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The Early Roman Expansion Into Italy: Elite Negotiation and Family Agendas

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This book presents a radical new interpretation of Roman expansion in Italy during the fourth and third centuries BCE. Nicola Terrenato argues that the process was accomplished by means of a grand bargain that was negotiated between the landed elites of central and southern Italy, while military conquest played a much smaller role than is usually envisaged. Deploying archa This book presents a radical new interpretation of Roman expansion in Italy during the fourth and third centuries BCE. Nicola Terrenato argues that the process was accomplished by means of a grand bargain that was negotiated between the landed elites of central and southern Italy, while military conquest played a much smaller role than is usually envisaged. Deploying archaeological, epigraphic, and historical evidence, he paints a picture of the family interactions that tied together both Roman and non-Roman aristocrats and that resulted in their pooling power and resources for the creation of a new political entity. The book is written in accessible language, without technical terms or quotations in Latin, and is heavily illustrated.


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This book presents a radical new interpretation of Roman expansion in Italy during the fourth and third centuries BCE. Nicola Terrenato argues that the process was accomplished by means of a grand bargain that was negotiated between the landed elites of central and southern Italy, while military conquest played a much smaller role than is usually envisaged. Deploying archa This book presents a radical new interpretation of Roman expansion in Italy during the fourth and third centuries BCE. Nicola Terrenato argues that the process was accomplished by means of a grand bargain that was negotiated between the landed elites of central and southern Italy, while military conquest played a much smaller role than is usually envisaged. Deploying archaeological, epigraphic, and historical evidence, he paints a picture of the family interactions that tied together both Roman and non-Roman aristocrats and that resulted in their pooling power and resources for the creation of a new political entity. The book is written in accessible language, without technical terms or quotations in Latin, and is heavily illustrated.

27 review for The Early Roman Expansion Into Italy: Elite Negotiation and Family Agendas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    The thesis as I understood the book is that the Roman conquests of Italy prior to the Punic wars was much more transactional between aristocratic peers than traditional history and Livy suggest. The authors suggest voluntary submissions and surrenders (and thrown battles?!) were the mainstay of the conquests outside the Appenine and Samnite conquests, and were rewarded by citizenship. He also reframes the plebeian/patrician conflict as inner and outer aristocratic conflicts. The writing is dry, The thesis as I understood the book is that the Roman conquests of Italy prior to the Punic wars was much more transactional between aristocratic peers than traditional history and Livy suggest. The authors suggest voluntary submissions and surrenders (and thrown battles?!) were the mainstay of the conquests outside the Appenine and Samnite conquests, and were rewarded by citizenship. He also reframes the plebeian/patrician conflict as inner and outer aristocratic conflicts. The writing is dry, and I didn't particularly enjoy the book, but the argument is novel and I was able to get some solid recs from his bibliography.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Stark

  3. 5 out of 5

    Toni

  4. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Muccilli

  5. 4 out of 5

    G

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tate

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tommaso Zattra

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  9. 4 out of 5

    Belal Krad

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Douglas

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrej

  15. 5 out of 5

    Felix

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jefferson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kenton Nakashima-Sautter

  18. 5 out of 5

    Will

  19. 5 out of 5

    Spiros

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maria Elisabetta

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linniegayl

  23. 5 out of 5

    Goodreads user

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Ceneme

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sergio

  26. 4 out of 5

    Taots

  27. 4 out of 5

    C. Wells

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