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For fans of Svetlana Chmakova's Awkward and Raina Telgemeier's Smile comes an inventive new story from Cardboard Kingdom creator Chad Sell about a group of young artists who must work together when one of their own creations becomes a monster. Drew is just a regular artist. But there's nothing ordinary about her art. Her doodles are mischievous . . . and rarely do they stay For fans of Svetlana Chmakova's Awkward and Raina Telgemeier's Smile comes an inventive new story from Cardboard Kingdom creator Chad Sell about a group of young artists who must work together when one of their own creations becomes a monster. Drew is just a regular artist. But there's nothing ordinary about her art. Her doodles are mischievous . . . and rarely do they stay in Doodleville, the world she's created in her sketchbook. Instead, Drew's doodles prefer to explore the world outside. But after an inspiring class trip to the Art Institute of Chicago--where the doodles cause a bit too much trouble--Drew decides it's time to take her artistic talents to the next level. Enter the Leviathan--Levi, for short. He's bigger and better than anything Drew has ever created before. He's a monster, but a friendly one. That is, until Levi begins to wreak havoc on Drew's other doodles--and on the heroes her classmates have dreamt up. Levi won't be easily tamed, and it seems there is a link between the monster's bad behavior and Drew's feelings. With the help of her loyal art club friends, will she be able to save Doodleville--and Levi--before it's too late?


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For fans of Svetlana Chmakova's Awkward and Raina Telgemeier's Smile comes an inventive new story from Cardboard Kingdom creator Chad Sell about a group of young artists who must work together when one of their own creations becomes a monster. Drew is just a regular artist. But there's nothing ordinary about her art. Her doodles are mischievous . . . and rarely do they stay For fans of Svetlana Chmakova's Awkward and Raina Telgemeier's Smile comes an inventive new story from Cardboard Kingdom creator Chad Sell about a group of young artists who must work together when one of their own creations becomes a monster. Drew is just a regular artist. But there's nothing ordinary about her art. Her doodles are mischievous . . . and rarely do they stay in Doodleville, the world she's created in her sketchbook. Instead, Drew's doodles prefer to explore the world outside. But after an inspiring class trip to the Art Institute of Chicago--where the doodles cause a bit too much trouble--Drew decides it's time to take her artistic talents to the next level. Enter the Leviathan--Levi, for short. He's bigger and better than anything Drew has ever created before. He's a monster, but a friendly one. That is, until Levi begins to wreak havoc on Drew's other doodles--and on the heroes her classmates have dreamt up. Levi won't be easily tamed, and it seems there is a link between the monster's bad behavior and Drew's feelings. With the help of her loyal art club friends, will she be able to save Doodleville--and Levi--before it's too late?

30 review for Doodleville

  1. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    This rating/review is based on an ARC courtesy of Netgalley and Knopf Books for Young Readers. First let me say that I will definitely put this in the hands of kids. Well, once libraries reopen and once people start coming back and once we start ordering books again and once this book is actually published! I think kids who like The Cardboard Kingdom will like this too, but stop one is definitely CK. I struggled with the world-building in this comic. The story focuses on Drew, a tween girl who lov This rating/review is based on an ARC courtesy of Netgalley and Knopf Books for Young Readers. First let me say that I will definitely put this in the hands of kids. Well, once libraries reopen and once people start coming back and once we start ordering books again and once this book is actually published! I think kids who like The Cardboard Kingdom will like this too, but stop one is definitely CK. I struggled with the world-building in this comic. The story focuses on Drew, a tween girl who loves drawing doodles. In the universe of the book her curious doodles can jump off the page and interact with the wider world. Is Drew somehow special? No, because her doodles interact with the drawings of her fellow Art Club members and with paintings at the Art Institute of Chicago. Is this just a part of the world? If it is then why are people surprised that it happens? Is this kid stuff “coming to life” but in actuality it’s imagined? That was such a clear and awesome delineation in Cardboard Kingdom, and this book is missing that element to ground it in reality. The story structure and reality of the universe in Doodleville are all over the place. Sell wants it to be both fantastic and realistic, but commits to neither enough for make it make sense. I really, really wanted to like this more, and there are so many ideas in it that I LOVE. Somehow when it's all combined it just falls flat.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christany

    What a sweet comic! It's simultaneously a book about the joy of making art, a book about mental health, and a book about celebrating differences - all wrapped up in colorful, artsy, kid-friendly package. I loved it. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenna D.

    Doodleville comes close, but doesn’t quite hit the mark, in its depiction of mental issues and insecurity. While I appreciate the diverse cast and will likely want to read more about them, I don’t feel a strong connection with this one. If given the choice, I’d go for Cardboard Kingdom instead.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    Cute kids graphic novel about the importance of art, not suppressing emotions, friendship, teamwork, and creativity. The art style is really engaging (and some of the doodles the author has been drawing since he was a kid!) and while it wasn't my favorite graphic novel, I'm not the target audience. But I'd buy it for my kids. **Thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for giving me a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    With the diverse cast of characters, everyone will find someone with whom they can identify. The plot is funny and action packed and I love the teamwork angle.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    June 9th 2020 by Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young ReadersE ARC provided by the publisher Drew loves to draw, and has a notebook full of doodles with whom she interacts. When she takes her sketch book with her on an art club field trip to the local art museum, some of the doodles escape and cause problems with the art in the museum. Drew feels that her drawings aren't as impressive as those by her fellow students, so when she is assigned a project, she tries something bigger. Her Leviathan drawing June 9th 2020 by Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young ReadersE ARC provided by the publisher Drew loves to draw, and has a notebook full of doodles with whom she interacts. When she takes her sketch book with her on an art club field trip to the local art museum, some of the doodles escape and cause problems with the art in the museum. Drew feels that her drawings aren't as impressive as those by her fellow students, so when she is assigned a project, she tries something bigger. Her Leviathan drawing causes all sorts of problems, destroying both her work and those of the other students, and this destructive behavior seems tied to her feelings of anxiety and inadequacy. She needs the help of her classmates to make things right. Strengths: This was a great fantasy graphic novel with a realistic start, and I enjoyed how we are just dropped into Drew's world where of course art comes to life. Her parents run a diner, which is a fun setting, especially since it means Drew has access to the huge roll of paper used to cover tables! What budding artist wouldn't love that. While Drew loves to draw, she feels that her work isn't as good as her classmates, which is certainly a feeling all of us have at one time or another. The Leviathan as the manifestation of her anxiety is an interesting way to explain this to younger readers. Weaknesses: This got a bit repetitive in the middle, with the monster ravaging different things and the classmates trying different ways to deal with it. What I really think: Debating. This is certainly an interesting and well done graphic novel, but Cardboard Kingdom doesn't circulate as well as I expected with my students, but that is probably because of the younger cover. This would certainly be fascinating to readers who like to draw a lot, and I would definitely purchase it for an elementary school.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    "Go big or go home" is the collective message our heroine gets from her friends and tutors at art club, so she decides to create the largest and most impressive thing she ever has, and knocks out a Leviathan, based on what she saw at the local gallery. The only thing is, everything she draws comes to life – she has a whole village of cutesy doodles called, er, Doodles. However, without intending to, she's let loose a monster – and it's also threatened to destroy all the recurring characters her "Go big or go home" is the collective message our heroine gets from her friends and tutors at art club, so she decides to create the largest and most impressive thing she ever has, and knocks out a Leviathan, based on what she saw at the local gallery. The only thing is, everything she draws comes to life – she has a whole village of cutesy doodles called, er, Doodles. However, without intending to, she's let loose a monster – and it's also threatened to destroy all the recurring characters her friends have designed. Can the whole group create something that can right the wrong – something called friendship, cooperation, and friendly positivism? I don't think anyone outside the target audience for this book will take to the concept, that sketches and doodles come to life, and interact with our heroine from their 2D existence – nor that they can leave that realm and enter ours for mischievous purposes. But this certainly isn't designed to be all-ages friendly, and the right reader will potentially really like this. There is some worthy art education here and there, which we could do without, but there is also a sense of a moral, portraying the fact you should not be disappointed in or doubtful of your creativity, and just be happy you've produced something. Certainly our art tutor is more amenable to trashy comic book-styled inventions than the norm. So we're not supposed to dismiss someone's doodles as light, simple junk, and we're not supposed to turn anyone's creative tap off. And when the results are a book as pleasantly enjoyable as this, that would be a wrong thing – for all my talk of morals and lessons this book is primarily here for the quirky fantasy it has a whole portfolio of.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Doodleville by Chad Sell, 288 pages. GRAPHIC NOVEL. Alfred A. Knopf (Random House), 2020. $13. Language: G (0 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH When Drew and her friends in art club go to the Art Institute, they take away inspiration to make something new. But Drew’s project quickly takes on a mind of its own, wreaking havoc on the other creations. With her doodles creating so many problems, can Drew recover from losing both h Doodleville by Chad Sell, 288 pages. GRAPHIC NOVEL. Alfred A. Knopf (Random House), 2020. $13. Language: G (0 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH When Drew and her friends in art club go to the Art Institute, they take away inspiration to make something new. But Drew’s project quickly takes on a mind of its own, wreaking havoc on the other creations. With her doodles creating so many problems, can Drew recover from losing both her art and her friends? Drew’s doodles are magical, and I love that everyone in the book takes it in stride as if it’s totally normal -- which makes me wonder what the rest of the world looks like as imagined by Sell. I also love that Drew has a great support system around her. The conflict in this book stems from Drew’s internal battles, and the depiction of depression, or at least a depressive episode, was beautifully done. A message to take away from all of this is when we reach out for help from those who love us, our inner demons can be overcome. Reviewer: Carolina Herdegen https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2020...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

    Drew loves to draw. She is in an art club with several other kids that have unique talents. However, when one of her drawings starts attacking her art club's work she must team up with them to stop it. Art: Overall I thought the drawings, especially the doodles, were really cute. I liked the moments when the doodles were playing with the real paintings. However, sometimes the art for the other characters got kind of ugly. I also think the other characters could have had more distinct art styles. Drew loves to draw. She is in an art club with several other kids that have unique talents. However, when one of her drawings starts attacking her art club's work she must team up with them to stop it. Art: Overall I thought the drawings, especially the doodles, were really cute. I liked the moments when the doodles were playing with the real paintings. However, sometimes the art for the other characters got kind of ugly. I also think the other characters could have had more distinct art styles. They all drew something that Drew could have drawn. It's probably the limitation of only having one artist. If only he could have collaborated with some other artists. Story: I liked the themes of cooperation. It's great to see such a diverse group of characters come together to achieve a goal. It's also a reminder that everyone has something to offer in their artistic expression. I also liked the leviathan as a metaphor for anger, depression, or artistic funk. Some of the dialog was a little stilted and could have been stronger. Overall, I'd give this a 3.5/5 stars rounded-up to 4. A cute graphic novel for kids ages 8-12

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    The art in Chad Sells new book is wonderful-Drew and her friends are graphic characters, but each unique and realistic-looking, especially as Drew’s “doodles,” simple line drawings, dance all over the pages around them. The blend of full color panels mixed with the black and white sketches is dramatic and appealing. But the storyline of a girl who draws sketches that come to life and interfere in every aspect of their creator’s life, wrecking havoc wherever they go, just seemed to drone on and o The art in Chad Sells new book is wonderful-Drew and her friends are graphic characters, but each unique and realistic-looking, especially as Drew’s “doodles,” simple line drawings, dance all over the pages around them. The blend of full color panels mixed with the black and white sketches is dramatic and appealing. But the storyline of a girl who draws sketches that come to life and interfere in every aspect of their creator’s life, wrecking havoc wherever they go, just seemed to drone on and on as poor Drew tries to fit in with the other kids in the art club. I loved the stories that Sells wrote and gathered from other writers to give readers a Cardboard Kingdom, but I am not too enthusiastic about his new book. I think I’ll wait and see what other librarians report about their patrons’ response before I buy this one. Content notes: no profanity or sexual content, violence is the cartoon superhero type of messes created by doodles on the rampage, the art club kids have a variety of skin tones and body shapes and the drawings of one member center on the adventures of two boyfriend princes. Target age group is likely grades 4-6. Thanks for the dARC, NetGalley.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Hicks

    I received this as an ARC from NetGalley and below are my honest opinions of the book. I absolutely adored Cardboard Kingdom and was so excited when I saw this was coming out! It is a story of friendship and figuring out how to deal with frustration and sadness all with the magic of art! I will definitely be purchasing this for my middle school library, but I also believe it is appropriate for upper elementary as well! It has great artwork specifically the parts in the art museum when you see th I received this as an ARC from NetGalley and below are my honest opinions of the book. I absolutely adored Cardboard Kingdom and was so excited when I saw this was coming out! It is a story of friendship and figuring out how to deal with frustration and sadness all with the magic of art! I will definitely be purchasing this for my middle school library, but I also believe it is appropriate for upper elementary as well! It has great artwork specifically the parts in the art museum when you see the different art styles and how they are all mingled together. I thought that was a unique touch to the story! I also thought the author tackled inner conflict to a perfection! A lot of times kids/preteens don't understand what is going on, just that they are frustrated and sad as well as navigating friendships that are a bit rocky. This story touched on those things which is something important to have for that age group! In the end, I highly recommend this GN and can't wait to share it with my students and teachers!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carro Herdegen

    Language: G (0 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG When Drew and her friends in art club go to the Art Institute, they take away inspiration to make something new. But Drew’s project quickly takes on a mind of its own, wreaking havoc on the other creations. With her doodles creating so many problems, can Drew recover from losing both her art and her friends? Drew’s doodles are magical, and I love that everyone in the book takes it in stride as if it’s totally normal -- which makes me w Language: G (0 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG When Drew and her friends in art club go to the Art Institute, they take away inspiration to make something new. But Drew’s project quickly takes on a mind of its own, wreaking havoc on the other creations. With her doodles creating so many problems, can Drew recover from losing both her art and her friends? Drew’s doodles are magical, and I love that everyone in the book takes it in stride as if it’s totally normal -- which makes me wonder what the rest of the world looks like as imagined by Sell. I also love that Drew has a great support system around her. The conflict in this book stems from Drew’s internal battles, and the depiction of depression, or at least a depressive episode, was beautifully done. A message to take away from all of this is when we reach out for help from those who love us, our inner demons can be overcome. Reviewed for https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Random House Children's Publishers through NetGalley. Sell's main character creates an entire city for her Doodles who come to life and explore. Unfortunately, they often get in trouble when they're out of the sketchbook or city drawing. One of Drew's drawings, the Leviathan, turns angry in response to Drew's emotions. She and her Art Club friends connect their characters and work to destroy the Leviathan. However, Drew realizes a better way to conne Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from Random House Children's Publishers through NetGalley. Sell's main character creates an entire city for her Doodles who come to life and explore. Unfortunately, they often get in trouble when they're out of the sketchbook or city drawing. One of Drew's drawings, the Leviathan, turns angry in response to Drew's emotions. She and her Art Club friends connect their characters and work to destroy the Leviathan. However, Drew realizes a better way to connect with it and help it balance the darker emotions. The resulting universe connects all of their characters and settings for all of the drawings. The illustrations are highly detailed and the characters evolve throughout the book. This is book one of a series and I'm looking forward to the next one to continue the tale.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novels and I know my students will too! Some have noted not being satisfied with the mix of realism and fantasy but I don't think that took away from the book for me. Kids are able to imagine alternate worlds where doodles can pop off the page - the intended age group doesn't necessarily question the plausibility of this happening in real life like adults might. This book features diverse characters and some deeper, more complex emotions/themes are explored. I c I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novels and I know my students will too! Some have noted not being satisfied with the mix of realism and fantasy but I don't think that took away from the book for me. Kids are able to imagine alternate worlds where doodles can pop off the page - the intended age group doesn't necessarily question the plausibility of this happening in real life like adults might. This book features diverse characters and some deeper, more complex emotions/themes are explored. I could see it being a little bit scary for very young children but I think it's sweet spot would be 4th grade & up. Overall, I had a lot of fun reading this and I'm excited to purchase for my elementary school library. I received a free eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review - thank you NetGalley & Random House Children's :)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ciera

    Doodleville was a cute kids graphic novel all about art and creativity and friendship. It dealt the psyche of artists and how emotion can affect art and vice versa and the demarcation between low and high art. I especially liked the scenes in the museum that established Drew as the colleague of famous and classical artists despite her age and because of her passion, and the value that art has contrary to the value people assign. Of course, it also was very much centered on friendship and the col Doodleville was a cute kids graphic novel all about art and creativity and friendship. It dealt the psyche of artists and how emotion can affect art and vice versa and the demarcation between low and high art. I especially liked the scenes in the museum that established Drew as the colleague of famous and classical artists despite her age and because of her passion, and the value that art has contrary to the value people assign. Of course, it also was very much centered on friendship and the collaboration between artists and friends; no matter what Drew or her doodles did, her friends supported and helped her, even when she was in the wrong.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Noonan

    I enjoyed Cardboard Kingdom, Sell’s first graphic novel produced with a team of other creators, but I like this debut solo effort even better. It’s got a wonderfully original story, and a cast of diverse characters that have genuine mass appeal. It’s got an illustrative style that will appeal to lovers of the clean lines of Telgemeier-esque books, while at the same time, drawing in fans of the more action-inspired superhero genre. It’s the perfect combination of fantasy and reality with a dose o I enjoyed Cardboard Kingdom, Sell’s first graphic novel produced with a team of other creators, but I like this debut solo effort even better. It’s got a wonderfully original story, and a cast of diverse characters that have genuine mass appeal. It’s got an illustrative style that will appeal to lovers of the clean lines of Telgemeier-esque books, while at the same time, drawing in fans of the more action-inspired superhero genre. It’s the perfect combination of fantasy and reality with a dose of psychological self-awareness mixed in. Spot on for middle grade readers developmentally. It will be a rec for many at my library.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    A cute middle-grade graphic novel about a young girl named Drew, whose doodles magically come to life. I really liked the concept of this book, but I think the execution fell a bit short. I wish we'd spent more time getting to know the doodles, and the conflict between Drew and her Art Club friends didn't really land for me. The art also wasn't my favorite, the caricature like style made the kids look like shrunk down adults, and that took me out of the story quite frequently. Overall, I didn't A cute middle-grade graphic novel about a young girl named Drew, whose doodles magically come to life. I really liked the concept of this book, but I think the execution fell a bit short. I wish we'd spent more time getting to know the doodles, and the conflict between Drew and her Art Club friends didn't really land for me. The art also wasn't my favorite, the caricature like style made the kids look like shrunk down adults, and that took me out of the story quite frequently. Overall, I didn't enjoy this one as much as Cardboard Kingdom, but I still think kids, especially artsy and creative ones, will have fun reading it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    In this book, the drawings you doodle come to life. Drew has had a passion for art since a young age, and unlike her classmates, her friendly characters tend to get into mischief beyond the pages she draws them on-- one of them just stole a hat from a painting at the museum! Her 2D pals live in Doodleville, a city she keeps on her bedroom wall. Her latest, a playful Leviathan, becomes a bit sinister when she tries to stop his hijinks... can she and her friends save their art from being consumed In this book, the drawings you doodle come to life. Drew has had a passion for art since a young age, and unlike her classmates, her friendly characters tend to get into mischief beyond the pages she draws them on-- one of them just stole a hat from a painting at the museum! Her 2D pals live in Doodleville, a city she keeps on her bedroom wall. Her latest, a playful Leviathan, becomes a bit sinister when she tries to stop his hijinks... can she and her friends save their art from being consumed by him? Doodleville is a super original concept, bound to draw in any graphic novel aficionado.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I really enjoyed Cardboard Kingdom by Sell so I was looking forward to this book. Like in Cardboard Kingdom, this story is fun and funny but has some depth to it. We have a five kids in an Art Club, each of who seems to already know about the Doodles. They can leave the paper they're drawn on and move about freely. I did somewhat feel like there was a back story we didn't get in the beginning but it didn't really impact the rest f the story. The art is good and it's nice and colorful. I think ch I really enjoyed Cardboard Kingdom by Sell so I was looking forward to this book. Like in Cardboard Kingdom, this story is fun and funny but has some depth to it. We have a five kids in an Art Club, each of who seems to already know about the Doodles. They can leave the paper they're drawn on and move about freely. I did somewhat feel like there was a back story we didn't get in the beginning but it didn't really impact the rest f the story. The art is good and it's nice and colorful. I think children who enjoyed Cardboard Kingdom with enjoy the first Doodleville installment (the end said "to be continued"). I'd hand this to ages 8 and above. #Netgalley

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Rose

    Very cute! I liked the world this was set in, a place where drawings are alive and can leave their picture frames. Sometimes the art style was a little weird because it would go from the cutesy cartoon style to a little more detail in the characters' faces that felt unsettling, but for the most part I liked the art. I thought the characters were all cute and likable and that Drew’s story of insecurity was relevant to its target audience. I also loved that Sell included a few pages in the back wh Very cute! I liked the world this was set in, a place where drawings are alive and can leave their picture frames. Sometimes the art style was a little weird because it would go from the cutesy cartoon style to a little more detail in the characters' faces that felt unsettling, but for the most part I liked the art. I thought the characters were all cute and likable and that Drew’s story of insecurity was relevant to its target audience. I also loved that Sell included a few pages in the back where he gave some backstory to some of the doodles, since some were real doodles he came up with as a kid:) Thanks to Netgalley for the EARC.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cass Moskowitz

    This book warmed my creative heart. For any kid who ever felt a little different, maybe more than a little, this book is for you. In a world like our own, but where doodles and drawings come to life, things can get a little sticky. Drew loves doodling, and her doodles are her closest friends, but sometimes they cause trouble. Drew and her art club are now some of my favourite characters. I loved their differences and their art styles and how they worked with Drew throughout the book. I am only s This book warmed my creative heart. For any kid who ever felt a little different, maybe more than a little, this book is for you. In a world like our own, but where doodles and drawings come to life, things can get a little sticky. Drew loves doodling, and her doodles are her closest friends, but sometimes they cause trouble. Drew and her art club are now some of my favourite characters. I loved their differences and their art styles and how they worked with Drew throughout the book. I am only sad that I have this as an E-ARC because I wanted to hug this book close to my chest when I was done with it. Which is why I’m preordering it right now. And you should too!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katie Reilley

    Drew is a tween who loves to doodle. And, oh yeah, her doodles come to life! During a visit to the Art Institute of Chicago, Drew’s art club leader encourages Drew to find inspiration for a new character based on something she sees there. Drew decides to create Leviathan (Levi) for short. Levi feeds off Drew’s emotions, and when Drew becomes worried or anxious, WATCH OUT! This graphic novel has important themes of friendship, creativity, teamwork, and mental health are present throughout he book Drew is a tween who loves to doodle. And, oh yeah, her doodles come to life! During a visit to the Art Institute of Chicago, Drew’s art club leader encourages Drew to find inspiration for a new character based on something she sees there. Drew decides to create Leviathan (Levi) for short. Levi feeds off Drew’s emotions, and when Drew becomes worried or anxious, WATCH OUT! This graphic novel has important themes of friendship, creativity, teamwork, and mental health are present throughout he book, and with an author’s note and annotated history of his doodles, my middle grade readers will love learning about the history of this one!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I didn't love this quite as much as I'd loved Cardboard Kingdom, but that's a pretty high bar. I like the concept of a world where art comes to life, but I don't think Sell quite articulated what made Drew's wild, uncontrollable art different from everybody else's well-behaved art. It just is. I did like the way he externalized Drew's anxieties and self-consciousness about her art, though, and I think that part of the story is quite relatable. I liked the art club kids and especially the sponsor I didn't love this quite as much as I'd loved Cardboard Kingdom, but that's a pretty high bar. I like the concept of a world where art comes to life, but I don't think Sell quite articulated what made Drew's wild, uncontrollable art different from everybody else's well-behaved art. It just is. I did like the way he externalized Drew's anxieties and self-consciousness about her art, though, and I think that part of the story is quite relatable. I liked the art club kids and especially the sponsoring teacher, who is positive and encouraging in all the best ways. I am looking forward to the next book in the series, because I am a bit attached to the characters.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Great Books

    From the author of "The Cardboard Kingdom" comes another adventure from Chad Sell. In this graphic novel, Drew is an inspiring artist who has created her own world of doodles which she calls "Doodleville". The graphic novel's illustrations connect famous paintings from Chicago's Art Institute with the characters' own creations. However Drew creates a leviathan it evolves into something that she never expected. Will her friends in the Art Club be able to help her learn how reign it into control b From the author of "The Cardboard Kingdom" comes another adventure from Chad Sell. In this graphic novel, Drew is an inspiring artist who has created her own world of doodles which she calls "Doodleville". The graphic novel's illustrations connect famous paintings from Chicago's Art Institute with the characters' own creations. However Drew creates a leviathan it evolves into something that she never expected. Will her friends in the Art Club be able to help her learn how reign it into control before it destroys all of Doodleville? Reviewer #16

  25. 4 out of 5

    Iris

    In Doodleville, doodles are more than meets the eye and Drew's doodles are more than she can handle! When one of her playful creations becomes monstrous in response to her own anger, Drew and her friends unite all their artwork to save Doodleville from destruction. The characters in the book are all diverse and so are their art. Despite their differences, they all share a passion and connection with each other, trying to help Drew reign back her Leviathan. A book about creativity, self-esteem, f In Doodleville, doodles are more than meets the eye and Drew's doodles are more than she can handle! When one of her playful creations becomes monstrous in response to her own anger, Drew and her friends unite all their artwork to save Doodleville from destruction. The characters in the book are all diverse and so are their art. Despite their differences, they all share a passion and connection with each other, trying to help Drew reign back her Leviathan. A book about creativity, self-esteem, friendship, and teamwork, it will surely appeal to its target audience.

  26. 5 out of 5

    TheNextGenLibrarian

    This graphic novel is by Chad Sell, author of Cardboard Kingdom, a Texas Bluebonnet nominee two years ago. Doodleville follows Drew, an artist whose drawings come to life. However when she takes her art to a newer, darker level, her monster Levi, comes alive and wreaks havoc on all the art in Art Club. Drew and her friends must find a way to stop it. I found this book to be beautifully drawn and a great example of a diverse group of kids that show readers what friendship and teamwork look like. This graphic novel is by Chad Sell, author of Cardboard Kingdom, a Texas Bluebonnet nominee two years ago. Doodleville follows Drew, an artist whose drawings come to life. However when she takes her art to a newer, darker level, her monster Levi, comes alive and wreaks havoc on all the art in Art Club. Drew and her friends must find a way to stop it. I found this book to be beautifully drawn and a great example of a diverse group of kids that show readers what friendship and teamwork look like. Book 2 should be great! Thanks Netgalley for an ARC. All opinions are my own.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    So happy for this new series from Chad Sell! Drew (perfect name!) is a doodler. I've had MANY doodlers over the years. Wish I would have had this book last year for the KING of doodlers. You could go really deep with this book. Drew's Leviathan reflects her own inner self -- part happy/friendly, and part dark/destructive. The book explores how to own your demons and balance them with your better self. Love the community of Drew's art club, how each artist's characters reflect them with different s So happy for this new series from Chad Sell! Drew (perfect name!) is a doodler. I've had MANY doodlers over the years. Wish I would have had this book last year for the KING of doodlers. You could go really deep with this book. Drew's Leviathan reflects her own inner self -- part happy/friendly, and part dark/destructive. The book explores how to own your demons and balance them with your better self. Love the community of Drew's art club, how each artist's characters reflect them with different strengths, and how they collaborated to help Drew.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This is such a sweet graphic novel! The diverse cast features some really fun young artists, and I think young readers will definitely be able to find someone to relate to. I loved that art was alive in this book, and watching Drew's doodles interact with famous paintings, as well as her friends' superhero sketches, was cute and clever! This is an awesome read that readers young and old should pick up!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    I received an advance reader's copy of this book. It is a graphic novel. While I'm not a big fan of graphic novels, I've read plenty and enjoyed them. This wasn't one of them. I found the story a bit convoluted. A young girl has created a town for all of her doodles. A monster comes to town and starts destroying things. I suspect that elementary kids might enjoy this book. If you're an adult, I'd suggest a pass on it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This didn't work for me. It has an interesting concept and some good messages about art, self-acceptance, and dealing with emotions, but I wanted more world-building and a lot less metaphor. Clearly, most readers liked this, and I'm glad that they did, but I had a hard time following the story. Because the author never grounded his magical realism plot within a framework of communicated rules for the fantasy world, what happened seemed random and choppy to me.

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