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The Nostalgia Nerd's Retro Tech: Computer, Consoles & Games

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Remember what a wild frontier the early days of home gaming were? Manufacturers releasing new consoles at a breakneck pace; developers creating games that kept us up all night, then going bankrupt the next day; and what self-respecting kid didn't beg their parents for an Atari or a Nintendo? This explosion of computers, consoles, and games was genuinely unlike anything the Remember what a wild frontier the early days of home gaming were? Manufacturers releasing new consoles at a breakneck pace; developers creating games that kept us up all night, then going bankrupt the next day; and what self-respecting kid didn't beg their parents for an Atari or a Nintendo? This explosion of computers, consoles, and games was genuinely unlike anything the tech world has seen before or since.This thoroughly researched and geeky trip down memory lane pulls together the most entertaining stories from this dynamic era, and brings you the classic tech that should never be forgotten.


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Remember what a wild frontier the early days of home gaming were? Manufacturers releasing new consoles at a breakneck pace; developers creating games that kept us up all night, then going bankrupt the next day; and what self-respecting kid didn't beg their parents for an Atari or a Nintendo? This explosion of computers, consoles, and games was genuinely unlike anything the Remember what a wild frontier the early days of home gaming were? Manufacturers releasing new consoles at a breakneck pace; developers creating games that kept us up all night, then going bankrupt the next day; and what self-respecting kid didn't beg their parents for an Atari or a Nintendo? This explosion of computers, consoles, and games was genuinely unlike anything the tech world has seen before or since.This thoroughly researched and geeky trip down memory lane pulls together the most entertaining stories from this dynamic era, and brings you the classic tech that should never be forgotten.

30 review for The Nostalgia Nerd's Retro Tech: Computer, Consoles & Games

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick Davies

    What a shame. I received this as a gift at Christmas, and on an initial browse through it looked like it would make for an interesting read. In truth though, once I got round to sitting down with it, I found it a disappointment. What appears an intriguing idea quickly turns out to be a flawed handling of a subject with limited scope to make a well-rounded read. Perhaps it's because the book was originally a Kindle book made into a coffee-table hardback for the Christmas gift market, it just didn What a shame. I received this as a gift at Christmas, and on an initial browse through it looked like it would make for an interesting read. In truth though, once I got round to sitting down with it, I found it a disappointment. What appears an intriguing idea quickly turns out to be a flawed handling of a subject with limited scope to make a well-rounded read. Perhaps it's because the book was originally a Kindle book made into a coffee-table hardback for the Christmas gift market, it just didn't quite work for me. Leigh attempts to go through the history of console and computer videogaming, for each of fifty formats discussing the technical aspects of the hardware, detailing the impact of the computer/console, and also giving an example of a game 'to see', 'to play' and 'to avoid' for each. There are also plenty of glossy photographs - the book has a good initial visual appeal. But it got more and more irritating and forgettable to me. Format wise you soon realise that there is a number of flaws associated with the use of dark coloured backgrounds on which the text is small and black rendering sections hard-to-read. There are a number of glaring typographical errors including an entire paragraph repeated. I soon realised the fixed four pages for each computer/console was often too many, meaning space was filled with photographs of keyboards and black/grey/white boxes ad nauseum with a sprinkling of text - text that in the end was not that engaging (it is not easy to hold the reader's attention in fairly detailed descriptions of electronics). Perhaps most problematic is that this is essentially a single author's attempts to engage a reader in a large number of computers/consoles where all but the most extremely nerdy would only have an interest in or experience of a very small number. Fifty tech items are far too many to try and describe, as more than half of these are of very little significance or interest to 99% of people. I also found the author's choice of games to discuss was rather restricted to certain genres (mainly scrolling/FP platformers and shooters) where I prefer sports sims and puzzles - a personal preference, but one which further alienated me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Themistocles

    I snatched Nostalgia Nerd’s book as soon as I found out about it because I’m following his YouTube channel and love most of his videos. He manages to be both informative and funny, and the items he covers are usually very interesting, so getting the book was a no-brainer. Although I have to say, its price has fluctuated, both up and down, over the weeks; for instance, I think I bought it at around £17 (not sure though), then got a refund for a fiver and now it’s standing at £6? Weird. The book it I snatched Nostalgia Nerd’s book as soon as I found out about it because I’m following his YouTube channel and love most of his videos. He manages to be both informative and funny, and the items he covers are usually very interesting, so getting the book was a no-brainer. Although I have to say, its price has fluctuated, both up and down, over the weeks; for instance, I think I bought it at around £17 (not sure though), then got a refund for a fiver and now it’s standing at £6? Weird. The book itself looks, feels and smells lovely. It’s a 15.9 x 2.9 x 21.9 cm little tome with a very nice hard cover. The heavy-stock paper it’s printed on is uncoated, offering a feel both warm and modern. At 224 pages it’s not small, though it’s not long either. So, something ideal for a cold afternoon in the old armchair or an evening in bed. The book follows a steady format, first presenting a machine, coupled with a few photos, and then offers three games with their respective screenshots – A “must see” title, a “must play” one and a “must avoid” one. It’s well written an pretty, with few errors or typos (though by this time there have been a few books where the editors have managed to avoid event he single its/it’s typo, this is not one of them. But it’s almost there); though there is a big layout error on the ZX 81 page (I think – or around there) with some wrong photos and a repeated passage. It covers 49 (maybe I counted wrong and it was 50? 😃 ) computers and games consoles ranging from the early 70s to the early 00s. The devices covered are your usual fare, covering all classics and some not-quite-so-classic ones, with a Eurocentric bias – which is always good in my book. So don’t think you’ll go into it looking for obscure machines you’ve never heard of before. The blurb accompanying each machine is interesting, but no more than a short description. There’s also a box containing a (very) short ‘Fact Sheet’. So it’s highly unlikely you’ll learn something new about a particular device, to be honest. The photos are lovely, shot professionally and with some aesthetically excellent speciments, and include the machines themselves, some internals and some accessories. However, they are quite small, and although the paper used in the book is really nice, using uncoated paper does have its drawbacks when it comes to photos: some shiny, coated paper would greatly benefit those photos and help them stand out. The last page of each section/machine deals with the three characteristic games in the way mentioned above. Three very small photos with a blurb that’s probably the tiniest reviews you’ll ever read. Of course I understand that exhaustively reviewing these titles was completely outside the scope of the book, but come on, especially the “Must Avoid” ones are SCREAMING for some of the Nerd’s dry humour to pummel them into a Mexican landfill. Also, inevitably each and every reader will disagree with the choice of the titles on those pages, but of course the opposite would be just impossible. I myself did find some choices curious, but didn’t exactly grumble about them. All in all, I’d say that (if it’s not already evident by now) the books biggest shortcoming is its dearth of content. There’s lots of white space which makes it very pleasant to the eye, but as far as content goes, it’s lacking, unfortunately. What’s worse, though, is that, most probably because this lack of material, I finished the book having learned nothing whatsoever. Now, I do love my retro machines and have a nice little collection, and I do know more about them than the average person in the street, but when reading such a book I do expect to learn something new – and I often do, even when reading something that covers my top favourite ones. As it is, I’m sorry to say that after a few days passed I can remember very little of the book’s content, because -for me at least- it was so little of it it barely scratched the surface. Which brings me to the question: who is this book for? A retro hobbyist will not gain much by it. A member of the ‘general public’ will probably pass it by. And yet it’s not a coffee table book to just sit there, beautiful and glorious, to be idly browsed. Somehow it manages to slip through all these very real categories. A real pity, because it’s a book put together very competently, but its goal is not clear at all. 3/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Levent Pekcan

    YouTube'da Nostalgia Nerd kanalını yayınlayan Peter Leigh böyle bir kitap kaleme almış. Değerli bir dostun hediye etmesiyle benim de elime geçmiş oldu bu güzel kitap. Kitap içerik olarak hiç bilmediğimiz, çok özel bilgiler içermiyor ama bir sürü eski sistemin özet detaylarını sunan bir derleme olarak hoş. Bana hediye edilen hardcover basımıydı, cildi oldukça güzel ve kaliteli ancak iki noktaya takıldım. Kitabın basıldığı kağıt anlamsız şekilde kalın, dolayısıyla sayfaları çevirmekte zorlandım ve YouTube'da Nostalgia Nerd kanalını yayınlayan Peter Leigh böyle bir kitap kaleme almış. Değerli bir dostun hediye etmesiyle benim de elime geçmiş oldu bu güzel kitap. Kitap içerik olarak hiç bilmediğimiz, çok özel bilgiler içermiyor ama bir sürü eski sistemin özet detaylarını sunan bir derleme olarak hoş. Bana hediye edilen hardcover basımıydı, cildi oldukça güzel ve kaliteli ancak iki noktaya takıldım. Kitabın basıldığı kağıt anlamsız şekilde kalın, dolayısıyla sayfaları çevirmekte zorlandım ve her sayfa çevirişimde "acaba iki sayfa mı çevirdim" diye düşünüp sayfa numaralarını kontrol ettim. Bu çok büyük sorun sayılmaz, ancak daha can sıkıcı olan, her sistem için hazırlanan ve 3 önemli oyunu ele alan "must see, must play, must aviod" sayfaları mavi zemin, yeşil zemin vs üzerine çok çok küçük harflerle basılmış. Sarı zemin kullandıkları zaman tamam ama diğer durumlarda yazılar okunmuyor açıkçası, büyüteç lazım. Toparlamak gerekirse, güzel bir derleme. Bana keyif veren bir hediye oldu, kitaplığımda yer aldığı için mutluyum.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lange

    This book covers about 50 gaming consoles and home computers from the early to mid 70s through to the early 2000s. Except for a brief blurb at the end of the book, it purposely leaves out handheld gaming and PC gaming, possibly as subjects for future books. In addition to the hardware, three “Must See, Must Play, and Must Avoid ” games for each platform are briefly covered as well. In addition to hardware popular with North American consumers, the author, based in the UK, covers systems that wer This book covers about 50 gaming consoles and home computers from the early to mid 70s through to the early 2000s. Except for a brief blurb at the end of the book, it purposely leaves out handheld gaming and PC gaming, possibly as subjects for future books. In addition to the hardware, three “Must See, Must Play, and Must Avoid ” games for each platform are briefly covered as well. In addition to hardware popular with North American consumers, the author, based in the UK, covers systems that were popular in the UK and Europe as well, so I was able to learn about systems and games that I wasn’t as familiar with. I didn’t always agree with the author’s “Must See, Must Play, and Must Avoid” choices, who doesn’t like K-RAZY Shoot-out? But I wholeheartedly agree with others, like Ultima IV on the Apple II platform. It's all subjective, and like the Apple/Atari/Commodore wars of the early 1980s, it's all part of the fun. Other than the few editing mistakes (see page 70 for an example), and a few errors (page 127, Ballblazer was originally released for the Atari 8-bit computers, not the Atari 5200), my one complaint, is that the text can be rather small in some places (Must See, Must Play, and Must Avoid), which is unfortunate, as there seems to be plenty of surrounding white space that could have been filled with a large font size. If you are a fan of retro gaming consoles, retro computers, and retro video games, you should enjoy this book. The hardcover edition has full color graphics on a kind of thick, flat, cardstock type paper. It has 224 pages full of retro goodness. As of this writing, the hardcover edition costs about 14 USD on Amazon, which makes it a bargain.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stan James

    Retro Tech provides just what it says on the tin. Starting with systems in the early 1970s, it provides a summary of virtually every video game console and personal computer released up until the debut of the original Xbox in October 2001. Each summary includes a generous number of photos, sometimes including controllers or oddball accessories, or more mundane things like the power supplies. Leigh offers both an historical overview and also his own personal assessment on each device, which at tim Retro Tech provides just what it says on the tin. Starting with systems in the early 1970s, it provides a summary of virtually every video game console and personal computer released up until the debut of the original Xbox in October 2001. Each summary includes a generous number of photos, sometimes including controllers or oddball accessories, or more mundane things like the power supplies. Leigh offers both an historical overview and also his own personal assessment on each device, which at times stands in contrast to how I saw some of the systems, accounting for the differences in reception between the UK and North American (and in particular U.S.) audiences. Each summary concludes with a look at three games from each system: The Must-See, the Must-Play, and the Must-Avoid. A lot of the Must-Avoids are typically obscure fare (no, E.T. did not make the list for the Atari 2600--though it does get mentioned alongside the "winner"). Leigh keeps the writing light and at times droll, never being afraid to call out lemons and questionable marketing of years gone by. I was struck by the sheer number of systems that came out in the 70s and early 80s. It seemed that nearly everyone tried to get a slice of the video game pie before the famous crash of 1983. While there are systems that never sold well here in Canada that I was aware of--like the MSX computers, there are many listed here that I was utterly unfamiliar with, even leaving aside the UK-specific machines that never made it over here. For anyone who grew up when these machines were coming out (as I did), this is indeed a heady dose of nostalgia. For others, it serves as a brief and well-illustrated history of the early days of video games and personal computers. In fact, my only real knock on the book is that each write-up only amounts to a page or so. I would love to see a more in-depth look at the same topic. As it is, I was able to tear through the book all too quickly. Still, this was an enjoyable look back and an easy recommendation for those who would enjoy seeing the sometimes wacky products that came out in the quest for the early gamer's dollars (or pounds).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    As an occasional viewer of the author's YouTube channel I couldn't believe my luck when I found this book on sale in a bookshop but I'm sad to say in the end I'm quite disappointed after reading it. First thing is the physical book itself which has been poorly thought out. The pages are not printed on gloss (i.e. the usually "shiny" paper you'd expected for photo/graphics heavy books) but instead is just done on standard paper. This gives it a bit of a cheaper feel and results in the pictures bei As an occasional viewer of the author's YouTube channel I couldn't believe my luck when I found this book on sale in a bookshop but I'm sad to say in the end I'm quite disappointed after reading it. First thing is the physical book itself which has been poorly thought out. The pages are not printed on gloss (i.e. the usually "shiny" paper you'd expected for photo/graphics heavy books) but instead is just done on standard paper. This gives it a bit of a cheaper feel and results in the pictures being less sharp on the page, which is a shame as the pictures of the consoles in this book are one of its major positives. Additionally the text in places is very small and unnecessarily so as the editing styles means there's plenty of white space available. This is compounded further as alot of this small text is on coloured backgrounds making it even harder to read. The content of the book is good in places and I learnt quite a few new facts and consoles from it (especially 1970/80s computers which are normally missing from most books like this). At times though (especially near the end) it was a bit of a slog to read through, I'm not sure why exactly as the text is quite short for each console anyways. One major highlight as mentioned previously are the many great pictures of the consoles in the book though along with their accessories. This is why the previously mentioned issue with the non-gloss paper is such a shame and oversight. Unless your a mega fan of the Nostalgia Nerd or want to read up on more obscure 70/80s computers I'd recommend to avoiding this book. There's plenty of other similar books on the market that do a so much better job at what he was trying to accomplish here with more information and more engaging writing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lewis Clark

    A brief yet well presented history of retro computers and consoles that comes off like a cute little guide to some of gaming history’s most famous (and infamous) hardware. I really like the chronological structure which creates a through-line between the various systems and it helps contextualise what makes them all noteworthy. It’s not perfect, though. It’s extremely light on words and even though each system is covered by 4 dedicated pages, it often feels like you’re only reading 4 paragraphs A brief yet well presented history of retro computers and consoles that comes off like a cute little guide to some of gaming history’s most famous (and infamous) hardware. I really like the chronological structure which creates a through-line between the various systems and it helps contextualise what makes them all noteworthy. It’s not perfect, though. It’s extremely light on words and even though each system is covered by 4 dedicated pages, it often feels like you’re only reading 4 paragraphs of “Wikipedia synopsis”-style information. Home computers feature heavily, but IBM compatibles do not. This is explained in a comment at the end that the breadth of PC gaming is so large that it demands a book of its own, which is a respectable stance to take, but this book could’ve used some extra contextualisation so you could understand what the various micros were competing against in the PC market. Also, I’m not a great fan of dedicating a single page to 3 games for each system and one of them is a game you should avoid. I think it would’ve been much nicer to have the 3rd choice be a sort of wildcard option; a game that isn’t widely remembered, but does something interesting and unique that’s worth mentioning. Also some of the choices are bizarre. Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2 is chosen as the “must play” game, but for the Dreamcast. Perhaps the choices should’ve been limited to platform exclusives so you got a real flavour as to what defined that system.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dmytro Koshovyi

    Люблю разнообразное ностальгическое старьё, параллельно в виде хобби занимаюсь IT-археологией. У меня было много компьютеров в ранних 90х. И советских, и более "классических" западных компьютеров эры до-IBM. Работаю программистом, потому что вся эта тема - любовь навсегда. И именно поэтому, когда в твиттере я увидел книгу с таким названием - сразу сделал предзаказ. Книга шла 3 месяца, спасибо УкрПочте :) Это хорошо оформленная книга с прекрасной обложкой. Пожалуй, всё. Увы. Очень мало информации, Люблю разнообразное ностальгическое старьё, параллельно в виде хобби занимаюсь IT-археологией. У меня было много компьютеров в ранних 90х. И советских, и более "классических" западных компьютеров эры до-IBM. Работаю программистом, потому что вся эта тема - любовь навсегда. И именно поэтому, когда в твиттере я увидел книгу с таким названием - сразу сделал предзаказ. Книга шла 3 месяца, спасибо УкрПочте :) Это хорошо оформленная книга с прекрасной обложкой. Пожалуй, всё. Увы. Очень мало информации, буквально самый минимум. Немного фотографий. Эпохальные, изменившие наш мир компьютеры - указаны вскольз. Некоторых ВАЖНЫХ вообще нет. Очень поверхностно пройдены по консолям. Как говорится, идея - 5. Реализация 3. И одна звезда из этих звёзд - таки за саму тему, попытку сделать что-то прекрасное.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mansour Sadhan

    Neat little (it's dimensions, not the pages)book full of interesting stuff. It's basically a guide for consoles and home computers from a time long ago. It's like a DK handbook on retro consoles/home computers! Full of beautiful pictures, specs and and an engaging text. The drawbacks here are the few information given for the specs section and a really brief entry on handhelds. But the quality of the rest certainly compensate for such drawbacks. The information presented here is general and will Neat little (it's dimensions, not the pages)book full of interesting stuff. It's basically a guide for consoles and home computers from a time long ago. It's like a DK handbook on retro consoles/home computers! Full of beautiful pictures, specs and and an engaging text. The drawbacks here are the few information given for the specs section and a really brief entry on handhelds. But the quality of the rest certainly compensate for such drawbacks. The information presented here is general and will not most likely fully satisfy the expert but I'm anything but, and it's still a good guide and an enjoyable read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kārlis Bergmanis

    This is a coffee table book, so not much to read from one end to another, and second downside is that if you follow his Youtube channel (or 8Bit guy, or other guys in the field), you already know all of these. All in all I can recommend getting one, not for reading, but for keeping it visible and entertaining guests.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Essentially a Youtuber/fanboy catalog of early gaming consoles and some micro computers. Lacks any historical context, and offers little in the way of analysis. Each entry reads like a shortened script from the author's Youtube channel. Pixelated images, and poor typesetting and layout also detract from the book. Essentially a Youtuber/fanboy catalog of early gaming consoles and some micro computers. Lacks any historical context, and offers little in the way of analysis. Each entry reads like a shortened script from the author's Youtube channel. Pixelated images, and poor typesetting and layout also detract from the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Frank Frankton

    A completely pointless book. The information looks like it's cut and pasted from wikipedia's side panel information panels, there's nothing interesting told about the machines and the 3 games per machine are next to useless. Really disappointing and I can't recommend this to anybody. A completely pointless book. The information looks like it's cut and pasted from wikipedia's side panel information panels, there's nothing interesting told about the machines and the 3 games per machine are next to useless. Really disappointing and I can't recommend this to anybody.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    Poor writing, lots of mistakes and grammatical errors, but most disappointing was the ZX Spectrum section. It looks like Peter cobbled it together without any plan. You will learn nothing about the good old Speccy. There are much better books out there than this 3rd rate rubbish.

  14. 4 out of 5

    JC

    Decent coffee table book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    The YouTube channel is far better than the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Angus Bain

    Very good for tech enthusiasts!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Pointless book. Glad I didn't pay for it. Pointless book. Glad I didn't pay for it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nabil Abdulla

    Just finished this book . Would recommend it for a nice enjoyable read . Some issues here and there but overall it was a lovely entertaining experience 😊

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    As an American, I enjoyed a high-level introduction to several European computers that I'd never heard of. The small text and bad contrast ratio made reading a struggle for my poor eyes at times. But overall the book does a good job of conveying the initially high diversity of game systems manufacturers. As an American, I enjoyed a high-level introduction to several European computers that I'd never heard of. The small text and bad contrast ratio made reading a struggle for my poor eyes at times. But overall the book does a good job of conveying the initially high diversity of game systems manufacturers.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aneta

    This book is like an old encyklopedia to me. Information about consoles are boring and they are almost the same for every single one. Amount of text per console is almost the same for every one, which is ridiculous as some consoles easily could have more interesting details. And there are always two games recommended and one not - usually the author forgets to even mention what about are these games. He uses generalised sentences all the time, and I got sick about reading that "this game has gre This book is like an old encyklopedia to me. Information about consoles are boring and they are almost the same for every single one. Amount of text per console is almost the same for every one, which is ridiculous as some consoles easily could have more interesting details. And there are always two games recommended and one not - usually the author forgets to even mention what about are these games. He uses generalised sentences all the time, and I got sick about reading that "this game has great colours" and this one "just stay away from it, it's boring". For some popular consoles I would also expect more great games, but no, it's always two! I really don't recommend this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    A decent overview of the various incarnations of computers and consoles from the early 1970s through to about 2001. It's interesting to read about the lesser known brands but it would have been much better to have a more detailed analysis of each system. It was interesting to see which games Peter Leigh considered to be the best and worst games for each system (the games fitted into Must Play/must play and worst) but the text size was way too small to read without squinting loads (and using my d A decent overview of the various incarnations of computers and consoles from the early 1970s through to about 2001. It's interesting to read about the lesser known brands but it would have been much better to have a more detailed analysis of each system. It was interesting to see which games Peter Leigh considered to be the best and worst games for each system (the games fitted into Must Play/must play and worst) but the text size was way too small to read without squinting loads (and using my daughter's magnifying glass to read!!). A decent read but lacks substance!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I loved this book. There are minor issues in the text, especially the entry for the spectrum, which is unfortunate. Also the text is rather small. most readers will be at the age their eyes will be fading, so this will make it more difficult to read. These are minor niggles. It is great to read about the computers you remember from back in the day, and those you dont!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stefan

    An excellent trip down memory lane! Anyone who grew up with these machines will appreciate this grand tour of the "Cambrian Explosion" era of home video game consoles and microcomputers. The detailed summaries of each console (or personal computer) contains some trivia that I had forgotten, or never knew, giving me a new appreciation of this stage of the history of technology. An excellent trip down memory lane! Anyone who grew up with these machines will appreciate this grand tour of the "Cambrian Explosion" era of home video game consoles and microcomputers. The detailed summaries of each console (or personal computer) contains some trivia that I had forgotten, or never knew, giving me a new appreciation of this stage of the history of technology.

  24. 5 out of 5

    James

    A really great nostalgia filled book with loads of excellent information and tips for collectors . My editor was called simply retro tech and found it a little disappointing at the lacklustre information regarding handheld consoles but hey ho it was still a nice quick read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    This introduced me to a lot of retro games I was unfamiliar with and looking forward to playing, and reminded me of some awesome games I loved in the past

  26. 5 out of 5

    Russ

    I really enjoyed the book it had a lot of good information about how each computer system came to be and gave some example titles and it was very enjoyable.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tim Drury

    Can highly recommend this look back at hardware & software of the past.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pat Wagner

    Just what you would expect. Cool pictures of weird old game consoles and home computers.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Philip Evans

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ezekiel Blessing

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