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Rich Dad's Before You Quit Your Job: 10 Real-Life Lessons Every Entrepreneur Should Know About Building a Multimillion-Dollar Business

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One of the basic tenets of the Rich Dad philosophy is to make the jump from employee to boss. This is the book that shows you how to make that leap - in 10 easy steps. Everyone in business knows that you won't ever achieve great wealth by being an employee. The real secret to making money and reaching financial independence is to start your own company and develop it quick One of the basic tenets of the Rich Dad philosophy is to make the jump from employee to boss. This is the book that shows you how to make that leap - in 10 easy steps. Everyone in business knows that you won't ever achieve great wealth by being an employee. The real secret to making money and reaching financial independence is to start your own company and develop it quickly. Millions of aspiring entrepreneurs are already convinced that this is the way to go - but they just don't know how to take those first few steps. In BEFORE YOU QUIT YOUR JOB, Robert Kiyosaki presents first-hand accounts of his own start-up companies and how he learned from both his failures and his successes. Along the way he explains the basics of: How to determine if your idea is a good one How to write a solid business plan and where to find Othe People's Money to help finance the idea How to incorporate yourself for business and tax purposes How to help you find key advisors to help develop your concept How to best launch your product or service.


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One of the basic tenets of the Rich Dad philosophy is to make the jump from employee to boss. This is the book that shows you how to make that leap - in 10 easy steps. Everyone in business knows that you won't ever achieve great wealth by being an employee. The real secret to making money and reaching financial independence is to start your own company and develop it quick One of the basic tenets of the Rich Dad philosophy is to make the jump from employee to boss. This is the book that shows you how to make that leap - in 10 easy steps. Everyone in business knows that you won't ever achieve great wealth by being an employee. The real secret to making money and reaching financial independence is to start your own company and develop it quickly. Millions of aspiring entrepreneurs are already convinced that this is the way to go - but they just don't know how to take those first few steps. In BEFORE YOU QUIT YOUR JOB, Robert Kiyosaki presents first-hand accounts of his own start-up companies and how he learned from both his failures and his successes. Along the way he explains the basics of: How to determine if your idea is a good one How to write a solid business plan and where to find Othe People's Money to help finance the idea How to incorporate yourself for business and tax purposes How to help you find key advisors to help develop your concept How to best launch your product or service.

30 review for Rich Dad's Before You Quit Your Job: 10 Real-Life Lessons Every Entrepreneur Should Know About Building a Multimillion-Dollar Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scott Dinsmore

    Why I Read this Book: I was about to quit my job to pursue some of my true interests. This sounded relevant. It certainly was. Review: A lot can be learned from Robert Kiyosaki and his experiences. I enjoy his books because they not only take an innovative perspective on things, but it is a perspective from which he lives day in and day out. I found myself at the book store a year or so ago with a pile of books having to do with Entrepreneurship and being your own boss. I was within weeks of my fi Why I Read this Book: I was about to quit my job to pursue some of my true interests. This sounded relevant. It certainly was. Review: A lot can be learned from Robert Kiyosaki and his experiences. I enjoy his books because they not only take an innovative perspective on things, but it is a perspective from which he lives day in and day out. I found myself at the book store a year or so ago with a pile of books having to do with Entrepreneurship and being your own boss. I was within weeks of my final day at work and to be honest, I was starting to get a bit nervous. I had nothing lined up, but that of course was the point. I did not want to have anything else lined up because I was determined to find something to do on my own. This would take creativity and as I have mentioned so many other places on this site, my creativity is at its peak when I am reading, especially when the authors have done what I want do. This book seemed like the perfect fit. It seemed very logical to read a book entitled “Before You Quit Your Job” just before I quit mine. The funny thing is that I did not actually get around to reading it until my last day at work had come and past. As it turned out this book was much more about being a successful entrepreneur than it was about quitting any job. I think the title may be a bit misleading but it certainly got my attention. The subtitle, “10 Real-Life Lessons Every Entrepreneur Should Know About Building a Multimillion-Dollar Business,” is much more fitting. Throughout the book Kiyosaki (and his C.P.A. Sharon Lechter) discuss the most important aspects and necessities of being an entrepreneur. He positions them as ten lessons but through those ten he is able to get across countless tips and fundamentals that any and everyone should at least be conscious of before setting out to be successful on their own. What I think is most powerful about this book is that it is as much of a biography about Robert’s business and lifetime trials and tribulations as it is anything else. I have mentioned before how valuable it is to read others’ life stories to get an understanding for what it took to get them to the proverbial top. Before You Quit Your Job is perfect for that. Kiyosaki is the model entrepreneur. He quit his high paying job to go out on his own, he failed, he learned, he did well, he failed, he learned and then he did very well. He discusses the various peaks and valleys that he experienced and how they have made him a better entrepreneur and business man. It is encouraging to read that Kiyosaki’s road to the top was not without some major down turns. When it comes down to it, you are the sum of your experiences. You can either make them work for you or against you, but it is for you to decide. Robert channeled all of his experiences into a very powerful and positive energy. You can do the same. There are a few points mentioned throughout this book that I believe are exceptionally powerful. One is the discussion about excuses. Robert emphasizes the fact that excuses are one of the easiest things to come up with and are probably the most limiting thoughts for an Entrepreneur. You cannot let excuses get the best of you. Money is the perfect example of a common excuse for not going after what you love. Some of the most successful people of our time have gotten to the top after starting with nothing. He also puts great value on continued learning, attending seminars, knowing how to sell and having a mission statement. That mission idea seems to be coming up more and more doesn’t it? Perhaps it is worth investigating. The concept that has stuck with me the most since reading this book is the following. It is easy to stand still and do nothing. It is so easy to go to work for those 40 hours and keep getting your steady paycheck. It is so easy to keep doing what you have always done, but then of course we know you will keep getting what you have always gotten. There will never be a perfect time to make that leap out of complacency and into your dream. The hardest part is getting started. Get educated about it and start today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This book is full of general but practical advice on planning, launching, and growing a business. The focus is more on growing a large business than on becoming self-employed. In fact, Kiyosaki seems to view self-employed professionals as underachievers, as if those people fall short by not building large businesses. Kiyosaki speaks a lot from firsthand experience, but he also draws lessons from businesses and entrepreneurs. I’m a Robert Kiyosaki fan, so despite his low opinion of the self-employ This book is full of general but practical advice on planning, launching, and growing a business. The focus is more on growing a large business than on becoming self-employed. In fact, Kiyosaki seems to view self-employed professionals as underachievers, as if those people fall short by not building large businesses. Kiyosaki speaks a lot from firsthand experience, but he also draws lessons from businesses and entrepreneurs. I’m a Robert Kiyosaki fan, so despite his low opinion of the self-employed, I found several points to remember as I grow my part-time web design company, OptimWise. With my company, I’m already following his advice to keep your day job but start a side business. I liked the point that the most successful businesses are those on a mission, pursuing a higher calling than profit. 3 skills for a successful business 1. Be able to sell. 2. Attract, build, and motivate a great team. 3. Teach others to sell, be team players, and succeed. The B-I Triangle (B is for Business Owner, I for Investor) Framework Mission: purpose and direction of business Team: people with necessary expertise and skills: owners, employees, outside advisors, business partners Leadership: business owner’s guidance Levels Product: goods or services the business sells Legal: business entity, intellectual property protection, agreements Systems: processes and procedures: billing, accounting, customer service, etc. Communications: interaction and relationships within the business, and between business and the world: reputation, PR, marketing, sales Cash Flow: capital to operate and execute • Product isn’t the most important; it’s just the top of the pyramid, supported by the foundation. • Be the expert in one level, and build a team of experts in the others. 3 types of money 1. Competitive money, from competing for jobs, raises, customers, market share, employees. 2. Cooperative money, from cooperating with a business team. 3. Spiritual money, from doing work for a higher calling; not necessarily because you want to do it, but because it must be done and you know you’re the one to do it. It can be because you love the work, or to become the best version of yourself, or because you’re on a mission in life to serve others. One type of money isn’t better than the others. Entrepreneurs • Entrepreneurs aren’t necessarily born; they can be trained. • Freedom and security are opposites. Entrepreneurs value freedom over security. Entrepreneurs thrive on risk; employees avoid it. • Entrepreneurship is “the pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled.” • Most entrepreneurs own a job, not a business. If you can’t leave your business for a year, it’s probably a job. Additional advice • “Anything worth doing is worth doing poorly.” This sentiment has become popular with Web 2.0, agile development, and the lean startup movement. • Don’t fear mistakes. Experiment and learn from failure. • Be a smart spender rather than a saver. Spend money that makes you money. • Spend over 50% of your time working on the business’ future. This involves marketing, PR, R&D, strategic partnerships, new deals, and making financial projections. • Aim to be the most expensive. A higher price is perceived as more valuable. The higher the price, the more precise your marketing must be. • Successful businesses have a mission, to solve a problem or fill a need. They serve others. To be rich, serve more people. • Scale the business to become rich. Move from self-employed to big business. Take the “self” out of “self-employed.” Final tips • Be willing to ask for help. • Find a mentor. • Join an entrepreneur’s network. Find these through the SBA, or chambers of commerce. Consider the Entrepreneur’s Organization.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Loren

    It is a very insightful book and a must read for anyone who is going to become an entrepreneur. There was alot of good advice and tips in the book. I listed below the best tips he gave in the book. Kiyosaki's Top 3 Tips to Entrepreneur Success Tip #1 Value Learning over Money You should get a job that helps you develop the skills and experience you need to become an entrepreneur. He got a job in sales so he could build excellent sales skills. Tip #2 Start a Part-Time Business Keep your full time jo It is a very insightful book and a must read for anyone who is going to become an entrepreneur. There was alot of good advice and tips in the book. I listed below the best tips he gave in the book. Kiyosaki's Top 3 Tips to Entrepreneur Success Tip #1 Value Learning over Money You should get a job that helps you develop the skills and experience you need to become an entrepreneur. He got a job in sales so he could build excellent sales skills. Tip #2 Start a Part-Time Business Keep your full time job and start a part-time business until the businesses is strong enough for you to quit your job. Tip #3 Fail Fast You should fail fast because the faster you fail the faster you can learn lessons from your failures.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Straight-forward and highly valuable information.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Manol Trendafilov

    Great tutorial for starting business when you consider quitting your job

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Absolutely not what I was expecting. The book is really about the subtitle in this case, not the title. Kiyosaki aims this book at sussing out what a person needs to understand in order to build a business of their own. He adds to the collection of charts he’s created and introduced in other “Rich Dad” books, or possibly not – I haven’t read all that many of them, but the ideas seem quite familiar. From my experience with this line of books, the author turns typical business and investing advice Absolutely not what I was expecting. The book is really about the subtitle in this case, not the title. Kiyosaki aims this book at sussing out what a person needs to understand in order to build a business of their own. He adds to the collection of charts he’s created and introduced in other “Rich Dad” books, or possibly not – I haven’t read all that many of them, but the ideas seem quite familiar. From my experience with this line of books, the author turns typical business and investing advice sideways, providing a different perspective and different guidance than in other, more traditional business and investment books. This one is more business and career guidance. I had been hoping, based on the title, that this would cover, at least in part, pre-retirement concerns, but Kiyosaki doesn’t in this volume. By amount of ink, I’d estimate that over half of this book is Kiyosaki’s “business autobiography”, telling the stories of his exploits in learning to run his surfer wallet business and his educational seminar business. I tend to enjoy these kinds of books, and I found these parts interesting. The rest of the book was dedicated to a few illustrative word triangles and two by two boxes that help classify and list the aspects of business that need attention or the different ways to make money in Kiyosaki’s world. He also returns to comparing his real father and his rich mentor, and it seemed like he trashed his father quite a bit more extensively than he did in his previous books that I had read. I did not find this very interesting, but for a different perspective for those building a business (or more creating the mindset to build a business – like understanding the roles of experts and determining which experts need to be involved), this may provide some value.

  7. 5 out of 5

    sadiq

    Kiyosaki never fails to milk the concept behind rich dad in a new and exciting way, while remixing it with stories and a new way of looking at the old concepts. If you have read his other books you may not feel like you learned any new paradigm-shifting concept, The book itself is an easy read and has really great ideas.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kassin

    Thanks, Tanner, for letting me borrow this! One more business book for the memory bank. All good concepts, and like many of Kiyosaki's books, a little on the repetitive side. The things that stuck with me: 1) Make sure the following bases are covered: - Product - Legal - Systems - Communications - Cash Flow (A good guide to follow for the newbie entrepreneur.) 2) Don't market yourself as being cheap - this will only get you cheap customers. 3) When it comes to marketing, think: - Product - Person - Price - P Thanks, Tanner, for letting me borrow this! One more business book for the memory bank. All good concepts, and like many of Kiyosaki's books, a little on the repetitive side. The things that stuck with me: 1) Make sure the following bases are covered: - Product - Legal - Systems - Communications - Cash Flow (A good guide to follow for the newbie entrepreneur.) 2) Don't market yourself as being cheap - this will only get you cheap customers. 3) When it comes to marketing, think: - Product - Person - Price - Place - Position Kiyosaki also recommends reading a book called, "Your Marketing Sucks," which is sitting on my nightstand. I'm looking forward to reading it- sounds like it may have some good advice around doing marketing that actually gets results, as opposed to high-profile PR (which is what most people in my field are all about). Good stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dhanu Amanda

    This is my 3rd Rich Dad book. The things that stuck with me: 1) Make sure the following bases are covered: - Product - Legal - Systems - Communications - Cash Flow (A good guide to follow for the newbie entrepreneur.) 2) Don't market yourself as being cheap - this will only get you cheap customers. 3) When it comes to marketing, think: - Product - Person - Price - Place - Position A must for anyone even contemplating opening their own Business. And a great read for employees to know what goes into a Business.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wenn

    I started the book expecting it to be a sensationalist quick read. Am I ever so glad to be wrong, because this is a gem of a book that gives the readers a glimpse of what it takes to be an entrepreneur. It doesn't sugarcoat it; yes it'll be hard, this and that are what's required of you, and though true to the Kiyosaki style of repeated selling, it is still a worthwhile read. This is something that I will come back to time and time again for references.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paco Nieto

    I am an employee and I have been looking for ways to become financially independent and become an entrepreneur. I tried a few times but was not able to make the leap. Now I know why, what holds me and also gave me clarity that I am on the right path but that I still need to develop other skills and continue learning before quitting my job.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

    Outstanding book! Do not open a business without reading. You may find it's not for you. I read before starting my business (9 years ago) and it was immensely helpful...even more important to read than E-Myth.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I admire Kiyosaki's honesty about his ups and downs and mistakes he's made. This is definitely worth reading for any aspiring entrepreneurs. Some of the chapters sounded like he was marketing his game and other books, but makes the advertisements a lesson in itself so I didn't mind.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Listened to the audio right after listening to "Rich Dad, Poor Dad". Lots of excellent advise, but most I'd heard before.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    If you're ever thinking about leaving your job and becoming self employed, you definitely should read this first. It would have saved me a lot of problems 17 years ago if it had been around then.

  16. 5 out of 5

    ClessVNA

    My first Rich Dad's book; gonna check the Cashflow game as almost it points to in this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    An Thai

    This is the story of an Entrepreneur and starting a business and the type of pain tolerance that you should be developing for yourself on this journey

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aitor De Celis Brownlow

    Wish I read it before I quit my job and not after. It contains a lot of valueble info to take into consideration when you are transitioning from your job to your business.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pieter Prinsloo

    Very inspiring.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Heriadi

    The good part is in the begining and the last content of this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amr Swalha

    As always Robert is the best person to get an advice about money and business from.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Fireplace Reader

    This was a quick read and interesting. I don’t think I got much from it besides a good couple of hours of reading. “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” was much better

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Several good principles on the difference between being an employee versus an entrepreneur. Best principles were on getting good customers and price points.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    🤔 Makes you think. It helped me consider aspects of our world. Wish it were adapted also for European law and business. The system is different from the American one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eshaq Khan

    how can i buy this book ? please advise

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

    Classic Robert, delivers as promised.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexandre Lapointe

    I read it before I quit my day job. Great book

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aldie Díaz

    Very good content if you want to reach financial freedom and you are thinking about quitting your day time job. Recommended!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Nothing really new in this one besides some new recommended books to read (besides his own books).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Xuehui Huang

    The book shocked me. I was very addicted this serial of book at university, just forgot the original heart after graduated. Keep reading ~

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