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The Young Carthaginian MP3 Audiobook (read aloud by Jim Hodges)

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Set in ancient times, during the Punic wars, this story follows the adventures of young Malchus, an officer in Hannibal's army. Henty describes the army's incredible journey through southern Europe and across the Alps in fascinating detail, providing both a lesson in ancient history and an absorbing story. The balance of power in Europe swayed between Rome and Carthage and Set in ancient times, during the Punic wars, this story follows the adventures of young Malchus, an officer in Hannibal's army. Henty describes the army's incredible journey through southern Europe and across the Alps in fascinating detail, providing both a lesson in ancient history and an absorbing story. The balance of power in Europe swayed between Rome and Carthage and the outcome of this struggle would determine the course of Western Civilization, even until today.


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Set in ancient times, during the Punic wars, this story follows the adventures of young Malchus, an officer in Hannibal's army. Henty describes the army's incredible journey through southern Europe and across the Alps in fascinating detail, providing both a lesson in ancient history and an absorbing story. The balance of power in Europe swayed between Rome and Carthage and Set in ancient times, during the Punic wars, this story follows the adventures of young Malchus, an officer in Hannibal's army. Henty describes the army's incredible journey through southern Europe and across the Alps in fascinating detail, providing both a lesson in ancient history and an absorbing story. The balance of power in Europe swayed between Rome and Carthage and the outcome of this struggle would determine the course of Western Civilization, even until today.

30 review for The Young Carthaginian MP3 Audiobook (read aloud by Jim Hodges)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Feliks

    Can not recommend to others, nor even tolerate myself--even with the widest leeway granted for a children's adventure book, this is frankly godawful. I had high hopes for this fine-looking printed work of historic fiction---it is a very handsome volume, complete with publisher's notes, author's preface, maps, illustrations, and superb cover art. In short, everything one could ask except good writing. The book fails on four broad points: content, technique, characters, and dialog. I will itemize Can not recommend to others, nor even tolerate myself--even with the widest leeway granted for a children's adventure book, this is frankly godawful. I had high hopes for this fine-looking printed work of historic fiction---it is a very handsome volume, complete with publisher's notes, author's preface, maps, illustrations, and superb cover art. In short, everything one could ask except good writing. The book fails on four broad points: content, technique, characters, and dialog. I will itemize them in turn: Content: staid, stale, stodgy. There is no new historical information provided. It's all straight out of a Western Civ 101 textbook. Content-wise, it falls well short of being anything amazing, un-guessed at, or looked-at-from-a-fresh angle. Henty makes no startling addition to what we know of Hannibal's campaign. Dismal & dismaying to discover this in such a famed novel. Technique: Not successful. The author labors to convey his story wholly without the imagination necessary for the task. Blocky paragraphs of adjectives and adverbs, falling back on a mass of old, exaggerated cliches and hyperbole such as 'his lofty forehead' and 'his tireless companions'. Henty descends into the old pitfall of 'telling, rather than showing'. No one wants to hear a western historian re-tell the Punic War in this fashion, believe me. This kind of writing would make the Strathemeyer syndicate wince! Characterization: the two grievances above would not damn the book entirely. But (you think to yourself trying to find something via which to salvage your purchase) "Well, if the history is lacking, are there at least any engaging characters?" Edgar Rice Burroughs proved that a hist-fic book without excellent research done, can still be fun if the characters are well-invented, convincing, and charismatic. Unfortunately here, they are not. What you get is leaden, wooden depiction, stilted and unrealistic. Cardboard-cutouts and store-window mannequins. It is frankly annoying to see the great Hannibal depicted in such a simplistic fashion. The Carthaginian army are --in this book--nowhere drawn earthy or vulgar the way we might expect soldiers to be. These men do not stink, spit, curse, urinate, or sweat--they 'perspire' and dab at their forehead with their hankies. They "do not know the meaning of the word 'fear'"! You catch my drift. Dialog: worst I've seen in a long time. There is no casual, vernacular slang. No colloquialisms, no colorful chatter--these troops all speak exceeding proper, formal schoolroom English. How bizarre! There is no ethnic flavor to the conversations at all. There is not even any especially 'Carthaginian world-view' offered. This story of the invasion of Rome is essentially told from the Roman viewpoint even though the troops wear barbarian armor. Everything is conveyed through a British mindset. Yes...this highly-lugubrious dialog, is really what forced me to toss the book aside. Painfully mawkish speech-making. No one in history ever spoke like these figures do. The book simply can't recover from these faults. Sad.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Mead

    Meh. The history aspect was interesting enough. The repetitiveness of it all was a bit too much. I just don't get on with Henty in the best way.... 2.5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Bronn

    I love so many of G.A. Henty’s other works but this one was just dull and preachy. The narrator was all wrong too in the audiobook. I’ll stick to the other titles of his that are more engaging.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Féarghal Mac giobúin

    I first read the Young Carthaginian as a child. Back then the Romans were popularly seen as the good guys, the civilising force of order against the barbarian hordes. To read this through the eyes of a young Carthaginian officer, a cousin to the dreaded Hannibal was groundbreaking for me. Malchus is a sympathetic protagonist and we follow him through campaigns in Spain, southern France, across the Alps and into Italy. Hannibal's greatest triumphs such as the River Trebia, Lake Trasimene and of cou I first read the Young Carthaginian as a child. Back then the Romans were popularly seen as the good guys, the civilising force of order against the barbarian hordes. To read this through the eyes of a young Carthaginian officer, a cousin to the dreaded Hannibal was groundbreaking for me. Malchus is a sympathetic protagonist and we follow him through campaigns in Spain, southern France, across the Alps and into Italy. Hannibal's greatest triumphs such as the River Trebia, Lake Trasimene and of course Cannae are all intimately described. Henty shows the cost of war and the human suffering quite harshly. Malchus loses men not just to the enemy but to disease, the cold and desertion. It is an absolute classic and a great introduction for children to historical fiction, as good as if not better than the Eagle of the Ninth.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Del

    A fun book about a time I didn't know much about. The author does a pretty good job of transporting you back to give you a view of what life was like during the time of Hannibal. I enjoyed it, but someone who already knows a lot about this time likely would not. It is an era I haven't studied, however, so I learned enough to make it enjoyable. Listened to the unabridged Audible.com audiobook version.

  6. 4 out of 5

    The_Flaming_Roach

    This is a terrible book,do not read this book,trust me you will hate it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    I grew up reading G.A. Henty, and, while I admit I often found his books boring, I love coming back to them now for the history. His books are geared more toward boys than girls, but I have always found them to be interesting, engaging, and informative. Henty was a thorough and meticulous historian, and you will be sure to learn a lot from his books. I particularly enjoy his four ancient stories: the Cat of Bubbastes, the Young Carthaginian, Beric the Briton, and For the Temple. All that being s I grew up reading G.A. Henty, and, while I admit I often found his books boring, I love coming back to them now for the history. His books are geared more toward boys than girls, but I have always found them to be interesting, engaging, and informative. Henty was a thorough and meticulous historian, and you will be sure to learn a lot from his books. I particularly enjoy his four ancient stories: the Cat of Bubbastes, the Young Carthaginian, Beric the Briton, and For the Temple. All that being said, it is important to remember that Henty was interested mostly in the historical, rather than the fictional, side of his books. Most of his stories are heavy on history and light on the actual plot line and hero. While this bothers many readers, I have never found it to be much of an issue. Read the books for the history, and you will be enlightened and informed. Read the books for the fiction, and you may find yourself bored. That is the case with most, if not quite all, of Henty's books. Henty was a Christian, which I love, because it means that he always takes a Christian perspective on historical events. The Young Carthaginian is probably one of his only books in which the character does not come into contact with Jewish or Christian influences, which makes it a little sad but also accurate to the times. Ultimately, I wish more boys and girls were exposed to Henty; his books are packed full with history and are a great way to learn about different time periods and events!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rick Stuckwisch

    This was our second G.A. Henty book (following after The Cat of Bubastes). Henty wrote historical fiction, typically crafting a fictional narrative within a highly accurate historical context. In this case he traced the efforts of Hannibal to conquer Rome on behalf of Carthage. I enjoyed the story while also finding the history engaging and informative. Although I previously had some vague awareness of Hannibal, but this was a period of history that I have not been well aware of or familiar with This was our second G.A. Henty book (following after The Cat of Bubastes). Henty wrote historical fiction, typically crafting a fictional narrative within a highly accurate historical context. In this case he traced the efforts of Hannibal to conquer Rome on behalf of Carthage. I enjoyed the story while also finding the history engaging and informative. Although I previously had some vague awareness of Hannibal, but this was a period of history that I have not been well aware of or familiar with. We're working our way through a number of Henty's books, reading them in order of historical chronology. My interest has certainly been whetted with the first two books, and I'm looking forward to more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christie Peters

    Like Cat of Babastes, this book is about non-English history. It was a great book. One of Henry's best for sticking to the story and filling in details. If you are the type of reader who samples a lot of different authors this must be one of the Henry books you try. I personally love Henry and intend to read all his books, but there are a few I have to push myself through, as not all his books, there's over 120 of them, are masterpieces. The Young Carthaginian is excellent. Henry tells you what i Like Cat of Babastes, this book is about non-English history. It was a great book. One of Henry's best for sticking to the story and filling in details. If you are the type of reader who samples a lot of different authors this must be one of the Henry books you try. I personally love Henry and intend to read all his books, but there are a few I have to push myself through, as not all his books, there's over 120 of them, are masterpieces. The Young Carthaginian is excellent. Henry tells you what it was like to match with Hannibal every step of the way.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    While it started out slow, the book picked up pace about half way through. There was also substantially more history in this book than the telling of a fictional story. As a history buff, I didn't mind it in the least. But others looking for a compelling story might be a bit bored.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jaguar

    TEEEEEERIIIIIIBLEEEEEEE CAN NOT GET THROUGH AND WHY WOULD SOMEONE EVEN WRITE A BOOK LIKE THIS TRYING TO MAKE IT INTO AN ACTION FILLED STORY JUST HISTORY IS FINE DOOOOOOOOO NOOOOOOT READ THIS BOOK TOOOOOOOOO BOOOOOOORING

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    A strange but entertaining read The novel is written in an of way that employs historical story telling, some present tense, some past tense. It’s mostly 3rd person but jumps into first occasionally. Really odd. But a great tale of the Punic wars. I enjoyed it thoroughly!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill Suits

    Not his best work and uneven.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen Gadd

    Very dense. Hard to get started, but interesting.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    We borrowed this book (on CD) from some friends and listened to it in the van whilst traveling hither and yon. To my shame, it's the first Henty I've read. I have heard good things about Henty's work for a number of years, but this was my first experience. I wish I could have given the book 3 1/2 stars, but I bumped it up to 4... I'm a nice guy. It was a good story, packed with historical interests. The protagonist, Malchus, was quite lovable in a PG sort of way. He exemplifies many admirable cha We borrowed this book (on CD) from some friends and listened to it in the van whilst traveling hither and yon. To my shame, it's the first Henty I've read. I have heard good things about Henty's work for a number of years, but this was my first experience. I wish I could have given the book 3 1/2 stars, but I bumped it up to 4... I'm a nice guy. It was a good story, packed with historical interests. The protagonist, Malchus, was quite lovable in a PG sort of way. He exemplifies many admirable character qualities. The downside, however, was that it made his character seem a bit flat: almost Ned Flanders-ish, but not quite. The story moved from one pond of action and adventure to another to another, to the point where young Machus's life seemed reminiscent of an episode of 24. The action portions of the book, however, were fun and well-told. The streams between those ponds of action, though, were not as pleasing. It would appear that Henty had a penchant for supplying detail, much detail, tedious detail. I think the book would have been better without it, but it was still a good book with it. My seven-year-old liked the book, so I'm sure we'll do more Henty. Maybe we'll even borrow some more from our friends!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vic Heaney

    A good old-fashioned adventure story. It follows Malchus, a young noble of Carthaginia, as he accompanies Hannibal's army as it invades Italy. Malchus takes part in all the astonishing battle victories of Hannibal and has a few adventures of his own. A good way of learning some history (although Hannibal is already a hero of mine) at the same time as having a good read. Of course the adventures, especially the implausibly easy escapes, stretch many points. Henty will not object to me giving him o A good old-fashioned adventure story. It follows Malchus, a young noble of Carthaginia, as he accompanies Hannibal's army as it invades Italy. Malchus takes part in all the astonishing battle victories of Hannibal and has a few adventures of his own. A good way of learning some history (although Hannibal is already a hero of mine) at the same time as having a good read. Of course the adventures, especially the implausibly easy escapes, stretch many points. Henty will not object to me giving him only 4 stars as he departed almost 100 years ago, leaving behind him many fine books like this to be read by young lads like myself. :-)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julia Garcia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Young Carthaginian by G.A. Henty is a book about the struggle between Carthage and Rome. The main character Malchus, is the cousin of Hannibal and fights with him in the battles. Throughout this book we see Malchus as young boy trying to save the sinking city of Carthage and later fighting for its survival. Detailed accounts of Hannibal's conquests constantly meet the reader's eye. This is a well written story and I highly recommend this book to anyone that loves reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Rasmussen

    I read this book when I was 12 years old. Henty books are rather on the "boyish book" side but many girls I know (including myself) enjoy them as well. You can find many G. A. Henty books on LibriVox: https://catalog.librivox.org/search.p... A friend of ours, Jim Hodges, has recorded many G. A. Henty books and we own them all and my brothers have listened to everyone of them. http://jimhodgesaudiobooks.com/ I read this book when I was 12 years old. Henty books are rather on the "boyish book" side but many girls I know (including myself) enjoy them as well. You can find many G. A. Henty books on LibriVox: https://catalog.librivox.org/search.p... A friend of ours, Jim Hodges, has recorded many G. A. Henty books and we own them all and my brothers have listened to everyone of them. http://jimhodgesaudiobooks.com/

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This excellent read chronicles the adventures of a young carthagenian as he marches with Hannibal on the way to attack Rome during the second Punic war. The descriptions are rich in detail and lend a feeling of being on the battlefield. Henty always does a fine job of pulling the reader into the story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This book was intended for boys and a young adult book from the late 19th century.  I read it because I love reading about Hannibal but it was far too old fashioned for me.  I read classic books but this is more classic popular fiction of the time.  I found the language too bombastic and overly dramatic.  It was a good example of writing for the time but for me very boring!  

  21. 5 out of 5

    Spenser White

    This book tells well a perspective of history nor often told (but getting more prevalent): history from the perspective of the losers. I didn't know much of the facts I learned from this book and the character are portrayed well. It feels, though, like sometimes I'm in proper Victorian England, but each era of history makes the others before it like them in ways. Top notch book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Martin

    Henty obviously wants to root for the Carthaginians against the Romans because they lost, but he discovered that they were pretty horrible, so this book is more complex than most because the good vs. evil line was harder for him to draw than usual.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    Full of adventures, battles, and honor, this book is about a brave and astute young noble in Hannibal's army. Having listened to 'The Great Courses' excellent lecture series about Rome last year, it was quite interesting to get the story of the 2nd Punic War from the Carthaginian perspective.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    So loooooong...but the boys and I both liked it. Accurate historical fiction, lots of great vocabulary, muted violence, even enjoyable for grown-ups. Excited to find this author and will definitely be reading more to the boys!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angelyn

    I love all of Henty's books. They were written for teenage boys, but I like them as much as my son. He was a good historian so his books are fairly accurate. This is the story of Hannibal. Amazing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John

    I still remember this book reading it as a young boy. Henty brought out historical events through the eyes of young boys and made them come to life. About Hanibal and his fight with Rome.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

    "...at least we should be free, and of all blessings none is to compare with that."

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love G.A. Henty books. love he inputs what he thinks and what is considered facts. Historical Fiction

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rkeddins

    Not sure why, but this was mas least favorite Henty book. It could be my lack of interest in this particular piece of history, but that hasn't kept me from enjoying his other books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeb

    this book is about hannibal.

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