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Enuma Elish (Enûma Eliš) (Complete Audiobook, Unabridged)

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46BGb... The Enuma Elish (Enûma Eliš) is the Babylonian creation myth that describes the great hero Marduk's battle with the great primordial dragon Tiamat and her armies of gods and monsters. Marduk defeats Tiamat, mutilates her body and uses it to form the covering of the sky and the Earth. He then creates man to keep the worship of the god https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46BGb... The Enuma Elish (Enûma Eliš) is the Babylonian creation myth that describes the great hero Marduk's battle with the great primordial dragon Tiamat and her armies of gods and monsters. Marduk defeats Tiamat, mutilates her body and uses it to form the covering of the sky and the Earth. He then creates man to keep the worship of the gods upon the earth. The Enuma Elish's earliest texts date back to the 700-600 BC, however the text was probably compiled long before, up to around 1800 BC.


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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46BGb... The Enuma Elish (Enûma Eliš) is the Babylonian creation myth that describes the great hero Marduk's battle with the great primordial dragon Tiamat and her armies of gods and monsters. Marduk defeats Tiamat, mutilates her body and uses it to form the covering of the sky and the Earth. He then creates man to keep the worship of the god https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46BGb... The Enuma Elish (Enûma Eliš) is the Babylonian creation myth that describes the great hero Marduk's battle with the great primordial dragon Tiamat and her armies of gods and monsters. Marduk defeats Tiamat, mutilates her body and uses it to form the covering of the sky and the Earth. He then creates man to keep the worship of the gods upon the earth. The Enuma Elish's earliest texts date back to the 700-600 BC, however the text was probably compiled long before, up to around 1800 BC.

30 review for Enuma Elish (Enûma Eliš) (Complete Audiobook, Unabridged)

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The Mesopotamian creation myth 20 July 2012 When I has handed a copy of this text in Old Testament I was not sure if I had actually read it or not even thought I had the Oxford World Classic's Myths from Mesopotamia. However, when I recently returned to that book to read the myths again (so that I could be more accurate when commenting on them, and the book as a whole, for Goodreads) I discovered that the 'Epic of Creation', as it is called in that book, is the Enuma Elish. I guess I had read it. The Mesopotamian creation myth 20 July 2012 When I has handed a copy of this text in Old Testament I was not sure if I had actually read it or not even thought I had the Oxford World Classic's Myths from Mesopotamia. However, when I recently returned to that book to read the myths again (so that I could be more accurate when commenting on them, and the book as a whole, for Goodreads) I discovered that the 'Epic of Creation', as it is called in that book, is the Enuma Elish. I guess I had read it. I have now read it again so I feel in a much better position to be able to write some decent comments, and in doing so I will outline the story, try to give my understanding of this story (though it will be quite speculative which is likely to put me in the madhouse alongside Immanuel Velikovsky) and then throw down some thoughts on its relationship to the biblical account. Basically the Enuma Elish is a creation myth – well, not quite, but I will say that it is to ease some confusion. The story opens with the god Tiamat rebelling against the other gods, creating a race of monsters, and then setting a guy named Qingu up as the chief god and her consort. I guess even in Ancient Mesopotamia the saying still holds true that behind every great man is an equally great woman. Anyway, Tiamat, who is basically using Qingu as a puppet, prepares to go to war against the other gods so that she may fulfil her goal of becoming all powerful. A couple of gods attempt to confront her but her power is so great that they are either defeated or flee in terror. Then Marduk presents himself as the champion, confronts Tiamat, and in an epic battle, slays her. Qingu is then captured and later executed for treason. The gods then take Tiamut's body and from her remains create the world. From the remains of Qingu they create humanity to pretty much do all of the work that they no longer wish to perform. The tale then ends with a list of the gods and their role in the governance of creation. While the poem seems to be fairly short I notice that the style is similar to some of the styles that appear in the Bible. One interesting aspect is that the poem will repeat entire tracts that have previously been said: for instance, something happens and then when somebody reports that event the entire text of that event is repeated, and then when the next person goes and reports it the entire text is repeated once again. This seems to occur a number of times in Mesopotamian literature, and as mentioned (though I cannot cite any passage off hand) appears to be a similar style used in some of the earlier parts of the bible. This obviously flags the possibility that parts of the Bible were written contemporaneously with these ancient Mesopotamian myths. We must remember that all of these events occurred before the flood, so we are dealing with prehistoric accounts. My theory is that the gods that are mentioned here were actually at one point real human beings, however due to time and also the nature of primitive religion, these gods had been deified and thrust into the realm of mythology. One of my theories of antideluvian civilisation is that they were substantially more advanced than humanity at the time that these myths were written down. Take for instance the book of Genesis. We learn that three generations after the fall humanity had discovered literature, music, and metallurgy, however technological development stops at that point. The reason being is that the writers of Genesis had no concept of technology beyond what they understood at the time of writing. So to would have the ancient Mesopotamians, and we see that in this book with references to spells and flood weapons, as well as creation of monsters and humanity out of the blood of a dead god. Now, I am not ascribing the creation of humanity to a cloning vat, but I shall point to references in the earlier parts of Genesis of the sons of god and the daughters of men coming together and producing great heroes as well as giants known as Nephalim. Did the antideluvians have cloning technology along with being excellent bioengineers? We do not and probably will never know unless that information is revealed to us in the restoration. However, it is interesting to see the possibility of how the ancients viewed potential technology far in advance of what they actually knew at the time. We should also note that after Tiamat's death Marduk went out and destroyed all of Tiamat's creation. My theory of how this story was elevated to mythology with the main actors being gods, is as such: the Bible indicates that the reason for the fall was because humanity chose to remove God from his rightful place as ruler of creation and place themselves up there instead. In a sense humanity was worshipping humanity. In a primitive culture, deity is usually ascribed to the older and deceased generations, a term we refer to as ancestor worship (however if you actually speak to a Christian ancestor worshipper, as I have done, we come to understand that ancestor worship is much more than simply deifying your ancestors, but rather respecting their wishes and holding their memory in high regard). However, as time passes and these ancestors drift into distant memory they cease to be human and instead become gods. Now, with the Egyptian and Babylonian deities we notice that they take the form of animals with humanoid features, whether it be the body of an eagle and the head of a man as with Anzu, or the head of an eagle and the body of a man as with Ra. These features do not necessarily indicate that that is what the deity looked like, but rather the deity has taken on an animal form to represent an aspect of their character, in the similar way that we see animals used in the Bible to represent certain qualities (such as a bull representing strength and a dragon representing destruction). So, by bringing them out of mythology we have an idea that maybe it is not so much the creation of the world that we are seeing but rather the development of civilisation, and the gods that we are seeing are early antideluvian human beings. Now, as with our society, so with theirs, there are is ruling class and a working class, and what we have here is a rebellion amongst the ruling class. Tiamat is attempting to overthrow the established order, and her army of monsters suggest that she has skills and abilities that are able to overrealm the established order (much the same was that Germany's advances during World War II were to give them an advantage over the less developed allied powers). However, Marduk, the champion, was able to defeat her, suggesting that the usage of her body to continue and complete creation reflects the sacking of her compound and using her technology to continue the development of civilisation. In particular we see references to the setting of times and dates (and it is interesting that the week is established on a seven day roster, and the month is established on a 30 day roster, which is very similar to the Biblical account). As I have mentioned previously, it is my position that the biblical account will supersede all other accounts, including this one. As the academic Christians like to put it, the Genesis account was handed down to stand apart from the ancient mythologies that were surrounding the Isrealite nation at the time, and the general consensus is that this was while they were either in Egypt, or after that they left. I sort of disagree slightly because we must remember that the revelation appeared to a number of earlier people, including Adam and Eve (which is to be discounted because it is quite likely that the events in this poem occurred after them, however would have possibly occurred before Enoch), Noah, and Abraham. We will take Abraham as an example (and whether Noah was alive when Abraham was alive can be debated and while I would like to think that the answer to that speculation is yes I am going to fall the other way and say no, namely because Abraham received a special revelation from God, something that probably would not have been necessary is Noah was still alive). Abraham, remember, grew up in Mesopotamia, so he would have been exposed to and surrounded by these myths, which is why he received the special revelation from God, and I suspect it was a lot more than simply 'pack up your bags go to the other side of the known world'. To be honest with you, we are told that Abraham was a man of Faith, but I am doubtful he was a man of blind faith. A mysterious voice (we actually don't know how God appeared to Abraham) coming out of nowhere and telling him to pack his bags would have needed some examination as to its truth. Remember, many of the men of faith in the Bible would turn to God and say 'if you are who you say you are, prove it to me'. God never asks for blind faith, that is dangerous, no, when God asks you to step out in faith, he does it in a way that we know that we can trust him (such as Christ's resurrection, which was necessary to prove that Christ's death was more than just the execution of a revolutionary).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Skyler Myers

    PROs: * First detailed creation myth ever found * Some interesting stories CONs: * Missing a ton of content * Lots of gods with weird names makes it hard to follow * Doesn't have a clear progression The Enuma Elish is the earliest creation myth ever discovered, coming from the ancient kingdom of Babylon. It is probably most famous for its obvious influence on the Bible, which the Biblical authors would have plagiarized when they were in Babylonian captivity. The book is nowhere near as detailed as more PROs: * First detailed creation myth ever found * Some interesting stories CONs: * Missing a ton of content * Lots of gods with weird names makes it hard to follow * Doesn't have a clear progression The Enuma Elish is the earliest creation myth ever discovered, coming from the ancient kingdom of Babylon. It is probably most famous for its obvious influence on the Bible, which the Biblical authors would have plagiarized when they were in Babylonian captivity. The book is nowhere near as detailed as more popular myths, such as those found in the Hindu Vedas, but it still gets the job done. The main problem with the book is that it is very incomplete. Many times a sentence will be cut off mid way, which makes the book confusing. Other times entire sections must be skipped because we haven't recovered all the tablets. If it weren't for this, I probably would have rated it much higher.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Kay Silva

    The edition I had included a few other tablets (such as the great deluge and some hymns to Istar) that were very interesting. The creation story itself is still fairly fragmented but there is a lot to be gathered from what was translatable. I read both the Babylonian and the Neo Babylonian account which were still fairly similar. The war in heaven theme seems to be very prominent throughout ancient history and this was no different. There were some similarities to the Hebrew account of creation The edition I had included a few other tablets (such as the great deluge and some hymns to Istar) that were very interesting. The creation story itself is still fairly fragmented but there is a lot to be gathered from what was translatable. I read both the Babylonian and the Neo Babylonian account which were still fairly similar. The war in heaven theme seems to be very prominent throughout ancient history and this was no different. There were some similarities to the Hebrew account of creation as well such as the dividing of the firmament, the placement of the stars and the moon and the sun in the sky and creation of man (woman being interestingly taken from a bone). These similarities make it an interesting comparative study.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Yasiru

    Read at http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/225/ See also- http://www.sacred-texts.com/ane/enuma... and http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/epic... There is definitely a sense of the work being revisionist as has been noted. The aim appears to be to supplant an older order (often violently, though Enki (Ea) and to a lesser extent Enlil for instance keep an honoured place) and elevate a new (with Marduk at the helm, for the prevailing Babylonian pantheon at least). This is, in my view, one of the earlies Read at http://www.ancient.eu.com/article/225/ See also- http://www.sacred-texts.com/ane/enuma... and http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/epic... There is definitely a sense of the work being revisionist as has been noted. The aim appears to be to supplant an older order (often violently, though Enki (Ea) and to a lesser extent Enlil for instance keep an honoured place) and elevate a new (with Marduk at the helm, for the prevailing Babylonian pantheon at least). This is, in my view, one of the earliest surviving examples of mankind tapping into the power of cohesive narrative for this purpose- the structure, specificity and completeness aimed for in the revamped account is noteworthy, and no doubt the manner of telling once had a great hold on the Babylonians as well. Of course, the Book of Genesis (see http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/...) distills the tale of Creation further still at its start, removing the transferral aspect which here cements Marduk's power and that of building upon the old, as well as abandoning/assimilating the whole theogony (in this and other fractured accounts) in favour of the Israelite God, then going on to stress and dramatise more intimately the connection between him and man. The Enuma Elish is a more colourful account on the other hand, perhaps for exactly the ways it differs from the Biblical account, and is well worth reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Just as likely as Genesis.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Although it is short and incomplete, I highly recommend the Enuma Elish because: 1. An entertaining, compelling, and very advanced (for its time) creation myth. 2. A primary source of the Biblical creation myth. Nonetheless, I really wished the scorpion-men and eleven monsters would have taken part in the epic fight between Marduk and Tiamat. Their characters had a lot to offer and I feel they were egregiously underutilized... maybe this is just the Michael Bay in me speaking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ishtar

    “ZIUKKINNA lives in every god, he made the skies their happiness, he holds them to their bliss; below the clouds dull men remember him,” Even with the pdf versions being a bit lame, and the translation itself lacking originality, I am quite honored to be able to read such a masterpiece. To read a text that dates back thousands of years BC AND is part of my ancient culture, is really a privilege and pride to me and I am thankful for my friend who recommended reading it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cynda

    Hymnic-epic text recited during New Year festivities. Performed to indicate the strength of the rulers. The gods create the world with Anger, Retaliation, Brutuality, and Misogyny, all to their Honor. Uhmmm. So far this reading selection is the one I like the least from Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others. I continue to read. Hymnic-epic text recited during New Year festivities. Performed to indicate the strength of the rulers. The gods create the world with Anger, Retaliation, Brutuality, and Misogyny, all to their Honor. Uhmmm. So far this reading selection is the one I like the least from Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others. I continue to read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    I prefer creation myths like this one about squabbling gods to those about one almighty dictator.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Basilius

    “When he speaks, we will all do obeisance, At his command the gods shall pay heed.” There are probably a few ways to read Enuma Elish, the Babylonian creation epic. We could soak in the ancient Mesopotamian theology or enjoy the battle of the gods and dissemination of culture. We could consider its poetry and observe the quaint veneration towards Marduk. Some may even taste the mental atmosphere of the period. I however see one specific purpose for this work, and feel it’s most profitably read in “When he speaks, we will all do obeisance, At his command the gods shall pay heed.” There are probably a few ways to read Enuma Elish, the Babylonian creation epic. We could soak in the ancient Mesopotamian theology or enjoy the battle of the gods and dissemination of culture. We could consider its poetry and observe the quaint veneration towards Marduk. Some may even taste the mental atmosphere of the period. I however see one specific purpose for this work, and feel it’s most profitably read in that light: Enuma Elish is political propaganda, pure and simple. Marduk was not the most powerful god of the early Mesopotamian pantheon. Hell I doubt he was even included at all, and probably developed over time from a lesser deity to head honcho. His ascension stems from his cult followers achieving power in Babylon. As they controlled the region they put their god in control of the local religions. This was done for many reasons. If your god controlled the (known) world, you as an adherent would have legitimate rights to being in power. Furthermore, your powerful god likewise blessed your kingship and kingdom (Babylon) which centralizes power and reinforces your claim. Have scribes doctor up some religious texts, incorporate well-known creation myths into the narrative, force your people to worship the new pantheon (carefully assimilated with the old) and BAM. Your power is now backed by sacred scripture. This scheme could only be accomplished through literature. It’s much more difficult to create institutionalized authority by word of mouth, which depends on strength of arms. The sanctification and promulgation of texts like Enuma Elish creates long lasting traditions that decide who will rule, and are difficult to break. And I don’t mean to single out Babylon. Nearly all civilizations throughout history have pulled this trick, and some even become theocracies (Christianity being the best example). But this specific creation story is the earliest attempt I’ve seen. What makes it so repulsive is its use of literature—not mere prose but epic poetry—to advance a political agenda. It’s a rude awakening for those who see literature as strictly positive. But perhaps this is positive. Being a good reader doesn’t mean you have to agree with what you read. It means critically and ruthlessly appraising its value, even if you enjoy it. I can delight in the mythology and poetry of Enuma Elish without adhering to its tenants. I can argue Ea and Enlil would have done a better job ruling the cosmos than that upstart Marduk. Or, interestingly enough, I can indeed acknowledge his supremacy and spend my life worshiping him. (If thousands of ancient Mesopotamians did, what makes me any better?) This is what makes these kinds of stories worth reading. We see past the beautiful language and powerful imagery for what it is: rhetoric. This, to many, is obvious. But in our pursuit of art it’s incredibly difficult to remember. We become captivated by the story when we surrender ourselves to its charm. We must always listen to the tiny voice lurking in the back of our minds, advising caution: What makes Marduk so qualified? What happened to the other gods? And, of course, is any of this even true?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aleta

    The copy I read wasn't this particular one, but a Danish one, with both this and 'Gilgamesh' in it. Which is excellent, because it gives me a means of comparing the two without having to worry about whether or not it was the translations that made me love 'Gilgamesh' and only give this one two stars. How do you rate or review a creation myth? Especially one so ancient, one of the first pieces of written text that we know of? Answer is – you don't. Instead you think of it merely as a story and go The copy I read wasn't this particular one, but a Danish one, with both this and 'Gilgamesh' in it. Which is excellent, because it gives me a means of comparing the two without having to worry about whether or not it was the translations that made me love 'Gilgamesh' and only give this one two stars. How do you rate or review a creation myth? Especially one so ancient, one of the first pieces of written text that we know of? Answer is – you don't. Instead you think of it merely as a story and go from there. Or at least, that's how I think of it. Where 'Gilgamesh' had exciting battles, friendship, love and gave insight into the lives of the Sumerian people, 'Enuma Elish' had hate, homicide and a very long list of the names of one of their gods. Which in my eyes makes it a lot less interesting. 'Gilgamesh' seemed like a means of entertainment as much as a semi-religious text. It was written down after centuries of oral tradition of probably being recited at parties and celebrations. They made students write snippets of it down from memory, it was that well known. 'Enuma Elish' on the other hand was (according to the introduction in the book I read) a story written down without a longstanding oral tradition, probably at the time when the statue of Marduk returned to it's rightful owners and as both a celebration of this and as sort of a means of justifying why Marduk went from an insignificant, local god, to a widely worshipped and “grand” one. Despite the fact that it didn't have that many gaps in it, it didn't manage to capture my interest as there was hardly any story to it, coupled with not giving as much insight into the time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Martindale

    From what I've read, Enuma Elish is the oldest creation myth that we have. The poem starts with the heavens and the earth being unnamed, when all there was, was Apsu (CHAOS and the Watery abyss) and Tiamat (A sea monster goddess of sorts). Their waters were merged into a single mass, and out of this chaos a long list of god's somehow showed up and created other gods. Eventually it seems Apsu wanted Tiamat to destroy the gods. Marduk was chosen to fight against Tiamat and the evil monsters that s From what I've read, Enuma Elish is the oldest creation myth that we have. The poem starts with the heavens and the earth being unnamed, when all there was, was Apsu (CHAOS and the Watery abyss) and Tiamat (A sea monster goddess of sorts). Their waters were merged into a single mass, and out of this chaos a long list of god's somehow showed up and created other gods. Eventually it seems Apsu wanted Tiamat to destroy the gods. Marduk was chosen to fight against Tiamat and the evil monsters that she created. Marduk, wins and comes up with a "Cunning plan" and creates the heaven and earth from the remains of her body. Upon learning the woe of the gods, because they had no one to worship them, there was another cunning plan to use Kingu's blood (If I remember Kingu was Tiamats husband) and mix his blood with earth and create man, so the gods could have worshipers. Finally Marduk seems to become supreme among the gods. Though an ancient document and parts being repetitive, I still found the epic rather entertaining.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Wow... these ancients! Please scan a list of the Mesopotamian pantheon before experiencing this text. Lacuna. Greatest hits: ------------- "She had given him the tablets of destiny. On his chest she laid them, saying 'Thy command shall not be without avail, and the word of thy mouth shall be established.' " "Thy weapons shall never lose their power. They shall crush thy foe." "He was clothed with terror." "And they beheld him. The gods beheld him! The gods, his fathers, beheld him. The gods beheld him Wow... these ancients! Please scan a list of the Mesopotamian pantheon before experiencing this text. Lacuna. Greatest hits: ------------- "She had given him the tablets of destiny. On his chest she laid them, saying 'Thy command shall not be without avail, and the word of thy mouth shall be established.' " "Thy weapons shall never lose their power. They shall crush thy foe." "He was clothed with terror." "And they beheld him. The gods beheld him! The gods, his fathers, beheld him. The gods beheld him." "The king of the gods. Supreme is his might." "The star which shineth in the heavens. May he hold the beginning and the future." "In the future of mankind, when the days grow old, may this be heard without ceasing. Hold sway forever." "Wide is his heart, broad is his compassion."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eylül Çetinbaş

    Enuma Elish is one of the most splendid creation epics and myths I've ever read. Based on the society's unique religion, it shows an example of gods' sincerity, a realistic world view, mutual relationships between gods and men -not found with a fatalistic and fearful scheme, it demonstrates that a belief system does not have to take the shape of a ''fear center''

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christian Proano

    The version read came from ANET (Ancient Near East Texts). By reading this Akkadian (Semite polytheistic) account of creation and the Canaanite myths, one learns to appreciate the struggle of the Hebrews (Semites converted to monotheism) to confess the One True God. This story, as well as other myths of the area, definitely change the approach to the Hebrew Scripture or the Christian Old Testament. No in matters of inspiration (which even the Jews believed to be so) but rather by offering a religi The version read came from ANET (Ancient Near East Texts). By reading this Akkadian (Semite polytheistic) account of creation and the Canaanite myths, one learns to appreciate the struggle of the Hebrews (Semites converted to monotheism) to confess the One True God. This story, as well as other myths of the area, definitely change the approach to the Hebrew Scripture or the Christian Old Testament. No in matters of inspiration (which even the Jews believed to be so) but rather by offering a religious and spiritual (and imagery) context of what the Scripture was up against, and what wanted to be accomplished. Even if Genesis 1 is a rework of this "prior" account, the inspiration in the biblical text resides in that it transmits monotheism as revealed and experienced by the Hebrews (and later Christians) which truly is a gift to the world. Some of the imagery used here was later reinterpreted in Daniel 7 and carried over to Revelation. As a personal reflection when one reads how deities are betraying and killing each other and out of it creation comes and compare with "God said" one does realize that God's Word is peace and light, and in His Light we see Light. If a Genesis account whether as we know it today or in any "proto" form circulated possibly before the Babylonian final development of the sexigesimal system, then chances are that the rendering of days in Scripture is not related to a 24 hours day of 60 mins an hour and 60 seconds a minute. Rather is a more poetic form of expression.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Angeli Andres

    Even though I have only read the first tablet of the Enuma Elish, it was still a bit difficult to understand. It may be due to translation errors or incompleteness (stone does erode afterall), but I still found the translation to be an interesting read. Although the family tree is a bit hard to follow, reading the Babylonian creation story as a whole was interesting enough. This was how they believed the world was created. It may seem like just a story or a legend to us, but this was more than l Even though I have only read the first tablet of the Enuma Elish, it was still a bit difficult to understand. It may be due to translation errors or incompleteness (stone does erode afterall), but I still found the translation to be an interesting read. Although the family tree is a bit hard to follow, reading the Babylonian creation story as a whole was interesting enough. This was how they believed the world was created. It may seem like just a story or a legend to us, but this was more than likely real to them. Would I say that the Enuma Elish gave birth to the different religions and creation stories? Possibly. If it is in fact the oldest creation story known to man, who’s to say that it is not the mother of all creation stories? It was also interesting to see how deceit and heroism played a major role in the creation of the world—almost reminiscent of today’s world. I would definitely read more than just the first tablet of the Enuma Elish mainly because creation stories are extremely interesting to me as well as the beliefs of other religions.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Nease

    It's, let's be clear, remarkable that this book even exists. When you read it, remember that you're reading something that has survived thousands of years and dates back to a time when the written word itself was young and its use for telling a story even more so. That being the case, it's easy to overlook its imperfections, but I wouldn't be doing my job if I did that. When reading the secondary epic, the one with the flood myth, it started to get a little repetitive. And when I say it started It's, let's be clear, remarkable that this book even exists. When you read it, remember that you're reading something that has survived thousands of years and dates back to a time when the written word itself was young and its use for telling a story even more so. That being the case, it's easy to overlook its imperfections, but I wouldn't be doing my job if I did that. When reading the secondary epic, the one with the flood myth, it started to get a little repetitive. And when I say it started to get a little repetitive, I mean it was one thirty in the morning when I was reading this, and I could only read through the same damn three- or four-page stretch about the gods getting angry and spiting mankind with a plague and the humans eventually resorting to eating their children before I started to get slaphappy. There are other examples of similarly excessive repetition in there. The Enuma Elish proper, however, is excellent. It's a colorful, original (in every sense of the word, of course), surprisingly fun-to-read story that you could get through in one sitting. Recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dina

    What I find fascinating out this is that the myths are coming from Ancient Sumer, then Babylon then Egypt on to Hebrew Bible. So, who were the beings that created humans? Was there bioengineering involved (reference to half man/half bull, half man/half crow...so on forth). I feel we need to re-think our Darwinian theory and pre-suppose or at least hypothesize that there were beings on this planet that could have possibly bioengineered humans using their own genes. There are references in Ancient What I find fascinating out this is that the myths are coming from Ancient Sumer, then Babylon then Egypt on to Hebrew Bible. So, who were the beings that created humans? Was there bioengineering involved (reference to half man/half bull, half man/half crow...so on forth). I feel we need to re-think our Darwinian theory and pre-suppose or at least hypothesize that there were beings on this planet that could have possibly bioengineered humans using their own genes. There are references in Ancient Sumer and Egypt about flying ships...beings appearing out of fire so on/forth. Instead of dismissing something as purely as a myth we can at least build up some theories worthy of scientific exploration.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nabu Borsippa

    The translation by King is so old that it makes no sense to read this particular translation, as his doubts are interpreted differently today - try a newer translation. I definitely feel unsatisfied and have to read up on this text. For example - who created men, Marduk of Kingu, whose blood was used? There were too many comments about the particular sources for each tablet (I mean 1/4 of a book should not deal with the tablets alone) - this was a boring fragment targeted for like thirteen scien The translation by King is so old that it makes no sense to read this particular translation, as his doubts are interpreted differently today - try a newer translation. I definitely feel unsatisfied and have to read up on this text. For example - who created men, Marduk of Kingu, whose blood was used? There were too many comments about the particular sources for each tablet (I mean 1/4 of a book should not deal with the tablets alone) - this was a boring fragment targeted for like thirteen scientists in the world, but not the general audience. The best chapter was the last one, where Judaism was compared to Mesopotamian cultures.

  20. 5 out of 5

    IVellon

    This book contains the Enuma Elish (the Babylonian creation myth) as well as several connected texts. It is conceived for an academic audience. Many of the mostly philogical explanations might be tedious for a layperson purly interested in the myths. Not all of the presented texts are translated. Note that the translations are over 100 years old and that they are outdated now. Today, we have more fragments and a greater knowledge on their background. Therefore, in my opinion, the value of this b This book contains the Enuma Elish (the Babylonian creation myth) as well as several connected texts. It is conceived for an academic audience. Many of the mostly philogical explanations might be tedious for a layperson purly interested in the myths. Not all of the presented texts are translated. Note that the translations are over 100 years old and that they are outdated now. Today, we have more fragments and a greater knowledge on their background. Therefore, in my opinion, the value of this book today solely lies in the philogical notes and it is not recommendable as a "story book". Vol. 2 contains the cuneiform texts.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Clara

    The story itself is really fascinating, but the way this book / translation is put together was really hard for me to grok, especially in the ebook edition. After reading GILGAMESH earlier in the year, I think I was expecting a more complete document. Even the introduction and translator's note was hard for me to parse. Too bad. I'd really love to learn more about this creation story, but I think I'll have to go to secondary sources to get the context I need.

  22. 4 out of 5

    ThePagemaster

    The story is legend, and we can see where the biblical creation myth got a lot of its inspiration from. This is especially evident in the lengthy passages of praise, which will go on and on, eventually reaching levels of boredom that are almost comparable to the old testament. Points for its legacy and originality, but on the other, the author could definitely have trimmed lots of fat from this one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Maan Kawas

    A great book that includes both the grear Babylonian Creation myth and Atrahassis, the story about the big flood/deluge, which resembles tk a great extent the story of Noah and his ark. I enjoyed reading this book as well as reading about the early man's attempts to understand and give meanings to his existence as well as the universe and his or her place in it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Arno Mosikyan

    From the time of the first discovery of fragments of the poem considerable attention has been directed towards them, for not only are the legends themselves the principal source of our knowledge of the Babylonian cosmogony, but passages in them bear a striking resemblance to the cognate narratives in the Book of Genesis concerning the creation of the world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    How the world, the gods and humans were created, but mainly how the Mesopotamian mother goddess Tiamat was replaced by a male god Marduk. Unexpectedly readable, with interesting details, like: for there to be a feast you need wine, and bread, and preferably to drink beer through a strow. The flood is mentioned a couple of times in passing, and so is the ice that once was.

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Keith

    Objective understanding brought to a very basic truth to as what this pagan mythical creation bloomed. I see thus far; what was chaos was brought to order through much blood shedding of quasi~gods. I am christian and believe me? It was chaos brought to order by one self sufficient God as He said each day of seven 'it is good" thus creation was made.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark C

    A must explore with your children if they are to have a classical concept of Anthropology and History. For my point of view, this is one of those areas where parents must step in for all things not covered in school.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cassia

    Good read I enjoyed reading this book. It’s well researched and out together, with many relevant references that connects with some of my past explorations and discovery. Deep 🙏🏽appreciation to the author for sharing this valuable material 📖

  29. 4 out of 5

    E7boehm

    Excellent translation of the work very interesting. The story is simple but filled with sort of a magical quality. Would recommend this position.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Colin Cook

    It was nice to read Babylon's version of the basic Mesopotamian creation myth, but there is so little detail about the combat, and way too much detail in the section about the fifty names of Marduk.

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