readers into a world of government defiance defined by both political and religious dogma and fueled by the internet. He lets his readers try to understand the motivation of this group of interesting and colorful characters, as well as the people who were tasked with squelching their cause. Are the Bundys and their fo John Temple delivers both a beautifully written narrative and thought provoking prose with “Up In Arms.” With characters that are carefully drawn and multidimensional, he takes his readers into a world of government defiance defined by both political and religious dogma and fueled by the internet. He lets his readers try to understand the motivation of this group of interesting and colorful characters, as well as the people who were tasked with squelching their cause. Are the Bundys and their followers staunch Constitutionalists, a loose knit group of rebellious loners looking for a cause, or something else? That, along with the righteousness of their actions, is for the reader to decide. “Up In Arms” is rich in context and detail. Whether you followed the Bundys’ stand-offs in the news or this is all news to you, once you begin this journey, you are not going to want to put this book down. It is entertainment and food for thought.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth Livingstone

    I felt my own values "rattling around," seeking their fit in the landscape. Definitely worth reading. I felt my own values "rattling around," seeking their fit in the landscape. Definitely worth reading.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Kennedy

    I remember the Bundy Ranch standoff only vaguely. I read a few articles about it, but mostly skipped over the whole incident thinking it had nothing to do with me or my part of the country. Just another bunch of wackos like those in Waco, I thought. But John Temple has changed all that for me. Mr. Temple has written a page-turning account of the "range wars" that simmer between ranchers and the federal government. Cliven Bundy, a Nevada rancher, ignited a tense standoff with the Bureau of Land Ma I remember the Bundy Ranch standoff only vaguely. I read a few articles about it, but mostly skipped over the whole incident thinking it had nothing to do with me or my part of the country. Just another bunch of wackos like those in Waco, I thought. But John Temple has changed all that for me. Mr. Temple has written a page-turning account of the "range wars" that simmer between ranchers and the federal government. Cliven Bundy, a Nevada rancher, ignited a tense standoff with the Bureau of Land Management in 2014 after years of not paying his cattle grazing fees, claiming that the federal government had no Constitutional right to own or manage the land. The amount of research the author did is staggering. But what really impressed me is Mr. Temple's ability to articulate the views of the main players without judging them. These are marginalized groups many (most?) people would consider nut jobs. Survivalists, fundamentalist Mormons, self-styled militias, ex-military extremists, so-called Patriots. I had never heard the word Patriot used this way, as an umbrella term uniting people who share a contempt for what they believe to be an overreaching federal government and, in service of the cause, arm themselves to the teeth. The Bundy range war -- fueled by outrage on the internet -- provided the perfect flashpoint for bringing these fringe groups together in a cause they'd been itching for. Frankly, these groups are scary. It's to Mr. Temple's credit that he doesn't paint them as caricatures. Because he acts as an objective observer, you come to understand, if never condone, their actions. The book segues into a second standoff in which the Patriots, led by Bundy family members, come to the aid of a family in Oregon, whose father and son were found guilty of setting fire to federal land and sentenced to jail terms. This was one more incident that I read about only in passing. Although Mr. Temple's book allows me to understand the motivation of these groups, I came away from these two incidents with no sympathy for the instigators, but a deep sorrow for the families they destroyed, particularly their own. Wives and children were left to fend for themselves as the men depleted the family savings, left their businesses to fail, and for some, went off to jail or died. If not for a controversy in my own backyard, I might not have had any understanding of the depth of commitment these people had to their cause. In the last few years, a gas company has been trying to build a pipeline through the countryside surrounding my town, even through protected wetlands. Homeowners and environmentalists have fought back in court and are standing guard at their homes, blocking company surveyors from stepping onto their properties. If the company is allowed to build its pipeline, it will have the right of eminent domain -- it could legally seize property and no one could do anything about it. I haven't seen anyone brandishing guns around here, but I can see why it would make you want to.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura Piercy

    I loved this book.  I was an instant fan of John Temple after reading American Pain (about the opioid crisis), and though it may not seem so, this topic is JUST AS relevant in today's society.  It's a fascinating story - and written with such detail and impartiality.  It's frightening to think that the events described therein may have inspired others to take the law - and others' lives - into their own hands.  My favorite quote: "Paranoia and anger are contagious, and when they're fed by misinf I loved this book.  I was an instant fan of John Temple after reading American Pain (about the opioid crisis), and though it may not seem so, this topic is JUST AS relevant in today's society.  It's a fascinating story - and written with such detail and impartiality.  It's frightening to think that the events described therein may have inspired others to take the law - and others' lives - into their own hands.  My favorite quote: "Paranoia and anger are contagious, and when they're fed by misinformation and misguided emotional appeals, everybody loses."  This is a must-read!

  18. 5 out of 5

    James Robert

    I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I opened this book. The Bundy family saga had seemingly passed a year or two back, and while the occasional fact still bounced around in my brain, what I remembered most were the images. Men and women gave weathered looks from under Stetson hats, gave speeches in front of American flags, and gazed at the horizon from horseback. In flannel shirts they brandished pistols or could be seen pointing and giving orders at a makeshift camp. Officers in tactical g I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I opened this book. The Bundy family saga had seemingly passed a year or two back, and while the occasional fact still bounced around in my brain, what I remembered most were the images. Men and women gave weathered looks from under Stetson hats, gave speeches in front of American flags, and gazed at the horizon from horseback. In flannel shirts they brandished pistols or could be seen pointing and giving orders at a makeshift camp. Officers in tactical gear formed lines in front of protesters, cradling semi-automatic rifles, or patrolled with K-9 units on short, taunt leashes. It was the culmination of a knee jerk reaction that escalated quickly. Except, as the reader comes to find out, that isn’t the real story. Not even close. As you might guess, the issues at hand are more complicated than they seem. We have to go back to the Mormon flight to the West, which is reminiscent of Gilmore’s Shot In The Heart and Mailer’s The Executioner’s Song. Then there is the evolution of state and federal laws, a crash course in ranching, and that’s just to get us started. Once we get back to modern day, we get to see the juxtaposing of what the law says versus what the law bothered to enforce. It’s at this point where we really pick up the story of the Bundy family. But this isn’t just their story, it is so much bigger than that. We meet sheriffs, BLM workers, ranchers, farmers, veterans, criminals, students, people from big cities and small towns, at the point where they all intersect. It is easy to read a few headlines and come to your own conclusion. In fact, most of us are probably guilty of, at one time or another, reading an article with our mind already made up. But this book will have you hesitating and second guessing yourself. Temple does a masterful job of showing us the growing pains, struggle, and misgivings on both sides. In fact, the author writes in a way that slowly makes you question how exactly you arrived at your own point of view and continues to challenge it. This book covers a lot of ground, but it never feels like it. I read it over the course of three days, and I each time I looked up, I was surprised to see the what time it was. What might have been bland information is weaved into over a dozen narratives that keep you engaged and on the edge of your seat. It doesn’t take long before the reader feels like they have something at stake as the story unfolds, and in fact, without realizing it, you probably do.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Mcclearn

    A Gonzo Western featuring idealistic ranchers, overzealous federal agents, and a cast of alt-right wild cards. And it's all true. The federal government never planned on owning vast swaths of land in the American west but no one else wanted it, so they wound up making it their own. This was fine, for a while, but then the post-WWII era saw a surge in population growth in states like Nevada. Ranchers like Cliven Bundy suddenly found themselves dealing with a federal Bureau of Land Management (a br A Gonzo Western featuring idealistic ranchers, overzealous federal agents, and a cast of alt-right wild cards. And it's all true. The federal government never planned on owning vast swaths of land in the American west but no one else wanted it, so they wound up making it their own. This was fine, for a while, but then the post-WWII era saw a surge in population growth in states like Nevada. Ranchers like Cliven Bundy suddenly found themselves dealing with a federal Bureau of Land Management (a branch of the Department of the Interior) that had to deal with not only them but environmental and tourism pressure groups who had very different ideas about how these properties should be managed. As time went on, Cliven Bundy and his peers faced tighter regulations and more paperwork involving their grazing rights on federal land. Bundy's resentment began to grow and fester. Eventually he came to the conclusion that the feds actually had no right to these lands and decided to stop paying his grazing fees. At first, the BLM just sent a bill to the Bundy ranch and didn't press the issue much beyond that. But that changed in 2014. and this is where the trouble began.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marc Pressley

    Temple does a yeoman's job in presenting a nuanced look at the range wars and the ascension of patriot/sovereign rights movement in the west. Hindsight being 20/20, I'm wondering if the US attorneys aren't kicking themselves. Yes, criminal trespassing would have been a lesser charge, but unlike the various conspiracy charges, that would have passed muster with a jury. Instead, it looked like the prosecutors were playing right into the patriot narrative of an overreaching government. This is a goo Temple does a yeoman's job in presenting a nuanced look at the range wars and the ascension of patriot/sovereign rights movement in the west. Hindsight being 20/20, I'm wondering if the US attorneys aren't kicking themselves. Yes, criminal trespassing would have been a lesser charge, but unlike the various conspiracy charges, that would have passed muster with a jury. Instead, it looked like the prosecutors were playing right into the patriot narrative of an overreaching government. This is a good example how to write factually about a divisive topic by letting the participants and their actions speak for themselves. This is a book that teaches, not preaches. While that in itself will aggravate some on both sides, I found it to be a major plus.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Up in Arms is an even-handed, exhaustive look at the travails of the Bundy family in their disputes with the federal government over land rights. The dispute ultimately attracts the Patriot Movement and details other similar conflicts that involve the Bundy’s. It’s a compelling well-researched book that really lets the reader draw their own conclusions, and gives us an insight into the whole issue. I was given an ARC by the publisher through @NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Downey

    I got this book free from the Amazon Vine program back in 2019. After four years at the University of Wyoming, I thought I had an idea of the West's dislike for the federal government. This book showed me how little I'd scratched the surface. Down in Texas I had vaguely heard of the Bundy family's standoff and the issues surrounding their beef (sorry, pun intended) with the Bureau of Land Management. As well, finishing this book in 2020 puts the acronym "BLM" in a very different light. Anyway, the I got this book free from the Amazon Vine program back in 2019. After four years at the University of Wyoming, I thought I had an idea of the West's dislike for the federal government. This book showed me how little I'd scratched the surface. Down in Texas I had vaguely heard of the Bundy family's standoff and the issues surrounding their beef (sorry, pun intended) with the Bureau of Land Management. As well, finishing this book in 2020 puts the acronym "BLM" in a very different light. Anyway, the author did an exhaustive job of collating existing research, conducting numerous first-hand interviews and reviewing court documents. The back of the book had a detailed glossary identifying sources from both sides of the conflict. There is definitely nuance to the story, but sympathy to both sides. This is a complicated issue of self-determination, federal overreach, faith and family. The Bundy's relative isolation and distance from the BLM, as well as both sides' inability to communicate, all built to a perfect storm of conflict. I was distressed to read about the breadth and depth of misinformation that people consume from sites like Infowars. They're so desperate for a reason to be upset at the feds that they grasp at straws they know to be fake. This book does cover some violent incidents, and has a few instances of coarse language. But overall it is a multi-faceted narrative of a still-evolving national relationship.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    Excellent Book! Well researched and presented in an approachable style that illustrates the challenges facing ranchers in the West. The author spins the struggles, personalities and beliefs of the ranchers into a non-fiction book that reads less like a newspaper and more like a novel. Through John Temple's engaging writing, I came to appreciate why the ranchers fought hard to communicate their message and wonder if the events could have been avoided had their been some difficult but insightful c Excellent Book! Well researched and presented in an approachable style that illustrates the challenges facing ranchers in the West. The author spins the struggles, personalities and beliefs of the ranchers into a non-fiction book that reads less like a newspaper and more like a novel. Through John Temple's engaging writing, I came to appreciate why the ranchers fought hard to communicate their message and wonder if the events could have been avoided had their been some difficult but insightful conversations and compromises made. Gains instead of losses, heroes in place of violence. Hindsight is 20/20.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jim Tracy

    John Temple has done it again. Up In Arms is another interesting topical story much like his previous book American Pain. In Up In Arms, Temple gives us a front-row seat to the rise of a Patriot militia movement. This one led by the compelling Bundy clan led by patriarch Cliven Bundy and his thirteen children and numerous friends. It's a reminder of "where there's government, there is not freedom." John Temple has done it again. Up In Arms is another interesting topical story much like his previous book American Pain. In Up In Arms, Temple gives us a front-row seat to the rise of a Patriot militia movement. This one led by the compelling Bundy clan led by patriarch Cliven Bundy and his thirteen children and numerous friends. It's a reminder of "where there's government, there is not freedom."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    I appreciated the depth of research shown here. Mr. Temple has written an engrossing book about a frightening situation (from all perspectives - anarchy vs. Gov’t overreach). There are many layers to delve through and the author does an admirable job of sifting through the events and personalities involved. All in all, a frightening situation on all levels. My thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an arc in exchange for my honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

    This book chronicles the events surrounding the 2014 Bundy standoff in Nevada and the 2016 Bundy-led occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. It does not take sides nor detail the reasoning behind positions for or against the Bundy cause. And the book does not attempt to provide a compendium of information enabling the reader to assess any position or support armchair adjudication. But making those assessments and passing judgment is tempting fruit to the reader. I found a co This book chronicles the events surrounding the 2014 Bundy standoff in Nevada and the 2016 Bundy-led occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. It does not take sides nor detail the reasoning behind positions for or against the Bundy cause. And the book does not attempt to provide a compendium of information enabling the reader to assess any position or support armchair adjudication. But making those assessments and passing judgment is tempting fruit to the reader. I found a couple of flashpoints in the book that bring forth interesting questions, but not easy answers… 1. Early on, Ryan Bundy reportedly asked himself if his father’s stance of not paying grazing fees or recognizing federal jurisdiction was born out of righteousness or self-interest. It’s a great question. He concluded righteousness, although we were not told by the author how he came to this conclusion or what his deliberations were. Psychologically, it would seem improbable (but not impossible) that a rancher’s son would conclude his father’s position was not righteous. But I’ll give him points for asking the question. 2. In a town meeting where Cliven Bundy made his case to his neighbors, one rancher asked: I pay my grazing fees, so why shouldn’t Bundy? The crowd’s response: grumbles. But this too is a good question. Going outside the book, I found that the BLM manages 18,000 grazing permits on 167 million acres. The Forest Service manages 95 million acres. Other agencies, including the DOD, also manage grazing permits. Should all these ranchers refuse to pay? The author doesn’t explore that question. The search for answers is complicated and goes back far in history, but Wikipedia states that “According to Bundy, the federal government lacks the constitutional authority to own vast tracts of lands, an argument repeatedly rejected by federal courts.” Bundy and supporters have also claimed that “the federal government lacks the authority to manage public lands. These arguments have been repeatedly rejected by legal scholars and federal courts,” including appeals all the way up to the Supreme Court. Having lost in court, Bundy choose the path of civil disobedience, not only by continuing to graze as he had done, without paying fees, but expanding his herd in number and in geographic location, including into a National Recreation Area. While Mr. Bundy has his own motivations and answers, the motives and opinions of his supporter—including paramilitary groups like the 3 Percenters, Praetorian Guard, and the White Mountain Militia—are potentially suspect. Are they legitimate protesters motivated by the cause, or is it something else? The psychology of this group is interesting and beg more good questions in the pursuit of understanding. Perhaps their motivations are in line with Cliven Bundy, or maybe it more complicated. In a similar vein, author Karen Armstrong has described war as “an enticing elixir. It gives us a resolve, a cause. It allows us to be noble.” And it sanctifies our behavior. Tangentially, Oliver Roy argues that, “Terrorism does not arise from the radicalization of Islam, but from the Islamization of radicalism.” Roy is keying in on the psychology of some forms of rebellious behavior, noting that with respect to suicide terrorist, they are not necessarily religiously pious or politically motivated, as appearances would suggest, nor is it a political solution or a military strategy. It is a movement rooted in nihilism. Organizations like al-Qaida and ISIS provide a script, but what seduces and fascinates the young nihilist is the idea of pure revolt. In other words, violence is not a means, it is an end in itself. In this regard, I have to ask if Bundy’s followers are really motivated by devotion to the Constitution or if the defense of the Constitution is just an excuse to release an innate inclination to rebel, or to imitate heroic Hollywood archetypes like Rambo or the American Sniper. A large factor driving the sagebrush rebellion is concern about the amount of federally owned land in the Western states, which in Nevada is around 85%. Is there a tipping point where federal land ownership is excessive? Another term for “federal land” or “government land” is “public land”. Recently in Idaho, large tracts of State-owned land were auctioned off to the private sector and sold to two wealthy Texan, who are brothers. Hunters, kayakers, outdoor people, and other Idaho residents of modest means found themselves cut off from use of land where they had previously recreated, including roads that had been used to access other public areas. The new private owners posted “no trespassing” signs. The land had gone from use by the many to use by a few. And privatization is a Pandora’s Box—once released, it’s difficult to get it back. So here’s one last question: Do you want to live in a country where all or most the land is owned by a few, to use or abuse at their own discretion, or in a country where there are private ownership opportunities, but also a vast area of public land available for the enjoyment of anyone, regardless of the fortunes or misfortunes of birth? Among these questions, I will offer one answer for your consideration: when we lose public land, we lose a part of our frontier, a part of our heritage.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Kerr

    Can the federal government legally own land in the states? Is it lawful for the federal government to charge ranchers to use the land that their families have been using for a hundred years? Is it right for the federal government to seize cattle from a rancher who refuses to pay these fines? In 2014 the Bundy family and hundreds of Patriot Bundy supporters answered these questions with a resounding "NO." In Up in Arms: How the Bundy Family Hijacked Federal Lands, Outfoxed the Federal Government, Can the federal government legally own land in the states? Is it lawful for the federal government to charge ranchers to use the land that their families have been using for a hundred years? Is it right for the federal government to seize cattle from a rancher who refuses to pay these fines? In 2014 the Bundy family and hundreds of Patriot Bundy supporters answered these questions with a resounding "NO." In Up in Arms: How the Bundy Family Hijacked Federal Lands, Outfoxed the Federal Government, and Ignited America's Patriot Militia Movement John Temple records the story of the Bundys' stand against the federal government, from the standoff at Bundy Ranch to the Patriot occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. I received a copy of this book through Goodreads giveaways. I do not think it was the author's intention to sway the reader's opinion one way or the other. I think John Temple presented an unbiased and honest account of the events at Bundy Ranch and Malheur. However, I found Up in Arms shed light on how the federal government sometimes oversteps their boundaries. The book was well researched and well written. I enjoyed it thoroughly. I think everyone should read this book, but I especially recommend it to anyone looking to learn about how the federal government is not the supreme authority that so many people believe it is.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Up in Arms follows the rise of the American Patriot Movement through the catalyst of the Bunkerville episode of Cliven Bundy who refused to pay for federal land fees on land he rented from the federal government. Temple wants to be sympathetic to the movement but even he has to admit that all it takes is one crazy person to go commit a mass shooting to undermine everything (which happens twice to people involved int his movement throughout the book). This book follows the lead up, time during an Up in Arms follows the rise of the American Patriot Movement through the catalyst of the Bunkerville episode of Cliven Bundy who refused to pay for federal land fees on land he rented from the federal government. Temple wants to be sympathetic to the movement but even he has to admit that all it takes is one crazy person to go commit a mass shooting to undermine everything (which happens twice to people involved int his movement throughout the book). This book follows the lead up, time during and aftermath of the Bundy affair and then focuses on the Hammond case in Oregon where Bundy brothers went and inserted themselves against the wishes of the participants to take over a federal facility. This split the patriot movement between those who believed in defending the homestead and property vs the more aggressive who wished to go on the offensive. This book does its best to try and get at the logic and thinking behind the patriots and the causes they espouse to which at times can be difficult to follow. It very clearly shows the dangers in things like Alex Jones Infowars that inflamed passions with little to know evidence and even when what they knew was wrong moved onto the next thing with equal gusto. Regardless of your feelings though this book is well worth a read if you want to understand the American Patriot movement and how they think it today’s political climate.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elsa Hoffmann

    Truth is stranger than fiction. It's also infinitely more amusing and sad at the same time. I remember seeing something vague about this on television but at that time South Africa had bad problems of its own. It was a pleasure to read this and what is very interesting is that the offshoot of this particular stand off led to the killing of so many people in Las Vegas. I had wondered how that started, there is always a trigger that set people off. This book, very well written, gives the reader a g Truth is stranger than fiction. It's also infinitely more amusing and sad at the same time. I remember seeing something vague about this on television but at that time South Africa had bad problems of its own. It was a pleasure to read this and what is very interesting is that the offshoot of this particular stand off led to the killing of so many people in Las Vegas. I had wondered how that started, there is always a trigger that set people off. This book, very well written, gives the reader a glimpse into the minds of ranchers, militia, pure criminals and how the FBI makes mistakes, and the tragedy that ensues when they clash. Highly recommend this book. It's easy to read and I think American people will understand it better than I do. John Temple put together a very human look at a complete mess. Sometimes one can only shake one's head..... Thank you to Netgalley and Mr Temple for letting me read Up In Arms, it was quite an experience!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Mayne-Schlachtun

    Very interesting read. I had no idea that the Federal government owned so much land in the western states. I could totally understand and sympathize with the Bundy's predicament and their feelings on the 1st Amendment. It's very scary how many of our rights are slowly being taken away and sadly most of us aren't even aware of it. I remember when the Bundy saga occurred, but didn't really know what it was about and didn't bother to learn about it at the time. This book opened my eyes to a lot of Very interesting read. I had no idea that the Federal government owned so much land in the western states. I could totally understand and sympathize with the Bundy's predicament and their feelings on the 1st Amendment. It's very scary how many of our rights are slowly being taken away and sadly most of us aren't even aware of it. I remember when the Bundy saga occurred, but didn't really know what it was about and didn't bother to learn about it at the time. This book opened my eyes to a lot of things. Especially more government corruption and if one doesn't publicly agree with all the government propaganda then there is a price to pay. But really we all already know that don't we! My personal views have become stronger and my interest in learning more about all of this has been piqued by this book. I'm definitely glad I read it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.