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The Art of Making Memories: How to Create and Remember Happy Moments

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What’s the actual secret to happiness? Great memories! Meik Wiking—happiness researcher and New York Times bestselling author of The Little Book of Hygge and The Little Book of Lykke—shows us how to create memories that make life sweet in this charming book. Do you remember your first kiss? The day you graduated? Your favorite vacation? Or the best meal you ever had? Memorie What’s the actual secret to happiness? Great memories! Meik Wiking—happiness researcher and New York Times bestselling author of The Little Book of Hygge and The Little Book of Lykke—shows us how to create memories that make life sweet in this charming book. Do you remember your first kiss? The day you graduated? Your favorite vacation? Or the best meal you ever had? Memories are the cornerstones of our identity, shaping who we are, how we act, and how we feel. In his work as a happiness researcher, Meik Wiking has learned that people are happier if they hold a positive, nostalgic view of the past. But how do we make and keep the memories that bring us lasting joy? The Art of Making Memories examines how mental images are made, stored, and recalled in our brains, as well as the “art of letting go”—why we tend to forget certain moments to make room for deeper, more meaningful ones. Meik uses data, interviews, global surveys, and real-life experiments to explain the nuances of nostalgia and the different ways we form memories around our experiences and recall them—revealing the power that a “first time” has on our recollections, and why a piece of music, a smell, or a taste can unexpectedly conjure a moment from the past. Ultimately, Meik shows how we each can create warm memories that will stay with us for years. Combining his signature charm with Scandinavian forthrightness, filled with infographics, illustrations, and photographs, and featuring “Happy Memory Tips,” The Art of Making Memories is an inspiration meditation and practical handbook filled with ideas to help us make the memories that will bring us joy throughout our lives.


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What’s the actual secret to happiness? Great memories! Meik Wiking—happiness researcher and New York Times bestselling author of The Little Book of Hygge and The Little Book of Lykke—shows us how to create memories that make life sweet in this charming book. Do you remember your first kiss? The day you graduated? Your favorite vacation? Or the best meal you ever had? Memorie What’s the actual secret to happiness? Great memories! Meik Wiking—happiness researcher and New York Times bestselling author of The Little Book of Hygge and The Little Book of Lykke—shows us how to create memories that make life sweet in this charming book. Do you remember your first kiss? The day you graduated? Your favorite vacation? Or the best meal you ever had? Memories are the cornerstones of our identity, shaping who we are, how we act, and how we feel. In his work as a happiness researcher, Meik Wiking has learned that people are happier if they hold a positive, nostalgic view of the past. But how do we make and keep the memories that bring us lasting joy? The Art of Making Memories examines how mental images are made, stored, and recalled in our brains, as well as the “art of letting go”—why we tend to forget certain moments to make room for deeper, more meaningful ones. Meik uses data, interviews, global surveys, and real-life experiments to explain the nuances of nostalgia and the different ways we form memories around our experiences and recall them—revealing the power that a “first time” has on our recollections, and why a piece of music, a smell, or a taste can unexpectedly conjure a moment from the past. Ultimately, Meik shows how we each can create warm memories that will stay with us for years. Combining his signature charm with Scandinavian forthrightness, filled with infographics, illustrations, and photographs, and featuring “Happy Memory Tips,” The Art of Making Memories is an inspiration meditation and practical handbook filled with ideas to help us make the memories that will bring us joy throughout our lives.

30 review for The Art of Making Memories: How to Create and Remember Happy Moments

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brooke — brooklynnnnereads

    Everything about this book is beautiful and stunning, from the physical book to the inner content. Whether it be the simple details in the illustrated graphics or the breathtaking photographs, everything within this book was well thought of and done with intention. The layout, the content, the writing--all of this combined into a beautiful book that captured the message by leaving an impression and "making a memory" for me. As someone who's incredibly nostalgic and sentimental, this book was a p Everything about this book is beautiful and stunning, from the physical book to the inner content. Whether it be the simple details in the illustrated graphics or the breathtaking photographs, everything within this book was well thought of and done with intention. The layout, the content, the writing--all of this combined into a beautiful book that captured the message by leaving an impression and "making a memory" for me. As someone who's incredibly nostalgic and sentimental, this book was a perfect read for me, especially during a difficult time where I felt that I was struggling and becoming somewhat 'jaded' in everyday moments. This book was a helpful reminder of what truly matters in life and showed how to work on getting back to appreciating those moments. Whether this book is placed on a bookshelf to be read or used as a beautiful coffee table book, I think it will be beneficial to anyone that picks this up. It's one of those books that's so important and pure, it focuses on what matters the most in life and gives assistance to help the reader on their own personal journey. Even those that think they live a full life of gratitude could benefit from the information contained in these pages. I know I will take some of the content from this book and it will stay with me. I'm going to try and incorporate some of the suggestions into my own life--even if it takes a couple of tries. This book is definitely one that would be worth reading periodically to bring back the balance into everyday life. ***Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review***

  2. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    I absolutely adore Meik Wiking's books. They're like a hug in book form, perfect for reading with a mug of your favourite hot drink for the ultimate feeling of comfort and warmth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    I had “Memories” scribbled in my book journal as a reminder of a book I read in the spring of 2020. In flipping back through it to try to get caught up on reviews, I stared at that dang word blankly trying to remember what it meant. After checking my various book apps, library accounts, and purchases, I finally realized it was a placeholder for THE ART OF MAKING MEMORIES. Soooooo…. clearly this book’s message was lost on me! I truly do not remember a thing about it a mere four months later. Perh I had “Memories” scribbled in my book journal as a reminder of a book I read in the spring of 2020. In flipping back through it to try to get caught up on reviews, I stared at that dang word blankly trying to remember what it meant. After checking my various book apps, library accounts, and purchases, I finally realized it was a placeholder for THE ART OF MAKING MEMORIES. Soooooo…. clearly this book’s message was lost on me! I truly do not remember a thing about it a mere four months later. Perhaps if I had captured my thoughts immediately after I closed the last page my review would be different, but alas, I’m drawing a blank. What I do know is that the physical book itself is adorable. The trio of MEMORIES along with Wiking’s others (THE LITTLE BOOK OF HYGGE and THE LITTLE BOOK OF LYKEE about Danish life) would make beautiful additions to any home’s décor. Stacked on a bookshelf, guest bedroom nightstand, or fireplace mantle, the mere sight of them is bound to make you feel just a wee bit cozier.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

    This was an enjoyable look at the science of memory and how our memories affect our happiness. The format of the book makes for very easy and pleasant reading, with brief but well-written subsections and beautiful illustrations and photos. Any reader will find food for thought here about how to process the big and little things in life so as to have a deep reservoir of meaningful memories in the story that you narrate about your own life. I especially loved the advice to "harness the power of firs This was an enjoyable look at the science of memory and how our memories affect our happiness. The format of the book makes for very easy and pleasant reading, with brief but well-written subsections and beautiful illustrations and photos. Any reader will find food for thought here about how to process the big and little things in life so as to have a deep reservoir of meaningful memories in the story that you narrate about your own life. I especially loved the advice to "harness the power of firsts" by seeking out novel experiences and "outsource memory" by recording what you experience--and not just in photos, which can actually decrease your ability to pay attention to the moment. For, as Confucius says, "The palest ink is better than the best memory." I thought there were some really handy suggestions about how to diminish the pull of your devices so that you are more capable of focusing on the moment. The author also addresses subjects such as the forgetting curve and the challenge of an overly curated memory bank that you create on social media. This author is very amusing, but the FUNNIEST section was where he briefly muses on why people are so excited about football and what the world would be like if people were equally passionate about, for instance, origami. (To a non-sports-enthusiast, this whole section will have you standing and applauding.) I recommend this quick and pleasant read to everyone. Thanks to Edelweiss for this advance review copy!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Houle

    When it comes to my memories, I have to say that they usually aren’t positive ones. The first thing that pops into my head is an instance of when I was in Grade Seven French class, and I pronounced a word in class out loud in a high falsetto voice. The teacher thought I was making fun of her (and I probably was), so she shipped me out to the Principal’s office to phone home about what I’d done. I remember the bus ride home that day, feeling dread in the pit of my stomach at confronting my mother When it comes to my memories, I have to say that they usually aren’t positive ones. The first thing that pops into my head is an instance of when I was in Grade Seven French class, and I pronounced a word in class out loud in a high falsetto voice. The teacher thought I was making fun of her (and I probably was), so she shipped me out to the Principal’s office to phone home about what I’d done. I remember the bus ride home that day, feeling dread in the pit of my stomach at confronting my mother and explaining my boorish behaviour to her. It was a sunny day, and that trip home seemed to take hours and not minutes. So, as you can see, I tend to think of the negative first, so when Meik Wiking’s The Art of Making Memories: How to Create and Remember Happy Moments crossed my plate, I jumped at the chance to read it. Now that I’m approaching my 44th birthday, I wanted to know how I can create more positive memories for the second half of my life to make up for the seeming paucity of good ones in the first half. Now, what this book won’t necessarily do is instantly make you forget all of your bad memories. As author Meik Wiking, a chatty and affable Danish man who has a current job as a happiness researcher (yes, such a profession exists!), will tell you, we all have to take the good with the bad. (To prove it, he recounts an episode from his first day on the job in government where he had unknowingly stepped in dog poop, and managed to stain the carpet in his new office building with it as he walked along.) However, Wiking challenges readers to take ownership of the bad memories so that they don’t take over your thoughts. So I suppose I just did that with the French lesson in the first paragraph of this review, using it as more of an instructive tool to illustrate a point rather than simply be something bad that takes up a lot of space. (See, this book is helpful!) Read the rest of the review here: https://medium.com/@zachary_houle/a-r...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Disneyland smells like Japanese Cherry Blossom body spray from Bath and Body works. At least it does to me. I purchase this new scent right before going to Disneyland with my family for the first time and I wore it everyday. Now when I smell that scent I am taken back to that trip over a decade ago, one of the last ones I would take with my mother, and I am filled with memories. The Art of Making Memories explores that many different ways that memories become more meaningful, or memorable really Disneyland smells like Japanese Cherry Blossom body spray from Bath and Body works. At least it does to me. I purchase this new scent right before going to Disneyland with my family for the first time and I wore it everyday. Now when I smell that scent I am taken back to that trip over a decade ago, one of the last ones I would take with my mother, and I am filled with memories. The Art of Making Memories explores that many different ways that memories become more meaningful, or memorable really. If you couple a new event, trip, or occasion with an additional sense, like a specific scent you have created a whole new way of recalling the memory. It is tied to more senses. He lists many different things that make memories stand out like the first time you did something new, when things go wrong but you make the best of it, and more. I enjoyed that he often coupled making memories with his research on happiness. Memories are not synonymous with happiness, but we often remember happy moments and the more that we revisit them the more we remember them and can feel the happiness of them again and again. Though memories implies something in the past, I appreciated his approach on living your life in the future to have meaningful memories. We can, through planning and awareness create or embrace our future memories now. One of my favorite quotes from the book is this one, "As a happiness researcher, I have often observed that happiness is often found when three views align: who we feel we are, who we want to be and how others see us. When our loved ones see us and love us for who we really are, and when we manage to become who we know we can be, that is where we find happiness."

  7. 5 out of 5

    SheLove2Read

    It wasn't bad. I felt like it was more nostalgia than memory making ideas. In truth, it played on my self esteem, and made me a little sad that I don't have the happy or joyful memories he recounts in this book. For some this might be a fun read, but for me it was depressing.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    This book wasn't quite what I expected. It was a lot more memory psychology that practical self help. While it was interesting, I didn't love it. It reads more like The Science of Making Memories rather than The Art of Making Memories. (Audiobook)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Bakar

    Bought the physical book on impulse because it was so pretty. I very much enjoyed the book though - there is a lot of advice about how to lay down good memories, all backed up by psychological studies and personal anecdote - delivered in a wry and humorous way. I also listened to the audiobook which was a pleasurable experience (it accompanied me in the garden) - I like books read by the author so you get to hear his/her voice, but delivery was just a little fast and there could have been pauses Bought the physical book on impulse because it was so pretty. I very much enjoyed the book though - there is a lot of advice about how to lay down good memories, all backed up by psychological studies and personal anecdote - delivered in a wry and humorous way. I also listened to the audiobook which was a pleasurable experience (it accompanied me in the garden) - I like books read by the author so you get to hear his/her voice, but delivery was just a little fast and there could have been pauses for new sections. This book would make a perfect gift.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Baker

    I'm DNF-ing at 90 pages - some of the info is getting repetitive and some of the suggestions... "make new memories travelling!" Buddy, I can barely afford the gas to get to work and the grocery store, where do you think I'm gonna travel to? The elements of privilege and ignorance of the struggles of being poor are strong.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ✨ kathryn ✨

    I love Meik Wiking a whole bunch. No new revelations there. Thoroughly enjoyed this book, which tackles something different to both The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well and The Little Book of Lykke: Secrets of the World's Happiest People. Concisely written and super-accessible, too. So many bookmarked pages; especially the end section on "planning a happy and memorable year." Extremely thought-provoking. I love Meik Wiking a whole bunch. No new revelations there. Thoroughly enjoyed this book, which tackles something different to both The Little Book of Hygge: The Danish Way to Live Well and The Little Book of Lykke: Secrets of the World's Happiest People. Concisely written and super-accessible, too. So many bookmarked pages; especially the end section on "planning a happy and memorable year." Extremely thought-provoking.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    I love Meik Wiking’s The Little Book of Hygge, so I was very excited to pick up this new book of his. But I was disappointed. The overly sassy narration was full of random deviations from the core ideas. It felt too much like the author was trying to be clever with wordplay rather than write a heartwarming, informative book. In addition, much of this book contained common sense-style information, which felt unoriginal. I feel conflicted being so critical of an author whose (other) research I res I love Meik Wiking’s The Little Book of Hygge, so I was very excited to pick up this new book of his. But I was disappointed. The overly sassy narration was full of random deviations from the core ideas. It felt too much like the author was trying to be clever with wordplay rather than write a heartwarming, informative book. In addition, much of this book contained common sense-style information, which felt unoriginal. I feel conflicted being so critical of an author whose (other) research I respect, but this totally missed the mark for me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ileana

    Having read the other two books written by Meik Wiking, I expected something else. This book is all about pseudo-science, everything is built on individual observations that are not supported by medical research/information. The book is not fun, is not easy to read, it was boring and it was just the perspective of Wiking, contemplating the situation of getting old.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Стоянка

    Amazing heart-warming book about happy memories and their retention in a life-long plan.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    These Meik Wiking books are beautiful, in both a physical and literary sense. They are hardcover with shiny gold bits on them, there are adorable little pictures and stunning photos throughout. The pages are thick, and it has nice fonts. It’s like the embodiment of a happy memory. The writing is a little too scholarly for my taste, but the line, “be Marie Kondo’s archenemy” makes up for that.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bistra Ivanova

    Disclaimer: I listened to the audiobook and I haven't seen the widely described as a 'beautiful' paper copy. I think that some of the experience is lost in the audiobook so I plan to check the paper one as well. This is exactly the type of non-fiction you need blinkist for :-))) Tons of information, studies and stories which are used to illustrate the author's message. Some of them were interesting and funny but most just seemed too much. I started it because I am following a Yale class on happi Disclaimer: I listened to the audiobook and I haven't seen the widely described as a 'beautiful' paper copy. I think that some of the experience is lost in the audiobook so I plan to check the paper one as well. This is exactly the type of non-fiction you need blinkist for :-))) Tons of information, studies and stories which are used to illustrate the author's message. Some of them were interesting and funny but most just seemed too much. I started it because I am following a Yale class on happiness but it seems that the book was focused more on memory as such, not so much on happiness.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alžběta

    Well written and researched, heart-warming, funny, and so incredibly beautiful! I absolutely adored Meik Wiking's previous two books and this one did not disappoint - thoroughly enjoyed every page.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Such a comforting read, both informative and humorous.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Britt Margit

    A lovely little book. Meik successfully blends psychology and lifestyle into a fun, easy read filled with fun facts you’ll be hard-pressed to forget. I guffawed through repeated mentions of ripped Santa, the hippo director, and pineapples (you had to be there / you’ll have to read it). Plus, the illustrations are beautiful - a perfect mix of traditional and modern/clean Scandinavian design.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jill Crosby

    This book is probably only worth a 2 on the reality scale, but there’s just something about the way Meik Wiking pits word down on paper that I find irresistible. In his latest book, the Happiness Professional discusses memory, how we remember, and how to make happy memories, and he uses gorgeous photography, adorable Scandinavian doodles, and memorable quotes to do it. Sure there’s that underlying patina of pretension—it’s easier to make stunning, eventful everyday memories when you live on an i This book is probably only worth a 2 on the reality scale, but there’s just something about the way Meik Wiking pits word down on paper that I find irresistible. In his latest book, the Happiness Professional discusses memory, how we remember, and how to make happy memories, and he uses gorgeous photography, adorable Scandinavian doodles, and memorable quotes to do it. Sure there’s that underlying patina of pretension—it’s easier to make stunning, eventful everyday memories when you live on an island in the Baltic and vacation internationally and all the people in your life are wonderful and friendly and you have no financial struggles whatsoever, than if you live smack dab in the middle of suburbia and have to deal with loud neighbors, crabby service people, higher property taxes & commuter nightmares. But Wiking is so matter-of-fact and light-hearted about how he lays out his stories, you kind of forgive him for it. A light, fun read, and you get to learn things along the way

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fully.Booked

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5/5 - Short, sweet and just the right amount of funny! The Art of Making Memories explores how we can create and remember happy moments! This book is narrated by happiness researcher Meik Wiking, who’s title seriously makes me think that I might’ve picked the wrong career path😂 I was really happy to see that his tips were backed up by research but I will say that, for a book that emphasizes memory, some tips weren’t memorable for me🙈 That said, the research points were and I also realize t ⭐️⭐️⭐️.5/5 - Short, sweet and just the right amount of funny! The Art of Making Memories explores how we can create and remember happy moments! This book is narrated by happiness researcher Meik Wiking, who’s title seriously makes me think that I might’ve picked the wrong career path😂 I was really happy to see that his tips were backed up by research but I will say that, for a book that emphasizes memory, some tips weren’t memorable for me🙈 That said, the research points were and I also realize that I can pick the book up at anytime... overall, I did really enjoy it! It was light and informative!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyrie

    I think I would have enjoyed this book more had I not read it in the middle of a quarantine. All the suggestions of things to do to create memories just made me think "Yeah. Right. Whenever we can move freely again." It's meant to be upbeat and positive. It just isn't working for me at the moment. Someday I may reread it and think, "oh, yes, the book I read in quarantine" and have many memories of events in my house. I'm more hopeful I'll think "this sounds vaguely familiar" but be better placed I think I would have enjoyed this book more had I not read it in the middle of a quarantine. All the suggestions of things to do to create memories just made me think "Yeah. Right. Whenever we can move freely again." It's meant to be upbeat and positive. It just isn't working for me at the moment. Someday I may reread it and think, "oh, yes, the book I read in quarantine" and have many memories of events in my house. I'm more hopeful I'll think "this sounds vaguely familiar" but be better placed to do some of the suggested activities.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christine Spoors

    This was a great book, exploring memories, the way they are stored and with some tips on how we can better hold onto memories of our happiest moments. I always love these books as they make me think about my day to day life & remind me to try and have fun. I did find that this book seemed to spend a lot more time talking about research than Wiking’s first two, but it was a good read. This was a great book, exploring memories, the way they are stored and with some tips on how we can better hold onto memories of our happiest moments. I always love these books as they make me think about my day to day life & remind me to try and have fun. I did find that this book seemed to spend a lot more time talking about research than Wiking’s first two, but it was a good read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Holm

    This book caught my eye at the library. My grandma has been battling Alzheimer’s and I have watched her memories fade away. Not only do I want to pursue a meaningful life, I want to remember all the experiences that made it such. This book gives helpful insights on how to enhance your ability to create and remember good moments.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Claire O'Sullivan

    A lovely little book to end my 2019 reading year 😊

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rose Smith

    I enjoyed the information in the book and also the layout of the book. The author cracked me up. It was a fun read! I have some practical ideas I can use to aid in my memory keeping and memory making.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elisa Walton

    Enjoyable insight in how modern day life can affect our memories. Worth the read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ayesha

    This poignant little book on the art of memory-making explores how to craft a life rich with happy moments and make them ever more memorable - by striving to up their memorability, taking photos, retelling them regularly and recreating them with future generations.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Meg Briers

    This was such a cute and really fun to read book, and I'll even remember reading it, thanks to the tips in the book, because today is the day in 1969 that apollo 11 landed on the moon!

  30. 4 out of 5

    superawesomekt

    A topic always worthy of attention.

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