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Petite philosophie secrète des oiseaux (Non Fiction)

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On a souvent besoin d'un plus petit que soi. C'est le secret que nous confie ce livre, avec bienveillance et douceur. Il faut réapprendre à observer ce qui nous entoure, à écouter les leçons de sagesse prodiguées par la nature. Et quoi de mieux pour cela que d'arrêter un moment le tempo infernal de nos vies et d'entendre ce qu'ont à nous dire les oiseaux ? Par leur mode de On a souvent besoin d'un plus petit que soi. C'est le secret que nous confie ce livre, avec bienveillance et douceur. Il faut réapprendre à observer ce qui nous entoure, à écouter les leçons de sagesse prodiguées par la nature. Et quoi de mieux pour cela que d'arrêter un moment le tempo infernal de nos vies et d'entendre ce qu'ont à nous dire les oiseaux ? Par leur mode de vie, leur façon d'être au monde, ces petits " maîtres à penser " nous enseignent un art de vivre plus respectueux de nos rythmes – plus profond aussi. Ces 22 petites leçons de vie, courtes et simples, nous invitent à retrouver l'être naturel qui dort en nous. Philippe J. Dubois est ornithologue et écrivain. Sa passion pour les oiseaux remonte à l'enfance. Il a parcouru le monde entier à leur recherche. Il dirige les éditions Delachaux et Niestlé, la plus ancienne maison consacrée aux livres sur la nature. Diplômée en philosophie et littérature, Élise Rousseau est journaliste et auteur d'ouvrages sur la nature et les animaux. Elle œuvre aussi pour la protection de l'environnement.


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On a souvent besoin d'un plus petit que soi. C'est le secret que nous confie ce livre, avec bienveillance et douceur. Il faut réapprendre à observer ce qui nous entoure, à écouter les leçons de sagesse prodiguées par la nature. Et quoi de mieux pour cela que d'arrêter un moment le tempo infernal de nos vies et d'entendre ce qu'ont à nous dire les oiseaux ? Par leur mode de On a souvent besoin d'un plus petit que soi. C'est le secret que nous confie ce livre, avec bienveillance et douceur. Il faut réapprendre à observer ce qui nous entoure, à écouter les leçons de sagesse prodiguées par la nature. Et quoi de mieux pour cela que d'arrêter un moment le tempo infernal de nos vies et d'entendre ce qu'ont à nous dire les oiseaux ? Par leur mode de vie, leur façon d'être au monde, ces petits " maîtres à penser " nous enseignent un art de vivre plus respectueux de nos rythmes – plus profond aussi. Ces 22 petites leçons de vie, courtes et simples, nous invitent à retrouver l'être naturel qui dort en nous. Philippe J. Dubois est ornithologue et écrivain. Sa passion pour les oiseaux remonte à l'enfance. Il a parcouru le monde entier à leur recherche. Il dirige les éditions Delachaux et Niestlé, la plus ancienne maison consacrée aux livres sur la nature. Diplômée en philosophie et littérature, Élise Rousseau est journaliste et auteur d'ouvrages sur la nature et les animaux. Elle œuvre aussi pour la protection de l'environnement.

30 review for Petite philosophie secrète des oiseaux (Non Fiction)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    A pleasant little book on bird behaviour that asks us to reflect on our own lives and on human society in general to consider how we might apply the lessons we can learn from birds to improve our own life experience. It’s a dip in, dip out book - a dipper? :). I enjoyed learning more about bird behaviour but found the philosophical angle a little convoluted. The illustrations are nice and I’m sure the hard copy will be an attractive book. With thanks to Penguin Random House UK/Ebury Publishing fo A pleasant little book on bird behaviour that asks us to reflect on our own lives and on human society in general to consider how we might apply the lessons we can learn from birds to improve our own life experience. It’s a dip in, dip out book - a dipper? :). I enjoyed learning more about bird behaviour but found the philosophical angle a little convoluted. The illustrations are nice and I’m sure the hard copy will be an attractive book. With thanks to Penguin Random House UK/Ebury Publishing for a review copy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus Nerd

    If we pay attention, birds have plenty to teach us, whether it’s their adaptability through unpredictable weather or their patience during the time of their ‘eclipse’ plumage, when some species that are moulting are unable to fly and are at their most vulnerable, allowing themselves to grow stronger before soaring once again. They live in the present, they are curious and willing to take risks. While this book doesn’t reference many specific philosophers or philosophical schools of thought, which If we pay attention, birds have plenty to teach us, whether it’s their adaptability through unpredictable weather or their patience during the time of their ‘eclipse’ plumage, when some species that are moulting are unable to fly and are at their most vulnerable, allowing themselves to grow stronger before soaring once again. They live in the present, they are curious and willing to take risks. While this book doesn’t reference many specific philosophers or philosophical schools of thought, which I expected a book with ‘philosophy’ in its title would, it does encourage introspection. A reflection of your own life, the way you spend your time and what you place value on. In short chapters this quick read touches on various lessons birds can teach us. Courage, freedom, beauty, romance and death are all mentioned. Often when I read books that have been translated it can feel like I’ve missed something vital that would have been captured in the original text. I didn’t experience that feeling here so commend Jennifer Higgins on her translation of the text into English. I have a number of birds of different species that visit me each day and I love watching their behaviour. I’m in awe of the level of trust they afford me and it delights me when I discover something new about their individual personalities. I didn’t think I could appreciate them any more but some of the facts included in this book astounded me. Take the bar-tailed godwit, for instance: In spring, the godwit migrates to make its nest in the Arctic. By tracking one of these godwits with a satellite tag, researchers have discovered that they are capable of covering the distance between Alaska and New Zealand - over 7,000 miles - in one go. That equates to flying for a whole week at forty-five miles per hour. Consider, too, that the godwit weighs just 250 grams. What’s more, during this non-stop flight, the godwit rests by allowing only one half of its brain to fall asleep at a time - thereby enabling it to fly continuously through its sleep. I really enjoyed Joanna Lisowiec’s illustrations at the beginning of each chapter. The flamingoes and duck were two of my favourites. If I were to nitpick I’d tell you that when facts were stated I would have liked to have seen these backed up with references, such as when it’s mentioned that crows’ brains have “twice as many synaptic connections as that of any mammal.” Given the majority of the birds discussed reside in the Northern Hemisphere (unless they’re migrating) I was unfamiliar with the behaviours of some of the specific birds, although I could easily compare these with the birds native to Australia that visit my garden. Thank you so much to NetGalley and WH Allen, an imprint of Penguin Random House UK, Ebury Publishing, for the opportunity to read this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    A Short Philosophy of Birds is a series of short essays about avian behaviour and what humans might stand to learn from birds’ lives: stories of resurrection and forgiveness are told through moulting ducks and gender equality among sandpipers. The result is a mix of natural history and behavioural science with a side of life skills and is both joyful and interesting read. The charming volume on bird behaviour invites us to take a step back from our busy lives and to listen to the tiny philosophe A Short Philosophy of Birds is a series of short essays about avian behaviour and what humans might stand to learn from birds’ lives: stories of resurrection and forgiveness are told through moulting ducks and gender equality among sandpipers. The result is a mix of natural history and behavioural science with a side of life skills and is both joyful and interesting read. The charming volume on bird behaviour invites us to take a step back from our busy lives and to listen to the tiny philosophers of the sky. From the delicate sparrow to the majestic eagle, birds are among the most fascinating species on earth, and there is much to be learned from these paragons of beauty and grace that can be applied to our lives. Filled with elegant illustrations of bird species, this gem of a book celebrates of our friends in the sky, and what they can teach us about the rhythms of life. I will never look at a bird in quite the same way again. Many thanks to WH Allen for an ARC.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bradford

    While this book starts of very pleasant, I could tell straight away that it was by no means a philosophy but rather very vague, undirected musings upon different species of bird and spinning it into "self help" territory, which I found a little dull, but the authors' constant straying into the hierarchy and relationship territory got progressively more irritating, and it eventually fully progresses into "feminist" assaults on being simply male. Near the latter end of the book there are much more While this book starts of very pleasant, I could tell straight away that it was by no means a philosophy but rather very vague, undirected musings upon different species of bird and spinning it into "self help" territory, which I found a little dull, but the authors' constant straying into the hierarchy and relationship territory got progressively more irritating, and it eventually fully progresses into "feminist" assaults on being simply male. Near the latter end of the book there are much more detailed and interesting accounts of certain bird families and other things like accent, commonality of theft, parasitism and so on, actually helping me learn something new, but this is sadly outweighed by its bad sides. The most frustrating of these was their reflection of France' national animal being the cockrel and despite explaining *why*(Latin slang in Rome compared the Gallic tribes to cockrels because of their similar namesakes), tries to pathetically spin this into the ignorance of dah patriarchy and how women would have made selection of national emblem(as if it really matters THATmuch) so much better. At other times they seems to border on promoting promiscuity in humans. I expected these efforts to border into same-sex relationships in the animal world, something which i find very interesting, but the two authors very briefly gloss over this and favour focusing on monogamous parallels with birds and humans, and social hierarchies like alpha and beta males in female competition, but bringing it down to female "choice". Why was the constant commentary on male-female social dynamics needed but not softening the mentioned presence of homosexual companionship in the animal world? While the authors have some pleasant prose (maybe by the help of the English translator) and a clearly detailed knowledge of birds, this is by no means a philosophy book, but rather a platform for social commentary and borderline identity politics; I see parts of this book (likely Rosseau's writings) as a primary example of the problems with the contemporary Humanities. As other reviews have said this book feels very snarky and condescending, but frankly, it is very easy to spin the constant judgement of the authors around and say that this shows a very narrow middle-class, college-educated mindset. TL;DR : Some good moments and interesting explorations on different birds but.. - Not philosophy but vague self help - constant interjection of needless feminist "burns" - shows a narrow view of humanity in general 1.5/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Connie Kuntz

    This is such a pleasant book to read. You can sneak in a few pages here and there. Instant peace. Or you can read a good chunk before bed. Leads to good dreams. Or, if your newspaper still hasn't arrived and you need something new but familiar to read, this will alleviate the anxiety of not receiving your damn paper in a timely fashion. But only to an extent, because waiting for the damn paper is the pits. And it happens far too often. And why did I just renew our subscription anyway? They are s This is such a pleasant book to read. You can sneak in a few pages here and there. Instant peace. Or you can read a good chunk before bed. Leads to good dreams. Or, if your newspaper still hasn't arrived and you need something new but familiar to read, this will alleviate the anxiety of not receiving your damn paper in a timely fashion. But only to an extent, because waiting for the damn paper is the pits. And it happens far too often. And why did I just renew our subscription anyway? They are so unreliable. When will I learn to stop giving them my money? Moving on. This book is great. If you find a morsel of insight you want to share with your family or friends (and you will find many) this book is formatted in such a way that you will be able to find said morsel without having to memorize the page number, or even the chapter number. About my listing of this edition on Goodreads: I read the hard copy, not the ebook. However, the hard cover copy is not listed with a picture of the cover, so I am listing the ebook.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I really disliked this trite book. As a bird scientist and nature lover...i loved the idea of this book. Though not new, i felt the concept could be done well and provide lovely bits of wisdom from the feathered world i and so many others live. But, this book glosses over things too much in it's "short" approach, and ignores much of the science completely. I could not even finish as this book is so dismissive and frankly, condescending. #ICK I really disliked this trite book. As a bird scientist and nature lover...i loved the idea of this book. Though not new, i felt the concept could be done well and provide lovely bits of wisdom from the feathered world i and so many others live. But, this book glosses over things too much in it's "short" approach, and ignores much of the science completely. I could not even finish as this book is so dismissive and frankly, condescending. #ICK

  7. 4 out of 5

    Seth Austin

    One star. Not a single mention of the Sage Grouse. Access: Gifted (Modern Times Bookshop, Newtown) "All journeys teach us solidarity, like migratory birds that support one another during their long flight by constantly calling to those around them. We never return from a journey the same: we leave a little of ourselves behind and bring a lot back with us." In the midst of the uncertainty that comes part and parcel with our new era of pandemic, I've found myself in desperate need of something light One star. Not a single mention of the Sage Grouse. Access: Gifted (Modern Times Bookshop, Newtown) "All journeys teach us solidarity, like migratory birds that support one another during their long flight by constantly calling to those around them. We never return from a journey the same: we leave a little of ourselves behind and bring a lot back with us." In the midst of the uncertainty that comes part and parcel with our new era of pandemic, I've found myself in desperate need of something light, breezy, and optimistic. The long haul of my Pynchon saga demands a sort of... palate cleanser; a reprieve from the verbosity and chaos on every page. I found exactly this within the little hardback copy of Dubois and Rousseau's. Although it only skims the surface of what is typically termed "philosophy", this reflective series of essays was a lovely, pleasant overview of the winged world, and what lessons we could draw from it. Still, it leaves me wanting; I wish the authoring duo had taken a more daring approach, venturing deeper in the dusty corners of the human mind. Instinctually, I feel as though the quieter, less frenetic parts of ourselves are kin to these ornithological specimens far more than we're comfortable giving them credit for. Here, the analogies and metaphors hardly tiptoed out of the realm of self-help and bathroom reader. It's a shame - they speak so beautifully, in an understated manner about the behaviours and lives of these small creatures. Despite my critiques, it's permanently earned a place on my shelf as a beacon of positivity in what I'll undoubtedly remember as a foggy period of time. 70

  8. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    A series of delightful short essays describing the behavior of different species of birds provide lessons for humans on how to behave and enjoy life. These lead to the book’s conclusion that makes the case for conserving and protecting birds, and thereby saving ourselves.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Simply horrible. So far fetched, this book honestly made me question whether the authors ever encountered actual human beings in their lives. Also in case any of you were wondering: this book is not scientific whatsoever, nothing they write is actually backed up with any studies on the matter.

  10. 5 out of 5

    GS

    A really mixed bag! The idea of this book is good - it explores various aspects of human life by making observations on how birds handle that aspect and then reflects on what humans might learn from birds when it comes to that particular aspect. Each chapter is short and explores one such aspect - e.g., family, love, intelligence, death etc. There are 22 such chapters exploring everything from curiosity and happiness to things as quirky as accents. The chapters are a mixed bag. The bird behavio A really mixed bag! The idea of this book is good - it explores various aspects of human life by making observations on how birds handle that aspect and then reflects on what humans might learn from birds when it comes to that particular aspect. Each chapter is short and explores one such aspect - e.g., family, love, intelligence, death etc. There are 22 such chapters exploring everything from curiosity and happiness to things as quirky as accents. The chapters are a mixed bag. The bird behavior examples cited are short (no more than 3-4 per chapter, sometimes as few as 1) and this works to the book’s detriment. The attempt at connecting that to lessons for humans comes across as childish/ shallow psychology in many places. I am giving this a 3 despite this because there are some chapters I enjoyed, and I did learn a lot more about birds than I knew before. For instance, I didn’t know birds have “accents”, thrushes get “drunk”, mallards “gang rape” and abandon the females, siskins make pigments etc. Given its short size, probably not a book you will regret reading. I just wish the authors had done a better job exploring bird and human behavior beyond scratching the surface; and given a bit more thought into writing a proper, well researched and deeper book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rhys Burgess

    This is a nice little read that asks us to learn from the behaviour of different types of birds. It is as much educational with neat little bits of information about bird behaviour as it is philosophical. Each chapter also has a beautifully illustrated picture of a different species which complements the short topics well. Overall it does not offer much direct advice or teachings but instead asks us to reflect on the parallels and differences between our own behaviour/lives and those of birds to This is a nice little read that asks us to learn from the behaviour of different types of birds. It is as much educational with neat little bits of information about bird behaviour as it is philosophical. Each chapter also has a beautifully illustrated picture of a different species which complements the short topics well. Overall it does not offer much direct advice or teachings but instead asks us to reflect on the parallels and differences between our own behaviour/lives and those of birds to perhaps live a little better ourselves.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mohamud

    I’ll be coming back to this work again and again I suspect.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    "Happiness starts with the absence of unhappiness" ❤ "Happiness starts with the absence of unhappiness" ❤

  14. 4 out of 5

    D

    A pleasant book that relates bird behaviour and traits to humans.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sean Ellul

    A short, light, bite-sized book on the behavioral patterns of birds, and the various philosophical questions which may arise from the observation of such behaviors. A short philosophy of birds is a quaint, informative book, which will have you asking the right questions, without diving into any form of formidable depth in the debates at hand.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rishabh Shukla

    This is a nice and short read with good anecdotal details about bird species seen around the world and their specialized behaviors along with notes on philosophy that relates to humans and what they can learn from these birds. Because of covering a lot of topics and bird species, the book reads more like a summary of topics than a deep study of a specific topics. Some can see it as a plus point too that the book covers so many species of birds and so many aspects of their behavior but to me perso This is a nice and short read with good anecdotal details about bird species seen around the world and their specialized behaviors along with notes on philosophy that relates to humans and what they can learn from these birds. Because of covering a lot of topics and bird species, the book reads more like a summary of topics than a deep study of a specific topics. Some can see it as a plus point too that the book covers so many species of birds and so many aspects of their behavior but to me personally, it felt less engaging. I came out knowing a few things about a lot of birds instead of an in-depth study of bird behavior and philosophical musing. I would also concede that when I picked up the book, my expectation was set around what I found from "Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness" by Peter Godfrey-Smith who mainly covers a few members of Cephalopods like Octopus and Cuttlefish but gives an in depth study of their special place in evolution and a commentary on a diametrically different path the development of intelligence and consciousness took.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh Marks

    Very nice to read, and probably nicer still in French. But basically, a study in how humans can project their entire lives onto most canvases.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    There is a rule in reading, which is that the books you pick up by chance always give you more than those you pick out specifically. Right? Well, anyways, I picked this up by absolute chance. Don't judge a book by its cover, but if you're going to smile at me like that, I can't help it, I'll fall for you. So, what did this give me? Little snippets of life wisdom, moments of quiet reflection, adorable anecdotes about birds. It reminds me of the fascination I have with quotes, how the words can be There is a rule in reading, which is that the books you pick up by chance always give you more than those you pick out specifically. Right? Well, anyways, I picked this up by absolute chance. Don't judge a book by its cover, but if you're going to smile at me like that, I can't help it, I'll fall for you. So, what did this give me? Little snippets of life wisdom, moments of quiet reflection, adorable anecdotes about birds. It reminds me of the fascination I have with quotes, how the words can be so beautifully enthralling but shouldn't be taken too literally. Take two of the later chapters. One is about not giving in to your fears, with an analogy about how a bird gets scared of a shadow and dies flying into a window. Then you have another about how we're no longer in tune with our instincts and should become more susceptible to them. What about the instinct to flee from a shadow and fly in the exact direction where there happens to be a window? My recommendation is to read this for the calm it inspires in you, not for the knowledge it imparts. If you manage to do that, I promise it's an enjoyable read!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Delightful! This would make a great gift for a nature or bird lover. The author team consists of an ornithologist/writer with world travel experience and climate change knowledge and a conservationist with a degree in literature and philosophy. The result is a well-written (and translated) thoughtful, knowledgeable "gift" book that examines human entities and constructs through a study of birds. Topics like equality, courage, love, intelligence and several more (22 total) are examined in the bir Delightful! This would make a great gift for a nature or bird lover. The author team consists of an ornithologist/writer with world travel experience and climate change knowledge and a conservationist with a degree in literature and philosophy. The result is a well-written (and translated) thoughtful, knowledgeable "gift" book that examines human entities and constructs through a study of birds. Topics like equality, courage, love, intelligence and several more (22 total) are examined in the bird world through the habits and characteristics of specific species - and then compared to humans. Fascinating details and information make this a really interesting read and though quick and short, it packs a lot in there. The overall message is the importance of attunement with nature and how crucial it is to ensure all these species survive because each one has something unique to contribute to the animal kingdom (of which humans are a part). "Birds, nimble and spontaneous, masters in the art of life, have much to tell us if only we will listen."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Megsbookclub

    So excited to #partner with @tlcbooktours and @deystreet to feature A Short Philosophy of Birds today! 🦆I have always been a fan of birds and if I had a superpower it would of course be to fly! 🦅I mean when you really think about birds, they are just so amazing.🦉 . Some of the things we can learn from birds are independence, vulnerability, and gender equality. 🐦The book asks you to think about how often you see a bird as a symbol- from an eagle, to a dove, to a stork. 🕊Pretty interesting right!🦢 So excited to #partner with @tlcbooktours and @deystreet to feature A Short Philosophy of Birds today! 🦆I have always been a fan of birds and if I had a superpower it would of course be to fly! 🦅I mean when you really think about birds, they are just so amazing.🦉 . Some of the things we can learn from birds are independence, vulnerability, and gender equality. 🐦The book asks you to think about how often you see a bird as a symbol- from an eagle, to a dove, to a stork. 🕊Pretty interesting right!🦢 . And a funny side note about me- when I was in 2nd grade I went around telling everyone I wanted to be an ornithologist! 🤓It was the biggest word I could spell, and it made me sound really smart. 🐥When adults would ask me what that was, I would look at them and be like duh- it’s the study of birds! 🐓But then when I learned you had to do stuff like sift through what they ate, I changed my mind!🦚 .

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jona

    While I thoroughly enjoyed some of the essays, the writing suffered from over-simplifications. The short delivery often made it feel like the philosophy could be applied to any living creature rather than being specific to birds. I also found the authors' approach to reproduction bizarre. In a comparison between bird relationships and relationships between people, it is argued that "reproduction is still a constant background presence in a romantic relationship". This and other similar statement While I thoroughly enjoyed some of the essays, the writing suffered from over-simplifications. The short delivery often made it feel like the philosophy could be applied to any living creature rather than being specific to birds. I also found the authors' approach to reproduction bizarre. In a comparison between bird relationships and relationships between people, it is argued that "reproduction is still a constant background presence in a romantic relationship". This and other similar statements throughout the book came across as incredibly heteronormative, which is disappointing, considering how relationships where reproduction is not the end goal also occur in the bird kingdom (e.g. gay penguins). The writers skipped out on opportunities to look beyond the obvious philosophy in several instances, and the arguments tended to fall apart in their shallowness.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Brown

    "There are certain kinds of weather that birds don't like much, such as rain and wind" Clearly the authors have never heard of an albatross. Rather than write about how the albatross teaches us to excel in a storm, this book teachers us to cower like chickens in a henhouse. This book takes highly selective details of specific bird species - even then often inaccurate - to self-indulgently illustrate the authors personal philosophies on life, which we could all do by selecting those bird species "There are certain kinds of weather that birds don't like much, such as rain and wind" Clearly the authors have never heard of an albatross. Rather than write about how the albatross teaches us to excel in a storm, this book teachers us to cower like chickens in a henhouse. This book takes highly selective details of specific bird species - even then often inaccurate - to self-indulgently illustrate the authors personal philosophies on life, which we could all do by selecting those bird species and behaviours - or even those of aardvarks or insects - which with the right spin put on them concur with our own beliefs. If it had been titled, "My philosphy of life as illustrated by my understanding of selected bird species and behaviours" I might have given it 5-stars, except that I don't always agree with their philosophy anyway!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fhsanders54

    A delightful set of 22 reflections on aspects of bird behaviour that might encourage us to examine our own lives. Written by an ornithologist together with a conservationist philosopher, it combines snippets of birds' lives from courtship rituals, bringing up their young, avoidance of predators,significance and appreciation of beauty and song, to living for pleasure and in the moment. Many different species illuminate the book and the authors open our eyes to their differing lifestyles. As a con A delightful set of 22 reflections on aspects of bird behaviour that might encourage us to examine our own lives. Written by an ornithologist together with a conservationist philosopher, it combines snippets of birds' lives from courtship rituals, bringing up their young, avoidance of predators,significance and appreciation of beauty and song, to living for pleasure and in the moment. Many different species illuminate the book and the authors open our eyes to their differing lifestyles. As a consequence of reading this book, I feel we can learn to value nature and its seasons better and try and enjoy life in the present without worry. Very appropriate for these particular virus-affected times. Perhaps a bit too anthropomorphic but nonetheless a very enjoyable read and just maybe a few lessons to learn!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt Benkarski

    A succinct book on what is to be learned from birds. The philosophy doesn’t really have a cohesiveness beyond “If we were more like birds and the way they interact amongst themselves and the world, we’d all be better for it”. It sometimes contradicts itself and other times anthropomorphizes bird behavior, all the while telling us periodically we should not do the same or place human ethics or morality on animals. However, the book does recognize (just as with human life) birds find many ways to A succinct book on what is to be learned from birds. The philosophy doesn’t really have a cohesiveness beyond “If we were more like birds and the way they interact amongst themselves and the world, we’d all be better for it”. It sometimes contradicts itself and other times anthropomorphizes bird behavior, all the while telling us periodically we should not do the same or place human ethics or morality on animals. However, the book does recognize (just as with human life) birds find many ways to thrive on the planet and therefore we too should have a more open minded approach to how to sustain and nurture ourselves and the world we are apart of. Overall, the interesting studies and facts of different bird species paired with advice that is generally good (despite bordering on platitudes and common sense at points) made this a quick, insightful read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard Parkin

    This is an easy, charming read drawing on observation of bird behaviour to offer insights into aspects of life as a human. To call it ‘philosophy’ is perhaps an exaggeration - you’ll be familiar with many of these insights if you’ve seen any good nature documentaries. The most important lesson might be that nature (or at least birdlife) is varied and contradictory and the conclusions to be reached are appropriately suggestive and circumspect. Treat each chapter as a thought-provoker, or conversa This is an easy, charming read drawing on observation of bird behaviour to offer insights into aspects of life as a human. To call it ‘philosophy’ is perhaps an exaggeration - you’ll be familiar with many of these insights if you’ve seen any good nature documentaries. The most important lesson might be that nature (or at least birdlife) is varied and contradictory and the conclusions to be reached are appropriately suggestive and circumspect. Treat each chapter as a thought-provoker, or conversation starter. It's also a very attractive volume, like a mini-coffee table book, with gold embossed grey cloth and woodcut-style chapter illustrations.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Didi

    ?This book takes you through a story specializing in comparing birds to humans. Mainly the way they live, think of immigration, reproduction, happiness and self-satisfaction. It is a compact book with some difficult language. It was difficult to read through at times. I am familiar with animal behavior and I found that there was very little news in this regard. Good attention has been paid to subject that where left unspoken until now like how is it possible that birds are never depressed?Issues ?This book takes you through a story specializing in comparing birds to humans. Mainly the way they live, think of immigration, reproduction, happiness and self-satisfaction. It is a compact book with some difficult language. It was difficult to read through at times. I am familiar with animal behavior and I found that there was very little news in this regard. Good attention has been paid to subject that where left unspoken until now like how is it possible that birds are never depressed?Issues emerge from an angle that has not been discussed often. All in all a nice book to read, I wouldn't immediately advise against it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Blaze

    A quick, delightful read for any bird lover. I found it to be very much of the same vein as many other books targeted for bird-lovers, in that it asks such questions as "do birds show us the true meaning of life?" That's the entire purpose of this book, however, and it's done pretty well. There are 22 short chapters, and each gives a reflection on how a particular bird and what it does reflects something in our human lives—an example being how a dust-bathing hen represents living fully in the pr A quick, delightful read for any bird lover. I found it to be very much of the same vein as many other books targeted for bird-lovers, in that it asks such questions as "do birds show us the true meaning of life?" That's the entire purpose of this book, however, and it's done pretty well. There are 22 short chapters, and each gives a reflection on how a particular bird and what it does reflects something in our human lives—an example being how a dust-bathing hen represents living fully in the present moment. There's not much brand-new information in here that a bird-lover wouldn't already know, but this is a fun book regardless and I think that anyone could enjoy it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Piyush Laad

    A nicely written book comparing human lives philosophy with birds lives. The authors have given a lot of good examples and analogy. A different perspective from normal philosophical views. Take away from this book : 1. if we can’t detach ourselves from the past, we can’t move forwards. 2. Sharing of tasks in hand is important 3. Rely on your inner fearlessness and determination. 4. travel as much as you can because it teaches us about ourselves, about what we are capable of in terms of endurance, dis A nicely written book comparing human lives philosophy with birds lives. The authors have given a lot of good examples and analogy. A different perspective from normal philosophical views. Take away from this book : 1. if we can’t detach ourselves from the past, we can’t move forwards. 2. Sharing of tasks in hand is important 3. Rely on your inner fearlessness and determination. 4. travel as much as you can because it teaches us about ourselves, about what we are capable of in terms of endurance, discomfort and how we adapt to challenging situations. 5. Learn from crows. How to make use of available things to create useful tools.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Keasey

    A lovely little book. If you're a bird fan, this would be a good read for its insights, eduction and the correcting of bird myths. Unfortunately, it is a book written mostly about birds that reside in Europe and the near vicinity. Some birds are common to birds found in America--those were the chapters I enjoyed most simply because I see the birds, know their behavior, etc. Perhaps they'll write another book based on North American birds. A lovely little book. If you're a bird fan, this would be a good read for its insights, eduction and the correcting of bird myths. Unfortunately, it is a book written mostly about birds that reside in Europe and the near vicinity. Some birds are common to birds found in America--those were the chapters I enjoyed most simply because I see the birds, know their behavior, etc. Perhaps they'll write another book based on North American birds.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Harv

    This is a interesting volume. Some of the entries read as almost trite, more like parables or stories, than sophisticated thought. Yet others read as profound wisdom. Perhaps the biggest surprise is that the re-readability is astounding. Where once there was triviality, brief passages become profound on a new day. Overall it is a valid natural philosophy compendium of the purest kind; familiar ideas and observations dressed and re-dressed by passionate, thoughtful authors.

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