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Whose side are you on? The Marvel Universe is changing. In the wake of a tragedy, Capitol Hill proposes the Superhero Registration Act, requiring all costumed heroes to unmask themselves before the government. Divided, the nation's greatest champions must each decide how to react - a decision that will alter the course of their lives forever! Collecting Civil War #1-7, Marve Whose side are you on? The Marvel Universe is changing. In the wake of a tragedy, Capitol Hill proposes the Superhero Registration Act, requiring all costumed heroes to unmask themselves before the government. Divided, the nation's greatest champions must each decide how to react - a decision that will alter the course of their lives forever! Collecting Civil War #1-7, Marvel Spotlight: Civil War and Civil War Script Book.


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Whose side are you on? The Marvel Universe is changing. In the wake of a tragedy, Capitol Hill proposes the Superhero Registration Act, requiring all costumed heroes to unmask themselves before the government. Divided, the nation's greatest champions must each decide how to react - a decision that will alter the course of their lives forever! Collecting Civil War #1-7, Marve Whose side are you on? The Marvel Universe is changing. In the wake of a tragedy, Capitol Hill proposes the Superhero Registration Act, requiring all costumed heroes to unmask themselves before the government. Divided, the nation's greatest champions must each decide how to react - a decision that will alter the course of their lives forever! Collecting Civil War #1-7, Marvel Spotlight: Civil War and Civil War Script Book.

30 review for Civil War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    Interesting. A reality type show with super heroes puts the real super heroes in a bad place in the public eye. Leading to politics getting involved. Boo hiss! I'm tired of political shit right now. You have one side led by Tony Stark and Reid Richards wanting to support the public's opinion that superheroes should go on the payroll, with no secret identities. Then Captain America steps up for the other side. Hmm.. I kinda always thought he was kinda bland until now. Not a bad read at all. I' Interesting. A reality type show with super heroes puts the real super heroes in a bad place in the public eye. Leading to politics getting involved. Boo hiss! I'm tired of political shit right now. You have one side led by Tony Stark and Reid Richards wanting to support the public's opinion that superheroes should go on the payroll, with no secret identities. Then Captain America steps up for the other side. Hmm.. I kinda always thought he was kinda bland until now. Not a bad read at all. I'm #TeamCap Carmen's review brought this book to my attention. Thank you Carmen!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    So beautiful, and so sad. This deluxe tricked-out edition offers you so much. Not only the collected comics, but interviews with the creators, a bunch of "newspapers" that would have run in the Marvel Universe as Civil War was going down, sketches, scripts, ideal casting choices (before Marvel was a movie hound, obviously - for instance, they suggest Brad Pitt as Cap and Johnny Depp as Tony Stark). Tons of good stuff in here. This is inherently depressing, I mean, of course we want to see our hero So beautiful, and so sad. This deluxe tricked-out edition offers you so much. Not only the collected comics, but interviews with the creators, a bunch of "newspapers" that would have run in the Marvel Universe as Civil War was going down, sketches, scripts, ideal casting choices (before Marvel was a movie hound, obviously - for instance, they suggest Brad Pitt as Cap and Johnny Depp as Tony Stark). Tons of good stuff in here. This is inherently depressing, I mean, of course we want to see our heroes have snuggling instead of killing each other, but it's very good nonetheless. Very different from the film. Tl;dr - Gorgeous book, definitely worth reading. You could read this dozens of times and still discover new stuff.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I feel like I was supposed to love this series. It's been out for 8 years at this point, and I've heard almost nothing but good things about it. I don't know why it took me so long to finally get to it in the first place. But, all told, I found it to be pretty lacking, both in logic and character. First, the logic. I feel like Millar was SO CLOSE to writing a fantastic, divisive, actual political commentary in the guise of a superhero book. The Superhero Registration Act serves as a solid stand-i I feel like I was supposed to love this series. It's been out for 8 years at this point, and I've heard almost nothing but good things about it. I don't know why it took me so long to finally get to it in the first place. But, all told, I found it to be pretty lacking, both in logic and character. First, the logic. I feel like Millar was SO CLOSE to writing a fantastic, divisive, actual political commentary in the guise of a superhero book. The Superhero Registration Act serves as a solid stand-in for the Patriot Act (at least at first), and poses some hard questions about who's right and wrong in terms of sacrificing some freedoms for greater national security. However, the pro-Registration group seem like, um, psychopaths? After about two issues, Tony Stark, Reed Richards, Peter Parker and every other hero on that side seem to lose their damn minds. They become incredibly unethical, violent, and throw all of their prior friendships and associations in the garbage in favor of a political movement. If you're like me and you've been reading related comics that lead up to Civil War, this seems particularly crazy, as everyone gets along so well. This leads me to my second-largest problem with the series: we spend zero time with any single character outside of a fight or the planning of a fight. This series reads like a Wikipedia entry of the events, rather than a humanized story about them. It's just "A fight happened. Then another one. And then this press conference. And then it ended!" The utter sea change happening in this book should be leading its characters to the breaking point, but instead of showing any of this, people just keep punching each other. Also, the escalation is just too fast. While the book is highly readable and full of action, there's too much of it. We go from thing to thing to thing so fast we can't even stop to catch our breath or live in the moments. This is especially prevalent in the finale, when a massive, all-encompassing Marvel Universe fight plays out in just a few pages, then just grinds to a halt and is over on a single page. It's also clear in Tony Stark and Captain America's relationship, which falls apart so fast that it seems like they never even were friends to begin with. It's an unfortunate oversight. The repercussions of Civil War, and the debate at its core, are very interesting. The art brings these fights to big, violent life, and overall this feels like you're watching a very rapidly-edited movie. But, I just felt let down. I wanted this to feel more important somehow. Maybe the supplemental material will, but this is the central series. It should've rocked the Marvel Universe to its foundations, but instead just felt like a minor bump in the road.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Holden Attradies

    This really was amazing. Yes, there is a lot to critique, but let me set that aside because I think near 100% of the critiques are more critiques of this medium/genre (Super hero comic books published in a monthly manner). For a story set in the Marvel universe with a plot that by definition effects all super-hero's in the Marvel universe to be told from "start" to "finish" in just seven (SEVEN!) issues, one graphic novel, it was amazing. The plot was great, the story was great, and the art was This really was amazing. Yes, there is a lot to critique, but let me set that aside because I think near 100% of the critiques are more critiques of this medium/genre (Super hero comic books published in a monthly manner). For a story set in the Marvel universe with a plot that by definition effects all super-hero's in the Marvel universe to be told from "start" to "finish" in just seven (SEVEN!) issues, one graphic novel, it was amazing. The plot was great, the story was great, and the art was incredibly stunning. Put aside the story for a moment and just look at the art. Every panel of every page is incredible. As someone who dabbled in being a professional "artist" I have to say just about every page of this is better than 99% of the art I saw hang on studio and gallery walls. Having over the last 6 months read many of the Marvel essentials that cover the first decade of the Marvel universe and comparing the art to this: it's stunning. The leaps comic art has made since the 60's are so amazing. Not just the quality of pictures, but all the other things that make up the art of comics. The page layout, the use of full page spreads, the placement of word bubbles. Hell, the ability to convey the action simply with the pictures and not have a need for 3-4 sentences of narration in each panel alone is incredible. McNiven takes so much to that next level. He manages on at least every three pages to convey a facial expression so clear and stunning not even three paragraphs of dialog or narration could equal it. The story was good too, and it dealt well with some heavy things. Although the idea of legally organizing "masks" isn't new (Watchmen did it the best), this dealt with it in an amazing manner within the reference of the Marvel universe. I thought the story did a good job of showing the moral ambiguity of the situation, and how whether one side was right or really really did, as Stephen Strange put it, "come down to a matter of perspective". I've seen and heard a lot of people complain about the end. That it was to abrupt and felt like a cop-out. At first I felt that way to, but I've realized two things. 1)It's a comic so most stories never have a clear end, only a set up for more story. This very much played out that way in the following years since it's release. It's just part of the genre/medium and I accept it as par for the course in Super hero comics, especially one's that are pretty reliant on keeping the story going indefinitely (could watchmen have had such a clear ending if it had been part of a larger universe published in a manner that required it and it's characters to continue month after month indefinitely they way most marvel comics are set up?). 2)Captain America quite for they right reasons, and his reasoning for giving up in the end make perfect sense and were not a cop out. They WERE no longer fighting about ideas, but about ideology. When you fight over ideology in a lot of ways it stops even being about the ideas of the ideology, your just fighting because those guys over there are "other". Xenophobia is one of the most common human instincts, the fear of anything that is "other" is one of our species largest down falls. For a moment there Cap saw that and accepted the compromises it takes to live in the large, diverse, interconnected community we call "our" world (or at least his fictional reflection of it)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kaisersoze

    I can imagine this being the most skirt-blowing-up/pants-tenting event in the history of comic books if you were a major comic book fan, but for this little black duck, who has read The Walking Dead and Y: The Last Man, gave up on Morning Glories and has read a bunch of Aliens and Predator comics, it was pretty much just okay. But when you only recognise about a third of the cast by appearance and were relying on other people to say the rest of the characters's names to know who they were, you k I can imagine this being the most skirt-blowing-up/pants-tenting event in the history of comic books if you were a major comic book fan, but for this little black duck, who has read The Walking Dead and Y: The Last Man, gave up on Morning Glories and has read a bunch of Aliens and Predator comics, it was pretty much just okay. But when you only recognise about a third of the cast by appearance and were relying on other people to say the rest of the characters's names to know who they were, you know you're not the target audience, and you go back to watching the films instead. One thing I will say before I depart: the artwork in this was excellent. 3 Nasty Thors for Civil War.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Forsyth

    In preparation for the new movie, I gave this a re-read over the last week or so. CIVIL WAR is one of the few "events" comics which stands both the test of time and the "can I read just this title and not feel utterly confused" test. Writer Mark Millar tells a complete story here, while still hinting at a larger subtext that you can explore outside of the main book. This edition also gets big points from me for the exhaustive bonus content, which really gets into how a title like this is planned In preparation for the new movie, I gave this a re-read over the last week or so. CIVIL WAR is one of the few "events" comics which stands both the test of time and the "can I read just this title and not feel utterly confused" test. Writer Mark Millar tells a complete story here, while still hinting at a larger subtext that you can explore outside of the main book. This edition also gets big points from me for the exhaustive bonus content, which really gets into how a title like this is planned across so many creative and corporate voices (and gives Joss Whedon his due).

  7. 5 out of 5

    morgan

    Reading this made me sad. I understood Tony and Cap's views, but I didn't agree with the registration. With super heroes being registered, then any of their enemies can find them and their families. I didn't think it was right of Tony to team up with the bad guys, like Venom. I understand having super heroes being held accountable but at what cost? Reading this made me sad. I understood Tony and Cap's views, but I didn't agree with the registration. With super heroes being registered, then any of their enemies can find them and their families. I didn't think it was right of Tony to team up with the bad guys, like Venom. I understand having super heroes being held accountable but at what cost?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    I read this every year with my students in Comic Books as Lit. It’s meh, but they wanted some Marvel, so this they got. It is about time to cycle it out though. It is an obvious crossover cash grab, and we spend most of the time looking at it as an example of that. It was the first book that made me think Captain America was cool though, so there’s that.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Noah King

    Probably holds up?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Lahn

    One of my favorite Marvel events, possibly because it was the first Marvel story I read. For me it will always represent a point near (if not quite the exact point) where Marvel comics entered the modern era. (I think the true start would lie with Avengers Disassembled, or possibly as early as Ultimate Spider-Man). Anyways, after Civil War everything changed in the Marvel Universe, and nothing that comes after (at least until The Heroic Age) makes sense without first reading this. I recently retu One of my favorite Marvel events, possibly because it was the first Marvel story I read. For me it will always represent a point near (if not quite the exact point) where Marvel comics entered the modern era. (I think the true start would lie with Avengers Disassembled, or possibly as early as Ultimate Spider-Man). Anyways, after Civil War everything changed in the Marvel Universe, and nothing that comes after (at least until The Heroic Age) makes sense without first reading this. I recently returned by paperback copy and ordered the hardcover instead, and I was thrilled to discover that the hardcover not only includes the complete series, it also includes the Civil War script book, which contains the final scripts of all 7 issues with commentary by the author, artist, and editorial team. I'm really excited to read through all that extra content!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hugh

    Start - This is a massive hard cover book (just like I like). The story is strong and the action starts right away. So far it's much better than Final Crisis (DC Universe) which was too hard for me to follow. Finish - The story was shorter than I expected and the book ended with a whimper...a little bit of a disappointment. There is a lot of filler in the end of the book that a dyed in the wool comic fan may treasure. I'd gladly trade the artwork and interviews for more story. It does not measure u Start - This is a massive hard cover book (just like I like). The story is strong and the action starts right away. So far it's much better than Final Crisis (DC Universe) which was too hard for me to follow. Finish - The story was shorter than I expected and the book ended with a whimper...a little bit of a disappointment. There is a lot of filler in the end of the book that a dyed in the wool comic fan may treasure. I'd gladly trade the artwork and interviews for more story. It does not measure up to "The Ultimates" (my current benchmark for hardcover comics).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anita Fajita Pita

    I really loved this story. It pulled me to pieces watching superheroes fight superheroes and superheroes employing villains. Watching a community of good guys fall apart and split over differing views is easily applicable to American politics (in my opinion). Seeing their arguments and stances shift over time and events, the reasoning behind their views, and how it all ended up was really a rollercoaster. I thoroughly loved it, and it makes me want to follow up on this arc when I had just intend I really loved this story. It pulled me to pieces watching superheroes fight superheroes and superheroes employing villains. Watching a community of good guys fall apart and split over differing views is easily applicable to American politics (in my opinion). Seeing their arguments and stances shift over time and events, the reasoning behind their views, and how it all ended up was really a rollercoaster. I thoroughly loved it, and it makes me want to follow up on this arc when I had just intended to do a one shot at the TPB.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ronetta (Peaches)

    Amending my review on 12.29.2014: This graphic novel has been on my mind since I finished it so I think it deserves a better rating than my initial rating. While I do not like the ending, I really like the artwork and story arc.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    I enjoyed reading this compilation. I also liked the 'Easter Eggs' to be found in it [i.e. - the extra materials to expand upon the storyline, including interviews with the author and the artist]. I felt it moved at a pretty good clip. I was not a big fan of the artwork, but I do think the artist has improved [overall] each time I see new work he has done. The basic plot is that the American public has grown tired of being victimized by costumed vigilantes battling criminals with impunity and not I enjoyed reading this compilation. I also liked the 'Easter Eggs' to be found in it [i.e. - the extra materials to expand upon the storyline, including interviews with the author and the artist]. I felt it moved at a pretty good clip. I was not a big fan of the artwork, but I do think the artist has improved [overall] each time I see new work he has done. The basic plot is that the American public has grown tired of being victimized by costumed vigilantes battling criminals with impunity and not being held accountable for their actions when people are injured or killed. The premise on how it all starts is somewhat funny, yet probably pathetic in that it 'could happen' based on today's society and the search for one's 'fifteen minutes of fame.' A batch of C-list heroes go after some super villains to arrest them for a TV reality show. It backfires, and over six hundred people die, mostly children at a nearby public school. The deaths of so many young victims is the catalyst for cries of change to occur in how the super hero community conducts itself. Iron Man turns out to be 'pro registration', and Captain America is 'anti registration.' I always felt like they had the two heroes on the wrong sides of this turf fight. Captain America is usually portrayed as standing up for the common man, so it would make more sense that he would want the common man to be protected from out-of-control heroes. However, that is not the case in this series. Tony Stark was always more 'don't touch my stuff' and went to war with various agencies [including the American government] over what he perceived as unlicensed use of his armor and his designs. So it would have made more sense for Tony to be anti-registration and Cap to be pro-registration. As much as I enjoyed the series, on the one hand, I was also very disappointed with it. I felt like it could have addressed some weighty issues amongst the superhero set; instead, it devolved into heroes and former teammates bludgeoning each other and forgetting why they donned the cape and mask in the first place. There were some great lines throughout the course of the series, like when Mariah Hill and Cap were disagreeing over what constitutes a criminal [so interesting/pathetic how Cap's definition changed to fit this 'big event' series]. I think it was funny how this series made Captain America, Luke Cage, the Falcon, and some other heroes look like jerks whereas in the majority of the other comic titles tying into this series, Tony was made to look like a complete and total jerk. A lot of people hated Tony [as a character] because of this series and how he was portrayed in the other titles. Both sides had some great points in terms of their beliefs and their stances, but I think the pro-registration group had more validity and legitimacy than those opposing the law. Even though I am not a big fan of McNiven's artwork, I think he did do an adequate job at times of expressing the madness in Cap's eyes as he opposed the law and his former friends. I felt like the 'scene' where he glares at Spider-Man after Spidey compares the Punisher to Cap was tremendous in its effect. I really had a hard time 'liking' Captain America after this series, and he had been one of my favorite comic book characters for a long, long, long time prior to this series. I think the idea was a great idea and worth exploring; it was poorly executed. Americans will demand laws be passed in which they are willing to give up some freedom[s] for more security even today. I can firmly believe that if there were super-powered beings running around amok, the government would not hesitate to step in to attempt to protect the citizens by requiring meta-humans to register with the government and to be trained to use their powers responsibly. Instead of truly exploring the ramifications of this law, the book turned into a bizarre super-hero slugfest where heroes fought heroes at the expense of the common man. Steve Rogers finally has his epiphany [of a sort] and realizes he is in the wrong when he is attacked by some 'common people' trying to protect Tony Stark from further pummeling by Captain America. I did feel like the ending was a bit of a cop-out. To have the anti-registration 'forces' winning until Captain America chooses to surrender seemed pretty weak to me. It seemed 'weak' to me because the pro-registration forces had the Sentry on their team, and technically there is no force on Earth that would be able to match him in battle. He could have cleaned up the anti-registration forces by himself without raising a sweat. Ah, well. I really 'hated' the character changes that went into this series. I will say this - some of those changes seemed to adversely affect the characters for some time afterwards. So this was one 'event' that had a lasting impact [of sorts] upon the Marvel U for quite some time after it was over. At the same time, it seemed like the hard feelings that occurred between some characters in this series were all-too easily forgotten in subsequent storylines. It also introduced some definitely questionable tactics used by both parties; however, some these murky tactics were quickly forgotten after the series was over. One of these questionable tactics involved a clone of Thor being created. It went haywire and killed a superhero on the anti-registration side. Cap agrees to a truce with Tony and then, after violating that truce, accuses Tony of being untrustworthy. Yet it was Cap who initially betrayed the trust. I cannot stress enough how much I hated how this series turned Captain America into a bitter, angry old man who was so blinded by his own fanaticism that he failed to see the damage he was causing by his actions until it was almost too late. I know I am in a minority opinion in this, but I really felt like Cap's portrayal in this series was antithetical to his character prior to this point. It was quite disappointing. The authors seemed to delight in making Cap look like a complete and total [email protected]$$ throughout the course of the story. For instance, in the beginning of the series, Cap and Co. free the Young Avengers from police custody. In the process, they cause at least three police cruisers to be involved in a catastrophic crash with other vehicles on the Interstate. So we have two heroes injuring law enforcement during a jail break freeing other heroes from police custody. No mention is ever made of the officers or civilians injured [or killed] during this crash, and Cap never shows any remorse for the damage or injuries his actions incurred. Yet Cap and his crew are held up as the moral equivalent/opposite of the pro-registration group. It boggles my brain. Sadly, the 'results' of this storyline were essentially wiped out after the 'Siege' storyline occurred [and Captain America went from being dead to being 'Top Cop' in America] [the Registration Act was repealed, for some bizarre reason, of which none were given]. Despite my disgust with how aspects of this storyline were handled, I still greatly enjoy reading this compilation. The 'extras' in the hardbound edition made it more than worthwhile. ------------------------------------------------- I just finished reading the 'Captain America' omnibus by Ed Brubaker [collecting vol. 5#'s 1-25 in it], so I am going to include some of my thoughts about that series in this review, as the two tie in together. After having reread 'Civil War' and then rereading this, I cannot help but wonder how much ahead of time Brubaker knew about what was going to happen with the 'Civil War' series and began laying that foundation in this series. For instance, Philadelphia is partially destroyed by a bomb, and the public knows that metahumans were involved in this act of terrorism. Yet I do not remember any mention of this act of terror being mentioned in any of the other Marvel series out at the time. Then we have a blurb about how Congress is considering legislation to force metahumans to register with the government. Finally, metahumans are involved in a melee that destroys a large swath of London and places in danger a number of government officials. So in addition to Stamford we have the foundation put in place of the SHRA to be enacted by Congress. Of course people are going to demand the government take action to protect the general population in light of such activity! There is a scene in the Captain America omnibus where Bucky and Nick Fury are talking about the SHRA. I think Fury's comparing the SHRA with either Nazi Germany or the Communists in Russia to be a bit extreme. Nick claimed 'that's not the America I fought for,' which I also think it is a bit hypocritical, as America interned [imprisoned] Japanese-Americans during WWII for 'protection' as this segment of society was viewed as being even less trustworthy than German-Americans and Italian-Americans. The SHRA required metahumans to register with the government; if they wanted to 'serve' [i.e. - stop crimes, enforce the laws] they would be expected to undergo training so that they could safely control their powers and to be held accountable for their mistakes if negligence was involved. Otherwise, they could not use their powers to enforce the law [as in, get involved in super-powered melees]. Realistically and legally, these costumed characters are technically breaking the law by battling metahuman criminals; we also know that characters like Daredevil and Batman are not above using force and terror to make people talk. In addition, despite their claims of being 'morally right,' they are still attempting to force their interpretation of the law and how it should be enforced upon the criminals they battle. This is not really any different than what they complained the government wanted to do with the SHRA. I thought it funny how the three issues directly tying into the Civil War series did not seem to focus exclusively on Captain America. It was like his character was hijacked for the miniseries, and he had to 'take a bye' in his series to star in the miniseries. There was a lot going on in the C.A. comics by this point, so I am impressed that Brubaker was able to tie it in so well with the Civil War series [which makes me think he knew about it well before his run reached the point where it was going to have to tie into the Civil War 'event'. Cap definitely seemed more level-headed in his own series when he showed up than how he was portrayed in the Civil War series itself. Anyway. A great idea that was poorly executed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Omnibuster

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I recommend reading this if you’re doing a comprehensive read of Bendis’ New Avengers run. This takes place after NA #20. This run reminds me of today’s political landscape where two main figures are so planted in their beliefs that they both become unlikeable. Apparently, “Civil War” literally divides fans upon release because of how Millar made Tony and Cap look. I read issues 1-7 to get an idea of what’s going on since this is yet another event that affects the New Avengers run like Disassemb I recommend reading this if you’re doing a comprehensive read of Bendis’ New Avengers run. This takes place after NA #20. This run reminds me of today’s political landscape where two main figures are so planted in their beliefs that they both become unlikeable. Apparently, “Civil War” literally divides fans upon release because of how Millar made Tony and Cap look. I read issues 1-7 to get an idea of what’s going on since this is yet another event that affects the New Avengers run like Disassembled and House of M. There are still many gaps to fill with several characters but you will get a sense of the entire event. Spider-Man seems to have the most interesting arc out of the main characters and as always represents the reader in the universe. He flips sides and changes his beliefs based on certain instances during the event. I would recommend reading this in conjunction with NA #s 21-25 and look up the reading order to make it read more smoothly. I really wanna pick up the slipcase for this and read all the tie-ins.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I kind of can't believe it took me so long to read this, but I finally did it, and I was pretty impressed overall. It's hard not to compare it to the MCU version and I think there are things that both did better and worse. As much as I adore Spider-Man being very firmly Team Iron Man in the films, the flip that he does in this comic fits his character a lot more and brings a lot of poignancy to the story. His Iron Spider suit in this is WAY cooler, though. The movie using the Winter Solider back I kind of can't believe it took me so long to read this, but I finally did it, and I was pretty impressed overall. It's hard not to compare it to the MCU version and I think there are things that both did better and worse. As much as I adore Spider-Man being very firmly Team Iron Man in the films, the flip that he does in this comic fits his character a lot more and brings a lot of poignancy to the story. His Iron Spider suit in this is WAY cooler, though. The movie using the Winter Solider backstory definitely makes you feel a lot more sympathy for Tony but I think even in the comic I'm still pretty firmly on his side (yeah, I know). I don't agree with everything he says/does, but Cap is just so naive and stubborn and it's a little infuriating. I loved the Fantastic Four storyline, especially with the introduction of my favourite angry ocean man, Namor. Along those lines it was also cool to see how other Marvel characters that aren't in the MCU fit into this story, like Daredevil and the Punisher and the X-Men.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Shay

    Not quite as impactful as a novel can be, when you can use written description to dig into emotion. But I gave this the same rating as the novel version, so regardless of the format, the fact remains that the idea is really neat. I wish the MCU could have stayed a bit closer to this and involved more characters. I did like how the novel pulled in more from the other one-off comics, though. This is the main storyline and there's so many characters you just can't fit it all in in a comic, meaning Not quite as impactful as a novel can be, when you can use written description to dig into emotion. But I gave this the same rating as the novel version, so regardless of the format, the fact remains that the idea is really neat. I wish the MCU could have stayed a bit closer to this and involved more characters. I did like how the novel pulled in more from the other one-off comics, though. This is the main storyline and there's so many characters you just can't fit it all in in a comic, meaning you have to read several books to get the whole picture instead of just the one novel.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gerry Sacco

    Very good. The art is great, story is solid. This was the comic that changed how I felt about Iron Man forever, and also made me appreciate Spider-Man more. If you ever thought Captain America doesn’t have depth, this is a good trade comic to start with. Really shows his range as a hero.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthias

    I was really excited to finally read this. It was good, but somewhat disappointing. There was little depth in the story, and each individual issue was unnecessarily short, in my opinion. They had a golden opportunity to delve into deeper issues, but for some reason decided not to.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erik Billings

    Fun read. Miss reading comic books like when I was a kid

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sjors

    This is the event that changes everything. From here on out all heroes will be divided. But how will they cope with this ultimate shift in power?

  22. 5 out of 5

    strawberry!

    tbh... badass as hell. the stevetony event (divorce) of the decade.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cosmin Agafitei

    A great event.

  24. 4 out of 5

    J'aime

    Civil War opens with a horrific event. A team of teen heroes, working on a reality tv show, go after some villains way beyond their capability. A school full of children is destroyed when the Nitro unleashes an enormous explosion. In the wake of the tragedy, the US government responds to public pressure by passing the Superhero Registration Act (SHRA) - all superpowered people must now register with, work for, and be accountable to, the Federal government. This Act divides the heroes for and aga Civil War opens with a horrific event. A team of teen heroes, working on a reality tv show, go after some villains way beyond their capability. A school full of children is destroyed when the Nitro unleashes an enormous explosion. In the wake of the tragedy, the US government responds to public pressure by passing the Superhero Registration Act (SHRA) - all superpowered people must now register with, work for, and be accountable to, the Federal government. This Act divides the heroes for and against the law: Tony Stark's Iron Man in support of it, and Captain America in opposition to it. The creators of Civil War tried keep the story from being black and white. There's supposed to be no "villain," just two groups divided over opinion. However, I don't think they fully succeeded in doing so. Tony is not evil, but he is WRONG. Cap's people are technically criminals, breaking the law. But, just because a law exists does not make it right or just. The government sanctioned internment camps for Japanese citizens during WWII, and Prohibition seemed like a good idea. But, people are trading freedom for security (something the Civil War writers specifically mention in the commentary). Though Cap is on the wrong side of the law, it is Tony's pro-SHRA side that makes the morally questionable decisions - like cloning Thor and forcing/using supervillains to hunt down Cap and his colleagues. The writers tried to paint Tony as making a difficult choice because he believes in it. Instead, it was more like acting out of guilt and ego; losing the adulation of the public was as horrific for him as the innocent deaths. Tony, unlike many heroes, is shielded from the more severe consequences of the SHRA. He's still rich; he'll not be the hero on street that has to be licensed to break up a mugging. He (and Reed) will run things from inside the ivory tower; they will still exercise power. I don't think Tony came off as a villain, but I do think he came across as weak and cowardly. He's a futurist, but it is always a future he builds and controls. For Cap, popularity has never been a goal, or even a benefit. He fights for what is right, and it is wrong to force people to work for the government because of gifts/skills they possess. Should all expert marksmen have to join the military? Or geniuses forced to work in government labs? Taking away freedom may provide security, but then you have the House of M. I do feel the writers stayed true to the characters. Cap and Tony's thoughts and actions make sense, as do their allies (even to some side-switching). Further, the conclusion was the only one that could work. ***SPOILER*** Registration has to prevail, or the crossover would have been meaningless; the status quo would not have changed. Civil War is downright depressing at moments, seeing these heroes fight their friends, but it is also a superb piece of writing. I look forward to seeing how the chips fall in the Marvel Universe. The first half of the Civil War hardcover collection is the main event. The second half of the collection has bonus materials which include: an interview with the creators, some fake newspaper articles and headlines covering the Registration act, as well as the full script of Civil War. The script section was especially enlightening as it includes commentary from the creators interspersed throughout. Readers learn why certain things unfolded as they did, why some panels were drawn the way they were, and more importantly, what the creators feel Cap and Tony were thinking during the story. Overall, this event was downright amazing and I look forward to reading the tie-ins. Highly recommended!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    Re-read. Civil War collects issues #1-7 of Civil War (basically all the main issues for the Event) and is about the war between Iron Man's pro-Registration Act-turned-Law side and Captain America's pro-Civil Liberties side that comes about due to minor league superheroes taking on supervillains above their power grade and causing an explosion in a suburban area that kills a bunch of children. I have such a problem with Mark Millar because I think, as a human being, he is awful, but as a comic book Re-read. Civil War collects issues #1-7 of Civil War (basically all the main issues for the Event) and is about the war between Iron Man's pro-Registration Act-turned-Law side and Captain America's pro-Civil Liberties side that comes about due to minor league superheroes taking on supervillains above their power grade and causing an explosion in a suburban area that kills a bunch of children. I have such a problem with Mark Millar because I think, as a human being, he is awful, but as a comic book writer he is one of the best. So every time I praise him, it kind of hurts my soul. Nevertheless, the plot is great and Millar has no problem pulling some (view spoiler)[deaths or cloned Thors (hide spoiler)] . Each character's motivation is believable and pretty true to who they are. A fascinating look at what civil liberties people will give up in order to attain a modicum of safety, which is just as applicable to the present as it was to 2006, or really any time post-9/11. As always, I have my homeboy Cap's back. The best characters in this story, personally, are Captain America, Spider-man and Sue Storm. The art is really good, but I am not really a fan of McNiven's style. I find that it's a bit too realistic for me and that unnerves me somewhat. I also don't like that he often draws a line across the cheeks which, instead of looking natural, looks like they have scars on their faces. The colouring and everything else is fantastic, with beautiful shading and colours. I really like how the panels are set up. The major issue with Civil War, and it's something that a lot of people always say, is that the ending is too abrupt; it doesn't feel like an organic ending, but like Millar shoved it into issue #7 just to get it over with, which is too bad because it's a very good story that evokes a lot of questions that are still pertinent today.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jenevieve

    A group of young wannabe superheroes tries to tackle some supervillians and the battle ends up killing several kids. Now the public is outraged and wants something done now! Tony Stark, aka Iron Man, works with the government and Reed Richards, aka Mr. Fantastic, to bring about registration and training for mutants and superheroes, to have superhero task forces in every state under government control. Not all the superheroes are in agreement with the proposal and perhaps the biggest surprise is A group of young wannabe superheroes tries to tackle some supervillians and the battle ends up killing several kids. Now the public is outraged and wants something done now! Tony Stark, aka Iron Man, works with the government and Reed Richards, aka Mr. Fantastic, to bring about registration and training for mutants and superheroes, to have superhero task forces in every state under government control. Not all the superheroes are in agreement with the proposal and perhaps the biggest surprise is that Captain America is completely against it. Now they are going against each other in the biggest civil war ever to decide the shape of their future. But who will win: Iron Man or Captain America? And do we even know who is in the right? Interesting idea and even more interesting to bring in everyone from the Marvel universe at some point in the books. Really interesting was who fell on which side of the issue and their reasons for it. The end wasn't a total surprise but the whole thing was engaging enough that I might continue reading a bit further to try and get some more backstory and see where things go. I'm not a huge fan of mainstream comics for a number of reasons, the biggest one being the lack of consistency in the worlds. Seventeen gazillion different Spiderman comics come out each month and each has "Spiderman" as the main character but the worlds are so different that it's not really the same person from comic to comic and it drives me nuts. Add in the different artistic styles (and I admit, I'm super fussy about what I like artistically from a comic and what I don't) and I tend to shy away but the artwork was good enough and the story well done to keep my interest for a bit longer.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rusty

    Now this is how you do an event comic. You know, when I was reading the secret invasion thing the other day, and kinda hating it, there was this point in the book, near the end, when several of the characters stood around and all started mentioning how so much of the invasion didn't make any sense. I'm not an expert or anything, but I try to write too, and I've found that whenever I have characters in my stories all standing around and asking questions like that to each other it means my story i Now this is how you do an event comic. You know, when I was reading the secret invasion thing the other day, and kinda hating it, there was this point in the book, near the end, when several of the characters stood around and all started mentioning how so much of the invasion didn't make any sense. I'm not an expert or anything, but I try to write too, and I've found that whenever I have characters in my stories all standing around and asking questions like that to each other it means my story is having some major problems, plotwise. Secret Invasion has some major issues. Which is why I'm so stunned at how well this one worked. It did a couple of things right that the Secret Invasion thing didn't. First, it focused on a few characters, namely Cap and Iron Man (with a little of Spider-Man in there too). Instead of every panel just being a different character saying, "Are you a Skrull? Am I?" No, this one was very well done. Right from the very beginning with the kid superhero group getting a whole school full of children blowed up, this was just a different class of storytelling. Really, really good. I've not read a ton of these event comics, but of the ones I have read, this is without a doubt the best. I liked it so much that I read all the annotated scripts that they put at the end too. Not the sort of thing I usually do. Great stuff there. Given that the art was about the best I've seen in some time as well, and this is a five star story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff McCormack

    When I first laid eyes on this massive large book, I was excited at the amount of issues and story it must contain. However, it turns out only about half of it is actual comic story line, the rest is like bonus features. Interviews with the writer, scripts, and additional information, most of which I did not stop to read in detail, but is probably nice to have for the hardcore fan. I did really enjoy the bonus sketches, variant covers and extra artwork, so that was a big plus. The story line itse When I first laid eyes on this massive large book, I was excited at the amount of issues and story it must contain. However, it turns out only about half of it is actual comic story line, the rest is like bonus features. Interviews with the writer, scripts, and additional information, most of which I did not stop to read in detail, but is probably nice to have for the hardcore fan. I did really enjoy the bonus sketches, variant covers and extra artwork, so that was a big plus. The story line itself is quite enjoyable. I had heard of the Civil War idea back when it came out, but was not following comics as much, but wondered whose side I might be on. Now, after reading it in great detail and understanding the issues, it really would be a tough decision. Both sides have excellent positions, so I can easily see why there was such a division. So, overall, I really enjoyed everything about this large volume, but especially the amazing artwork, story line, and some of the bonus features.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I don't usually like cross-over comics. They tend to be spawned by marketing for the totally cynical purpose of getting as many fans to buy it as possible by transplanting as many superheroes into it as possible despite the fact they bring virtually nothing to the story and little more than wallpaper in a lot of cases. This isn't that. This is good. I actually really liked this despite the fact I think Tony Stark is a prick and Captain America is a permanently dull goody-two-shoes. The concept o I don't usually like cross-over comics. They tend to be spawned by marketing for the totally cynical purpose of getting as many fans to buy it as possible by transplanting as many superheroes into it as possible despite the fact they bring virtually nothing to the story and little more than wallpaper in a lot of cases. This isn't that. This is good. I actually really liked this despite the fact I think Tony Stark is a prick and Captain America is a permanently dull goody-two-shoes. The concept of a civil war amongst the Marvel pantheon of superheroes is always fun but in the hands of a worse writer it could have been just a lot of fighting, a lot of things exploding and not much else. This is intelligently written, with identifiable and understandable reactions from all sides of the debate. It is the struggle between personal liberty and reasonable security. It's just framed in a superhero ultra-double-plus way.

  30. 4 out of 5

    SJ

    This book is a little deceptive, because the actual comics only take up about a third or less. The rest of it is interviews with the author, artists, and extras like several pages of newspaper articles to go along with the plot of the Marvel Civil War. To be honest, I haven't read all the extras yet, (although I'm interested to peruse those fake news articles), but I liked the main story pretty well, and I loved the art. Plus I bought it with a gift card, so I didn't really mind that it was so h This book is a little deceptive, because the actual comics only take up about a third or less. The rest of it is interviews with the author, artists, and extras like several pages of newspaper articles to go along with the plot of the Marvel Civil War. To be honest, I haven't read all the extras yet, (although I'm interested to peruse those fake news articles), but I liked the main story pretty well, and I loved the art. Plus I bought it with a gift card, so I didn't really mind that it was so heavy on extras and light on actual story content the way I might have if I had paid for it myself. This volume was recommended to me by a true comic book nerd when I asked what I should read with regard to the Civil War saga, as a starting point. Having finished it, I'm definitely interested to read some of the individual characters'side-stories to this arc.

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