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Spanning the decades from World War II to the 2008 presidential campaign, A God in Ruins is the riveting story of Quinn Patrick O'Connell, an honest, principled, and courageous man on the brink of becoming the second Irish Catholic President of the United States. But Quinn is a man with an explosive secret that can shatter his political amibitions, threaten his life, and t Spanning the decades from World War II to the 2008 presidential campaign, A God in Ruins is the riveting story of Quinn Patrick O'Connell, an honest, principled, and courageous man on the brink of becoming the second Irish Catholic President of the United States. But Quinn is a man with an explosive secret that can shatter his political amibitions, threaten his life, and tear the country apart--a secret buried for over a half century--that even he does not know...


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Spanning the decades from World War II to the 2008 presidential campaign, A God in Ruins is the riveting story of Quinn Patrick O'Connell, an honest, principled, and courageous man on the brink of becoming the second Irish Catholic President of the United States. But Quinn is a man with an explosive secret that can shatter his political amibitions, threaten his life, and t Spanning the decades from World War II to the 2008 presidential campaign, A God in Ruins is the riveting story of Quinn Patrick O'Connell, an honest, principled, and courageous man on the brink of becoming the second Irish Catholic President of the United States. But Quinn is a man with an explosive secret that can shatter his political amibitions, threaten his life, and tear the country apart--a secret buried for over a half century--that even he does not know...

30 review for A God in Ruins

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zefyr

    Oh, embarrassment. I read this shortly after it came out and thought, in all my fifteen-year-old wisdom, that it was SO. FUCKING. AWESOME. It was my Atlas Shrugged , people. It promised me the political optimism I craved, and I promised right back that I'd reread it in 2008 and see if the real election of that year compared. And then, in the years to came and as the specifics of the book became a blur and all I could remember was feeling like this book was the shit, I recommended it to people. Oh, embarrassment. I read this shortly after it came out and thought, in all my fifteen-year-old wisdom, that it was SO. FUCKING. AWESOME. It was my Atlas Shrugged , people. It promised me the political optimism I craved, and I promised right back that I'd reread it in 2008 and see if the real election of that year compared. And then, in the years to came and as the specifics of the book became a blur and all I could remember was feeling like this book was the shit, I recommended it to people. I'd be all, you know what's coming up? 2008. You know what I'm going to do? Read this book. And then I did. Not far into this reread, a gnawing feeling started. A feeling that this book was, maybe, not all that I had remembered. In fact, it was maybe...none of what I remembered. It's got a yelling guy in it, who's surrounded by people who think, he's a yelling guy, I should listen to him! The yelling guy is the liberal, which you know because: a) he's about to be the second Irish Catholic president b) he's got a gay assistant that he tolerates even though the assistant is gay, like those liberals do; c) he's not the Republican (although the 2008 presidential candidate's image he was most like outside of the first-Jewish-president thing was McCain). You know the Republican is a Republican because he's: a) a Southerner; b) served by a black guy; c) into technology and business before people, that cold, heartless, brilliant fucker (was he supposed to be, like, Bill Gates or something? His appointment to office actually makes even less sense than yelling guy). Then when yelling guy (view spoiler)[turns out to be Jewish and wins the presidency anyway (hide spoiler)] everybody loses their shit, which seems to speak mostly to the fears of the guy who wrote historical fiction that was instrumental in building identity of Israelis as strong Jews who survived attempted eradication, and less to the reality that occurred when Obama won in 2008 (in which many people did in fact say and do a bunch of racist shit but the streets were not a riot zone, although in many districts there was dancing). Also, Uris has an understanding of technology the way I have an understanding of income tax allocations. Like, there's some numbers! And if you put a lot of them then you get a lot of money now but it sucks later! And if you put the round thingie instead it sucks now but then in spring, bammo! CASHY MONEY BABY, ALLOCATIONS ALLOCATED. There is absolutely no reason to read this book, and now I'm worried that I've also been recommending his Mila 18 , which I read shortly before reading this the first time, and maybe that one's similarly less good than previously determined, and maybe everything I read and liked as a kid was really this yay-for-yelling-guys literature. Boy, am I glad that I promptly turned around and wrote my college admissions essay about my finding guidance in my study plans through readings of Transcendentalist essays. How I got in I still don't know.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Exodus will always be my favorite Uris book, but this one comes in a close second. Some of the other reviews I find shocking, especially those dealing with his description of technology, but after working in the computer industry for nearly 30 years, I've met many people who lacked more common human attributes and more closely resembled computers in their thought processes and mannerisms. I found the characters realistic and the storyline compelling. In fact many I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Exodus will always be my favorite Uris book, but this one comes in a close second. Some of the other reviews I find shocking, especially those dealing with his description of technology, but after working in the computer industry for nearly 30 years, I've met many people who lacked more common human attributes and more closely resembled computers in their thought processes and mannerisms. I found the characters realistic and the storyline compelling. In fact many of the characters were spot on for the "movers and shakers" of today's industry. The inability to relate to human emotions can be all too common in the field.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Leon Uris got old before he died. It's too bad he published this book first, because old people lose the filter between their thoughts and what they say out loud. Leon Uris got old before he died. It's too bad he published this book first, because old people lose the filter between their thoughts and what they say out loud.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ron Wroblewski

    A very good book in parts, a bit screwy in parts. A lot to do with Gun Control and the 2nd amendment. Published in 1999, the plot has to do with a presidential election of 2008. Republicans vs Democrats. Some very good action operations, both in Iran and in Colorado. This could be fact - 30,000 Americans are killed each year by guns. Match that against 60,000 killed in Vietnam over a 10 year period. Each year more Americans die by gunfire than are killed in traffic accidents." A very good book in parts, a bit screwy in parts. A lot to do with Gun Control and the 2nd amendment. Published in 1999, the plot has to do with a presidential election of 2008. Republicans vs Democrats. Some very good action operations, both in Iran and in Colorado. This could be fact - 30,000 Americans are killed each year by guns. Match that against 60,000 killed in Vietnam over a 10 year period. Each year more Americans die by gunfire than are killed in traffic accidents."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Those who hate, must hate this book. I had heard of it, but I had never before seen it. Those who support unlimited firepower for every one regardless of their ability or their record; those who seek to enlarge themselves by being prejudiced against everything and everyone; those who distrust the educated because they couldn't find it in themselves to become educated; those who find a million excuses for their failures but never see how their own choices have put them where they are; and those wh Those who hate, must hate this book. I had heard of it, but I had never before seen it. Those who support unlimited firepower for every one regardless of their ability or their record; those who seek to enlarge themselves by being prejudiced against everything and everyone; those who distrust the educated because they couldn't find it in themselves to become educated; those who find a million excuses for their failures but never see how their own choices have put them where they are; and those who live for ever more money and power over others; all of these and more will hate what Mr. Uris has said in this book. The only way I can understand the numerous negative reviews, is that hateing it, they must seek to prevent the promulgation of its message by providing so many strongly negative reviews. I had heard that the extreme right often did this kind of thing. I had never before seen it in action. I almost didn't buy the book because of the reviews. I am very glad now that I did.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The story of an orphan from a Catholic Adoption Home who kept family records very secret. The young boy is adopted by an Irish Catholic couple and grows up into a very honest, principled and courageous man on a remote Colorado ranch. The author goes back to WW II giving us a background on his parents and those around the young man. As a middle aged man we find that he is Governor of Colorado and on the brink of becoming the second Catholic president of the United States. But his secret past - of The story of an orphan from a Catholic Adoption Home who kept family records very secret. The young boy is adopted by an Irish Catholic couple and grows up into a very honest, principled and courageous man on a remote Colorado ranch. The author goes back to WW II giving us a background on his parents and those around the young man. As a middle aged man we find that he is Governor of Colorado and on the brink of becoming the second Catholic president of the United States. But his secret past - of which he knows nothing - catches up with him and could tear the country apart in January 2009. The book moved along well and was well research in the military and gun-control history of our country. Bogged down a little for me during some of the military writings as it got technical, but otherwise entertaining, and sometimes too close to the truth. Interesting that it was written after the Bill Clinton scandal.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jason Young

    Republicans are stupid, greedy, amoral s.o.b.'s with no redeeming qualities. Liberal democrats are the saving grace to all that is good in the world. Gun owners and anyone associated with guns are violent, anti-social, anarchist criminals just waiting to cause death and destruction. Liberals are intelligent and witty. The saddest thing about this book is the underlying story was interesting, but all the religious dogma worshipping at the alter of liberalism really ruined it for me. The writing was Republicans are stupid, greedy, amoral s.o.b.'s with no redeeming qualities. Liberal democrats are the saving grace to all that is good in the world. Gun owners and anyone associated with guns are violent, anti-social, anarchist criminals just waiting to cause death and destruction. Liberals are intelligent and witty. The saddest thing about this book is the underlying story was interesting, but all the religious dogma worshipping at the alter of liberalism really ruined it for me. The writing wasn't really bad, it just wasn't very good. Much of the dialog was confusing and the characters actions relating to the dialog made no sense. In the parts where the hero Quinn O'Connell was supposed to be so clever and formidable, he wasn't. I saw nothing in either action or dialog that would have made the people working against him have cause for concern. Yet they went running for the door. All in all, this one did not work for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Akd200 Martin

    I have read Leon Uris and liked him, this is not the case with this book! This is another book that just got worse and worse. At one point I was wondering if Leon just wanted to make another Michel Crichton book. I was very hopeful that it was going to be a wonderful book, but then it got worse as I realized it was about crap that I did not care about. I got to around page 500 and I could not get myself to finish it...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rob Sullivan

    I've enjoyed Leon Uris before, but whoa, this was a pretty special level of bad. Stupid and lazy. Very lazy, actually. I've enjoyed Leon Uris before, but whoa, this was a pretty special level of bad. Stupid and lazy. Very lazy, actually.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura Rittenhouse

    This book wasn't for me. Which given the author is more likely my problem than his. The premise is intersting enough - the lives of 2 candidates for the US presidency, one incumbant business genius and one newcomer idealist, are told through flashbacks. The personalies are developed nicely, if a bit obviously by this method. Subjects such as gun control and the impact of humans on the environment are touched on. But it was all a bit heavy handed for me. I didn't like either of the candidates and This book wasn't for me. Which given the author is more likely my problem than his. The premise is intersting enough - the lives of 2 candidates for the US presidency, one incumbant business genius and one newcomer idealist, are told through flashbacks. The personalies are developed nicely, if a bit obviously by this method. Subjects such as gun control and the impact of humans on the environment are touched on. But it was all a bit heavy handed for me. I didn't like either of the candidates and suspect their stubborness (or is it "strength") wouldn't serve them well if either actually held the post of President. Honestly, it is rather terrifying to me that this side of the book might be realistic - surely not. The glorification of military violence and the acceptance (while stating it shouldn't be so) that women must be held to a higher standard of sexual fidelity than men were both offputting subtexts. Uris gives us an uncompromising idealist with an adoring family and loyal friends versus a greedy business man willing to sacrifice anyone and everything to achieve his goals. If only people were so black and white, wouldn't voting be easier!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette

    Leon Uris has written a lot of great historical fiction (including Exodus, Mila 18, the Haj and Trinity, one of my all time favorite books). So I have to wonder who actually wrote this book, because the writing was awful. I was almost 300 hundred pages into this book before the various stories and characters started to come together and make sense. The only reason I gave it 2 stars instead of one was the parallels between the stories (white supremacy and militia movements, Second Amendment battl Leon Uris has written a lot of great historical fiction (including Exodus, Mila 18, the Haj and Trinity, one of my all time favorite books). So I have to wonder who actually wrote this book, because the writing was awful. I was almost 300 hundred pages into this book before the various stories and characters started to come together and make sense. The only reason I gave it 2 stars instead of one was the parallels between the stories (white supremacy and militia movements, Second Amendment battles, a national tragedy, a billionaire businessman president who only cares about himself and how things impact him) and today's world, especially creepy/eery since this book was published in 1999!!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    Our story opens in the autumn of 2008 and we are introduced to the Democratic candidate for POTUS who is leading the incumbent in the polls by a few percentage points. We learn that he is an orphan and he has just learned that his biological parents were Jewish. Through flashbacks that take place throughout most of the book we learn how he and the incumbent arrived at this point in their lives. This is not Exodus or QB VII but it's a pretty doggone good read. Uris, like so many of my favorite au Our story opens in the autumn of 2008 and we are introduced to the Democratic candidate for POTUS who is leading the incumbent in the polls by a few percentage points. We learn that he is an orphan and he has just learned that his biological parents were Jewish. Through flashbacks that take place throughout most of the book we learn how he and the incumbent arrived at this point in their lives. This is not Exodus or QB VII but it's a pretty doggone good read. Uris, like so many of my favorite authors, is not putting out the quality he once did. (In my opinion)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rhett Smith

    Overall, I am not a fan of this book. It is not worth reading. yet, I greatly appreciate the main premise of the book (which only really involves the first 20 pages and the last 10 pages of the book.) Funny note: I took this book from Leon Uris' summer house on Shelter Island. After he died, he left a library of misprinted editions of this books. I've slept in his bed, and stepped on his floor. When i was done reading/skimming this book, I shot it multiple times with a 22mm rifle. It now resides i Overall, I am not a fan of this book. It is not worth reading. yet, I greatly appreciate the main premise of the book (which only really involves the first 20 pages and the last 10 pages of the book.) Funny note: I took this book from Leon Uris' summer house on Shelter Island. After he died, he left a library of misprinted editions of this books. I've slept in his bed, and stepped on his floor. When i was done reading/skimming this book, I shot it multiple times with a 22mm rifle. It now resides in Wardsboro, Vermont.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This was by far the worst Uris. It was as if someone else was writing, someone with a political agenda and far less storytelling ability than Uris.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Nutting

    Leon Uris was VERY prophetic- this book was written in 1999, but it was uncanny how it parallels the next 21 years. He foretold of a rotten billionaire president, terrorism on the home front, a contentious election, rioting, burning and looting in the streets, the hatred and racism of the skinheads, the corruption of the NRA - the similarities just go on and on. He dies in 2003, but the book ends with the 2008 election. The more I read the more amazed I became. Just a quote that sound exactly lik Leon Uris was VERY prophetic- this book was written in 1999, but it was uncanny how it parallels the next 21 years. He foretold of a rotten billionaire president, terrorism on the home front, a contentious election, rioting, burning and looting in the streets, the hatred and racism of the skinheads, the corruption of the NRA - the similarities just go on and on. He dies in 2003, but the book ends with the 2008 election. The more I read the more amazed I became. Just a quote that sound exactly like Trump, “I’m the president. I can do any goddamned thing I want.” - it is hard to believe Uris did not use Trump as the model for his fictional president. Thornton Tomtree exhibited every evil trait that personifies Trump’s character. I couldn’t have read this at a more appropriate time, as we have wallowed through a post-election fraught with lies and anger. I’m surprised at all the one star ratings, I think they were written before the events in the book actually happened in real time. RIP

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bodosika Bodosika

    The best of Leon Uris

  17. 5 out of 5

    D.w.

    During a recent trip to the hospital, this book was handed to me to read and pass the time. A good opening had the potential to grab you. Leon Uris doesn't disappoint here. The shoo-in for the presidency in november's election, an orphan raised roman-catholic, finds one week before the election that his birth-parents, both deceased, are Jewish. That could be a great premise but then what... The story falls apart. Uris tries to create tension in our two party system in the US with the histories of During a recent trip to the hospital, this book was handed to me to read and pass the time. A good opening had the potential to grab you. Leon Uris doesn't disappoint here. The shoo-in for the presidency in november's election, an orphan raised roman-catholic, finds one week before the election that his birth-parents, both deceased, are Jewish. That could be a great premise but then what... The story falls apart. Uris tries to create tension in our two party system in the US with the histories of not only the RC/Jew protagonist, but his rival who is the president. If that had been handled better, perhaps this book would succeed, but Uris has chosen his battlegrounds poorly. Republicans do not do everything poorly in regards to the nation, but in God in Ruins Republicans always fail. Democrats always succeed, and where we have some true named places and people, and ambiance, too much fictionalized that you have to read (AMERIGUN-is the NRA, Charlton Heston is their president so an Actor leads AMERIGUN...) throws the book into that thinly disguised type of clap trap. The writing style of Uris also fails. People, all even the dumb ones, are too smart, for the use half sentences to talk to one another. Always full of depth of meaning. Our leaders maybe that smart, but I doubt it. Some of them are geniuses, some are charismatic dilettantes in reality, which Uris does not portray. All his politicians are brilliant. So the story fails. It could have been good. It wasn't.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    This was a book crossing book. I found it with some free newspapers in a local food coop. This is the story of two men. It chronicles their childhoods and their ultimate rise to the position of President of the United States. It seemed to me to be an incredibly masculine book in a way that sometimes alienated me as a reader.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Donald Charters

    mammoth book; didn't realize it was 20 years old and Leon died not long after; mesmerizing in places; a lot to say about gun control and politics, brings home what an unfortunate choice the current president is mammoth book; didn't realize it was 20 years old and Leon died not long after; mesmerizing in places; a lot to say about gun control and politics, brings home what an unfortunate choice the current president is

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lana

    Not my favorite book, but I did enjoy reading it and thought some of the prediction of where life/politics could go in the future, from a book published in the late 1990s, were.... uncomfortably accurate.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Minkus

    Somehow I missed this book originally. The back-and-forthing can be somewhat disconcerting but over all it is a compelling book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Baron Rothschild

    good read

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Excellent book by one of my all time favorite authors.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brian Carrigan

    very good

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul Lyons

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well, I got through it. Look, Leon Uris's turn of the century novel about...um...I guess the rise of a man who becomes President of the United States (?), is not all bad. In fact that are some parts of the novel that are quite good indeed. Unfortunately, three quarters of "A God In Ruins" contains a ponderous attempt at exploring the good, bad, and horribly ugly side of America through a lackluster storyline and poorly written prose. World War II, racism, anti-semitism, old world values, abortion Well, I got through it. Look, Leon Uris's turn of the century novel about...um...I guess the rise of a man who becomes President of the United States (?), is not all bad. In fact that are some parts of the novel that are quite good indeed. Unfortunately, three quarters of "A God In Ruins" contains a ponderous attempt at exploring the good, bad, and horribly ugly side of America through a lackluster storyline and poorly written prose. World War II, racism, anti-semitism, old world values, abortion, religion, family strife, technology, human psychology, love, infidelity, duty, the U.S. military, terrorism, white nationalism, the 2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, Zionism, gun control, art, poetry, adoption, politics, and big business are all thrown together to form a plotless tale of an adopted, Irish-Catholic hero from Colorado named Quinn Patrick O'Connell, on the verge of winning the U.S. Presidential election, discovers that his birth parents are actually Jewish Zionist fighters from Poland and Russia. "A God In Ruins" is inexplicably framed in flashback, where both Colorado Governor Quinn Patrick O'Connell and rival President Thornton Tomtree look back on their respective lives as they go head-to-head in the 2008 Presidential election. O'Connell is faced with the confusion surrounding his secret Jewish heritage, whose revelation could cost him the Presidency. President Tomtree is faced with a fierce and unstoppable competitor, whose warmth and humanity clashes with Tomtree's ambition, greed, and lack of social awareness and skills. The book then flashes way back to the story of O'Connell and Tomtree's parents and early childhood. The reader learns of Thornton Tomtree's genius, loneliness and alienation as he grows up motherless as the son of a Rhode Island junkyard owner. Tall and gawky, Tomtree would have been friendless as well if it weren't for his neighbor and close pal Darnell Jefferson. "A God In Ruins" tracks Tomtree and Jefferson through their friendship, business partnership founded on Tomtree's technical computer genius, rise to corporate power and later the Presidency. However most of "A God In Ruins"focuses on the Quinn Patrick O'Connell. With a foot deeply planted in melodrama, Leon Uris goes on and on about the ups and downs and dramas in O'Connell's life. Quinn's individuality clashes with his old world, conservative and racist-rancher-Senator-father Dan. Quinn falls in love with ambitious, free spirit schoolmate Greer, and the reader is subjugated to a dull back and forth soap opera chronicling their back and forth complicated relationship. The novel also has Quinn endure another silly, complicated, melodramatic romance. This time it's with the woman who would become his wife: Rita, a wannabe poet who has been in love with Quinn ever since childhood. She has a secret, not-really-an-affair with Quinn's former best friend Carlos, that almost destroys Quinn and Rita's marriage. Ho-hum. The book comes alive when its puts Quinn through dangerous, action-packed adventures, such as his part on a successful, yet tragic raid at a terrorist camp in the Middle East, and the time Quinn took control of a plan to take down illegal gun-runners in Colorado via a secret sting operation. Some of Quinn's speeches and tactics regarding the controversial 2nd Amendment were indeed inspiring and thought provoking. Yet too much of "A God In Ruins" is a mess, and doesn't make much sense. The author's long reveal as to the true parentage of Quinn O'Connell and reasons why he was put up for adoption do not add up at all. Leon Uris's conclusion that an Irish-Catholic Democratic Presidential-nominee's revelation (at the last minute) that he was actually of Jewish heritage would cause nationwide riots and violence as a direct result felt illogical and idiotic. How DOES the math work on that one? And...Uris jumps from rampant riots across the U.S.A. to the day Quinn Patrick O'Connell is sworn in as President of the United States. For reasons unknown, the author skips over a very important transition: President Tomtree's agreed upon "Joy Streets" martial law plan is executed to the fullest extent...and the election itself! Was the election close? Huh? What? Whatever. Well, yes, I got through "A God In Ruins," though I can't say I'm the better for it. Again, the book is not all bad, yet too much of the novel is embarrassingly so. Truth be told, it is unlikely I will ever spend time with a Leon Uris book again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Missyjohnson1

    meh. easy to put down and go do dishes instead. some of the sections were frustrating in that they were almost stream of consciousness and did not always fit. The Quinn and Greer relationship did not ring true for more reasons than I want to list of even think about. The Quinn life choice switch at college did not make sense to me. Some of the descriptions seemed juvenile at times, for instance, describing women's heels on a footbridge as click, click, click. not sure why those things bothered m meh. easy to put down and go do dishes instead. some of the sections were frustrating in that they were almost stream of consciousness and did not always fit. The Quinn and Greer relationship did not ring true for more reasons than I want to list of even think about. The Quinn life choice switch at college did not make sense to me. Some of the descriptions seemed juvenile at times, for instance, describing women's heels on a footbridge as click, click, click. not sure why those things bothered me. the only thing that was really interesting was at the end when riots started in the country because of a revelation a presidential candidate had and how the presiding POTUS allowed the destruction to go on for his own gain. Hits pretty close to home as our country is experiencing riots due to the death of black men at the hands of police and specifically the death last week of George Floyd. The current POTUS is handling the situation very poorly if at all. Another example of how this lack of acceptance of others has been going on entirely too long. Not sure why we cannot just follow God's simple command of Love one Another.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bella Foxygobble

    This book was... just a lot. It brought up some uncomfortable/problematic issues that aren't usually my jam when reading a book. It felt slightly disorganized with the timeline bouncing around and the focus on specific "thriller" style events to keep the reader engaged. I had a difficult time connecting with the main protagonist. I loved the premise of the novel, but it just wasn't tackled in the manner that I expected. It introduces something HUGE in the first three pages and then the reader he This book was... just a lot. It brought up some uncomfortable/problematic issues that aren't usually my jam when reading a book. It felt slightly disorganized with the timeline bouncing around and the focus on specific "thriller" style events to keep the reader engaged. I had a difficult time connecting with the main protagonist. I loved the premise of the novel, but it just wasn't tackled in the manner that I expected. It introduces something HUGE in the first three pages and then the reader hears nothing more about it until the very end. It was slightly frustrating as I felt like I was tricked into reading the book. All of that said - I read this book in just a few days - not something I typically do for a straight-up fiction novel. I probably should've started with some of Uris's earlier works first. My Ratings: 5*****I loved this book, consider it an all time favorite 4**** Thoroughly enjoyed the book and will recommend it 3*** I liked it well enough 2** Brain Candy - It was okay. Writing mediocre, will keep/re-read if part of a series 1* didn't like/possibly not finished. (less)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I had read most of Uris's books before coming up on this one in a used book store...paperback copy. It's certainly different from others that I've read, but I loved it just the same if for different reasons. Uris has always known how to tell a riveting story, and this book is no exception, but what really got me was that it is so relevant to current events, though written years ago: gun violence, the NRA's (Amerigun in the book) insistence that anyone in the country should be permitted to own as I had read most of Uris's books before coming up on this one in a used book store...paperback copy. It's certainly different from others that I've read, but I loved it just the same if for different reasons. Uris has always known how to tell a riveting story, and this book is no exception, but what really got me was that it is so relevant to current events, though written years ago: gun violence, the NRA's (Amerigun in the book) insistence that anyone in the country should be permitted to own as many guns of any variety as they choose (and we, as a family, are gun owners), the virulent racism and antigovernment stance of the many white supremacist groups, the willingness of the man occupying the White House to use any lies to defeat an opponent. With a congenital liar in the White House today, a man and the party he represents refusing to pass commonsense gun laws, and White Supremacists on the rise, this book is quite timely in spite of having been written back before 9/11.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steve Craven

    I have read and enjoyed much of Uris' output. This one put me off. It is a wandering (though well paced) story, but serves as a personal political story: one party pure as the driven Colorado snow in motive and activities; the other indifferent, conniving and unscrupulous. In addition Uris employs some of the least informed Constitutional arguments (which have been aped in subsequent years) to bolster the position espoused. It is fascinating how on target his view of events show a prescience to I have read and enjoyed much of Uris' output. This one put me off. It is a wandering (though well paced) story, but serves as a personal political story: one party pure as the driven Colorado snow in motive and activities; the other indifferent, conniving and unscrupulous. In addition Uris employs some of the least informed Constitutional arguments (which have been aped in subsequent years) to bolster the position espoused. It is fascinating how on target his view of events show a prescience to future events nationally and internationally (published in 1999, and centers on the 2008 Presidential campaign).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rupesh Goenka

    A God in Ruins is the story of Quinn Patrick O'Connell who is adopted by an Irish Catholic couple just after the end of WWII. Quinn is raised on a ranch in Colorado and grows up to be a honest, strong and principled man. He is a war hero. He is in race as a Democrat candidate for the President of the United States when unexpectedly he discovers, just before the presidential elections, that his biological parents were Jews. The novel discusses subjects like harmful racism, illegal gun sales and b A God in Ruins is the story of Quinn Patrick O'Connell who is adopted by an Irish Catholic couple just after the end of WWII. Quinn is raised on a ranch in Colorado and grows up to be a honest, strong and principled man. He is a war hero. He is in race as a Democrat candidate for the President of the United States when unexpectedly he discovers, just before the presidential elections, that his biological parents were Jews. The novel discusses subjects like harmful racism, illegal gun sales and birth control. The story deviates from the original track to preach religion and political liberalism. The dreadful writing breaks the flow and at times the dialogue makes no sense at all. LOUSY.

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