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Writing in response to our current “constitutional crisis,” New York Times bestselling author and Christian activist Jim Wallis urges America to return to the tenets of Jesus once again as the means to save us from the polarizing bitterness and anger of our tribal nation. In Christ in Crisis Jim Wallis provides a path of spiritual healing and solidarity to help us heal the Writing in response to our current “constitutional crisis,” New York Times bestselling author and Christian activist Jim Wallis urges America to return to the tenets of Jesus once again as the means to save us from the polarizing bitterness and anger of our tribal nation. In Christ in Crisis Jim Wallis provides a path of spiritual healing and solidarity to help us heal the divide separating Americans today. Building on “Reclaiming Jesus”—the declaration he and other church leaders wrote in May 2018 to address America’s current crisis—Wallis argues that Christians have become disconnected from Jesus and need to revisit their spiritual foundations. By pointing to eight questions Jesus asked or is asked, Wallis provides a means to measure whether we are truly aligned with the moral and spiritual foundations of our Christian faith. “Christians have often remembered, re-discovered, and returned to their obedient discipleship of Jesus Christ—both personal and public—in times of trouble. It’s called coming home,” Wallis reminds us. While he addresses the dividing lines and dangers facing our nation, the religious and cultural commentator’s focus isn’t politics; it’s faith. As he has done throughout his career, Wallis offers comfort, empathy, and a practical roadmap. Christ in Crisis is a constructive field guide for all those involved in resistance and renewal initiatives in faith communities in the post-2016 political context.


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Writing in response to our current “constitutional crisis,” New York Times bestselling author and Christian activist Jim Wallis urges America to return to the tenets of Jesus once again as the means to save us from the polarizing bitterness and anger of our tribal nation. In Christ in Crisis Jim Wallis provides a path of spiritual healing and solidarity to help us heal the Writing in response to our current “constitutional crisis,” New York Times bestselling author and Christian activist Jim Wallis urges America to return to the tenets of Jesus once again as the means to save us from the polarizing bitterness and anger of our tribal nation. In Christ in Crisis Jim Wallis provides a path of spiritual healing and solidarity to help us heal the divide separating Americans today. Building on “Reclaiming Jesus”—the declaration he and other church leaders wrote in May 2018 to address America’s current crisis—Wallis argues that Christians have become disconnected from Jesus and need to revisit their spiritual foundations. By pointing to eight questions Jesus asked or is asked, Wallis provides a means to measure whether we are truly aligned with the moral and spiritual foundations of our Christian faith. “Christians have often remembered, re-discovered, and returned to their obedient discipleship of Jesus Christ—both personal and public—in times of trouble. It’s called coming home,” Wallis reminds us. While he addresses the dividing lines and dangers facing our nation, the religious and cultural commentator’s focus isn’t politics; it’s faith. As he has done throughout his career, Wallis offers comfort, empathy, and a practical roadmap. Christ in Crisis is a constructive field guide for all those involved in resistance and renewal initiatives in faith communities in the post-2016 political context.

30 review for Christ in Crisis: Why We Need to Reclaim Jesus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    I read this book (digital advance copy). I'm buying a copy of it to read it again. It is profound, it is life-changing, and it is a scathing criticism of the current administration on the basis of the teachings of Jesus. There's a logical arrangement of chapters, excellent commentary and discussion of the topics. My full review (and it's long) is here: https://readersforecast.blogspot.com/.... My second reading was for an online book discussion through the Episcopal Partnership (the dioceses of W I read this book (digital advance copy). I'm buying a copy of it to read it again. It is profound, it is life-changing, and it is a scathing criticism of the current administration on the basis of the teachings of Jesus. There's a logical arrangement of chapters, excellent commentary and discussion of the topics. My full review (and it's long) is here: https://readersforecast.blogspot.com/.... My second reading was for an online book discussion through the Episcopal Partnership (the dioceses of Western NY and Northwest PA), and it was an excellent book to discuss, especially once we got rolling, and everyone got used to Zoom.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Campton

    As a long term Jim Wallis reader I started this book, chosen by our church book group, with a certain level of frustration seeing it initially as a reworking of previous ideas but narrowly focused on the Presidency of Donald Trump and the crisis that has prompted in American church life and civil society, thus failing to see any great application beyond that. However I hadn't finished the book when the book group met, and a comment there encouraging us to see it as a case study with Trump not as As a long term Jim Wallis reader I started this book, chosen by our church book group, with a certain level of frustration seeing it initially as a reworking of previous ideas but narrowly focused on the Presidency of Donald Trump and the crisis that has prompted in American church life and civil society, thus failing to see any great application beyond that. However I hadn't finished the book when the book group met, and a comment there encouraging us to see it as a case study with Trump not as the cause of the crisis but the symptom helped me to broaden my view and apply it more fully to our own local political contexts including Brexit and the NI stalemate. In the light of that the concluding statements could and perhaps should be adapted and adopted by people of faith operating in a contested public square. Also the section on abortion was probably the most nuanced I have read and again might be helpful in the vacuum created in NI by Westminster's removal of previous draconian sanctions against abortion without introducing detailed replacement legislation. However I doubt it. Sections of the church like wider society have dug themselves do deep into opposing trenches in this and other issues that there is little room for constructive dialogue. The thinking is, on both Conservative (or more accurately reactionary) and supposedly Liberal (yet often profoundly intolerant) wings, that unless you tick all of the boxes on our checklist and are unwavering in your public support you are not one of us. If I didn't believe in a transcendent and compassionate God I might just despair. Having now read it a second time in the midst of the covid-19 lockdown, with disastrous management by the US and UK governments, and an unraveling of the recently re-established NI Executive after a bad decision by the Deputy First Minister re a political ally's funeral, the ethos behind this book is even more important. But on all of those fronts the recent evidence has tended to suggest that the political establishments are only interested in the perspective of the churches (or any other civic stakeholder) when that perspective supports their own, with little consultation being done with civic stakeholders in response to the crisis and short term economic issues being the primary drivers of policy. In that context Wallis' exposition on resurrection hope and the vision of the Sermon on the Mount towards the conclusion of the book is vital.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Poole

    Christ in Crisis by Jim Wallis is a deeply personal, timely and relevant response to the crisis in which our nation finds itself. This is a very powerful and provocative read. I was amazed at the way in which the author recounts the many disturbing and unacceptable actions by our current leadership and administration and the anger and incivility in our nation at the current time, and yet my overall feeling throughout this book was one of hope and empowerment. Wallis reminds us that while the mon Christ in Crisis by Jim Wallis is a deeply personal, timely and relevant response to the crisis in which our nation finds itself. This is a very powerful and provocative read. I was amazed at the way in which the author recounts the many disturbing and unacceptable actions by our current leadership and administration and the anger and incivility in our nation at the current time, and yet my overall feeling throughout this book was one of hope and empowerment. Wallis reminds us that while the monsters under the bed are real, it will not serve us, or our neighbor or our Lord well to sit paralyzed in the darkness hoping that in two or six years they will go away. Instead he shines light upon the evil and danger that currently surrounds us and reminds us that we are called to boldness and to witness to the light. The crisis that the title of the book refers to is one that holds great opportunity. I genuinely appreciate the structure of the book. By designing the content around questions, there are handles to hold on to while swimming around in some very complex and emotional waters. With these questions of Jesus as a road map, Wallis walks with the reader through a prophetic and theologically grounded journey that addresses some very important and emotionally charged issues that are essential to who we are as people of faith, yet have become sources of division within the church and have become weaponized to cause great pain and suffering by those in power on both sides of the political spectrum. Wallis speaks with clarity and integrity regarding the treatment of the LGBTQ community by people of faith, the deeper issues of abortion and pro life, who is our neighbor, and what does it truly mean to be a servant leader in a world where power is used to isolate and victimize the poor and vulnerable. Wallis engages his audience in a powerful exploration into what it would mean to live a life that is Christ like in a world where anti-Christ behaviors are too often the norm.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    This book was spiritually dark and politically dishonest. This author is probably the leading proponent of the "social justice gospel" which essentially is humanism repackaged for Christian consumption. He uses Saul Alinsky like tactics to polarize (demonize) anyone, any Christian especially, who disagrees with him or the progressive ethos. The social gospel movement bends the word of God and calls the Bible an evolving document. That way it can refuse the full counsel of God's word and not real This book was spiritually dark and politically dishonest. This author is probably the leading proponent of the "social justice gospel" which essentially is humanism repackaged for Christian consumption. He uses Saul Alinsky like tactics to polarize (demonize) anyone, any Christian especially, who disagrees with him or the progressive ethos. The social gospel movement bends the word of God and calls the Bible an evolving document. That way it can refuse the full counsel of God's word and not really preach the gospel at all. Seemingly with the mission to align the church with the mentality and morality of the world. This author and his movement truly seem to be part of what the Bible describes as the last day apostacies.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James R

    This is an important book. It’s target audience, I suspect, is Evangelical Christians and I hope it reaches them. I’m not one, but I am heartened that a very prominent, well respected and influential Evangelical leader, an elder, whose advice, guidance and ministering has been sought out in this politically tumultuous time has written such a direct, prophetical warning and, more importantly, provided a clear Biblically based corrective course of action. Wallis pulls no punches. Donald Trump, wha This is an important book. It’s target audience, I suspect, is Evangelical Christians and I hope it reaches them. I’m not one, but I am heartened that a very prominent, well respected and influential Evangelical leader, an elder, whose advice, guidance and ministering has been sought out in this politically tumultuous time has written such a direct, prophetical warning and, more importantly, provided a clear Biblically based corrective course of action. Wallis pulls no punches. Donald Trump, what he stands for, and his administration is a threat to not only our democratic republic, but to the moral standing of the Christian Church. Jim Wallace does not stand alone in this condemnation and in the suggested corrective action. Evangelical Christians make up the core of Donald Trump’s base and only Evangelicals can speak to them in terms they will understand and hopefully be swayed by. I don’t agree with everything Wallis says or all the positions he takes. In some cases I strongly disagree, but I certainly agree with the major thesis and feel that whatever points of disagreement we may have could be discussed and worked through with the intention of returning our country to a foundation of moral and ethical principles that are Biblically supported and which would serve the common good and recognize the value, dignity and rights of all people equally. Our country and the world desperately need that redemption.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Norma Todd

    This book has made me feel a part of a community I hadn't hoped was available to me at this crucial time in our American history. Jim Wallis gives voice to what I could only feel deep in my gut and in my soul. I was thinking Matthew 25 when I didn't know it was Matthew 25, just that it was what I had been taught to believe about being a Christian. For anyone who feels abandoned by current Washington rhetoric and the divisive, cruel policies being enacted by this current administration, read this This book has made me feel a part of a community I hadn't hoped was available to me at this crucial time in our American history. Jim Wallis gives voice to what I could only feel deep in my gut and in my soul. I was thinking Matthew 25 when I didn't know it was Matthew 25, just that it was what I had been taught to believe about being a Christian. For anyone who feels abandoned by current Washington rhetoric and the divisive, cruel policies being enacted by this current administration, read this book and regain your hope for our future. Together we CAN make a difference!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Clinton

    Truly compelling Christ in Crisis is not how many of us Christians have approached our faith. I include myself when I say that more often than not, we approach our faith as Me in Crisis. Here is where I am suffering God, come fix it. Always an it needs to be fixed, never a me. The powerful words of this book are a clarion for those like me ready to abandon faith, to abandon God. It is a call to choose what truly matters, and to accept that in so doing our choice matters not in the words we speak Truly compelling Christ in Crisis is not how many of us Christians have approached our faith. I include myself when I say that more often than not, we approach our faith as Me in Crisis. Here is where I am suffering God, come fix it. Always an it needs to be fixed, never a me. The powerful words of this book are a clarion for those like me ready to abandon faith, to abandon God. It is a call to choose what truly matters, and to accept that in so doing our choice matters not in the words we speak, but our actions that speak the truth about us.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I am not the person who needed to read this book. Sadly, anyone who does need to read it will not, and if they do, would likely ignore the message anyway. It was however, very thoughtfully written, and gives a lot of talking points to those resisting the un-Christian values of the current US regime. It's a good reminder to us that, in order to re-claim Jesus we need not go left nor right, but "go deep.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    The election of Donald Trump in 2016, the White Supremacist march in Charlottesville, VA, in 2017, the separation of immigrant families at the U.S. southern border, and many other events have been a terrible wake up call to the moral decay that has infected the highest levels of our government. Though popular imaginations of Christianity in America have Christians being some of the strongest supporters of Pres. Trump, what the media too often fails to notice is the large numbers of faithful Chri The election of Donald Trump in 2016, the White Supremacist march in Charlottesville, VA, in 2017, the separation of immigrant families at the U.S. southern border, and many other events have been a terrible wake up call to the moral decay that has infected the highest levels of our government. Though popular imaginations of Christianity in America have Christians being some of the strongest supporters of Pres. Trump, what the media too often fails to notice is the large numbers of faithful Christians throughout the country who are just as appalled by recent events as other Americans are, but perhaps more so as it seems to cut to the very heart of everything the gospel of Jesus Christ is suppose to oppose. Jim Wallis is one such prominent Christian thinker and activist who has been calling on Christians in America not, as he puts it, to go left or right, but to go deeper into faith. In this incredibly timely book, Rev. Wallis examines the core questions at the heart of the Gospel message and applies the answers to our current political time. Inspired by the Reclaiming Jesus Movement that was kicked off in 2018, Rev. Wallis takes a deep dive into the Gospel and our current political environment (I highly recommend you visit the website as well as watch their video statement for more information). In a time where lies, corruption, and authoritarian actions at the highest levels of our government seem to define our daily headlines, Rev. Wallis gives the morally clearest statement of how Christians should respond to the times from anyone inside our outside the faith I have ever read. And the fact that this book is centered on the strong moral principles taught in the Bible, as exemplified in Matthew 5 & 25, of loving your neighbor as yourself is deeply stirring. As I wrapped up reading this book over the course of the Lenten season (and using a Lenten study guide to do so), I have been deeply stirred to "be transformed by the renewing of my mind" (Romans 12:2). The lessons I have learned from this book as well as the many other resources Sojourners has provided will be sitting with me for a long time. This book will not appeal to everyone, unfortunately. For those who are already "ride or die" for Pres. Trump will be turned off by Rev. Wallis's unrelenting criticism of him and his administrations. There were one or two places where I thought that even Rev. Wallis was starting to lose sight of his topic, but his long criticisms always have the point of contrasting what is happening in our country and government to what the Gospel calls Christians to be and how to act at all times. I also fear that the closeness of some Christian denominations to right and far right politics will turn off others from reading a book on social justice in our present times with Jesus at its center. On top of that, depending on how the 2020 presidential election shakes out what the future of America holds post-Trump, this book and its social critiques may have a limited shelf life. That said, this is a deeply moving call to action and social justice to Christians in America and around the world. Whether you are Christian or not, American or not, pro-Trump or not, I wish everyone would read this book and "go deeper" into the Gospels. The country is in need of strong moral clarity and Rev. Wallis provides it in this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Initially, this was going to be three stars, because it is heavy, heavy going. It was also not quite what I expected. Rather than being an examination of empire and how it contradicts Christianity at the root, Mr. Wallis focuses on Donald Trump. One chapter, in particular, was illuminating to me. That is chapter four, "The Truth Question". After examining Our Lord Jesus's words about truth (to take one famous example, "You will know the truth, and the truth will set you free"), Mr. Wallis points Initially, this was going to be three stars, because it is heavy, heavy going. It was also not quite what I expected. Rather than being an examination of empire and how it contradicts Christianity at the root, Mr. Wallis focuses on Donald Trump. One chapter, in particular, was illuminating to me. That is chapter four, "The Truth Question". After examining Our Lord Jesus's words about truth (to take one famous example, "You will know the truth, and the truth will set you free"), Mr. Wallis points out that our current leader lies constantly. There is another saying I'm sure we all know: The devil is a liar and the father of lies. What impact is this barrage of lies having on us? On the world we live in? Oh, there have been other bad presidents in my lifetime. Every leader of this country in the last fifty years has, arguably, committed war crimes. But Mr. Wallis convinced me that our current leader's constant lies are indeed deeply harmful and divisive--and completely opposed to Christ. The book was well worth reading for this chapter alone. There is much more, including, in the final section, a pledge and a call to action. It took me a long time to read this book and I can't say I found it consoling, but I am glad I tackled it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jodie

    One of the best books I’ve read in ages and it is the only book I’ve read that gives a pathway... a plan... for how to heal our nation’s deep divide. It is biblically sound and well measured. Wallis does a brilliant job in showing us the unsettling juxtaposition of this current administration’s worldview against the worldview and actual words of Christ.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I thought this was an extremely important book for this time we are all struggling through....

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Jim Wallis gives the church and people of faith a lot to think about in a difficult time. Wallis has a way of digging deep into the matters of faith in a way that all people can understand. This is the best book by Wallis that I have read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Once again, Wallace nails it when he states that today's political crisis is a crisis of faith. He discusses Jesus' emphases on the neighbor, all people made in the image of God, speaking power to truth, peacemaking, fear, and discipleship, and ends with being salt and light in the world. He shares the "Reclaiming Jesus" declaration, written by several Christian leaders in May of 2018 to state what true followers of Jesus believe, and so what they must also reject in today's world if they are to Once again, Wallace nails it when he states that today's political crisis is a crisis of faith. He discusses Jesus' emphases on the neighbor, all people made in the image of God, speaking power to truth, peacemaking, fear, and discipleship, and ends with being salt and light in the world. He shares the "Reclaiming Jesus" declaration, written by several Christian leaders in May of 2018 to state what true followers of Jesus believe, and so what they must also reject in today's world if they are to be true followers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathie

    Foreword by Bishop Michael Curry ends with the "Reclaiming Jesus" declaration from 2018, with the noted religious leaders who developed and signed it (including Bishop Curry) Prologue - Reclaiming Jesus What about Jesus? "Why do you call me Lord, Lord, but do not do what I tell you?" Luke 6:46 The Neighbor Question "But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus And who is my neighbor?" Luke 10:29 The Good Samaritan parable The Image Question "Then God said, let us make humankind in our image" Genesi Foreword by Bishop Michael Curry ends with the "Reclaiming Jesus" declaration from 2018, with the noted religious leaders who developed and signed it (including Bishop Curry) Prologue - Reclaiming Jesus What about Jesus? "Why do you call me Lord, Lord, but do not do what I tell you?" Luke 6:46 The Neighbor Question "But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus And who is my neighbor?" Luke 10:29 The Good Samaritan parable The Image Question "Then God said, let us make humankind in our image" Genesis 1:26 The Truth Question "And you will know the truth, and the truth will make you free." John 8:32 The Power Question "I am among you as one who serves" Luke 22:25-27 The Fear Question "But he said unto them, it is I; be not afraid." John 6:20 "For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind." 1 Timothy 1:7 The Caesar Question "Render therefore unto Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's." Matthew 22:21 The Peacemaker Question "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called the children of God." Matthew 5:9 The Discipleship Question "Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me." Matthew 25:40 Becoming Salt, Light, and Hope "You are the salt of the earth... you are the light of the world." Matthew 5:13-14 Epilogue - the Light of the World Some of the chapters are a little long, but he makes the point that people are leaving established churches because they see that many of them are not following the principles of Jesus. For too long the Christians who are trying to follow Jesus have let the hypocritical people hijack Jesus and his message - it's time to reclaim Jesus and his principles. The chapters outline the principles and start with a Bible quote which sets the theme. The author stresses that Jesus was a radical and was crucified because he was seen as a threat to the reigning authorities - Jesus' message is that God's power is higher than earthly rulers. The author talks about the misuse of Romans 13, that earthly rulers are to rule "for the people's good." He stresses that we are all made in God's image. And he stresses the importance of the Beatitudes and Matthew 25, how those defined what it meant to be Christian in the early days.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Hill

    This was an awesome look into how Christianity can become compassionate again in our tumultuous time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jaffe

    Wallis is a leader of the Red Letter Christian movement, that takes a more social justice, social activist approach to the world. Wallis believes that many Christians have become disconnected from Christ, and that explains why so many are perfectly content to support public policies that go against the teachings of Christ in the Bible. He thinks in times of stress or crisis, we should go back to the basics and focus on the central meaning. He also notes that when Christians talk more about Chris Wallis is a leader of the Red Letter Christian movement, that takes a more social justice, social activist approach to the world. Wallis believes that many Christians have become disconnected from Christ, and that explains why so many are perfectly content to support public policies that go against the teachings of Christ in the Bible. He thinks in times of stress or crisis, we should go back to the basics and focus on the central meaning. He also notes that when Christians talk more about Christ, studies show that everyone seems to prefer it - Christians, Jews, Muslims, non-religious all find Christian talk less threatening when it focuses on the words of Christ. Among other things, this book gave me a new appreciation for Chapter 25 of the Gospel of Matthew.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Melrose

    Jim Wallis revisits some old themes and present some of his new thinking of how Christians can resist the Trump administration in a Christian way. He identifies key biblical principles to discern what Christ-followers should do when faced with a government that pretends to be Christian, but for all the wrong reasons. Wallis is a gifted progressive Christian author and speaker who is one of the founders of the Red Letter Christians. He asks the question of what would it be like if we took the wor Jim Wallis revisits some old themes and present some of his new thinking of how Christians can resist the Trump administration in a Christian way. He identifies key biblical principles to discern what Christ-followers should do when faced with a government that pretends to be Christian, but for all the wrong reasons. Wallis is a gifted progressive Christian author and speaker who is one of the founders of the Red Letter Christians. He asks the question of what would it be like if we took the words of Jesus seriously.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin DaVee

    I first picked up a Jim Wallis book many years ago, probably during the years of the second Bush Administration. That was God’s Politics, which for whatever reason I never read. This then was my first exposure. It might be easy to assume this is a work primarily directed at the current regime in Washington or perhaps more generally at the religious right. That would be incorrect. The latter part of this book is more about challenge to those of us who claim to aspire to following the Way of Chris I first picked up a Jim Wallis book many years ago, probably during the years of the second Bush Administration. That was God’s Politics, which for whatever reason I never read. This then was my first exposure. It might be easy to assume this is a work primarily directed at the current regime in Washington or perhaps more generally at the religious right. That would be incorrect. The latter part of this book is more about challenge to those of us who claim to aspire to following the Way of Christ. I found I was particularly challenged relative my feelings of helplessness and complacency.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    What is truth? Who is your neighbor? Make no mistake, this is an in-your-face book on the current political state in the US and the abdication of many religious leaders. Consider it a modern day 'Letter From A Birmingham Jail'. Jesus was radical. Jesus was political. If you object to the author's challenge, you make his point.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Richard Pütz

    One of the most inspiring books of 2019

  22. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    Considering everything that is taking place in this country, this narrative is worth the time to read no matter what your faith may or may not be.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I know people that should read this. But would they even understand!! It does give me hope.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Richard Propes

    If you know Jim Wallis, then for the most part you know what to expect from "Christ in Crisis: Why We Need to Reclaim Jesus," Wallis's late 2019 theological response to a world gone wildly awry. Wallis is a theologian, writer, teacher, and peace/social justice activist likely most known as founder of Sojourners magazine and community. With "Christ in Crisis," Wallis claims that Christianity in America is in decline and connects this decline to a distance between Christians and the practices of J If you know Jim Wallis, then for the most part you know what to expect from "Christ in Crisis: Why We Need to Reclaim Jesus," Wallis's late 2019 theological response to a world gone wildly awry. Wallis is a theologian, writer, teacher, and peace/social justice activist likely most known as founder of Sojourners magazine and community. With "Christ in Crisis," Wallis claims that Christianity in America is in decline and connects this decline to a distance between Christians and the practices of Jesus. Specifically, Wallis asks eight questions that serve as the foundation of his writing here including "The Neighbor Question," which examines what it means to love one's neighbor, "The Image Question," which explores what it means to be made in the image of God, "The Truth Question," which explores the normalization of lying and is very specifically connected to the current American political climate, and "The Discipleship Question," which encourages exploration of what it means to help those in need. There are, of course, others. "Christ in Crisis" explores common interpretations of scripture and utilizes a wide variety of sources and denominations as a response. While some shy away from more controversial issues, Wallis enthusiastically embraces these issues head-on and is unafraid to state his theologically-based interpretations with clarity and refreshing directness. If you disagree with him, and many do, this will likely cause you to immediately dismiss "Christ in Crisis." If you agree with Wallis, you may very well embrace the book just as immediately. "Christ in Crisis" is clear, concise, incredibly accessible, and undeniable in its theological positions and in issues around the current political climate and most social justice concerns of contemporary American society. As a longtime supporter of Wallis's work, there was never much of a doubt where I would be in terms of his theological voice. If anything, that's perhaps why I'm going with a 4-star rating rather than a 5-star rating. If you're familiar with Wallis, then there's very little in "Christ in Crisis" that you don't already know and already understand. While many will disagree with Wallis, he is consistent in the way he speaks and writes and his theological voice is equally consistent. "Christ in Crisis" will be most beneficial to those mostly progressive theological voices seeking to add a greater understanding of theological exegesis to their existing thoughts, ideas, and opinions. Wallis doesn't just explain "what" but "why." That helps tremendously. As a seminary graduate myself and someone who has done a lot of research on these issues, I found these discussions sort of "101" and familiar. In other words, I didn't really need them to understand the issues and, as such, the book was less impactful for me. It simply reinforced what I already knew about Wallis and positions on these issues. For someone newer to these discussions and identifying more with a progressive, or Christian left, voice, then I would definitely recommend "Christ in Crisis" as a great way to understand the theology underneath it all and to help organize your thoughts, ideas, and discussion points. I will always, of course, encourage reading Jim Wallis as one of this generation's great public theologians and justice advocates. Having gone to his conferences, been to the Sojourners Leadership Conference, subscribed to Sojourners, and generally been extensively familiar with Wallis's world, however, I'm generally hoping to dig even deeper and really study these ideas.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Len Knighton

    "We are living through perilous and polarizing times as a nation,...". This statement, coming near the end of the book, opens the RECLAIMING JESUS Declaration but also tells us why that document and this book were written. The United States, under the tyrannical thumb of President Donald J. Trump, is, perhaps, more divided now than at any time since the Civil War. So divided are we that I have stopped using Facebook because I cannot tolerate the political comments of many of my friends. It is be "We are living through perilous and polarizing times as a nation,...". This statement, coming near the end of the book, opens the RECLAIMING JESUS Declaration but also tells us why that document and this book were written. The United States, under the tyrannical thumb of President Donald J. Trump, is, perhaps, more divided now than at any time since the Civil War. So divided are we that I have stopped using Facebook because I cannot tolerate the political comments of many of my friends. It is becoming difficult for me to work one of my jobs because of the partisanship displayed by coworkers. As a pastor, I am frustrated because I may not speak out against the President without jeopardizing my church's tax status or alienating some of my congregation. I very much appreciate how Jim Wallis has brought numerous issues into the light, at the same time exposing the President for the charlatan he truly is. And yet, he will likely be reelected for a second term with major assistance by evangelical Christians who have been duped and conned. A friend of mine, a supporter of Trump, told me that she is afraid of our nation becoming socialist or communist under a Democratic president. What she fails to see is that the nation is closer to fascism under this president than it has ever been. On this Transfiguration Sunday 2020, the words of God from the cloud ring like the bells of Notre Dame but are more akin to the Liberty Bell, THIS IS MY BELOVED SON, WITH WHOM I AM WELL PLEASED. LISTEN TO HIM. It is time for our nation to do just that. This book is a wonderful guide for finding Jesus' words. Four stars waxing

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anieta

    I happen to agree with 95% of the ideas Jim Wallis shares in his book Christ in Crisis, but I rated it a "3" because his arguments did not always have sold facts underpinning them. Historically, Wallis says, "when some people decide to have dominion over some people, instead of stewardship with other people over the rest of creation, it literally is a sin against God's act of creation...." (page 47). I can make a case for this statement. And I think I agree with it. But he has leaped a river wit I happen to agree with 95% of the ideas Jim Wallis shares in his book Christ in Crisis, but I rated it a "3" because his arguments did not always have sold facts underpinning them. Historically, Wallis says, "when some people decide to have dominion over some people, instead of stewardship with other people over the rest of creation, it literally is a sin against God's act of creation...." (page 47). I can make a case for this statement. And I think I agree with it. But he has leaped a river without providing a bridge....how is it a sin against creation to rule over some people? From what facts, what scripture did he get here. That few women (page 69) signed the Nashville statement (2017) also indicates a clear connection being made between the rejection of LGBTQ Christians and overwhelmingly male signers rejection of the equality of women and their leadership in the churches (page 69). Again, how did he make the connection between women signers and male signers? Besides making an unsupported opinion, that statement seems binary as as well. There are numerous reasons I can think of as to why women didn't sign the Nashville statement. How did he get to this one? How did he come to see this as a male signers and women nonsigners (binary--two options he considers)? I will recommend the book, and I will caution that, while Christ in Crisis has great ideas to research and ponder, his opinions do not have the underlying foundation to support them well.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I'm not sure who the intended audience is for this book. I think there's a segment of Christians who will read the book and agree with most of what Wallis says (as I did), but were already on board with it anyway. I think there's another segment of Christians who will not be persuaded that by following Trump they've abandoned Christ. They either won't pick up the book at all, or they'll abandon it really quickly. I don't think there are many people in the middle. I was hoping this might be a goo I'm not sure who the intended audience is for this book. I think there's a segment of Christians who will read the book and agree with most of what Wallis says (as I did), but were already on board with it anyway. I think there's another segment of Christians who will not be persuaded that by following Trump they've abandoned Christ. They either won't pick up the book at all, or they'll abandon it really quickly. I don't think there are many people in the middle. I was hoping this might be a good book to use for a book discussion at my church, but I think the tenor of the book would alienate some people who I'd really like to bring into the conversation. It's a good book; I just don't think it opens up a dialogue.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jonnie

    If there were half stars, I would rate this 3.5 stars. Undoubtedly, there is a strong political bias throughout the book. That said, there are valid points made related to the behavior of many Christians today in regards to Christ's teachings. As far as the overall message at a high level, it is a 4.5 star book. However, the 3.5 star ratings was because there are too many repetitive rants in the first part of the book. The first few chapters could have been edited to one chapter by editing out t If there were half stars, I would rate this 3.5 stars. Undoubtedly, there is a strong political bias throughout the book. That said, there are valid points made related to the behavior of many Christians today in regards to Christ's teachings. As far as the overall message at a high level, it is a 4.5 star book. However, the 3.5 star ratings was because there are too many repetitive rants in the first part of the book. The first few chapters could have been edited to one chapter by editing out the political diatribe. The message of the book does get better towards the middle and last part of the book so don't quit reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This was somewhat of a frustrating book. On the one hand, I always appreciate Wallis' insights as a left leaning religious conservative who by his very nature undermines our overly-strict religious/political divisions. I also shared his concern that Donald Trump is one of the worst things to happen to both Democracy and Christianity in a long time.]and that Christians worship God, not any political leader. But on the negative side, that focus made the book seem somewhat repetitive and preachy. I This was somewhat of a frustrating book. On the one hand, I always appreciate Wallis' insights as a left leaning religious conservative who by his very nature undermines our overly-strict religious/political divisions. I also shared his concern that Donald Trump is one of the worst things to happen to both Democracy and Christianity in a long time.]and that Christians worship God, not any political leader. But on the negative side, that focus made the book seem somewhat repetitive and preachy. It reads like 8 long sermons on faith and politcs.

  30. 4 out of 5

    marcus miller

    I wanted to like this book but .... maybe I've read too many issues of Sojourners and other similar writings. In short, a lot of people would benefit from reading this book and Wallis's call for people who call themselves Christians to renew their focus on the person and teachings of Jesus, but most won't. Wallis raises important points when he focuses on the Sermon on the Mount, not living in fear, living in ways which reflect the teachings of the Bible, and the importance of truth, but somehow I wanted to like this book but .... maybe I've read too many issues of Sojourners and other similar writings. In short, a lot of people would benefit from reading this book and Wallis's call for people who call themselves Christians to renew their focus on the person and teachings of Jesus, but most won't. Wallis raises important points when he focuses on the Sermon on the Mount, not living in fear, living in ways which reflect the teachings of the Bible, and the importance of truth, but somehow I found it easy to skim through the pages.

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