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Winner of the Writer's Trust of Canada / Samara's - Best Canadian Political Book of the Last 25 Years Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is a shocking and controversial look at the corruption of Canada’s human rights commissions. “On January 11, 2008, I was summoned to a 90-minute government interrogation. My crime? As the publisher of Western Standard magazin Winner of the Writer's Trust of Canada / Samara's - Best Canadian Political Book of the Last 25 Years Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is a shocking and controversial look at the corruption of Canada’s human rights commissions. “On January 11, 2008, I was summoned to a 90-minute government interrogation. My crime? As the publisher of Western Standard magazine, I had reprinted the Danish cartoons of Mohammed to illustrate a news story. I was charged with the offence of “discrimination,” and made to appear before Alberta’s “human rights commission” for questioning. As crazy as it sounds, I became the only person in the world to face legal sanction for printing those cartoons.” As a result of this highly publicized event, Ezra Levant began investigating other instances in which innocent people have had their freedoms compromised by bureaucrats presuming to protect Canadians’ human rights. He discovered some disturbing and even bizarre cases, such as the tribunal ruling that an employee at a McDonald’ s restaurant in Vancouver did not have to wash her hands at work. And the human rights complaint filed by a Calgary hair stylist against the women at a salon school who called him a “loser.” In another case that seemed stranger than fiction, an emotionally unstable transvestite fought for — and won — the right to counsel female rape victims, despite the anguished pleas of those same traumatized victims. Human rights commissions now monitor political opinions, fine people for expressing politically incorrect viewpoints, censor websites, and even ban people, permanently, from saying certain things. The book is a result of Levant’s ordeal and the research it inspired. It shows how our concept of human rights has morphed into something dangerous and drastically different from its original meaning. Shakedown is a convincing plea to Canadians to reclaim their basic liberties.


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Winner of the Writer's Trust of Canada / Samara's - Best Canadian Political Book of the Last 25 Years Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is a shocking and controversial look at the corruption of Canada’s human rights commissions. “On January 11, 2008, I was summoned to a 90-minute government interrogation. My crime? As the publisher of Western Standard magazin Winner of the Writer's Trust of Canada / Samara's - Best Canadian Political Book of the Last 25 Years Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is a shocking and controversial look at the corruption of Canada’s human rights commissions. “On January 11, 2008, I was summoned to a 90-minute government interrogation. My crime? As the publisher of Western Standard magazine, I had reprinted the Danish cartoons of Mohammed to illustrate a news story. I was charged with the offence of “discrimination,” and made to appear before Alberta’s “human rights commission” for questioning. As crazy as it sounds, I became the only person in the world to face legal sanction for printing those cartoons.” As a result of this highly publicized event, Ezra Levant began investigating other instances in which innocent people have had their freedoms compromised by bureaucrats presuming to protect Canadians’ human rights. He discovered some disturbing and even bizarre cases, such as the tribunal ruling that an employee at a McDonald’ s restaurant in Vancouver did not have to wash her hands at work. And the human rights complaint filed by a Calgary hair stylist against the women at a salon school who called him a “loser.” In another case that seemed stranger than fiction, an emotionally unstable transvestite fought for — and won — the right to counsel female rape victims, despite the anguished pleas of those same traumatized victims. Human rights commissions now monitor political opinions, fine people for expressing politically incorrect viewpoints, censor websites, and even ban people, permanently, from saying certain things. The book is a result of Levant’s ordeal and the research it inspired. It shows how our concept of human rights has morphed into something dangerous and drastically different from its original meaning. Shakedown is a convincing plea to Canadians to reclaim their basic liberties.

30 review for Shakedown: How Our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Ezra's thesis is that the various Human Rights Commissions throughout the country no longer protect human rights but instead have become ideologically driven, politically correct, thought police. The book does a good job of exposing abuses at the Canadian Human Rights Commission and the various crazy rulings of the provincial commissions. The book does get a little rambly at times. Best quote is on page 128 "Great achievements in human rights--such as the equality of men and women; such as the ac Ezra's thesis is that the various Human Rights Commissions throughout the country no longer protect human rights but instead have become ideologically driven, politically correct, thought police. The book does a good job of exposing abuses at the Canadian Human Rights Commission and the various crazy rulings of the provincial commissions. The book does get a little rambly at times. Best quote is on page 128 "Great achievements in human rights--such as the equality of men and women; such as the acknowledgement that we should solve national problems without violence; such as our belief in pluralism, whereby each of us can choose our own religion (or none at all) --are not wins that last forever. If the attack on those values were to come through a militay jihad, we'd know to fight back and rally to our national principles of freedom. But when those who challenge our way of life come not with a suicide bomber's vest but with letterhead marked 'Human Rights Commission,' we let our guard down."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    Very important book for Canadians and others concerned about freedom. Ezra tells his story of being hauled before a "Human Rights" Commission to "defend" his decision to print the Danish cartoons depicting Muhammed in his magazine. So much for freedom of the press! Another important case he documents is that of a pastor who wrote a column about homosexuality, someone was offended, he was hauled before a kangaroo court and was forced to pay a huge fine and is now BARRED from speaking against homo Very important book for Canadians and others concerned about freedom. Ezra tells his story of being hauled before a "Human Rights" Commission to "defend" his decision to print the Danish cartoons depicting Muhammed in his magazine. So much for freedom of the press! Another important case he documents is that of a pastor who wrote a column about homosexuality, someone was offended, he was hauled before a kangaroo court and was forced to pay a huge fine and is now BARRED from speaking against homosexuality in any forum (including the pulpit) or even speaking about his accuser or his case. Many other shocking cases are documented. Ezra makes the case that the government agency (HRC) is acting like a thug and forcing people to pay fines rather than fight their cases in these non-judical courts. The tide of public opinion is turning, however, which is encouraging.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    If we just take the book as detailing the misuses of the quasi-judicial human rights commissions then this book would be an engaging, eye-opening read. Instead, rather than simply present a case for dismantling/updating/reorganising these commissions, Levant pads this book with a bunch of his neo-liberal, right-wing propaganda that is completely unnecessary for making his case. For no reason whatsoever, there are jabs at Palestinians, liberals, Torontonians, etc., that in no way serve to strengt If we just take the book as detailing the misuses of the quasi-judicial human rights commissions then this book would be an engaging, eye-opening read. Instead, rather than simply present a case for dismantling/updating/reorganising these commissions, Levant pads this book with a bunch of his neo-liberal, right-wing propaganda that is completely unnecessary for making his case. For no reason whatsoever, there are jabs at Palestinians, liberals, Torontonians, etc., that in no way serve to strengthen his point. Threaded through the piece is also the notion that Canadian society has rid itself of all bigotted behaviour. Coming from a rich, white, straight, man statements like that smack of privilege and having worked with people below the poverty line, I can assure you that bigotry and racism do still exist in Canada. Unfortunately. Hopefully someone in the future can expand these issues with the human rights commissions and write a more balanced, less vitriolic, perspective.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    If you're a Canadian or even just concerned with free speech then you absolutely need to read Shakedown. I was completely unaware how much our rights have been eroded by the HRC's. I can almost guarantee you will be compelled to finish this book once you start it and you owe it to yourself. If you're a Canadian or even just concerned with free speech then you absolutely need to read Shakedown. I was completely unaware how much our rights have been eroded by the HRC's. I can almost guarantee you will be compelled to finish this book once you start it and you owe it to yourself.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nigel Shenton

    I think most can't even tell what a conspiracy to a controversy is in this book and that's a huge difference in segueing issues. The contronyms of time in the French Revolution say that things of dispensary of inequality don't change with the immortality equality distribution. Even a disorderly queue is a disorder against a background of order. Otherwise, there is no queue at all. This is what makes apparently trivial issues or order, moral issues. So much with the bias of this book says the cha I think most can't even tell what a conspiracy to a controversy is in this book and that's a huge difference in segueing issues. The contronyms of time in the French Revolution say that things of dispensary of inequality don't change with the immortality equality distribution. Even a disorderly queue is a disorder against a background of order. Otherwise, there is no queue at all. This is what makes apparently trivial issues or order, moral issues. So much with the bias of this book says the chaos in decision are not really trivial issues but no issue at all but a moral one, and how people are sueing for ethics or human rights, with the stories becoming visable to the reader.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M.

    Shocking book detailing the atrocities committed by the Human Rights Commissions in Canada. It's so hard to believe that the Commissions themselves hired people to log onto websites and deliberately post inciting and entrapment types of comments. All true. After so doing, they put people through gruelling non legal hearings and have the right to silence people. In a country of free speech, how is this possible. They mete out justice in non judicial hearings and small business owners are forced to Shocking book detailing the atrocities committed by the Human Rights Commissions in Canada. It's so hard to believe that the Commissions themselves hired people to log onto websites and deliberately post inciting and entrapment types of comments. All true. After so doing, they put people through gruelling non legal hearings and have the right to silence people. In a country of free speech, how is this possible. They mete out justice in non judicial hearings and small business owners are forced to bear responsibility and costs for ridiculous, spurious and frivolous accusations.It certainly confirms my opinion of the HRC in Canada, they are operating illegally and rendering decisions that make a mockery of our democratic system and our laws. They need to be disbanded and relegated to the garbage pile.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Grant

    In Shakedown: How our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights Ezra Levant writes that, “human rights commissions were a beautiful idea – that failed.” The Human Rights Commissions (HRCs) in Canada were created with the purpose of protecting victims of discrimination with, “a quick, low-cost means to fight back against bigoted landlords, employers and storeowners.” Levant counters this by arguing that the decreases in bigotry in society caused the HRCs in Canada to shift f In Shakedown: How our Government is Undermining Democracy in the Name of Human Rights Ezra Levant writes that, “human rights commissions were a beautiful idea – that failed.” The Human Rights Commissions (HRCs) in Canada were created with the purpose of protecting victims of discrimination with, “a quick, low-cost means to fight back against bigoted landlords, employers and storeowners.” Levant counters this by arguing that the decreases in bigotry in society caused the HRCs in Canada to shift focus away from protecting human rights to becoming an ideologically driven, politically correct, thought police. Furthermore, Levant argues that the roles of HRCs have become so redundant in a society of acceptance, that in an attempt to justify their jobs and government expenditures HRCs accept increasingly ridiculous human rights cases or ‘nuisance cases’ to prosecute. Nuisance cases such as the one against Ezra Levant and The Western Standard for publishing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in accompaniment with a news piece on the controversy faced by the original publishers of the cartoons the Danish paper Jyllands-Posten. Because of his action, Levant and The Western Standard was charged by Alberta’s HRC under the hate speech provision Section 13. Section 13 is a problematic provision within the Canadian Human Rights Act which makes it illegal to say or publish anything, “that is likely to expose a person or persons to hatred or contempt by reasons of the fact that that person or those persons are identifiable on the basis of [his group status].” Levant is quick to point out that one need not actually provoke hatred or discrimination but rather merely cause the possibility of hatred or discrimination. As a result, Section 13 has a 100 per cent conviction rate. The wording of Section 13 means that the intent of the individual speaker need not be taken into account, only whether their actions can be misconstrued into inciting violence. Additionally, those faced with Section 13 charges often plead guilty to avoid the lengthy court proceedings and large expense incurred through fighting. Unlike other lawsuits which demand you pay part if not all of the fees for the opposing side the HRC has no such caveat. Moreover, unlike the criminal court where one can expect a speedy trial the HRCs can drag out proceedings for months if not years. Quite simply, to go through the HRC tribunal process is punishment enough. A legal nightmare that can financially ruin an individual as “Fewer than 10 per cent of all Section 13 targets were able to afford the five- or six-figure price tag to engage a lawyer for the lengthy HRC process.” Despite his completely valid point on the problematic Section 13 Levant’s message of corrupt bureaucratic actions within Canadian HRCs is lost through his abrasive rhetoric. As a white upper class, educated male Levant comes from a privileged position. As such, it is easy to claim that discrimination is on the decline when the odds of encountering such discrimination are slim. In a society of increasing acceptance, Levant questions the validity of HRCs. Although he is more than willing to provide ludicrous examples of HRC mismanagement and bureaucratic red tape, he neglects to mention any positive cases of true discrimination that HRCs have dealt with. Perhaps valid cases worthy of the HRCs attention are on the decline but does that mean they have ceased to exist? By cherry picking examples of misconduct, Levant provides a skewed representation of HRCs in Canada. The narrative of Canada’s HRCs would be better served by profiling a single province’s human rights complaints in the span of a year and single out the number of nuisance cases versus valid ones. This would provide a much clearer representation of the state of human rights in Canada. Another issue is Levant’s depiction of the individuals who bring complaints to HRCs which borders on character assassination. His bias against Syed Soharwardy is unashamedly obvious as he piles accusation after accusation of Soharwardy’s ties to radical Islam. Levant’s blatant fear mongering stating Soharwardy’s desire to replace the Canadian constitution with the Koran displays his anti-Islamic sentiment. Furthermore, Levant’s clear distaste for Muslims brings into question the validity of the Alberta’s HRC inquiry. At his trial Levant was asked by human rights officer Shirlene McGovern what his intent and purpose was in publishing his article. He argues that what his thoughts where at the time of publishing was irreverent and that the article itself displayed its reasoning behind publication however Levant’s virulent anti-Islamic sentiment portrayed throughout his book brings into serious question his intent. Despite the inherent problems with Levant’s rhetoric, he highlights some very real issues present with the HRCs namely Section 13 which has come under considerable scrutiny in the past years. The presence of nuisance cases and their acceptance into HRCs legal proceedings is indeed troubling. The absence of ‘loser pays’ caveats make nuisance claims more appealing to habitual complainers and perhaps accounts for their prevalence. Additionally, the patently unfair legal advantage given to complainants means only the largest corporation or individual with considerable means can fight their accusations. The purpose of HRCs was to assist individuals from discrimination and the legal process faced by small business owners and other individuals can only be described as a discrimination of its own sort.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan Glover

    Ezra Levant has sounded the alarm on the most serious and potentially disastrous issue in Canadian politics today - the regression and repression of the basic and natural freedom to think and say what we jolly-well please. Ezra blows the whistle on the Canadian thought police, arguing the federal and provincial/territorial "human rights" commissions have grossly overstepped their well-intentioned original purpose. Along with telling his own horror story of being dragged through Alberta's opinion Ezra Levant has sounded the alarm on the most serious and potentially disastrous issue in Canadian politics today - the regression and repression of the basic and natural freedom to think and say what we jolly-well please. Ezra blows the whistle on the Canadian thought police, arguing the federal and provincial/territorial "human rights" commissions have grossly overstepped their well-intentioned original purpose. Along with telling his own horror story of being dragged through Alberta's opinion-inquisition for 3+ years, Levant documents numerous cases where radical leftist or Islamic zealots as well as opportunists looking for an easy buck, have used these "kangaroo courts" to punish law-abiding Canadian citizens for their political or religious views and corporations for their business decisions. Levant makes a convincing and water-tight argument that these unelected, unaccountable, secretive, underhanded, unscrupulous, grossly-powerful, usually untrained, and tax-payer funded bureaucratic thought police have become the vehicle of choice of radical groups or individuals looking to advance their own pet agendas and take out anyone whose thoughts or opinions might stand against them. If we don't believe in the freedom of thought, speech and conviction for people that offend us or that we disagree with, then we don't really believe in those fundamental freedoms at all. This book is the most important book Canadians can read right now about their government. If what Levant says about the "human rights commissions" in Canada doesn't make you mad enough to demand of your provincial and federal representatives that the HRCs be abolished or, at minimum, severely reformed, you're probably one of the few freedom-hating Canadians currently milking the system for personal fame and fortune. Canadians need to stand up with Ezra Levant and demand that we let people's opinions fend for themselves in the market place of ideas rather than let a small and sordid group of social engineers with a messiah complex try to save their fellow Canadians from themselves. Well researched, lively and engaging, I'd buy the book for the introduction by Mark Steyn alone (and don't neglect reading the appendices). You may disagree with Levant's political opinions but if you don't agree with his defense of our freedom to think and opine as we please, there may come a day in the not-to-distant future when you no longer have the freedom to disagree.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan Glover

    Ezra Levant has sounded the alarm on the most serious and potentially disastrous issue in Canadian politics today - the regression and repression of the basic and natural freedom to think and say what we jolly-well please. Ezra blows the whistle on the Canadian thought police, arguing the federal and provincial/territorial "human rights" commissions have grossly overstepped their well-intentioned original purpose. Along with telling his own horror story of being dragged through Alberta's opinion- Ezra Levant has sounded the alarm on the most serious and potentially disastrous issue in Canadian politics today - the regression and repression of the basic and natural freedom to think and say what we jolly-well please. Ezra blows the whistle on the Canadian thought police, arguing the federal and provincial/territorial "human rights" commissions have grossly overstepped their well-intentioned original purpose. Along with telling his own horror story of being dragged through Alberta's opinion-inquisition for 3+ years, Levant documents numerous cases where radical leftist or Islamic zealots as well as opportunists looking for an easy buck, have used these "kangaroo courts" to punish law-abiding Canadian citizens for their political or religious views and corporations for their business decisions. Levant makes a convincing and water-tight argument that these unelected, unaccountable, secretive, underhanded, unscrupulous, grossly-powerful, usually untrained, and tax-payer funded bureaucratic thought police have become the vehicle of choice of radical groups or individuals looking to advance their own pet agendas and take out anyone whose thoughts or opinions might stand against them. If we don't believe in the freedom of thought, speech and conviction for people that offend us or that we disagree with, then we don't really believe in those fundamental freedoms at all. This book is the most important book Canadians can read right now about their government. If what Levant says about the "human rights commissions" in Canada doesn't make you mad enough to demand of your provincial and federal representatives that the HRCs be abolished or, at minimum, severely reformed, you're probably one of the few freedom-hating Canadians currently milking the system for personal fame and fortune. Canadians need to stand up with Ezra Levant and demand that we let people's opinions fend for themselves in the market place of ideas rather than let a small and sordid group of social engineers with a messiah complex try to save their fellow Canadians from themselves. Well researched, lively and engaging, I'd buy the book for the introduction by Mark Steyn alone (and don't neglect reading the appendices). You may disagree with Levant's political opinions but if you don't agree with his defense of our freedom to think and opine as we please, there may come a day in the not-to-distant future when you no longer have the freedom to disagree.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Nichol

    We like to think we live in a free country, protected by the right to free speech. Well, after reading Levant's provocative expose of Canada's human rights commissions, I'm not so sure. Levant, the former publisher of The Western Standard magazine, was hauled before the Alberta Human Rights and Citizenship Commission for republishing the controversial cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed. His ordeal at the hands of a commission - that had the power to search his home and business without a warrant - is We like to think we live in a free country, protected by the right to free speech. Well, after reading Levant's provocative expose of Canada's human rights commissions, I'm not so sure. Levant, the former publisher of The Western Standard magazine, was hauled before the Alberta Human Rights and Citizenship Commission for republishing the controversial cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed. His ordeal at the hands of a commission - that had the power to search his home and business without a warrant - is truly horrifying. That HRCs across the country have carte- blanche to ruin ordinary people by investigating frivolous complaints is a perversion of the hard-won civil rights battles of the 1960s. Anyone who believes in freedom of speech, and abhors the nanny-state, should read this book. You will be outraged. I know I was.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    I picked up this book for $2 on the bargain shelf at the local bookstore. I was familiar with the controversy surrounding Ezra Levant, and to be honest it seemed like an issue I had interest in. But for $2 hardcover, decent reviews, what had I to lose. Levant's investigative journalism is brilliant. Some of his sarcastic explanations and his anger in the words make this a pretty interesting read. This guy has some balls for sure. More importantly, every Canadian should know about the CHRC and thei I picked up this book for $2 on the bargain shelf at the local bookstore. I was familiar with the controversy surrounding Ezra Levant, and to be honest it seemed like an issue I had interest in. But for $2 hardcover, decent reviews, what had I to lose. Levant's investigative journalism is brilliant. Some of his sarcastic explanations and his anger in the words make this a pretty interesting read. This guy has some balls for sure. More importantly, every Canadian should know about the CHRC and their problems. Levant has laid out enough information in here for you to judge. Just a few weeks ago, the Supreme Court overturned Guy Earle's case of the anti-lesbian comedian rant in BC (the original case was mentioned in the book). When this book was published, the appeal was not yet settled. Levant must have a few words to say about this in his blog.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Levant makes some good points. A lot of good points, in fact. Enough to have convinced me that the CHRC and it's provincial incarnations need some serious reconsideration. He seems unable, however, to have been able to decide what kind of book he wants to write; this is simultaneously a work of investigative journalism, history, smug self-congratulation, and a polemic in favour of a small government and robust private sector economy. There is nothing wrong with taking a varied approach to an iss Levant makes some good points. A lot of good points, in fact. Enough to have convinced me that the CHRC and it's provincial incarnations need some serious reconsideration. He seems unable, however, to have been able to decide what kind of book he wants to write; this is simultaneously a work of investigative journalism, history, smug self-congratulation, and a polemic in favour of a small government and robust private sector economy. There is nothing wrong with taking a varied approach to an issue like this, but Levant is a little to impressed with his own legal and political maneuverings and lets his personal distaste for specific people associated with the CHRC show a little too much for me to take him entirely at face value. That said, the book is definitely worth a read, but have one extremely critical eye open when you do so.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marc D

    I've been wanting to read this book since I heard about it from Ezra Levant when he was a commentator on Sun News. That was five years ago and I finally got around to reading it. I should have read it years ago. It is a chilling account of how 'Human Rights' Commissions operate in Canada. The reader soon discovers that these Kangaroo Courts view anything and everything as human rights violation, from McDonalds firing an employee for refusing to wash their hands to Levants own struggles for publish I've been wanting to read this book since I heard about it from Ezra Levant when he was a commentator on Sun News. That was five years ago and I finally got around to reading it. I should have read it years ago. It is a chilling account of how 'Human Rights' Commissions operate in Canada. The reader soon discovers that these Kangaroo Courts view anything and everything as human rights violation, from McDonalds firing an employee for refusing to wash their hands to Levants own struggles for publishing some cartoons. If you love Canada and our tradition of free speech, you need to read this book to understand the threat HRCs pose to a freedom-loving society. It almost reads as a prequil to George Orwells 1984 where the government dictates what people can or can't speak about. Don't wait like I did, read this book now!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daren Doucet

    Very good book, in portraying how some Human Rights courts can financially ruin an individual, when they themselves were just applying their free speech rights. Human rights courts, were always expected to help the poor and powerless. When does someone have the right not to be insulted? And, when does it go too far against the supposed perpetrators human rights? On which circumstances can human right tribunals become witch hunts? And, are the courts good enough and set up well enough to handle, Very good book, in portraying how some Human Rights courts can financially ruin an individual, when they themselves were just applying their free speech rights. Human rights courts, were always expected to help the poor and powerless. When does someone have the right not to be insulted? And, when does it go too far against the supposed perpetrators human rights? On which circumstances can human right tribunals become witch hunts? And, are the courts good enough and set up well enough to handle, Human Rights alone, without these tribunals? Very interesting questions, which the book may lead you to ask. Is "thought crime" really a crime? Ezra Levant explains his ordeal and views on HRC.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Johns

    Sad stories of how political correctness is out of control across Canada under the guise of cleverly-named but deceitful Human Rights Commissions. Here's a great summary line from page 120 of this little book: "It says a lot about how thoroughly our [Canadian] society has distorted the concept of human rights over the years that leftist, feminist bureaucrats could unwittingly become allies of angry men [radical Muslims] with fascist politics and medieval ideas about women's place in society." Ma Sad stories of how political correctness is out of control across Canada under the guise of cleverly-named but deceitful Human Rights Commissions. Here's a great summary line from page 120 of this little book: "It says a lot about how thoroughly our [Canadian] society has distorted the concept of human rights over the years that leftist, feminist bureaucrats could unwittingly become allies of angry men [radical Muslims] with fascist politics and medieval ideas about women's place in society." May God help our Neighbors to the North in re-gaining control of their own runaway government bureaucrats!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Liao

    I am not sure if I personally like the author, and part of this book really borderlines personal attacks. However, Ezra has a point - the practices Canada's human right commissions undertake need to change. It is thought-provoking and it will push your buttons - what's considered a right? and what's considered a crime? Should some behaviours be dealt with by the commissions, by criminal courts, or by public opinions? I still think that there is a point for the human right commissions to exist, bu I am not sure if I personally like the author, and part of this book really borderlines personal attacks. However, Ezra has a point - the practices Canada's human right commissions undertake need to change. It is thought-provoking and it will push your buttons - what's considered a right? and what's considered a crime? Should some behaviours be dealt with by the commissions, by criminal courts, or by public opinions? I still think that there is a point for the human right commissions to exist, but definitely not with the old ways.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Byron Wright

    If you did not follow the kerfuffle surrounding Human Right Commissions from 2006-2010 then this might be more interesting than it was for me. I found this book to cover the same points over and over and over. Ezra makes a compelling case for why the Human Rights Commissions need to be either radically reformed or abolished. They have become self-propagating bureaucratic beasts that look for a reason to exist. If you have not followed this issue in the past then the book is well worth a read just If you did not follow the kerfuffle surrounding Human Right Commissions from 2006-2010 then this might be more interesting than it was for me. I found this book to cover the same points over and over and over. Ezra makes a compelling case for why the Human Rights Commissions need to be either radically reformed or abolished. They have become self-propagating bureaucratic beasts that look for a reason to exist. If you have not followed this issue in the past then the book is well worth a read just to inform yourself on the topic.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    This is an eye opening book about Human Rights Councils in Canada. The goal of which is to stamp out hate speech and other forms of discrimination. The author explains what they are and how they work. He chronicles his battle over his right as a publisher to make his own decisions about what to print. It is extremely enlightening if not expecially relevant to us in the United States, or is it?

  19. 4 out of 5

    R

    Canadian, timely, and outrageous. Incompetent and corrupt kangaroo courts in Canada are egregiously violating civil rights in the name of "human rights". I read this book straight through in one very long evening, and I very rarely do that with a book over 200 pages long. Canadian, timely, and outrageous. Incompetent and corrupt kangaroo courts in Canada are egregiously violating civil rights in the name of "human rights". I read this book straight through in one very long evening, and I very rarely do that with a book over 200 pages long.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Wow. This book had my jaw dropping open several times while reading it. It's truly shocking what Human Rights Tribunals have been getting away with in Canada. This book is a must-read for all Canadians. Wow. This book had my jaw dropping open several times while reading it. It's truly shocking what Human Rights Tribunals have been getting away with in Canada. This book is a must-read for all Canadians.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Adam Corsaut

    An insightful and disturbing history of Canada's human rights commissions, which through left wing politics and government growth have become the greatest threat to many of the rights the institution was built to protect. An insightful and disturbing history of Canada's human rights commissions, which through left wing politics and government growth have become the greatest threat to many of the rights the institution was built to protect.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shamel Hosni

    Author makes surprising revelations about the tyrannical Human Rights Commissions (HRC) in Canada. His steadfast refusal to bow out has helped expose the HRC farce. I am of the opinion that HRCs be rendered obsolete and let real courts handle any human rights claims.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rochelle

    Ezra lacks credibility at times and because he's so hyper-partisan it made fact-checking and second-guessing necessary. I would have enjoyed the book more if he was a little less obvious about his axe to grind and trusted the reader to come to her own conclusions once in a while. Ezra lacks credibility at times and because he's so hyper-partisan it made fact-checking and second-guessing necessary. I would have enjoyed the book more if he was a little less obvious about his axe to grind and trusted the reader to come to her own conclusions once in a while.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mariaf

    A must read for every Canadian.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Taylor

    Shocking violations of freedom of speech.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Slomp

    WOW. What happened to due process and our legal rights? This book is a must read for every Canadian. Even if you don't agree with Levant's politics you will agree with his synopsis of the CHRT. WOW. What happened to due process and our legal rights? This book is a must read for every Canadian. Even if you don't agree with Levant's politics you will agree with his synopsis of the CHRT.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sean Maguire

    Should be required reading for all Canadians - Levant truly is On Guard for us in Shakedown.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    An interesting book concerning Canadian Human Rights Commissions and some of the "powers" that they have (had?). At the very least, it is thought provoking. It is a worthwhile read. An interesting book concerning Canadian Human Rights Commissions and some of the "powers" that they have (had?). At the very least, it is thought provoking. It is a worthwhile read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A little out of date now so this has been discussed ad nauseam in the press but still a great read

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Must Read for Conservative.

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