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WHO IS DARTH VADER? He has been many things: a SITH warrior, a commander, a destroyer. DARTH VADER is to many throughout the GALACTIC EMPIRE a symbol of fear and mysterious, otherworldly power. But there are some who have seen the DARK LORD in a different light. There are some corners of the galaxy so dark and desperate that even Vader can be a knight in shining armor. The WHO IS DARTH VADER? He has been many things: a SITH warrior, a commander, a destroyer. DARTH VADER is to many throughout the GALACTIC EMPIRE a symbol of fear and mysterious, otherworldly power. But there are some who have seen the DARK LORD in a different light. There are some corners of the galaxy so dark and desperate that even Vader can be a knight in shining armor. The first issue of a new STAR WARS limited series, writer Dennis Hopeless (CLOAK AND DAGGER, JEAN GREY) sheds new light on the many sides of the galaxy's greatest villain. COLLECTING: VADER: DARK VISIONS #1-5


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WHO IS DARTH VADER? He has been many things: a SITH warrior, a commander, a destroyer. DARTH VADER is to many throughout the GALACTIC EMPIRE a symbol of fear and mysterious, otherworldly power. But there are some who have seen the DARK LORD in a different light. There are some corners of the galaxy so dark and desperate that even Vader can be a knight in shining armor. The WHO IS DARTH VADER? He has been many things: a SITH warrior, a commander, a destroyer. DARTH VADER is to many throughout the GALACTIC EMPIRE a symbol of fear and mysterious, otherworldly power. But there are some who have seen the DARK LORD in a different light. There are some corners of the galaxy so dark and desperate that even Vader can be a knight in shining armor. The first issue of a new STAR WARS limited series, writer Dennis Hopeless (CLOAK AND DAGGER, JEAN GREY) sheds new light on the many sides of the galaxy's greatest villain. COLLECTING: VADER: DARK VISIONS #1-5

30 review for Star Wars: Vader - Dark Visions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael O'Brien

    This is a collection of stories about the Dark Lord of the Sith himself. I found it fun and entertaining throughout. [Warning: Spoilers possibly to come] The first one shows Vader in a scenario in which Evil battles Evil -- with the outcome leading certain observers to believe that what they're really seeing is Good vs Evil. As Obie Won might say, it "all depends upon a certain point of view". The second one, I think, is illustrative of why, notwithstanding the belief in their efficiency, totalit This is a collection of stories about the Dark Lord of the Sith himself. I found it fun and entertaining throughout. [Warning: Spoilers possibly to come] The first one shows Vader in a scenario in which Evil battles Evil -- with the outcome leading certain observers to believe that what they're really seeing is Good vs Evil. As Obie Won might say, it "all depends upon a certain point of view". The second one, I think, is illustrative of why, notwithstanding the belief in their efficiency, totalitarian systems, being based upon fear and coercion, inevitably become ones based upon lies -- each one of which imposes a promissory note upon the future. In this case, a Star Destroyer commander lies to the High Command, only to realize that Vader is on it, who then embarks upon a suicidal effort to cover it up even further. It doesn't end well, and it reminded me of variations of the profligacy in lives or dreadful miscalculations that have actually been repeated in the real "Empires" of human history. Think Chernobyl, or Hitler's subordinates being afraid to tell him the truth about the Normandy invasion ---- or Stalin's death because his lackeys were too terrified to disturb him to find out if he was well. The third shows what can happen when a groupie worships the wrong kind of hero. I won't go into the fourth and fifth stories except to say that they were fun and enjoyable to read. All in all, this is what I expect from a graphic novel --- to be fun, engaging, and entertaining. I think most fans of the anti-hero genre would enjoy it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

    Man, Marvel sure loves their Darth Vader, don’t they? First there was Kieron Gillen’s awesome 25-issue “Darth Vader” run. Then Charles Soule followed that up with his own equally awesome 25-issue run of “Darth Vader – Dark Lord of the Sith”. Coming up in the next few months, we’ve got Robbie Thompson’s miniseries “Star Wars: Target Vader.” And just wrapped is now Dennis Hopeless’ “Darth Vader: Dark Visions,” a 5-issue miniseries comprised of individual one-shots, each one detailing a different s Man, Marvel sure loves their Darth Vader, don’t they? First there was Kieron Gillen’s awesome 25-issue “Darth Vader” run. Then Charles Soule followed that up with his own equally awesome 25-issue run of “Darth Vader – Dark Lord of the Sith”. Coming up in the next few months, we’ve got Robbie Thompson’s miniseries “Star Wars: Target Vader.” And just wrapped is now Dennis Hopeless’ “Darth Vader: Dark Visions,” a 5-issue miniseries comprised of individual one-shots, each one detailing a different story featuring the titular baddie. The good news? For the most part, all of the Darth Vader-centric material that Marvel’s pumped out these last few years – “Dark Visions” included – has been solid, even occasionally traipsing into "great." Each of the 3 writers that have been lucky enough to get their hands on Vader have possessed their own solid grasps on different aspects of what makes Vader such a great villain. Gillen, for instance, seemed to really understand his intellectual, calculating side, while Soule clearly had a ball exploiting his physical menace. Hopeless, meanwhile, seems most invested in the “myth” of Vader, particularly the way that the legend of Vader can spread and permeate like a virus across the galaxy. It makes for a series of issues that feel, at times, almost like campfire stories – these are less vital, integral chapters in the ongoing canon of Darth Vader as they are creepy/interesting/heartbreaking interludes, designed to celebrate different aspects of the aura that has come to precede Vader as a villain. It’s yet another cool, interesting take on a character who’s been fortunate to have plenty of cool, interesting takes these last few years. Keep it up, Marvel.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Very solid and enjoyable collection of five short stories, each offering a new and different perspective on Darth Vader and his place in the world of Star Wars. Out of five stories, only one (#4) I’d say wasn’t that good, and even then it’s just mediocre. Other stories, especially the first three, are excellent and really show some interesting angles on Vader from the perspective of people surrounding him. The art is solid throughout. Overall, a fun quick read I’d recommended to any Star Wars fa Very solid and enjoyable collection of five short stories, each offering a new and different perspective on Darth Vader and his place in the world of Star Wars. Out of five stories, only one (#4) I’d say wasn’t that good, and even then it’s just mediocre. Other stories, especially the first three, are excellent and really show some interesting angles on Vader from the perspective of people surrounding him. The art is solid throughout. Overall, a fun quick read I’d recommended to any Star Wars fan.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    This is a collection of short stories that concentrate on how people view Darth Vader. These views can range from abject fear to all the way to fanaticism. These stories don't really add anything to the overall canon so it is not a required reading. I am not the biggest fan of short stories but I really enjoyed these stories about Vader. Whether it was a viewpoint of savior or to total desperation because a character fears to disappoint Darth Vader this was a very pleasant look into his reputatio This is a collection of short stories that concentrate on how people view Darth Vader. These views can range from abject fear to all the way to fanaticism. These stories don't really add anything to the overall canon so it is not a required reading. I am not the biggest fan of short stories but I really enjoyed these stories about Vader. Whether it was a viewpoint of savior or to total desperation because a character fears to disappoint Darth Vader this was a very pleasant look into his reputation. We know that he is the Emperor's right hand man and the galaxy's enforcer and this collection emphasizes that. Once again the artwork is terrific with each story having its own style. I believe what sold me on this collection is that I feel like it is a commentary as to why audiences have gravitated towards this character. When we see his amazing entrance in A New Hope we know that he is the bad guy. That didn't matter though as fans of all ages (including myself) have become Darth Vader fans and I like how this issue deals with how that happens. I was a little skeptical going into this because of the opening cover. Darth Vader being a knight doesn't exactly exude Star Wars to me. But this collection won me over as we see him being a bad ass and his effects of his reputation throughout the galaxy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James Taber

    It's like I tell my students: plagiarism is an automatic failing grade. It's easy enough to Google, but Chuck Wendig was originally working on a Vader anthology series. He was fired, the series was canceled, and then Marvel suddenly announced a new Vader anthology series written by someone else. That's suspicious enough. But when the third issue in Vader: Dark Visions came out, Wendig admitted on Twitter that the story was similar—incredibly similar, in fact—to the third issue he had already writ It's like I tell my students: plagiarism is an automatic failing grade. It's easy enough to Google, but Chuck Wendig was originally working on a Vader anthology series. He was fired, the series was canceled, and then Marvel suddenly announced a new Vader anthology series written by someone else. That's suspicious enough. But when the third issue in Vader: Dark Visions came out, Wendig admitted on Twitter that the story was similar—incredibly similar, in fact—to the third issue he had already written and submitted. There were, he indicated, only some minor changes. These changes added up to a major problem with the issue, but the changes themselves were relatively small. And nowhere in this issue or any other is Wendig given credit. Now, you can argue it's all hearsay, he-said he-said arguments. We only have his word on it. Whatever you think of the reason for Wendig being fired from his book (which is well-documented as being over his personal politics on Twitter) the firing itself was legally and ethically sound. Writers are essentially contractors, employed at-will, and can be let go at any time for any reason. Being upset at Wendig for being political is a little like being upset at water for being wet, but there's nothing inherently wrong with someone firing him for it. What's wrong is turning around, taking the work he already did, and making only surface-level changes without giving him proper credit. Because once you know Wendig worked on this book, if you're at all familiar with his writing, you can't help but see his fingerprints all over it. His hallmarks are deliberate emotional dissonance, a slow-burn subtext of horror that breaks the surface at exactly the right moment to unsettle you, and rigorously exploring all aspects of a character. His themes and techniques are present throughout the narrative. Even worse, the minor changes they made to justify outright theft manage to make the final product terrible. As Wendig himself described, in his version of the third issue, the viewpoint character was a man. That story would have been an incisive commentary on toxic masculinity and the hazards of idolizing authority. Instead, the version we got had a woman in the lead. She's depicted as a disturbed deviant who lusts after Vader based on her personal fantasies, and the story indulges in every depraved trope of the desperate fangirl you can think of. So in this metaphor, the writers and editors responsible didn't just try to plagiarize their assignment; they decided to change words they didn't understand to try to avoid getting caught. The result is a barely coherent mess that wouldn't have gotten a passing grade even if it wasn't stolen.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    No issue was bad but most were just ok. Issue number three was my favourite and brought the rating up to 3.5 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    This is a solidly "okay" collection of short vignettes featuring Vader. The best Star Wars writers can write Vader in such a way that you can sense Anakin behind the mask. These stories don't do that at all—they give only an Episode 4–level understanding of the character: the mysterious, evil, terrifying dark knight. It's fine, though there have been much better graphic novels about Vader in the past few years. The image of Vader as the cover of a romance novel will be hard to forget. This is a solidly "okay" collection of short vignettes featuring Vader. The best Star Wars writers can write Vader in such a way that you can sense Anakin behind the mask. These stories don't do that at all—they give only an Episode 4–level understanding of the character: the mysterious, evil, terrifying dark knight. It's fine, though there have been much better graphic novels about Vader in the past few years. The image of Vader as the cover of a romance novel will be hard to forget.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sophie_The_Jedi_Knight

    What... what did I just read? That was the weirdest bunch of SW comics I've read in a while. Not even just weird. The Aphra comics are kind of weird, but I've gotten into a rhythm with those. But this... some of these stories were so dark and depressing that part of me regrets ever reading this. I had to jump right into Clone Wars Adventures volume 9 to stop feeling so weird. Also, I don't know why this is titled "Dark Visions." This is just a collection of five completely unrelated stories that in What... what did I just read? That was the weirdest bunch of SW comics I've read in a while. Not even just weird. The Aphra comics are kind of weird, but I've gotten into a rhythm with those. But this... some of these stories were so dark and depressing that part of me regrets ever reading this. I had to jump right into Clone Wars Adventures volume 9 to stop feeling so weird. Also, I don't know why this is titled "Dark Visions." This is just a collection of five completely unrelated stories that include Vader in some way. The first story in here is the least weird out of all of them. It's about this time Vader fought this monster that terrorized a planet. The narration is kind of interesting, but it's nothing to write home about. The next one is one of those dark ones that I couldn't enjoy. The artwork and the styling of the panels are both very cool, but the plot for this is... ugh. Basically, it's about this guy who's so scared of Vader that he'll do whatever it takes to bring him victory. I suppose it's realistic, but it was very unsettling to read. The third one, oh man... okay, I saw most of the panels for this comic beforehand on Pinterest or something, so I already fully knew what this story was about. But that still didn't properly prepare me - this is about a strange stalker obsessive nurse on the Death Star who has a crush on Vader. Yeahhh. It's got that slightly depressive air to it that the last story had, and it's just... really, really weird. It has some good artwork in places, but I really don't know what I'm supposed to be feeling at this point. Story number four is hardly about Vader, honestly. It's more so about this pilot who wants to take the winning shot just once. (Also, writers of these kinds of stories need to stop making the main plot point "will Vader die?" because... duh.) It's a really depressing story, and not in a moving or interesting way. I thought that ending would be stronger but... nope. Ugh, what is this collection? Can we have some stories about Vader, not about the random people he encounters? If "Dark Visions" was about Vader seeing visions of past Jedi or something, that would be neat. Instead we have... whatever these stories are. Ugh, almost done. The fifth and final story in here is also weird, albeit tamer than the previous ones. Again, I really don't know what I'm supposed to be getting from any of these. It's about Vader trying to kill rebels, but there's this barkeep... ugh, why am I even trying to describe this? This story is nothing. It's weird and random and confusing and, again, is hardly about Vader. You could replace him with any other SW villain. 1/5 stars. I wish this volume had a single story I liked, but this seemed to purposely be veering towards weird. That's not a problem, but I felt like it strayed a bit too far into the "depressing weird" category for me to actually like this and get invested. I felt so uncomfortable after reading this that I had to watch several Rebels episodes to get the taste out of my mouth. Oh well. Onto the next Aphra comic, I guess.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Unseen Library

    Rating of 4.5 Prepare to see one of the most iconic and beloved villains in all of fiction, Darth Vader, in a whole new light as Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum and several talented artists present five new and clever stories of the Dark Lord of the Sith from across the galaxy. To most of the universe, Darth Vader is the Empire’s ultimate symbol of power, authority and fear, delivering death and destruction upon all who incur his wrath. But to some he can be something even more potent and remarkable. On Rating of 4.5 Prepare to see one of the most iconic and beloved villains in all of fiction, Darth Vader, in a whole new light as Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum and several talented artists present five new and clever stories of the Dark Lord of the Sith from across the galaxy. To most of the universe, Darth Vader is the Empire’s ultimate symbol of power, authority and fear, delivering death and destruction upon all who incur his wrath. But to some he can be something even more potent and remarkable. On one planet he is a Black Knight, a beacon of hope that saved them from a terrible monster. To a certain Imperial Commander, Vader is a reminder that failure is unacceptable. To one Imperial nurse, Vader is her one true love. But no matter how people see him, the one universal truth is that those who encounter this Sith Lord are likely to end up dead. To see the full review, check out the link below: https://unseenlibrary.com/2019/11/03/... For other exciting reviews and content, check out my blog at: https://unseenlibrary.com/

  10. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Short stories all portraying different perspectives of Vader.

  11. 4 out of 5

    kat

    it’s pretty amazing how some can idolize, obsess over, or completely despise dark vader depending on their first impression of him

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lance Shadow

    Here's another comic I got on sale at the end of 2019 on Comixology- Vader: Dark Visions! We've had a ton of vader centric content in the comics of late, between Kieren Gillen's Vader series taking place between A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back, the Dark Lord of the Sith series from Charles Soule, Target Vader, and a new "rebooted" Darth Vader series that will take place between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. In between Dark Lord of the Sith and Target Vader, we were gi Here's another comic I got on sale at the end of 2019 on Comixology- Vader: Dark Visions! We've had a ton of vader centric content in the comics of late, between Kieren Gillen's Vader series taking place between A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back, the Dark Lord of the Sith series from Charles Soule, Target Vader, and a new "rebooted" Darth Vader series that will take place between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. In between Dark Lord of the Sith and Target Vader, we were given Vader: Dark Visions- and the start of a small sense of "Vader fatigue". Look, I love Darth Vader as much as anybody else- he's kind of the perfect villain. He's a badass, a terrifying presence, and a complex history to back it all up. Pretty much no other villain in pop culture history has both terrified and inspired the world on the scale that Darth Vader has. But... how much can Darth Vader can we get before it starts to get old? THE STORIES: Yep, this one is a bunch of oneshots, that doesn't follow one particular story. Normally with an anthology like this, or a comic collection that has multiple story arcs, I review each one individually, but if there's not enough unique things to say about each one, I'll do them all in one go. This is the case here: each one shot tells different stories, but they have enough of a unifying theme and enough of the same good and bad aspects that reviewing each one individually is redundant. Whereas with something like almost every volume of the Knights of the Old Republic comics by John Jackson Miller had multiple story arcs and they were all pretty much consistently awesome, Vader Dark Visions has multiple story arcs that are consistently... mediocre, at best. The first story is about Vader crashlanding on a planet during a space battle between the Empire and the Rebellion, told from the point of view of a native boy from a society that sees the offworlders as gods. The second is about a maniac of an imperial officer so terrified of failing his mission that he fanatically pursues a rebel target whatever the costs. The third is about a nurse who is in love with Darth Vader and collects cybernetic pieces left behind from her doctor's surgical procedures after a battle. She also fantasizes about Vader, a lot. The fourth story is about a hotshot rebel pilot who will do whatever he can to get himself in an X-wing to blow up imperial scum. Finally, the last story is about Vader tracking down some stolen information, told from the point of view of an undercover bartender on a backwater planet. THE BAD: well, first things, first, the writing sucks. It's not a problem in every one of these, but most of them are plagued with obnoxious internal monologues. I seriously don't understand why comic book writers still use this device. A little bit of narration at the very beginning of a comic can be fine to establish the plot and setting, and I tend to be a bit more lenient on non-star wars comics for this. Its bad in most star wars comics because they utilize an opening crawl, but with Dark Visions, again I could have given it a pass if it was just used at the start (these one shots don't use the crawl). But the problem is that with the first, third, and the fifth story (the former 2 in particular), it doesn't let up, and just gets tiresome. WE GET IT. these internal monologues are pointless! They aren't providing anything new in regards to useful insights about the characters. Let the visuals speak for themselves. Comics are a VISUAL MEDIUM. IT'S CALLED A GRAPHIC NOVEL FOR KRIFF'S SAKE! None of these really add anything new to the character of Darth Vader. I guess it was trying to explore the mythical boogeyman aspect of the character by exploring him through other characters, but what we end up getting in execution is just more of Vader being a big bad badass who kills everything and everyone in his path. We aren't left with many interesting new characters either- a wideeyed boy from #1 who thinks aloud way to much, a creepy fangirl in #3 (although the ending was fitting), a 10-cent Poe Dameron in #4, and just some guy in #5. THE GOOD: I did get two takeaways from this comic. First is the artwork. While it's not the best and looking cheap in many panels (particularly #3), other panels look really good and have a style that matches what the tone is going for. In issue #1 it focuses on a wide-eyed kid who idolizes vader like an antiheroic god- so we get to see Vader in all these sweeping poses like a knight in glistening black armor, with his lightsaber drawn more like a flaming sword. In issue #2 all the over-the-top expressions on the imperial officer protagonist actually work in the story's favor. The man is so scared by what Vader will do to him for failing that it basically drives him insane, so all the exaggerated facial expressions play to an advantage in conveying the character's emotions more effectively. The nurse's fantasies in #3 are drawn like impressionist paintings, which tend to depict things in a more idealistic manner. Lastly, I liked how ambiguous the endings to #2, #4, and #5 were. They stop on a visual image that feels more like a cliffhanger than total closure. The ultimate fates of the protagonists aren't actually shown, but enough is implied that you could fill in the blanks with a more terrifying image than anything the artists could actually depict. And I have to commend this comic for doing that a few times. I've been getting the impression that due to Star Wars always having this tightly interconnected canon (this was true in the legends days, but it is even more true now that lucasfilm gave an official statement regarding that), it hamstrings creativity an impactful moments. Most of the time you would see the very endings of the characters in these stories and you would definitively see Vader doing the deed, but I loved how there's some room for interpretation as to how it exactly played out in the moments I mentioned here. THE CONCLUSION: Final rating is 2.5 stars, rounded down because the good stuff is not mindblowingly spectacular and doesn't outweigh the problems. Vader: Dark Visions just didn't feel necessary to me. You get to see more of Vader being badass and terrifying, but we've seen that plenty of times before in recent years, and done better in just about everywhere else its been tried. Rogue One's hallway scene captured how scary and unstoppable Vader is far more effectively than any of these five stories combined, and the previous two Darth Vader series in the canon showed more insight into who Vader is as a person. I will give it this: Issue #2 with the Imperial officer and his emotional breakdown was good and effective. That's pretty much where most of the credit for that 2.5 stars is going. It gives us enough backstory to tell us why this person is so fearful, and the story slowly builds up the dread as the officer slowly loses his mind. But that isn't enough to save the rest of these stories which are plagued with clunky writing, dull characters, and repetitive setups that convey the same message over and over again. While I've read worse, this one doesn't go beyond run-of-the-mill mediocre. I'd skip it and read Dark Lord of the Sith instead.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    The back cover talks about how the book shows Vader in a slightly different light. They should turn that light off. The first story, showing Vader as a Dark Knight, isn't bad, and is well drawn. But the 'Tall, Dark and Handsome' story was just wrong on so many levels, not the least making light of a woman with apparent mental issues. Hotshot was okay until the final pages, and 'You Can Run' goes weird places for no good reason. 'Unacceptable' is of middling quality, but that still makes it one of The back cover talks about how the book shows Vader in a slightly different light. They should turn that light off. The first story, showing Vader as a Dark Knight, isn't bad, and is well drawn. But the 'Tall, Dark and Handsome' story was just wrong on so many levels, not the least making light of a woman with apparent mental issues. Hotshot was okay until the final pages, and 'You Can Run' goes weird places for no good reason. 'Unacceptable' is of middling quality, but that still makes it one of the better stories in the collection. The art varies from impressive (Savior, Hotshot) to barely tolerable (Unacceptable), but there isn't anything worth reading here. If you want to see Darth Vader at his best, read the regular series instead.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Red

    Really mixed bag, but it’s exciting to read a bunch of Vader stories that aren’t from Vader’s perspective. The first story is five star gold, though. One of the best Wars comics I’ve read since Marvel took over the brand. I can’t recommend the book as a whole unless you’re a big Vader fan, instead just get the first issue. It’s got a lot of unexpected majesty and whimsy. No mean feat for a Vader tale.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Monsour

    Star Wars: Darth Vader's day job. Star Wars: Darth Vader's day job.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mauri Luna

    If anything, I felt this never reached the surface of its full potential. I love the idea, I love how the cover and title hook you in, but honestly, I don’t think it truly delivered to my expectations. Illustrations are wonderful, some of the “dark visions” of Vader do give the nightmarish feel of his presence, and I do have to admit...the cover art for this book is the best thing about it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    I was skeptical of this comic....seriously Vader on horse with a shield?? But it was very good!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Darth Vader as a hero. Sorta. MY GRADE: C plus to B minus.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Dalton

    Not so good. 2 stars mostly. Forgettable art and none of the stories really appealed to me OR harken towards the Vader anguish. Free via Comixology Unlimited, not every issue is a winner.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    One shots that showcase the terror, dread, and madness surrounding the Dark Lord of the Sith.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vilma Jorge

    This was a waste of time

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Anderson

    Dark Visions is weird and I mean really weird. It’s weird even outside the context of the general weirdness that is Star Wars. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t like it. In fact, I loved Dark Visions because of that weirdness. It’s so unlike anything before it that’s it’s hard not to enjoy what Hallum is trying to do with it. It’s 5 loosely connected shorts, all revolving around the dark lord of the Sith and highlighting just how badass and hardcore he is. I’ll admit that the quality of the tales isn Dark Visions is weird and I mean really weird. It’s weird even outside the context of the general weirdness that is Star Wars. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t like it. In fact, I loved Dark Visions because of that weirdness. It’s so unlike anything before it that’s it’s hard not to enjoy what Hallum is trying to do with it. It’s 5 loosely connected shorts, all revolving around the dark lord of the Sith and highlighting just how badass and hardcore he is. I’ll admit that the quality of the tales isn’t all great (personally, I thought the 4th issue kind of lagged and wasn’t all that exciting), but in the grand scheme of things, it all worked together surprisingly well, especially when each of the stories is unique in its own right (both in story and illustrations). Gotta say that the 2nd story is easily the best. SPOILER WARNING!!!!! I mean, a freakin Star Destroyer flys into the Mouth of a space worn! Can’t say I’ve ever seen that in any Star Wars story before!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emilee Hone (Emilee Reads)

    3/5 - Full review at emileereads: http://emileereads.com/blog/2020/8/11... I LOVED the first issue, Savior, the next two were decent, and the last two I could have done without. Dark Visions is not my favorite Vader comic but I really really loved that first one. Vader fans should read for that one at least. 3/5 - Full review at emileereads: http://emileereads.com/blog/2020/8/11... I LOVED the first issue, Savior, the next two were decent, and the last two I could have done without. Dark Visions is not my favorite Vader comic but I really really loved that first one. Vader fans should read for that one at least.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nick Nguyen

    Interesting gimmick, competently pulled off. But it is clear that the best Darth Vader comics are the ones that get inside his head.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alan Castree

    An very interesting idea, telling stories of Vader from the perspective of others, but I only kinda enjoyed two of the 5 stories. The others were just, meh.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Brief and to the point, this Volume shows us a few different perspectives on Darth Vader. All are awesome and more than one is hilarious. Brief Summaries of the stories: 1) Vader as hero and savior. - A planet held under oppression from a huge beast also happens to be having a space battle above it. Vader crash lands on the planet and defeats the huge beast. 2) Vader is pure manic fear. - Commander Tylux, who had escaped Vader's wrath for failing years ago, takes huge risks and chaotic moves (lik Brief and to the point, this Volume shows us a few different perspectives on Darth Vader. All are awesome and more than one is hilarious. Brief Summaries of the stories: 1) Vader as hero and savior. - A planet held under oppression from a huge beast also happens to be having a space battle above it. Vader crash lands on the planet and defeats the huge beast. 2) Vader is pure manic fear. - Commander Tylux, who had escaped Vader's wrath for failing years ago, takes huge risks and chaotic moves (like sending an entire TIE Squadron down to a desert planet to chase a starfighter OR driving the Star Destroyer down the throat of a huge space slug) to attempt to reclaim a lost Rebel spy. "Failure is Unacceptable..." 3) Vader is misunderstood and just needs to be loved. - A young medical assistant is obsessed with Darth Vader, thinking she's in love with him. She saves broken parts that get removed in the med bay. Quite hilarious story at times, but a tragic surprising ending when she seeks him out with his helmet removed. 4) Vader is weak and a nothing... until you face him in combat. - A hotshot kid seeks to prove himself in an X-Wing and gets a chance to.... until he freezes when taking the shot, which leads to getting his whole base killed. 5) Vader is beyond terrifying. - A Rebel spy escapes from a bar attack from Vader, trying to carry his cargo, but freaking out when he gets poisoned by a plant on the way. Vader is scary enough... no need to add to it with hallucinogens. LOL Another great outing from Star Wars. High recommend. A Quick read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    An anthology of short comics united thematically around Vader and I think technically encompassing a complete story about some stolen factory plans? The concept of putting together a story through the pieces of negative space it leaves in otherwise unrelated stories is solid but doesn't really materialize here at all. I guess he got the plans back? Otherwise these can only really be evaluated individually. The first is a kind of Star Wars comic I don't particularly care for. It's the "vaguely sc An anthology of short comics united thematically around Vader and I think technically encompassing a complete story about some stolen factory plans? The concept of putting together a story through the pieces of negative space it leaves in otherwise unrelated stories is solid but doesn't really materialize here at all. I guess he got the plans back? Otherwise these can only really be evaluated individually. The first is a kind of Star Wars comic I don't particularly care for. It's the "vaguely scifi-fantasy isolated planet one-off" except condensed even further, with kid protagonists, and full of Capitalized Nouns. The art is also that sloppy manga action style and I'm not sure it works well here. Plus the concepts is just boring--who wants to see Vader fight a kaiju? Yawn! The second story was the standout for me. Vader murdering Imperial Officers is a cliche by now, but I'm not sure I've ever seen a story take the perspective of those officers seriously. It suggested even more than it delivered on, but this story effectively sells the desperation and mania brought on by working under that threat. What kind of results do you expect when you squeeze your officers that way? The third was also interesting, something I don't know that we've seen before. An in-universe Vader stalker. Nothing too deep, again suggesting more possibilities than it has time to explore, but a decent concept. The fourth story is fine I guess but didn't really do it for me. The last one seemed pretty underinspired.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    A very disappointing collection, from the beginning (with the unfortunate removal of the previous creator), it's not as bad as the Mace Windu miniseries, but earns its place as the new canon second worst comic. It presents five different stories connected to Vader, trying to create a picture of him through the eyes of other characters. The first one started well, with Vader crash landing on a planet ruled by a gargantuan creature; but those good first steps start to falter when the second one, pai A very disappointing collection, from the beginning (with the unfortunate removal of the previous creator), it's not as bad as the Mace Windu miniseries, but earns its place as the new canon second worst comic. It presents five different stories connected to Vader, trying to create a picture of him through the eyes of other characters. The first one started well, with Vader crash landing on a planet ruled by a gargantuan creature; but those good first steps start to falter when the second one, painted more as a comedy, presents a relentless (and not in the good sense) Star Destroyer commander who would do anything not to earn Vader's wrath. But the series downfall was the third one, about a nurse who falls in love with Darth Vader and starts a collection of mementos. Plagued with cliches, bad writing and horrible art, is simply too disturbing and I wonder who consented to commit this to print. The final stories are just OK. As a kid, a Rebel froze in place and could not save his father. Becoming a pilot and mustering a lot of bravado, he finds himself ready to shoot down Vader but is unable again to pull the trigger. And finally, escaping with Imperial secrets, a bartender is poisoned by a beast, living a horrendous nightmare where Vader is just another monster in the jungle. Avoid like the ... err... avoid at all costs.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    An anthology in the Tangled Web vein, showing the Sith Lord's impact on the lives of those he barely notices, from a boy on a ruined planet who sees him as a saviour from the stars, to one of those luckless Imperial officers he casually scrags. Dennis 'Hopeless' Hallum writes, and is down as such inside, though he's just Hopeless on the cover – I do find myself unreasonably intrigued by the oscillations of his name. It's a different artist each issue, none of them big names but all of them good; An anthology in the Tangled Web vein, showing the Sith Lord's impact on the lives of those he barely notices, from a boy on a ruined planet who sees him as a saviour from the stars, to one of those luckless Imperial officers he casually scrags. Dennis 'Hopeless' Hallum writes, and is down as such inside, though he's just Hopeless on the cover – I do find myself unreasonably intrigued by the oscillations of his name. It's a different artist each issue, none of them big names but all of them good; I really liked the way the layouts contribute to the mood in Paolo Villanelli's story, but the highlight has to be the David Lopez and Javier Pina issue, which is, I shit you not, a nurse romance. Well, on her part, at least. Her crush on Vader reminds me of a few people I know, but it's hardly a spoiler to say that her dreams do not come true. Also, I don't think I'd ever noticed until the final issue here how much Vader's mask recalls Swamp Thing's face.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaycee Costley

    A whole lot of mediocre nothing that still could've gotten to two stars on the back of some fun art if not for the third issue being needlessly mean and petty to a subset of fandom that's already taken its share of licks. Very brave of Hopeless and Dark Visions to come after the fangirls. Nobody's dared to before. And in a series that's unafraid to- literally! In the very first issue!- mythologize Darth Vader with lavishing action sequences and slasher style delight in his slaughter, it takes th A whole lot of mediocre nothing that still could've gotten to two stars on the back of some fun art if not for the third issue being needlessly mean and petty to a subset of fandom that's already taken its share of licks. Very brave of Hopeless and Dark Visions to come after the fangirls. Nobody's dared to before. And in a series that's unafraid to- literally! In the very first issue!- mythologize Darth Vader with lavishing action sequences and slasher style delight in his slaughter, it takes the time to fire potshots at people who don't think Vader is cool in the right way. And put an emphasis on that 'slasher style' comment. In a five issue miniseries about how random people could see Darth Vader, Hopeless settles on 'horror monster' three times out of five. He ran out of steam that fast. Of the Vader series in Marvel's pocket, this is easily the bottom of the barrel. There is nothing revelatory here, and its spite drags even its mediocrity down.

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