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Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops: Late 1st S. C. Volunteers (1902)

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Susie King Taylor was the only African-American woman to publish a memoir of her Civil War wartime experiences. Negro narratives of the Civil War are few. Susie King Taylor's 1902 slender volume, "Reminiscences of My Life in Camp," written with an earnest simplicity, records in camp the experience of a woman born a slave who was for four years a regimental laundress and Susie King Taylor was the only African-American woman to publish a memoir of her Civil War wartime experiences. Negro narratives of the Civil War are few. Susie King Taylor's 1902 slender volume, "Reminiscences of My Life in Camp," written with an earnest simplicity, records in camp the experience of a woman born a slave who was for four years a regimental laundress and nurse in the Thirty-third United States Colored Infantry, earlier First South Carolina Colored Troop. In April 1862, Susie Baker and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While at the school on St. Simons Island, Baker married Edward King, a black noncommissioned officer in the First South Carolina Volunteers of African Descent (later reflagged as 33rd United States Colored Troops). For three years she moved with her husband's and brothers' regiment, serving as nurse and laundress, and teaching many of the black soldiers to read and write during their off-duty hours. As Taylor notes, "There are many people who do not know what some of the colored women did during the war. There were hundreds of them who assisted the Union soldiers by hiding them and helping them to escape. Many were punished for taking food to the prison stockades for the prisoners." In describing Confederates' treacherous use of blackface, Taylor writes: "When the rebels saw these boats, they ran out of the city. The regiment landed and marched up the street, where they spied the rebels who had fled from the city. They were hiding behind a house about a mile or so away, their faces blackened to disguise themselves as negroes, and our boys, as they advanced toward them, halted a second, saying, 'They are black men! Let them come to us.'" About the author: "Susie King Taylor (1848 –1912) was the first Black Army nurse. She tended to an all Black army troop named the 1st South Carolina Volunteers (Union), later redesignated the 33rd United States Colored Infantry Regiment, where her husband served, for four years during the Civil War. Despite her service, like many African-American nurses, she was never paid for her work. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African-American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. She was also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. At this school in Savannah, Georgia, she taught children during the day and adults at night. She is in the 2018 class of inductees of the Georgia Women of Achievement.


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Susie King Taylor was the only African-American woman to publish a memoir of her Civil War wartime experiences. Negro narratives of the Civil War are few. Susie King Taylor's 1902 slender volume, "Reminiscences of My Life in Camp," written with an earnest simplicity, records in camp the experience of a woman born a slave who was for four years a regimental laundress and Susie King Taylor was the only African-American woman to publish a memoir of her Civil War wartime experiences. Negro narratives of the Civil War are few. Susie King Taylor's 1902 slender volume, "Reminiscences of My Life in Camp," written with an earnest simplicity, records in camp the experience of a woman born a slave who was for four years a regimental laundress and nurse in the Thirty-third United States Colored Infantry, earlier First South Carolina Colored Troop. In April 1862, Susie Baker and many other African Americans fled to St. Simons Island, occupied at the time by Union forces. While at the school on St. Simons Island, Baker married Edward King, a black noncommissioned officer in the First South Carolina Volunteers of African Descent (later reflagged as 33rd United States Colored Troops). For three years she moved with her husband's and brothers' regiment, serving as nurse and laundress, and teaching many of the black soldiers to read and write during their off-duty hours. As Taylor notes, "There are many people who do not know what some of the colored women did during the war. There were hundreds of them who assisted the Union soldiers by hiding them and helping them to escape. Many were punished for taking food to the prison stockades for the prisoners." In describing Confederates' treacherous use of blackface, Taylor writes: "When the rebels saw these boats, they ran out of the city. The regiment landed and marched up the street, where they spied the rebels who had fled from the city. They were hiding behind a house about a mile or so away, their faces blackened to disguise themselves as negroes, and our boys, as they advanced toward them, halted a second, saying, 'They are black men! Let them come to us.'" About the author: "Susie King Taylor (1848 –1912) was the first Black Army nurse. She tended to an all Black army troop named the 1st South Carolina Volunteers (Union), later redesignated the 33rd United States Colored Infantry Regiment, where her husband served, for four years during the Civil War. Despite her service, like many African-American nurses, she was never paid for her work. As the author of Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops, Late 1st S.C. Volunteers, she was the only African-American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences. She was also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia. At this school in Savannah, Georgia, she taught children during the day and adults at night. She is in the 2018 class of inductees of the Georgia Women of Achievement.

30 review for Reminiscences of My Life in Camp with the 33d United States Colored Troops: Late 1st S. C. Volunteers (1902)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a memoir of a black woman who received her freedom early in the American Civil War. During the war years, she worked in a union camp nursing the sick and wounded, educating the soldiers, and helping out in any capacity she could. After the war she remained in the south for several years working as an educator, and then in the early 1870’s she moved north to Boston Massachusetts. I had a difficult time rating this book. This is a great window into what life was like for a black woman durin This is a memoir of a black woman who received her freedom early in the American Civil War. During the war years, she worked in a union camp nursing the sick and wounded, educating the soldiers, and helping out in any capacity she could. After the war she remained in the south for several years working as an educator, and then in the early 1870’s she moved north to Boston Massachusetts. I had a difficult time rating this book. This is a great window into what life was like for a black woman during and after the Civil War. At the end of each chapter there are notes that provide historical context on events and terms no longer in use, which I found helpful. I especially enjoyed the last couple of chapters because you really get inside Susie King Taylor’s head: how she thought and felt about the current issues and events of the day and how they affected her life. The writing was good, the end of the book powerful, but where it lacked for me was the emotions and thoughts of Susie’s life during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods. This part of the book read like facts with little or no emotion. I can only speculate why she didn’t go into more detail of her thoughts and feelings, but this lack of emotion made me feel disconnected from her. This is a quick and interesting read, and I recommend it to anyone who’s interested in the Civil War or black studies.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cynda

    A fuller title of this book is A Black Woman's Civil War: Reminiscences of my Life in Camp with the 33rd US Colored Troops, late SC Volunteers. As Union troops moved from the North through the Upper South, Susie King Taylor (SKT) (Not yet married and not yet her name) became part of the mass of slave folk which was escaping slavery. The SC Volunteers/the 33rd US Colored Troops group of Union soldiers and their rescued slaves/Contraband made their way to the Outer Banks. barrier islands off the co A fuller title of this book is A Black Woman's Civil War: Reminiscences of my Life in Camp with the 33rd US Colored Troops, late SC Volunteers. As Union troops moved from the North through the Upper South, Susie King Taylor (SKT) (Not yet married and not yet her name) became part of the mass of slave folk which was escaping slavery. The SC Volunteers/the 33rd US Colored Troops group of Union soldiers and their rescued slaves/Contraband made their way to the Outer Banks. barrier islands off the cost of North Carolina. The white Union officers in charge of these troops found out that SKT could read and write. So they put her in charge of teaching classes of children and adults. As the war progressed and the Union camp moved from one Outer Banks island to another, SKT became a nurse rather than a teacher. She was on the island that Fort Wagner was on. (For those who have watched the movie Glory. Fort Wagner was the fort at the end of the movie where the Massachusetts 54th Infantry tries to take the Confederates.) Due to SKT's skills, professionalism, and importance in changing and saving lives, SKT became a respected person who travelled through parts of US to give speeches. Review of the text. The text is heavily edited, clear, concise. Notes at the back of each chapter largely explain what SKT did not name. Of course, SKT was a literacy teacher and war nurse, not a historian. And time fades memory. Fortunate for readers, historians have gone back into the text and added footnotes to provide names and context. For those interested in filling out a bit of the context of the Massachusetts 54th at Fort Wagner, for those who want a little more context of behind the Union Lines on the Outer Banks, this memior will provide a more human rpbehind-the-lines perspective.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Taylor

    I was so happy to stumble upon this book, which I had never heard of before, right on the day that the first African American woman was sworn in as Vice President of the United States. This is the memoir of Susie King Taylor, born a slave in 1848 Savannah, Georgia. She had to learn how to read and write in secret, as this was highly forbidden for Black children. At the age of only 14, Susie was traveling with the Union army and helping to nurse Civil War soldiers. Susie takes us through her backg I was so happy to stumble upon this book, which I had never heard of before, right on the day that the first African American woman was sworn in as Vice President of the United States. This is the memoir of Susie King Taylor, born a slave in 1848 Savannah, Georgia. She had to learn how to read and write in secret, as this was highly forbidden for Black children. At the age of only 14, Susie was traveling with the Union army and helping to nurse Civil War soldiers. Susie takes us through her background and covert education, to being a part of the army, her fearlessness over tending men with infectious diseases, and listening to the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, which she and the soldiers celebrate. There were many things about the Civil War and the era that I had never heard before, including many horrific details. For example, there is the terrible story of a group of Confederate soldiers wearing blackface to disguise themselves as Black men, thus tricking the Union soldiers into letting their guard down, and then attacking. A Confederate general repeatedly offers false surrender. And one Union soldier given leave into town in South Carolina is captured by the enemy, and given a twisted sort of death parade through the streets, made to sit in his own hearse carrying his coffin, which his fellow soldiers must watch helplessly, until at the end of his "parade," he is shot. And as well, Taylor mentions multiple times how the government was unwilling to pay the Black soldiers their pay, offering them half-pay instead, although many did not receive "a penny for eighteen months." Besides these disturbing and heavy scenes, there are also lighter details: For example, the story of a pet pig who became beloved by the regiment and taught to play tricks, jokingly called "His pigship" by Taylor. Also, she swears by the health benefits of her delicious sassafras tea - I suppose I'll have to try some now. After the war ends, Taylor continues her memoirs, detailing her years after the war, setting up a school for Black children and later teaching adults at a night school. She also witnesses the continuation of segregation and vicious racism, leading her to question at times if the war was in vain. When she travels south to Tennessee, she is made to ride in a filthy train car - for colored passengers. And once she arrives in Chattanooga, a Black man tells her with weary resignation that here, men are lynched "all the time," and says "Oh, that is nothing. That is the way they do here. It is done all the time. We have no rights here." This passage was absolutely heartbreaking: In this "land of the free" we are burned, tortured, and denied a fair trial. We are murdered for any imaginary wrong conceived in the brain of the Negro-hating white man. There is no redress for us from a government which promised to protect all beneath its flag. It seems a mystery to me. They say, "One flag, one nation, one country indivisible. But is this true? It is sad how chillingly timely this quote feels reading it today. From this point on in the book, Taylor's writing takes on new power as she delivers page after page of hard-hitting truths about the atrocities of racism. Recommended reading to illuminate the life of a courageous woman who should be better known.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Thurman

    I think everyone should read this book. I hadn't heard much about Susie King Taylor and I'm surprised there aren't more books about her. Susie was a remarkable nurse and teacher. Quite frankly, this woman was extraordinary. I think everyone should read this book. I hadn't heard much about Susie King Taylor and I'm surprised there aren't more books about her. Susie was a remarkable nurse and teacher. Quite frankly, this woman was extraordinary.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Harris

    Really enjoyed this interesting perspective on the civil war and on the life of freed slaves. Anyone interested in American history or the civil war should read this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Even with the limited reading I've done in the area, at this point I'd be willing to lay money on something like 85% of people who survived the Civil War having published some form of memoir. Colonels, merchants, nurses - everyone had something to say about their experiences during the war. Yet even in this glut, Susie King Taylor's Reminiscences of My Life in Camp stands out, offering the unique perspective of a formerly enslaved black woman embedded with the 1st South Carolina (later the 33rd Even with the limited reading I've done in the area, at this point I'd be willing to lay money on something like 85% of people who survived the Civil War having published some form of memoir. Colonels, merchants, nurses - everyone had something to say about their experiences during the war. Yet even in this glut, Susie King Taylor's Reminiscences of My Life in Camp stands out, offering the unique perspective of a formerly enslaved black woman embedded with the 1st South Carolina (later the 33rd United States Colored Troops), the Union's first regiment of black troops. Born in Georgia in 1848, Taylor lived from a young age with her grandmother in Savannah, who sent her daily - and very much illegally - to a secret school for black children where she was able to learn to read and write. When she and her family surrendered themselves to the Union as Contraband in 1862, those skills stood her in good stead and upon her arrival on St. Simon's Island she was invited to start a school. By August, she'd moved to Camp Saxton where she acted first as a laundress and then as a nurse for the fledgling 1st South Carolina. Having married a sergeant in E Company, Edward King, Taylor remained with the 1st throughout the war, following them first to Jacksonville during its oh-so-brief third Union occupation, then back to Port Royal, and finally on to Charleston. Along the way she meets Clara Barton, battles smallpox, and learns how to break down and reassemble a musket on the fly. I read the original 1902 edition of Taylor's text, which lacks any kind of commentary or footnoting to help contextualize the events. It does, however, include introductory notes from both commanders of the 1st/33rd, Thomas Wentworth Higginson (to whom the volume is dedicated) and Charles Tyler Trowbridge, plus an appendix listing all the surviving members of the 33rd USCT as of the original publication date. It's difficult not to like Taylor, who was clearly a woman to be reckoned with, and whose final chapters calling out lingering post-war racial inequalities are pure fire. ("In this 'land of the free' we are burned, tortured, and denied a fair trial, murdered for any imaginary wrong conceived in the brain of the negro-hating white man. There is no redress for us from a government which promised to protect us all under its flag...No, we cannot sing 'My country, 'tis of thee, Sweet Land of Liberty'! It is a hollow mockery.") Despite picking this up specifically to read her account of the occupation of Jacksonville (which, notably, debunks the standard claim that the Union's seizure was a bloodless affair), Taylor's no-nonsense style and behind-the-scenes insight into the life of black Union soldiers was enough to keep me engaged through the end of the war, her post-War teaching career, and eventual move to Boston. As with most memoirs in this vein, Taylor's is pretty light on specific dates, geographic locations, and broader historical context, so I suggest looking for an edition that's been annotated by a historian, or picking up Stephen Ash's Firebrand of Liberty to fill in the blanks. It's also interesting to read this side-by-side with Higginson's memoir, Army Life in a Black Regiment, which covers much of the same content from a very different perspective. I can't help but wish there were a full biography of Taylor available to offer a more in-depth look into her life, but in the meantime her Reminiscences and her voice continue to stand out as exceptional in the crowded field of Civil War memoirs. (You can read the original edition of Taylor's memoir online as a PDF in the Internet Archive here.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becky Shattuck

    This primary source briefly describes life with the "colored troops" in the Civil War. Susie King Taylor was an educated slave, who escaped and was offered a teaching position for other escaped slaves. Eventually, she joins in the war efforts. She has the title of a laundress, but she basically does whatever work is required to meet the needs of the soldiers. She teaches soldiers to read. She cooks, cleans and loads guns, and helps make the injured as comfortable as possible. She gives a unique This primary source briefly describes life with the "colored troops" in the Civil War. Susie King Taylor was an educated slave, who escaped and was offered a teaching position for other escaped slaves. Eventually, she joins in the war efforts. She has the title of a laundress, but she basically does whatever work is required to meet the needs of the soldiers. She teaches soldiers to read. She cooks, cleans and loads guns, and helps make the injured as comfortable as possible. She gives a unique perspective on the war, both from her perspective as a woman and as a black former slave. This is a side of history we hear little about: How women got involved in the war, and how slaves in the South sometimes found ways to help the Union. It's written in 1903, I believe, so decades after the war. She discusses some of the aftermath of the war and the rights of black Americans that are still left wanting, especially in the segregated South.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    It was difficult to read this book: 1) I've never been one to read history; I have a tendency to gloss over proper nouns. This book is full of people's names, so that was a struggle for me! 2) There are quite a few footnotes with each chapter. I could never decide which worked better - stop and read the footnote as I came to it (they were typically very interesting, but it really slowed down my reading); or just read them all after the chapter (when I had likely forgotten which point exactly they It was difficult to read this book: 1) I've never been one to read history; I have a tendency to gloss over proper nouns. This book is full of people's names, so that was a struggle for me! 2) There are quite a few footnotes with each chapter. I could never decide which worked better - stop and read the footnote as I came to it (they were typically very interesting, but it really slowed down my reading); or just read them all after the chapter (when I had likely forgotten which point exactly they tied to.) Anyway, it held my interest because it's mostly set in the Savannah, Georgia region. It taught me some details of the civil war that I never knew. It was interesting to see the perspective of an educated black woman.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelsy

    A worthy read, but Taylor’s thought processes are often hard to follow. The narrative changes direction frequently without any transitions, and this often happens before she delves into a specific experience. However, the perspective Taylor gives is invaluable as there are very few accounts of military life in the 19th century from a woman’s point of view, and she gives powerful insight to the post-Civil War prejudices prevalent throughout the South. -A relevant read with lessons still needing t A worthy read, but Taylor’s thought processes are often hard to follow. The narrative changes direction frequently without any transitions, and this often happens before she delves into a specific experience. However, the perspective Taylor gives is invaluable as there are very few accounts of military life in the 19th century from a woman’s point of view, and she gives powerful insight to the post-Civil War prejudices prevalent throughout the South. -A relevant read with lessons still needing to be learned today.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ernest Sneed

    A historical treasure. A detailed writing of the experiences of a black woman who learned how to read and write as a child. She describes the sacrifices, pride, and injustice that she witnessed and experienced before and after the Civil War. The reporting of her military camp experiences and of the black soldiers is insightful. Also, she speaks about the post Reconstruction struggle of blacks and the beginnings of the painful period of Jim Crow.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Teresa A.

    Susie King Taylor’s words give much insight to the perils that freed slaves endured during the Civil War. While I’m familiar with the history, reading about it from her perspective gives me a greater appreciation. The last two chapters bring us closer to present day and makes me feel disheartened that even in the 21st century we still see many of the same issues arise. A must read if you enjoy first-hand accounts of American history.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    The author joined the North in the Civil war as a laundress and quickly became indispensable as a teacher and nurse. She and her husband labored along with many other volunteers in the African American colored troops corps with no pay, just room and board for eighteen months. This slim narrative is written in her own hand years after the deadly conflict. Unflinchingly honest, poignant and a rare glimpse of life and bravery by this intrepid woman.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary Halecki

    There was so much of her own experience that was barely discussed by her such as her marriages, the birth of her son and his life, and really, all of the contributions of the women during the war. It is a quick read which provides some interesting details, but if one is looking for a true memoir about what African-American women went through during the war, this is not the book. It is still worth reading though.

  14. 4 out of 5

    cayla

    Susie King Taylor was a remarkable woman and this book being one of the scarce Civil War primary sources from the perspective of a black woman is invaluable. She tells the gruesome tale of what being a solider in the Civil War was like but further provides insight into the aftermath of the war and the continued feeling of rigid determination of African Americans in pursuit of a life of true harmony and unity with whites. It’s a necessary and thought-provoking read at its finest.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alison Dunn

    Susie King Taylor is a true survivor and an exceptional human being, always giving of herself to advance and help others. I certainly enjoyed this book, it is a quick read, done in an hour or two. I would have liked more detail than it offers, even significant events are described as a snapshot, I was left wanting more. Despite this, it still offers an incredibly poignant memoir of its time and left me feeling sad to know the struggle for equality continues into the twenty first century. Will we Susie King Taylor is a true survivor and an exceptional human being, always giving of herself to advance and help others. I certainly enjoyed this book, it is a quick read, done in an hour or two. I would have liked more detail than it offers, even significant events are described as a snapshot, I was left wanting more. Despite this, it still offers an incredibly poignant memoir of its time and left me feeling sad to know the struggle for equality continues into the twenty first century. Will we ever get there I wonder?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Very good This book gives on-site into the life of Susie King Taylor. She was a remarkable woman. A monument to her is currently in the works by the Sons Of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Dept. Of MA.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Wiest

    Though this was written at the turn of the 20th century, the last few chapters about life during Jim Crow strike some uncomfortable parallels with the present day. Well worth the read, especially in 2020 and beyond.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Martin

    Interesting and short

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Richardson

    A book that is a quick and easy read, very simple. Some illustrations and pictures.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    Lots of footnotes with each chapter of this book. For me, it made reading the book a little difficult, which made getting it read longer than I expected.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    Note: I read the 1988 library bound edition. Whether you are interested in the history of slavery and the Reconstruction, or in the Civil War, this is fascinating inside information.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Short book but very interesting. Does not sugarcoat life in the camps during the Civil war. I would recommend it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Very interesting perspective. I can’t believe we weren’t taught about Susie King Taylor in school! I think everyone should know about her. Highly recommend reading this memoir to anyone

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Absolutely fantastic!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    This book left me wanting way more information about every aspect of her life. I would love to have read details of her childhood, how she met her husband, her son's death, life during battle, her teaching experiences... but sadly it read more like a diary of disjointed events in very broad terms. I don't blame her or question her skills as a writer, I just wish she was able to have taken more time to lay out whatever she was comfortable sharing about her life so that someone 119 years in the fu This book left me wanting way more information about every aspect of her life. I would love to have read details of her childhood, how she met her husband, her son's death, life during battle, her teaching experiences... but sadly it read more like a diary of disjointed events in very broad terms. I don't blame her or question her skills as a writer, I just wish she was able to have taken more time to lay out whatever she was comfortable sharing about her life so that someone 119 years in the future could understand how she had the bravery to do what she did.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzi

    t is well-written, easy to read, and gives a small glimpse into the life of a soldier’s wife who went with the camp in 1861 and following. The end talks about her good life, with basic equality, in Massachusetts (which gives me a fonder view of that state than I have heretofore had) and the horror she experienced on a trip from there to Shreveport to reach the side of her dying son. There are several things I don’t understand. Why did she give up her child? Why didn’t she say how she met her husba t is well-written, easy to read, and gives a small glimpse into the life of a soldier’s wife who went with the camp in 1861 and following. The end talks about her good life, with basic equality, in Massachusetts (which gives me a fonder view of that state than I have heretofore had) and the horror she experienced on a trip from there to Shreveport to reach the side of her dying son. There are several things I don’t understand. Why did she give up her child? Why didn’t she say how she met her husbands? Was she really 14 when she married Sgt. King? But it was an interesting book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    A dignified and laconic writer, Mrs. Taylor gives us an amazing glimpse into the lives of African-Americans who fought and defended the Union only days or weeks after having been enslaved. Read between the lines for some truly fresh insights about both black and white, Union and Confederate stories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    A slim but informative book about the experience of a former black slave during and after the Civil War and her insight into the make-up of the Confederate, Union and Negro [sic] troops and their commanders. Susie King Taylor was an important witness and helper during the war. She lived into the 20th century. The historical footnotes to her memoir add helpful details.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Five stars for significance, three for the writing itself, which was, by and large, vague and understated. I suspect she wrote the account to be (mostly) unimpeachable, so anything debatable was omitted. I wish the author would have fleshed out the narrative a bit, but perhaps that's just my wish for the sensibility of a different century. Five stars for significance, three for the writing itself, which was, by and large, vague and understated. I suspect she wrote the account to be (mostly) unimpeachable, so anything debatable was omitted. I wish the author would have fleshed out the narrative a bit, but perhaps that's just my wish for the sensibility of a different century.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A fascinating and fantastically readable memoir. I read it for school and enjoyed it, and it would make a wonderful primary source for anyone looking for documents about the Civil War in general or black/women's participation in the Civil War. A fascinating and fantastically readable memoir. I read it for school and enjoyed it, and it would make a wonderful primary source for anyone looking for documents about the Civil War in general or black/women's participation in the Civil War.

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