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The Rembrandt Conspiracy

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Arthur, the son of an art conservator, and his friend Camille suspect that plans are afoot to steal some of the most important portraits in the entire world. The problem is that no one believes them.


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Arthur, the son of an art conservator, and his friend Camille suspect that plans are afoot to steal some of the most important portraits in the entire world. The problem is that no one believes them.

30 review for The Rembrandt Conspiracy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey (Books for Christian Girls)

    DNF at 33% in. Can we leave political agendas out of middle grade books? Thanks. Disappointed, but not surprised.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy Schwab

    The Rembrandt Conspiracy is Deron Hicks’ newest addition to the Lost Art Mystery series. The inclusion of QR codes enhances the National Portrait Museum experience by bringing readers face to face with works of art by Rembrandt, Degas, Vermeer and others. This is a great techie hook for readers of all ages! Art, the son of Dr. Hamilton, protector of the artworks, and new school friend, Camille, are excited to be invited to the Gala celebrating the opening of the Millennium Exhibit, the most impo The Rembrandt Conspiracy is Deron Hicks’ newest addition to the Lost Art Mystery series. The inclusion of QR codes enhances the National Portrait Museum experience by bringing readers face to face with works of art by Rembrandt, Degas, Vermeer and others. This is a great techie hook for readers of all ages! Art, the son of Dr. Hamilton, protector of the artworks, and new school friend, Camille, are excited to be invited to the Gala celebrating the opening of the Millennium Exhibit, the most important the National Portrait Gallery has ever hosted. On the anniversary of an unsolved theft from thirty years ago, Art has reason to believe a heist worth billions of dollars will occur on the night of the gala. Now to prove his suspicions! Young readers will be introduced to scientific equipment that protects delicate art, techniques of restoration, and even a lesson on how to curtsy in case one is introduced to the Queen of England! Hone those prediction skills, follow Art’s observations and clues from the back of a scooter, and prepare for an exhilarating, rollicking tour of Washington D.C and the National Portrait Gallery. A Highly recommended “tour”!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Rivera

    Twelve-year-old Art Hamilton thinks that someone is trying to rob the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC during the Millennium Exhibit which will showcase up to a billion dollars in paintings. While his best friend Camille Sullivan has her doubts. Even though last December they narrowly managed to expose one of the greatest cons in art history, she needs more proof than an iced mocha, forty-two steps and a mysterious woman who appears like clockwork at 4:30 pm to walk through the museum Twelve-year-old Art Hamilton thinks that someone is trying to rob the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC during the Millennium Exhibit which will showcase up to a billion dollars in paintings. While his best friend Camille Sullivan has her doubts. Even though last December they narrowly managed to expose one of the greatest cons in art history, she needs more proof than an iced mocha, forty-two steps and a mysterious woman who appears like clockwork at 4:30 pm to walk through the museum in the same route taking the same amount of steps each time for over a week. Art’s dad Art Sr is the director of the Lunder Conservation Center which is responsible for caring for all the artwork owned by the Smithsonian Institute. So Art wants to get definitive proof of an actual plan to rob the gallery so he doesn’t end up embarrassing his dad in his new job. They end up following the woman afte she leaves the gallery through DC trying to figure out where she going to see if they get a proof about a plan and who is behind the theft and save a billion dollars’ worth of paintings. This was really fun read and there were QR codes throughout the book that linked to the painting that they were talking about which was a really fun and cool interactive element. This was the second book of the series and while I didn’t read the first one this was still really easy to follow and there was a little recap during the first chapter of the book to get you all caught up. I really liked the mystery and the twist was really good as well and just a really fast and great read. Thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Childrens Book Group and Netgalley for the complimentary copy of this book in e-book form. All opinions in this review are my own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Did not meet the needs of my collection at this time. There are so many art related middle grade mysteries, and my students have no interest in them. They really prefer murder mysteries or fairly gruesome ghost stories

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I received an electronic ARC from HMH Books for Young Readers through Edelweiss+ and later from NetGalley. Art and Camille are again at the center of solving a spectacular art heist. This time at the National Portrait Gallery. Some readers may figure out the main thief from early on, but others will track the twists and be surprised in the end. Hicks continues to develop his characters and share their lives and thoughts. Readers will feel like the third member of this team as they track suspiciou I received an electronic ARC from HMH Books for Young Readers through Edelweiss+ and later from NetGalley. Art and Camille are again at the center of solving a spectacular art heist. This time at the National Portrait Gallery. Some readers may figure out the main thief from early on, but others will track the twists and be surprised in the end. Hicks continues to develop his characters and share their lives and thoughts. Readers will feel like the third member of this team as they track suspicious activities and uncover clues before finding a clever way to stop the theft. The short chapters format will appeal to a broad spectrum of middle grade readers. The QR codes offer an opportunity to see the artwork being described and allow for further interactions. Hicks offers enough suspense without tipping too far for this age group. Looking forward to the next book based on the ending chapter of this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    DISCLAIMER: I received a digital review copy of THE REMBRANDT CONSPIRACY via Edelweiss Above the Treeline in exchange for an honest review. Look, I really, really like middle grade mysteries. Especially if it has something to do with a heist or robbery, so this book seemed to tick all those boxes. A boy/girl duo that’s completely platonic? Check. Trying to stop a robbery or heist? Check. Red herrings? Check. Some historical facts? Check. Personally, though, I didn’t love this book like I wanted DISCLAIMER: I received a digital review copy of THE REMBRANDT CONSPIRACY via Edelweiss Above the Treeline in exchange for an honest review. Look, I really, really like middle grade mysteries. Especially if it has something to do with a heist or robbery, so this book seemed to tick all those boxes. A boy/girl duo that’s completely platonic? Check. Trying to stop a robbery or heist? Check. Red herrings? Check. Some historical facts? Check. Personally, though, I didn’t love this book like I wanted to. I enjoyed it, sure, but I did feel it to be rather boring in parts and overall it was kind of a let down. (Full disclosure that I did not read the first book, but I wasn’t confused about anything, so it can be read as a standalone.) I don’t really plan on going back and reading the first one or continuing on with the next ones. Perfect for fans of Gordon Korman’s SWINDLE series. Will I be purchasing in December? Not likely.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I adored The Van Gogh Deception. I was not, however, expecting it to be a series. The plot of the first is such that it does not lend itself to multiple books. So naturally Hicks got very creative in this one, creating a new art theft that might be afoot while retaining the same core characters we got to know so well in VGD. Nice. Great. Well, except for the part where this book has a gargantuan case of Second Book Syndrome and really doesn't elaborate subplots other than "ah yes art crime" and I adored The Van Gogh Deception. I was not, however, expecting it to be a series. The plot of the first is such that it does not lend itself to multiple books. So naturally Hicks got very creative in this one, creating a new art theft that might be afoot while retaining the same core characters we got to know so well in VGD. Nice. Great. Well, except for the part where this book has a gargantuan case of Second Book Syndrome and really doesn't elaborate subplots other than "ah yes art crime" and "trust your friends even when they're being slightly stupid". But the real trouble is that this sort of thing has been done before, and better too. Art mysteries are everywhere in this demographic, and The Rembrandt Conspiracy reminded me of the Framed trilogy in particular. Parent in an art museum career. Budding young male protagonist with a talent for solving impossible crimes. Spunky female sidekick who hasn't met at least one of her biological parents before. The similarities just keep going, but I wouldn't go as far to say that this book plagarized. It is clearly its own universe, just with the same cliches that have been done time and time again in this genre. I do think that authors need to realize that art crime mysteries aren't especially unique in middle school fiction anymore. If this budding series is going to go anywhere, it needs to bring something new to the table that hasn't been done to death. I'm still invested in this little world Deron Hicks has built, and I'm going to keep up with these characters mostly because I saw the seeds of some subplots (try saying that three times fast) that interested me. I'm hoping the next one is better and bothers to step out of its confort zone a little, and that this will be known as the low point in whatever next books Hicks has planned for this pocket world. TL;DR - The Framed Trilogy wore it better, and this one needs to improve if it wants to make its mark on the genre. 3 stars for a painless book that made a nice showing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hope Hunter

    Art and his father are settled in Washington D.C., adapting to life in one place instead of traveling the globe to visit one museum after another. For Art, this means going to school with his friend Camille and for his dad, this means a position at the National Portrait Gallery, which is preparing for a Millennium Gala event that will display famous works of art. Art and Camille spend many of their days after school at the National Portrait Gallery, and Art notices suspicious activity that leads Art and his father are settled in Washington D.C., adapting to life in one place instead of traveling the globe to visit one museum after another. For Art, this means going to school with his friend Camille and for his dad, this means a position at the National Portrait Gallery, which is preparing for a Millennium Gala event that will display famous works of art. Art and Camille spend many of their days after school at the National Portrait Gallery, and Art notices suspicious activity that leads him to believe that a group of thieves are planning a heist comparable to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum art theft. I like the adventure in this book, although it isn't as action-packed as the first Art & Camille book, "The Van Gogh Deception." The QR codes inspire some independent research and have the potential to lead to some amazing virtual field trips to "visit" the places mentioned in the book. The descriptions of Washington D.C. are also very thorough. I look forward to adding this to my school library's collection and to the next Art and Camille adventure.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katheryne

    I wanted to like this book more than I did. The concept and plot are intriguing. An art theft mystery with a sprinkling of art history and appreciation set in Washington DC is a fabulous idea for a kid's chapter book. I also appreciated that the two main characters were male and female with nontraditional families. However, the dialogue was forced at times, many scenes were unnecessarily extended with repetition and wordiness, and some of the plot twists were more exciting than the ending, which I wanted to like this book more than I did. The concept and plot are intriguing. An art theft mystery with a sprinkling of art history and appreciation set in Washington DC is a fabulous idea for a kid's chapter book. I also appreciated that the two main characters were male and female with nontraditional families. However, the dialogue was forced at times, many scenes were unnecessarily extended with repetition and wordiness, and some of the plot twists were more exciting than the ending, which was a big let down. I had some trouble with the interactive QR codes (another great idea!), but that might have been because I was reading an ebook on my laptop and I couldn't get the codes to scan properly into my phone. For kids who will read mysteries of any kind, and are looking for something new and different, this will be a good choice for them. Unfortunately, it wasn't a mystery for me. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an advanced readers copy. All opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jaymie

    [I received an electronic review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.] 3.5 stars = Good+ Fun art-based mystery with ties to a real-life heist. Nice continuation of the story started in The Van Gogh Deception. Art is brilliant and Camille is clever and bold. They make a great team. My review copy didn't do well with the QR codes, but I love this feature that will take readers to photos of the art being referenced. It's such a creative feature. [I received an electronic review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.] 3.5 stars = Good+ Fun art-based mystery with ties to a real-life heist. Nice continuation of the story started in The Van Gogh Deception. Art is brilliant and Camille is clever and bold. They make a great team. My review copy didn't do well with the QR codes, but I love this feature that will take readers to photos of the art being referenced. It's such a creative feature. The epilogue launches a new thread that could make for an interesting third book in the series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yapha

    Art and Camille are back just in time to prevent another art heist in Washington, DC, this time at the National Portrait Gallery. QR codes provide easy access for readers to see the works of art. Although it isn't essential to have read The Van Gogh Deception first, it helps provide background information. Give this to your avid readers while the wait for the next books from Stuart Gibbs and James Ponti. For grades 4 & up. ARC provided by publisher Art and Camille are back just in time to prevent another art heist in Washington, DC, this time at the National Portrait Gallery. QR codes provide easy access for readers to see the works of art. Although it isn't essential to have read The Van Gogh Deception first, it helps provide background information. Give this to your avid readers while the wait for the next books from Stuart Gibbs and James Ponti. For grades 4 & up. ARC provided by publisher

  12. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    We bought this book for my 6th grader because she LOVED the Van Gogh Deception. I requested the ARC, but was not approved until after we bought the book via Amazon. She loved this second installment so much she wants to see a third book in the series. She said the storyline was surprising, page turning, and kept her reading. She would love to see a sequel and described the characters as “well developed.” She loved the mystery in this book and said the twists were unexpected and exceeded her expe We bought this book for my 6th grader because she LOVED the Van Gogh Deception. I requested the ARC, but was not approved until after we bought the book via Amazon. She loved this second installment so much she wants to see a third book in the series. She said the storyline was surprising, page turning, and kept her reading. She would love to see a sequel and described the characters as “well developed.” She loved the mystery in this book and said the twists were unexpected and exceeded her expectations. This was the perfect middle school read for my sixth grade book worm. I was glad I let her read it as an early Christmas gift.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Art and Camille are on the case again in this standalone follow-up to The Van Gogh Deception. Can they foil an art heist at the National Portrait Gallery, and maybe even solve a decades-old mystery in the process? This well-paced novel is a good mixture of mystery and action with entertaining tidbits of art history information sprinkled throughout. Multiple perspectives ratchet up the tension while good twists keep the reader engaged. This was an enjoyable read that I will definitely be recommend Art and Camille are on the case again in this standalone follow-up to The Van Gogh Deception. Can they foil an art heist at the National Portrait Gallery, and maybe even solve a decades-old mystery in the process? This well-paced novel is a good mixture of mystery and action with entertaining tidbits of art history information sprinkled throughout. Multiple perspectives ratchet up the tension while good twists keep the reader engaged. This was an enjoyable read that I will definitely be recommending to middle grade readers at my library.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Kizer

    This book had me fooled for a few chapters. It had me thinking after I had read more than half way through the book that there was no mystery or crime after all. But surprise there was one after all. A great book that kept me interested. I would recommend this series to any aged person who love art and definitely to any middle school student who likes mysteries.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Travelmaven

    Part of what I loved most about the other books in this series was the art. I feel like a lot of that got left out of this one. The adventure is there. I appreciate the teamwork with the kids. Just missed the art. A lot.

  16. 4 out of 5

    sophia 🍃

    I prefer the first one to this (it was more engaging and exciting), but I still enjoyed this lol. It’s the kind of book that’s short enough to binge in one sitting and I think it would have been a loooot more interesting if I had done it that way.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lily Bailly

    THIS BOOK IS MY FAVORITE OF ALL TIME!!! I LOVED THIS BOOK SO MUCH! I would recommend this book to art and mystery lovers! (Make sure to read the Van Gogh deception first)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jihan

    wow

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    DNF at 167. Skimmed end. Not nearly as good as first one. Was hoping for a lot better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Engel Dreizehn

    That was fast paced + twisty turny!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Miller

    Amazon Love this book for kids and adults alike. My fourth grade students groan when I stop reading and beg for one more chapter! I hope there’s another in this fun series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Kearney

    This book was a very fun and interesting middle school level story that I think a lot of younger people around that age group would enjoy quite well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Khaled

    Good

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Bradsher

    Great middle-grade book with many opportunities for additional learning and fun extensions. Wonderful for book clubs and hands-on learning.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Adventurous and fun! I loved the QR codes that take you to actual photos of the artwork mentioned. Makes the story realistic and interesting.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    A fun middle grade mystery with some unpredictable twists and turns. This is second in the series, but although I now want to go back and read the first, I had no problems following this story. I liked the balance of Art and Camille's strengths; I liked the QR codes which link to the artwork described in the story; I liked some of the unexpected twists in the plot. The book ended nicely; the current mystery was well-wrapped up but there are definitely hints of a sequel. I look forward to the con A fun middle grade mystery with some unpredictable twists and turns. This is second in the series, but although I now want to go back and read the first, I had no problems following this story. I liked the balance of Art and Camille's strengths; I liked the QR codes which link to the artwork described in the story; I liked some of the unexpected twists in the plot. The book ended nicely; the current mystery was well-wrapped up but there are definitely hints of a sequel. I look forward to the continuation of the series. Recommended for mystery and art lovers, ages 8-12. Review based on an ARC through Edelweiss.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I’m excited to be the first reviewer on Goodreads. I received an ARC of this book and think it’s a great addition to this series. It is such a fun, interesting, and educational book for kids about art and art heists. I love the QR codes throughout to show the different paintings. If you haven’t read this author yet, you should.

  29. 4 out of 5

    China

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maria Wang

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