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Travels Into Bokhara: Being the Account of a Journey from India to Cabool, Tartary and Persia: Also, Narrative of a Voyage on the Indus, from the Sea to Lahore. Performed Under the Orders of the Supreme Government of India in 1831, 1832, 1833, Volumes 1-2

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

30 review for Travels Into Bokhara: Being the Account of a Journey from India to Cabool, Tartary and Persia: Also, Narrative of a Voyage on the Indus, from the Sea to Lahore. Performed Under the Orders of the Supreme Government of India in 1831, 1832, 1833, Volumes 1-2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zacharias Sifakis

    Enjoyable and insightful This is the travel log of an explorer, adventurer, diplomat and spy. Reading this book you become a companion of Burnes in his primitive mission, mapping a relatively unknown area of the world (unknown even in modern time for many of us). Although in many cases the descriptions of the landscape can be tedious (i.e. length and depth of rivers), it is useful to put it into perspective of the time this was written, and understand the importance it had at this time. Enjoyable and insightful This is the travel log of an explorer, adventurer, diplomat and spy. Reading this book you become a companion of Burnes in his primitive mission, mapping a relatively unknown area of the world (unknown even in modern time for many of us). Although in many cases the descriptions of the landscape can be tedious (i.e. length and depth of rivers), it is useful to put it into perspective of the time this was written, and understand the importance it had at this time. Thankfully most of the time the descriptions are magnificent, and give a real insight to the lands he travelled, the people he encountered, and their customs and cultures, that also relevant (in some extend) today. The reader has a lot also to gain by appreciating the ways he traveled in each region (change of medium, clothes, habits) and the ways he built his relationships with the different people. I am not sure if this is the most accurate history/travel book for this region, yet I rate it with 4 stars because I definitely enjoyed reading it and following Burnes to his journey. Explanatory notes on this edition were also helpful.

  2. 4 out of 5

    W

    British spies,two hundred years ago,were willing to travel anywhere,and everywhere,to expand the frontiers of their empire.Alexander Burnes' journey,brought him fame and a knighthood.Eventually,however,he ventured forth into Afghanistan once more and paid with his life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    jwh16

    Accounts of a British spy employed by the East India Co, to travel through India and the Middle East. The book provided an insightful overview of 19th century British India and the Middle East, which was educational. The former consistently treated Burnes with deference (by virtue of being a British colony) - this formed a rather dull and boring 2/3 of the book where we witness Burnes wine and dine with a litany of brown nosing locals. The latter was much more interesting, with lots of brushes Accounts of a British spy employed by the East India Co, to travel through India and the Middle East. The book provided an insightful overview of 19th century British India and the Middle East, which was educational. The former consistently treated Burnes with deference (by virtue of being a British colony) - this formed a rather dull and boring 2/3 of the book where we witness Burnes wine and dine with a litany of brown nosing locals. The latter was much more interesting, with lots of brushes with slave traders and lawless "Wild Wild West" type societies. Overall, despite potentially exciting content, Burnes's narration is dull, flat, distant and removed, rendering this to be a tedious book, despite its exciting premise. It doesn't give you a full and heady sense of his experiences. It isn't immersive in the way one hopes a rip roaring account of adventure should be. It reads more like a stale thesis by a sociologist.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

    For anyone who has worked or travelled in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan or Turkmenistan this is a gem. An under-cover British agent on an intelligence gathering mission in the1830s, giving his first-hand account. An episode of The Great Game, when no-one in the British Empire knew whether the Indus was navigable, or what was really happening in Central Asia beyond Kabul. A spectacular success with a very sorry end. Altogether fascinating! For anyone who has worked or travelled in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan or Turkmenistan this is a gem. An under-cover British agent on an intelligence gathering mission in the1830s, giving his first-hand account. An episode of ‘The Great Game’, when no-one in the British Empire knew whether the Indus was navigable, or what was really happening in Central Asia beyond Kabul. A spectacular success with a very sorry end. Altogether fascinating!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jrobertus

    Burnes was an officer in the British Indian army and in 1831 made a trip from India, through the Punjab, into Afghanistan and up to Bukhara. He traveled in disguise as far as locals were concerned, but identified himself to local officials as a British officer to be sure he wasnt accused of spying. Along the way he took note of roads, topology, climate etc., all as part of the Great Game. Several years later, Barnes was killed by a mob in Afghanistan as part of the first war there. Anyway, this Burnes was an officer in the British Indian army and in 1831 made a trip from India, through the Punjab, into Afghanistan and up to Bukhara. He traveled in disguise as far as locals were concerned, but identified himself to local officials as a British officer to be sure he wasn’t accused of spying. Along the way he took note of roads, topology, climate etc., all as part of the Great Game. Several years later, Barnes was killed by a mob in Afghanistan as part of the first war there. Anyway, this is a most engaging read. He describes the landscape, rivers, cities, and people along the way. There are so many observations I can’t summarize them all, but I will list a couple. He observed that people in desert Bukhara always drink water with ice, which they warehouse from the harsh winter. There is a lot of discussion of slave selling; Persian Shia and Russian infidels being the top sellers. Except for being held captive, the slaves he talks with say they are generally well treated, as long as they at least pretend to be Sunni Moslems. Barnes and his party spend a lot of time as guest of various potentates. When the cheese of Bukhara helps them find a safe caravan to the Caspian, he does it by calling in the caravan leader, holding his family hostage and insisting that the leader bring him back a sealed letter from Barnes that he has safely reached his destination, or else the caravan leaders family will be “wiped from the earth”. I guess that’s how you facilitate commerce in 1830 central Asia. I loved this short book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet E.

    A twenty-six-year-old British adventurer, multi-lingual Alexander Burnes explored and spied for the British East India Company and, ultimate, the Crown. 'Bokhara Burnes' explored Bukhara, served as a spy during the first Afghan War. He was knighted by Queen Victoria for his clandestine services in those tempestuous times. Here is his detailed record of a trail-blazing journey across Afghanistan and beyond, which he later published as "Travels into Bokhara - A Voyage up the Indus to Lahore and a A twenty-six-year-old British adventurer, multi-lingual Alexander Burnes explored and spied for the British East India Company and, ultimate, the Crown. 'Bokhara Burnes' explored Bukhara, served as a spy during the first Afghan War. He was knighted by Queen Victoria for his clandestine services in those tempestuous times. Here is his detailed record of a trail-blazing journey across Afghanistan and beyond, which he later published as "Travels into Bokhara - A Voyage up the Indus to Lahore and a Journey to Cabool, Tartary & Persia." What more do you need to know? Grab a copy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Although the text is a little dry and plodding and slow for me to read, and although most of the author's travels were in countries that I have no immediate intention of visiting (such as Afghanistan and Pakistan), it was still interesting and enjoyable to read an almost 200 year old travelogue of getting to Bukhara and what is now modern Uzbekistan.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Zoe Saadia

    Most fascinating testimony to the voyages of British adventurer, employed by the East India Company and later on knighted by Queen Victor for his accounts and deeds, through parts of India, Uzbekistan and Afghanistan, a vivid account that I, for one, found impossible to put down!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Great edition to a masterwork of travel writing/human observation A thrill for numismatists and travel buffs alike. Nice edition with explanatory notes. Burnes was a humane man, far ahead of his time. Very readable, not overwrought Victorian prose. Clear and even funny.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paul Conroy

    Fascinating look at life, 200 years ago, in the Terra Incognito on the frontiers of British India, the Russian Empire, the Chinese Empire and the Middle East. Fascinating look at life, 200 years ago, in the “Terra Incognito” on the frontiers of British India, the Russian Empire, the Chinese Empire and the Middle East.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emmapettitt

    Interesting and of its time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    William O'Brien

    Travels Into Bokhara by Alexander Burnes Brilliant for those currently interested in the history of Queen Victoria. One to add to the collection.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tom Bevan

    One of Britain's most important missions of exploration and diplomacy, preceding a Catalogue of bad political decisions that cost her dear. The prose of the time is floral and dynamic, but you get a true sense of the land and people as Alexander's mission travels through the north west frontier. Despite the differences the land has undergone in nearly two hundred years, it is highly poignant relevant to activities in the same region today.

  14. 4 out of 5

    YASH RAJ ARAB

  15. 4 out of 5

    Markus

  16. 4 out of 5

    readkrautread

  17. 5 out of 5

    Middlethought

  18. 5 out of 5

    MR J C FIELD

  19. 5 out of 5

    ErikZ

  20. 5 out of 5

    DL

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris S

  22. 5 out of 5

    Colter Freeman

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shahid Parvez

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Zubair Fattahi

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Lembke

  26. 4 out of 5

    Madelaine

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dave Snodgrass

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Corcut

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gurpreet Singh

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