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Winner, General Fiction, 2018 Publishers Weekly Booklife Prize "Sharp and engaging. Takes readers on a memorable adventure to the French Renaissance."—Publishers Weekly "A dramatically engrossing and historically searching tale about a powerful duchess.”—Kirkus Reviews "A masterpiece that paints an extraordinary vision of its times. Satisfying, educational, and hard to put Winner, General Fiction, 2018 Publishers Weekly Booklife Prize "Sharp and engaging. Takes readers on a memorable adventure to the French Renaissance."—Publishers Weekly "A dramatically engrossing and historically searching tale about a powerful duchess.”—Kirkus Reviews "A masterpiece that paints an extraordinary vision of its times. Satisfying, educational, and hard to put down.”—Midwest Book Review Anne, Duchess of Brittany, is the love of King Louis XII of France’s life. Too bad he’s already married. While his annulment proceedings create Europe’s most sensational scandal of 1498, Anne returns to Brittany to take back control of her duchy that her late husband, Charles VIII, King of France, had wrested from her. At age twenty-one, Anne is sovereign ruler of Brittany as well as Europe’s most wealthy widow. But can she maintain Brittany’s independence from France if she accepts Louis’ offer to make her Queen of France once more? With Italian arrivals to the French court from Cesare Borgia to Niccolò Machiavelli, Anne and Louis’ story unfolds as the feudal era gives way to the dawn of the Renaissance. Their love for each other tested by conflicting duties to their respective countries, the two rulers struggle to navigate a collision course that will reshape the map of sixteenth-century Europe. Book Two of the Anne of Brittany Series, the gripping tale of the only woman in history to be twice crowned queen of France. To begin your discovery of Anne of Brittany, read Anne and Charles, Book One.


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Winner, General Fiction, 2018 Publishers Weekly Booklife Prize "Sharp and engaging. Takes readers on a memorable adventure to the French Renaissance."—Publishers Weekly "A dramatically engrossing and historically searching tale about a powerful duchess.”—Kirkus Reviews "A masterpiece that paints an extraordinary vision of its times. Satisfying, educational, and hard to put Winner, General Fiction, 2018 Publishers Weekly Booklife Prize "Sharp and engaging. Takes readers on a memorable adventure to the French Renaissance."—Publishers Weekly "A dramatically engrossing and historically searching tale about a powerful duchess.”—Kirkus Reviews "A masterpiece that paints an extraordinary vision of its times. Satisfying, educational, and hard to put down.”—Midwest Book Review Anne, Duchess of Brittany, is the love of King Louis XII of France’s life. Too bad he’s already married. While his annulment proceedings create Europe’s most sensational scandal of 1498, Anne returns to Brittany to take back control of her duchy that her late husband, Charles VIII, King of France, had wrested from her. At age twenty-one, Anne is sovereign ruler of Brittany as well as Europe’s most wealthy widow. But can she maintain Brittany’s independence from France if she accepts Louis’ offer to make her Queen of France once more? With Italian arrivals to the French court from Cesare Borgia to Niccolò Machiavelli, Anne and Louis’ story unfolds as the feudal era gives way to the dawn of the Renaissance. Their love for each other tested by conflicting duties to their respective countries, the two rulers struggle to navigate a collision course that will reshape the map of sixteenth-century Europe. Book Two of the Anne of Brittany Series, the gripping tale of the only woman in history to be twice crowned queen of France. To begin your discovery of Anne of Brittany, read Anne and Charles, Book One.

30 review for Anne and Louis: Passion and Politics in Early Renaissance France: The First Years of Anne of Brittany's Marriage to Louis XII

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Martin

    My Review of “Anne and Louis” “Anne and Louis,” written by Rozsa Gaston, plays out as an intelligent treatment of the lives of Louis XII of France and Anne of Brittany, with an emphasis on the latter. Anne had been betrothed a number of times, but her two actual marriages brought her to the throne of France—both times. How that occurred is nicely told. One marriage proves much happier than the other. Was it the first to Charles VIII or the second, to Louis XII? Anne’s court features an array of cha My Review of “Anne and Louis” “Anne and Louis,” written by Rozsa Gaston, plays out as an intelligent treatment of the lives of Louis XII of France and Anne of Brittany, with an emphasis on the latter. Anne had been betrothed a number of times, but her two actual marriages brought her to the throne of France—both times. How that occurred is nicely told. One marriage proves much happier than the other. Was it the first to Charles VIII or the second, to Louis XII? Anne’s court features an array of characters ranging from Anne and Louis, to her marriageable ladies-in-waiting, to visiting young gallants, to cardinals, to Cesare Borgia, and to Niccolò Machiavelli. Although tensions (and sometimes romance) break out among these, conflicts are generally mild. The strongest story points concern Anne’s child-bearing performance and the game of thrones that is negotiated and executed within and behind the scenes. In Anne, Gaston unveils a dimensional character, one who sets her sights on goals and, despite setbacks, moves toward them. Sometimes the speakers’ taglines come at the end of a speech, even a long sentence. Also, occasionally we jump from one character’s thoughts to another’s within the same scene. These quibbles aside, “Anne and Louis” is a well-written story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    InD'tale Magazine

    4.5/5.0 A gripping novel about a larger than life queen, “Anne and Louis” is a smartly written read filled with both passion and wit. Read full review in the 2018 holiday issue of InD'tale Magazine. 4.5/5.0 A gripping novel about a larger than life queen, “Anne and Louis” is a smartly written read filled with both passion and wit. Read full review in the 2018 holiday issue of InD'tale Magazine.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fyo

    I talked in my review of the previous book of this series about my love for Anne of Brittany. She's one of my favorite historical figures and tied for my favorite medieval Anne (the other one being of Bohemia). I also have some interest in Louis XII, though he's nowhere cool as his wife. I'm kind of torn here because I want to like this book. I really do. Gaston is really good at recounting the historical events, which i appreciate (nothing worse than a historical fiction that can't get its hist I talked in my review of the previous book of this series about my love for Anne of Brittany. She's one of my favorite historical figures and tied for my favorite medieval Anne (the other one being of Bohemia). I also have some interest in Louis XII, though he's nowhere cool as his wife. I'm kind of torn here because I want to like this book. I really do. Gaston is really good at recounting the historical events, which i appreciate (nothing worse than a historical fiction that can't get its history right) but the book lacks action and much insight into Anne. Let's face it, despite her rank, Anne had a pretty rough life, from being made duchess at such a young age and having to fight for the independence of her territory and herself, to the strain of her many pregnancies (only two of which survived infancy), and all the crap that comes with being queen. Very little of this actually comes out in this book or the one before it. Anne seems fine throughout, never really affected by the tragedies around her and the strain on her body. I'm not saying she could never have been happy, I just think maybe some of what she went through would be a little hard on her. She never seems to be as young as she actually was-- 22 when she married Louis. Obviously she was incredibly tough historically, but this book doesn't really touch on WHY she had to be. So much is also in exposition that we're told about her personality but I never got the feeling I was seeing it. A lot of this book concerns Louis. I don't know a ton about him (his dad, Charles d'Orleans, yes. Louis, not so much) but I guess it was fun to see him. He is great when his daughter Claude is born, he's immediately in love with her and won't let go of her and that made me so happy. I was a little less happy with how his annulment with Joan was treated. I honestly don't know how accurate the claims of Joan's disability are, history has a tendency to exaggerate, and this book does stress she was a good pious woman who put up with Louis' crap, but the book is also sympathetic to Louis and kind of misses how much of a jerk he was to her. Obviously if he was going to marry Anne as per the earlier contract he had to get an annulment, so he had to make a good case, but he still humiliated her by ragging on her being infertile (historically Joan was like "How would YOU know?" and honestly, valid). I just had a hard time feeling sympathetic for him (Joan's deformities reminds me-- Anne was actually disabled too, she had some hip problem that messed up her leg, there's no mention of that in this). Joke's ultimately on Louis now though, because Joan is actually literally a canonized saint in the Catholic Church. Anne and Louis worked well together historically, and he gave her way more respect than Charles did, and I would have liked to see them agree more and work as a team rather than be at odds with everything. I need to do more research into Louis's Italian campaigns but I'm not sure about Anne's reaction to them-- she thinks they're stupid and they trigger memories of her philandering first husband, but I would think Anne would understand at least theoretically why Louis was so concerned with Milan, since it was his inheritance that had been denied his father (basically, Valentina Visconti's son Charles was supposed to inherit Milan and Asti from her, he failed in pressing the claim, and so the next heir would be his son Louis. I would think Anne would understand wanting to secure your birthright). Maybe I'm nitpicking here. There are some fun things in here. Louis and baby Claude are adorable, he and Anne arguing over if he should wear a Breton scarf was a good setup, and I loved the shutouts to Christine di Pizan and Marie de France. And the Unicorn tapestries! Louis! Let Anne have some fun and get you something nice! The book isn't awful, i promise. It's never violent or gross or overly sexual and it doesn't lean too much on unpleasant tropes. It's just not particularly deep and I really just want to see Anne as a character rather than a historical figure being described. I'd maybe recommend this and it's predecessor to someone interested in Anne but who wants more of an overview than, say, the rock opera Anne de Bretagne gives, and maybe a light romance. The author is also really nice, i was approved on Netgalley to review the next book after this and she personally emailed me after seeing my blog (boolean-illogic.blogspot.com) saying she's interested in my opinion on Louis's Italian campaigns, so I hope to give her a more informed response about that and the next book in general. I see a lot of promise in this series, my low rating more has to do with the lack of character introspection and how Anne didn't seem very real to me. I do appreciate Gaston's dedication to writing about Anne, you can tell she really does care about her and isn't writing this just to get it done with.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna Ford

    Gaston Retrieves the Passion and Politics of the 1500s Four hundred years before women in America won the right to vote and serve in government, a young girl in the duchy of Brittany began an illustrious 26-year career in the politics of eastern Europe. Anne of Brittany won the hearts and respect of two French kings. Gaston’s book two in the Anne of Brittany series will not disappoint her Romance readership. Even while providing historical details, the author continues this amorous tale of life i Gaston Retrieves the Passion and Politics of the 1500s Four hundred years before women in America won the right to vote and serve in government, a young girl in the duchy of Brittany began an illustrious 26-year career in the politics of eastern Europe. Anne of Brittany won the hearts and respect of two French kings. Gaston’s book two in the Anne of Brittany series will not disappoint her Romance readership. Even while providing historical details, the author continues this amorous tale of life in the 1500s...among those at court and in the up-coming class of European trades people. What will be the fate of Anne’s children born to King Louis? Will any live to follow Anne's footsteps in the governments of France and/or Brittany? Readers enchanted with the brave heroine’s story will eagerly read book two.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Anne and Louis: Passion and Politics in Early Renaissance France: The First Years of Anne of Brittany's Marriage to Louis XII (Anne of Brittany #2) By Rozsa Gaston Reviewed June 28, 2021 Anne and Louis: Passion and Politics in Early Renaissance France is the second in a quartet of books about Anne of Brittany who, outside of her native Brittany, isn’t as well known as she should be. Hopefully, this series will help rectify that. Unlike many historical novels, there’s not a lot of action. By that I Anne and Louis: Passion and Politics in Early Renaissance France: The First Years of Anne of Brittany's Marriage to Louis XII (Anne of Brittany #2) By Rozsa Gaston Reviewed June 28, 2021 Anne and Louis: Passion and Politics in Early Renaissance France is the second in a quartet of books about Anne of Brittany who, outside of her native Brittany, isn’t as well known as she should be. Hopefully, this series will help rectify that. Unlike many historical novels, there’s not a lot of action. By that I mean there are no battle scenes, no ale house brawls, and basically very little in the way of overt violence. Instead, this books treats us to the domestic side of a royal couple who, though they love each other very much, still have their rough patches to work through. The book opens after the 40 days or mourning for Anne’s deceased husband, Charles VII of France, have passed. After four months she still mourned for Charles, faithless as he had been. He had loved her, in his own fashion, and she him. But he had not allowed her to administer her own duchy, over which he held co-rights with her. Now Charles was dead and she was sole ruler of Brittany once more. It was her moment to take the reins. Their story, covered in Anne and Charles, was a story of young love. When they married, Anne was only 15 and Charles was 21. Though he was the older of the two, Anne was the more emotionally mature. Though the two shared affection for one another, in many ways the marriage remained unfulfilled – each child Anne bore Charles died, and Charles was a philanderer who couldn’t resist a pretty face. Now, at age 21, Anne is a mature woman who knows what she wants, and she wants Louis d’Orléans, her husband’s heir and now King Louis XII. (If you thought all the Richards and Edwards over in England at this time was confusing, have fun with all the Louises and Charleses in France!) But there’s a problem. Louis is tied to an unhappy marriage. When he was 14 years old (the age of consent at that time in France), he had been compelled to marry Princess Jeanne, Charles VII’s sister, even though she suffered from physical deformities (said to have been a hunchback though her actual appearance is never discussed in detail in the book) and was believed to be sterile. The marriage was part of a devious plan by King Louis XI (the Spider King) who had no use for this branch of his family and wanted to extinguish the Orléans branch of the Valois line. As Louis d’Orleans is the only male heir to that line, if he produces no children the line will die out and all titles and lands will revert back to the crown. Throughout their marriage, Louis d’Orléans has had a little to do with his wife as possible. The marriage was consummated, but that was through coercion rather than any affection as Louis XI made sure there were witnesses to the event. Later, the only times he had conjugal relations with Jeanne was when he was literally forced to, such as when Louis was a prisoner for three years following his opposition to the king. During that time, Jeanne’s sister Anne, who was Louis’s jailer, would only let Louis sleep in a bed if he had intercourse with his wife; otherwise, he was forced to sleep in an iron cage. (Honestly, with a family situation like that, who wouldn’t want out of the marriage!) Eventually Louis d’Orléans is pardoned by his cousin, Charles, and resumes his life at court. During all of this, Jeanne has turned to religion for comfort and love, and is considered a living saint by many of the common folk. Louis has known Anne of Brittany since she was a child. Though much older than she (by about 15 years), the first time they met he was struck by her intelligence and charm. Later, when she grows into a young and beautiful woman, he falls deeply and forever in love with her, feelings that Anne reciprocates. After the death of his cousin, Louis decides he must marry Anne and make her his queen…but first, he needs to get rid of Jeanne. To do that, his current marriage needs to be annulled. What followed would have been tabloid heaven if it had taken place a few centuries later, with the lawsuit being described as “one of the seamiest lawsuits of the age.” (Holy National Enquirer, Batman!) Louis did not argue the marriage to be void due to consanguinity which was the usual ground for the dissolution of a marriage at that time. Instead, it was contested on the grounds of non-consummation, and became a matter of he-said, she-said. Jeanne is not painted as a bad person, though. Far from it. "Jeanne of France was widely loved by the French people. She was rarely seen, serving to increase her mystique. Stories were rife that she could heal with her touch or even a glance from her limpid brown eyes, welling with mercy and compassion. Her own family members had shown her so little of either." While all this drags on, Anne has returned to Brittany and reclaimed her ancestral lands. As Duchess of Brittany, she is well loved by her people, and she thrives on this. Ruling Brittany is what she was born to do, and she does it with energy and good governance. She is also in love with Louis, but refuses to chase after him. If he wants her, he must free himself of the impediment of his marriage to Jeanne and be the one who comes to her, hat in hand (so to speak) – and this time, she will make sure the marriage contract guarantees the independence of Brittany. In the end, the pope grants the annulment, as “Pope Alexander VI, the former Rodrigo Borgia, was thoroughly corrupt of character, possessing the lusty temperament of a breeding bull,” and marriage soon follows. For Anne and Louis, their union is something rare – a royal marriage that is a love match. Through the rest of the book, we follow the couple through their early years together, including the birth of their first child, a daughter. Anne is intelligent, raised to rule, but being a woman limits her options, so as with Charles she has to learn how to work the system (as we’d call it today) and even use her feminine wiles when necessary to get what she wants. She also has to deal with Louis’s dreams of grandeur, when he wants to invade the Italian peninsula and claim the throne of Naples. A number of historical persons make an appearance, including Cesare Borgia who (as he did in real life) passes himself off as the Pope’s nephew and is the one who delivers the official documents of annulment, and Italian diplomat Niccolò Machiavelli. All in all, an enjoyable read that has me ready to dive into book #3.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erinpad

    Anne of Brittany was made Duchess of Brittany in 1488 at the young age of 11. In an effort to protect her people she married the King of France Charles VIII and though her marriage was never ideal, what with Charles being a know womanizer and Anne being in love another-she eventually came to love her husband but suffered from many miscarriages. After only 6 years of marriage, Charles unfortunately passed away and left Anne no longer a queen. The man that Anne has truly loved every since she was Anne of Brittany was made Duchess of Brittany in 1488 at the young age of 11. In an effort to protect her people she married the King of France Charles VIII and though her marriage was never ideal, what with Charles being a know womanizer and Anne being in love another-she eventually came to love her husband but suffered from many miscarriages. After only 6 years of marriage, Charles unfortunately passed away and left Anne no longer a queen. The man that Anne has truly loved every since she was a little girl is now the newly appointed King of France Louis XII. Anne and Louis can finally do what they’ve always secretly wanted but there’s just one problem, he’s already married. Now at the age of 21 Anne will travel back to her country to not only once again establish herself as Duchess and a force not to be reckoned with, but to also seek solace within her people. Back in France, King Louis XII begins the fight for an annulment in order to be with the one woman who has forever claimed his heart but has always never been within reach. To do this he must not only prove that he never had relations with the saint that he has for a wife but also battle wits with the Pope to grant the annulment. The Pope is non other than Rodrigo Borgia and with him comes his notorious nephew/son Cesare Borgia. Cesare’s demands of a royal title seem reasonable but when he also expects to have a Princess for a wife, Louis is wary of just whom would he be able to convince to marry him. Especially since Cesare’s reputation of a brother killer, known poisoner and questionable parentage is not what one usually looks for in a husband. I very much enjoyed this engaging and insightful novel that brings to life a story that many including myself were not familiar with. Highly recommended for any history lovers and those looking for a story where love prevails against all.

  7. 5 out of 5

    HalKid2

    The second in a three-novel series about the life of Anne of Brittany by Rozsa Gaston, I have to say this one is just OK. Picking up Anne's life after the death of her first husband, King Charles VIII of France, Anne soon winds up married to her late husband's cousin and successor, King Louis XII - a man she has admired since childhood. Even though the marriage is presented as a love match on both sides, Anne, is determined this time to ensure the independence of her home duchy of Brittany -- so The second in a three-novel series about the life of Anne of Brittany by Rozsa Gaston, I have to say this one is just OK. Picking up Anne's life after the death of her first husband, King Charles VIII of France, Anne soon winds up married to her late husband's cousin and successor, King Louis XII - a man she has admired since childhood. Even though the marriage is presented as a love match on both sides, Anne, is determined this time to ensure the independence of her home duchy of Brittany -- something she was unable to do with her first husband. The problem with a love match however is that it's far less intriguing than, say, a more uneven and unpredictable relationship -- like the one Anne had with her first husband. That relationship helped make the first book in this series interesting. Also, the politics (mostly Louis's efforts to annul his first marriage) and warfare (chiefly Louis's desire to conquer parts of Italy) were not particularly engrossing to me. When I read historical fiction (which I do a lot) I'm much more interested in the people and their relationships with each other, rather than historical events. And while the author did make a valiant effort to include some of the memorable figures of this era (i.e. Christine de Pizan and Niccolo Macchiavelli), many of those passages were forced and felt contrived. So that overall, this novel did not feel either believable or authentic. Plus, it ends VERY abruptly, without presenting much of a set-up for the third and final volume in the series. Nevertheless, I will likely finish the series. After all, it's not everyday you meet a smart, strong Medieval woman who is Queen of France twice over. I just can't say this is among the better historical novels I've read. Maybe Anne's life would have worked better with a two-novel approach.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diane Solomon

    This book is the second in the Anne of Brittany series, covering the romance and marriage of larger-than-life Anne, Duchess of Brittany, and Louis Xll of France. 1498 in France and Brittany was a time where existence for the average person was hard, taxes were high, royals were not to be disobeyed or even criticized, and life was cheap. Especially for women. Anne was an unusual woman for her time. I loved this portrayal of a strong intelligent woman who maintained her independence, even while jo This book is the second in the Anne of Brittany series, covering the romance and marriage of larger-than-life Anne, Duchess of Brittany, and Louis Xll of France. 1498 in France and Brittany was a time where existence for the average person was hard, taxes were high, royals were not to be disobeyed or even criticized, and life was cheap. Especially for women. Anne was an unusual woman for her time. I loved this portrayal of a strong intelligent woman who maintained her independence, even while joining her life with the powerful King of France. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and am impressed by Gaston’s depth of research and attention to detail. It was educational while entertaining. My favorite element was the beautifully handled romance between Anne and Louis. It is quite wonderful; the wedding night scene in the bedroom is unique, tantalizing, deeply romantic and sensual. My single criticism seems almost churlish in light of the depth and complexity of this book, its wonderful expression of character, vibrant dialogue, etc. I just wish the author had maintained more convention with regard to point of view. Sometimes even within a paragraph we are treated to two characters' private thoughts and this can feel a bit disconcerting to the reader. It throws you out of the book to have to figure out who is now thinking... I prefer a focus on sole POV, even deep POV, that gives you access to the character's senses and experience. However, it was a absorbing read. Having read many historical novels by such authors as Philippa Gregory and Jean Plaidy, it is good to welcome Rozsa Gaston to this genre. I look forward to the next book from her!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christine Cazeneuve

    This is Book 2 of which I understand will be a three book series (with the third book coming out this fall). I enjoyed this book a bit more than the first and only because I was more in awe of Anne as she matured into an even greater woman. Truly a woman to be admired. Still the minor issue with some repetitive lines and retells but it doesn't take away from the greatness of the book and the recommend of a must read. This is Book 2 of which I understand will be a three book series (with the third book coming out this fall). I enjoyed this book a bit more than the first and only because I was more in awe of Anne as she matured into an even greater woman. Truly a woman to be admired. Still the minor issue with some repetitive lines and retells but it doesn't take away from the greatness of the book and the recommend of a must read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Russell

    This was another great story in the Anne of Brittany series. I loved the first one and couldn't wait until I had time to read the second one. The history is realistic. The author did a ton of research for this. You can tell. And the characters are believable and multi dimensional! I really enjoyed this book and I am going to be getting the third one shortly. I truly hope this terrific author keeps writing. These are the kinds of books I look for and can't always find so I am glad I found these! This was another great story in the Anne of Brittany series. I loved the first one and couldn't wait until I had time to read the second one. The history is realistic. The author did a ton of research for this. You can tell. And the characters are believable and multi dimensional! I really enjoyed this book and I am going to be getting the third one shortly. I truly hope this terrific author keeps writing. These are the kinds of books I look for and can't always find so I am glad I found these!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Danielle L Green

    Well written and I like to see a strong female character! I really enjoyed this book! A strong Queen who lives life according to her rules is rare and refreshing for this time period. The romance between Anne and Louis is presented as one of the great love stories that I never knew about. I look forward to more from this author!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Caruso

    If you enjoy historic fiction this is a good book. I enjoyed it. It is part of a series, but it stands alone as well. I was interested in this particular time period, so I only read the second book in the series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hebby Roman

    I was expecting more from this book, as it was based on historical events and persons. Writing was stiff and formal, lots of repetition and reciting of historical facts. Not really a historical book, nor truly a fictional one, as emotions were dubious from protagonists.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth

    As good as the first booj Now that King Charles is dead, Anne is free to follow her heart. No longer a girl, she knows she must keep her duchy , for that is where her true love and duty lie

  15. 4 out of 5

    J. A.

    This is her 2nd of 3 marriages. Book 2 of 4 ebooks I have . Interested in history .I wanted to know more about Anne of Brittney. Historical fiction gives me a well researched world building,& historical time line.

  16. 4 out of 5

    candy l thompson

  17. 5 out of 5

    Zee

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gina

  19. 4 out of 5

    GordieF

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark K

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cece

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan Swaim

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  25. 5 out of 5

    elena lang

  26. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Corrow

  27. 4 out of 5

    Krista C

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diane Kelly

  29. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mercedes Bullrich

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