counter create hit SHERLOCK HOLMES: The Complete Collection - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

SHERLOCK HOLMES: The Complete Collection

Availability: Ready to download

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - s Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases. He is arguably the most famous fictional detective ever created, and is one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters in any genre. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that featured Holmes. All but four stories were narrated by Holmes' friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson, two having been narrated by Holmes himself, and two others written in the third person. The first two stories, short novels, appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialized novels appeared almost right up to Conan Doyle's death in 1930. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1903, with a final case in 1914. This collection contains all the 60 official and the 6 unofficial Sherlock Holmes stories - in total 66 works (the biggest and greatest Sherlock Holmes collection in the eBook world).


Compare

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - s Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases. He is arguably the most famous fictional detective ever created, and is one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters in any genre. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that featured Holmes. All but four stories were narrated by Holmes' friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson, two having been narrated by Holmes himself, and two others written in the third person. The first two stories, short novels, appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialized novels appeared almost right up to Conan Doyle's death in 1930. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1903, with a final case in 1914. This collection contains all the 60 official and the 6 unofficial Sherlock Holmes stories - in total 66 works (the biggest and greatest Sherlock Holmes collection in the eBook world).

30 review for SHERLOCK HOLMES: The Complete Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Caz (littlebookowl)

    Rating: 3.5-3.75 stars?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Beata

    Ten stars would be too few for A C Doyle in the interpretation of Stephen Fry ... two Masters meet ..... and give delight to readers ......

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gio Listmaker

    Stephen Fry Narrates Sherlock Holmes The Characters Come To Life The Different Voices Are Amazing Highly Recommend Stephen Fry Narrates Sherlock Holmes The Characters Come To Life The Different Voices Are Amazing Highly Recommend

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katerina

    Amazing narration of (mostly) amazing stories. This is a great listen and a splendid investment of one 15-dollar Audible credit:) It's wonderful to get to reread Sherlock Holmes mysteries for the first time since secondary school and to find them still gripping and cool. Also, Fry's prefaces to each volume is a delight. Amazing narration of (mostly) amazing stories. This is a great listen and a splendid investment of one 15-dollar Audible credit:) It's wonderful to get to reread Sherlock Holmes mysteries for the first time since secondary school and to find them still gripping and cool. Also, Fry's prefaces to each volume is a delight.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael Perkins

    I've read these stories many times over the years. My first versions, which I bought in the 70's, were a set of paperbacks as a boxed set. Often I would take one of the paperbacks along to keep me company and entertain while in waiting rooms or at a hotel for a night. Eventually the paperback pages grew yellow and began to crumble, but I still have them. I do not usually read mysteries or thrillers, I prefer film or TV depictions, but Holmes has always been an exception. Stephen Fry is the perfe I've read these stories many times over the years. My first versions, which I bought in the 70's, were a set of paperbacks as a boxed set. Often I would take one of the paperbacks along to keep me company and entertain while in waiting rooms or at a hotel for a night. Eventually the paperback pages grew yellow and began to crumble, but I still have them. I do not usually read mysteries or thrillers, I prefer film or TV depictions, but Holmes has always been an exception. Stephen Fry is the perfect narrator and, as an accomplished writer in his own right, he has written lucid and informative introductions that he engagingly reads aloud as part of this package. I am new to audiobooks. There is a certain point in the evenings where my eyes tire and I have no interest in watching TV, so these audiobooks keep me company in the watches of the night. I also take them to bed where they help me drop off to sleep. I know the stories so well that I don't have to worry that I will miss anything important. As with audiobooks of Huckleberry Finn and Alice in Wonderland, I've learned to appreciate the Holmes stories in a new way. Though there is the classic dynamic of Holmes & Watson, Doyle's style is not the least bit formulaic. His is the perfect narrative voice for the short story. And it has made me realize why all attempts at imitation of Doyle have inevitably failed. Doyle was an entirely unique and gripping storyteller that one can go back to again and again. ---------- "We must begin in Baker Street; and best of all, if possible, let it be a stormy winter morning when Holmes routs Watson out of bed in haste. The doctor wakes to see that tall, ascetic figure by the bedside with a candle. "Come, Watson, come! The game is afoot!" (Christopher Morley)

  6. 5 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    Simply the best! (Except if you are listening to the US version of the Audible audiobook which, at the time of writing, is missing the final book in the Holmes canon...because of copyright reasons, apparently.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Auntie Terror

    What can I say? This was brilliant. [Prtf]

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Rose

    How does one review the complete anthology of Sherlock Holmes adventures? These classical works by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are such a huge part of contemporary literature that I find it difficult to convey my thoughts suitably. Nevertheless, as some who had never read Sherlock Holmes before, Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection was an amazing introduction; Stephen Fry did a brilliant job of immersing the reader in each of the adventures. As such, I believe that with 72 hours of Sherlockian How does one review the complete anthology of Sherlock Holmes adventures? These classical works by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle are such a huge part of contemporary literature that I find it difficult to convey my thoughts suitably. Nevertheless, as some who had never read Sherlock Holmes before, Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection was an amazing introduction; Stephen Fry did a brilliant job of immersing the reader in each of the adventures. As such, I believe that with 72 hours of Sherlockian magic, it goes without saying that this definitive collection is well worth a monthly credit. Although, if I am honest, I much preferred the short stories to the full-blown novels. I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this book to my fellow audio lovers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Between fact and fiction is a space where legend dwells. It is where Holmes and Watson will always live. ~ Stephen Fry Almost 72 glorious hours spent listening to the wonderful Stephen Fry bring Holmes and Watson to life can hardly be considered a waste of time. His love for these stories is so palpable, it makes even the most boring case a delight to listen to! I also really loved his personal introductions which sometimes explained the role Holmes has played in his own life, or philosophized o Between fact and fiction is a space where legend dwells. It is where Holmes and Watson will always live. ~ Stephen Fry Almost 72 glorious hours spent listening to the wonderful Stephen Fry bring Holmes and Watson to life can hardly be considered a waste of time. His love for these stories is so palpable, it makes even the most boring case a delight to listen to! I also really loved his personal introductions which sometimes explained the role Holmes has played in his own life, or philosophized on the impact Holmes and Watson have had on our culture and why we are so fascinated by them.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Grace (Fully Booked)

    I had read the complete Sherlock Holmes a couple times. First time when I was 12 year old, that was my summer vacation. Listening to Stephen Fry narrate made it exciting and new again for me. Also it is awesome that I saw the movie he was in as Mycroft.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cáitín

    I just love Sherlock Holmes and it was great to be able to set back and listen to Stephen Fry reading these stories and also given us some interesting information about the tales and Arthur Conan Doyle own private thoughts

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Beaumont

    It's not quite complete (the "Casebook" is omitted), but this is the best and liveliest narration of the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels I've ever heard. Stephen Fry does a brilliant job of it, and his introductions are fascinating. It's not quite complete (the "Casebook" is omitted), but this is the best and liveliest narration of the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels I've ever heard. Stephen Fry does a brilliant job of it, and his introductions are fascinating.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel England-Brassy

    A wonderful experience, despite the attitude towards women being of it's time and the stories also have overtures of racism too. Despite all that I still love them all. A wonderful experience, despite the attitude towards women being of it's time and the stories also have overtures of racism too. Despite all that I still love them all.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tara♥ {MindforBooks}

    Absolutely wonderful. Stephen Fry does an amazing job narrating this and his introductions to each book were a joy. I honestly think that this is a collection that everyone who loves audio books should consider adding to their library. I will add the disclaimer that I adore Stephen Fry though and would likely be happy with him reading the phone book. This however is not the phone book. It is the enigmatic Holmes and his Watson. I had some issues with various cases, mostly the sexism and racism t Absolutely wonderful. Stephen Fry does an amazing job narrating this and his introductions to each book were a joy. I honestly think that this is a collection that everyone who loves audio books should consider adding to their library. I will add the disclaimer that I adore Stephen Fry though and would likely be happy with him reading the phone book. This however is not the phone book. It is the enigmatic Holmes and his Watson. I had some issues with various cases, mostly the sexism and racism that belonged to the time. I was also sad to see the Holmes of the earlier works becoming more and more aggressive and uncooperative. It is very easy to see that the creator had grown tired of his creation. Overall though I really enjoyed this collection and I find I'm going to miss the man himself. Part 1 Chapter 1: Opening Credits and Introduction to A Study in Scarlet Chapters 2-15: A Study in Scarlet Chapter 16: Introduction to The Sign of Four Chapters 17-21: The Sign of Four, Part 1 6hrs 34mins Part 2 Chapters 1-7: The Sign of Four, Part 2 Chapter 8: Introduction to The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Chapters 9-21: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Part 1 13hrs 20mins Part 3 Chapter 1: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Part 2 Chapter 2: Introduction to The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes Chapters 3-14: The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes Chapter 15: Introduction to The Hound of the Baskervilles Chapters 16-21: The Hound of the Baskervilles, Part 1 13hrs 30mins Part 4 Chapters 1-9: The Hound of the Baskervilles, Part 2 Halfway point. Chapter 10: Introduction to The Return of Sherlock Holmes Chapters 11-21: The Return of Sherlock Holmes, Part 1 14hrs 7mins Part 5 Chapters 1-2: The Return of Sherlock Holmes, Part 2 Chapter 3: Introduction to The Valley of Fear Chapters 4-18: The Valley of Fear Chapter 19: Introduction to His Last Bow Chapters 20-21: His Last Bow, Part 1 9hrs 15mins Part 6 Chapters 1-7: His Last Bow, Part 2 Chapter 8: Introduction to The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes Chapters 9-20: The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes and Closing Credits 15hrs 8mins

  15. 4 out of 5

    A.M.

    2435 pages or in audio book, 71 hrs 58 mins. Let’s call it 72 hours. All four novels and five short story collections. A Study in Scarlet The Sign of Four The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes The Hound of the Baskervilles The Return of Sherlock Holmes The Valley of Fear His Last Bow The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes It even includes the only work written in third person pov [it was originally a stage play]. It is very odd to have things happening without Dr Watson there to descri 2435 pages or in audio book, 71 hrs 58 mins. Let’s call it 72 hours. All four novels and five short story collections. A Study in Scarlet The Sign of Four The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes The Hound of the Baskervilles The Return of Sherlock Holmes The Valley of Fear His Last Bow The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes It even includes the only work written in third person pov [it was originally a stage play]. It is very odd to have things happening without Dr Watson there to describe them to us. And another two that Holmes himself narrates for us: The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier and The Adventure of the Lion's Mane. In the Valley of Fear, Doyle writes what is basically an undercover cop story. Is it one of the first? The last set of stories from the Casebook, contain a few of the more unfamiliar elements: Holmes’ love of Turkish baths, the ‘come at once’ note, a bit more of his overt racism, and Sussex vampires. Ikr? [no… story brain] Racism is, sadly, a flavour of the time. I swear that volume has some of the better lines, as well. Some of the story ideas repeat but it is a set of work that had a real affect on the world. Changing police procedures, and generating Detective stories for all worlds and genres. The modern English police computer is called HOLMES. Of course it is. I love the way that often the servants know exactly what’s going on, but no one bothered to ask them. 72 hours is a lot of walking. But truthfully, it’s going very quickly. Fry is a brilliant narrator. I adored these books when I was a child and still have my hardback collection. I even covered them in clear plastic during my ‘I want to be a librarian’ phase. Yes, I wanted to be a librarian and an opera singer, as I recall. Weird kid. Damn, Fry - I’m walking 9km a day! In one story, The adventure of the Abbey Grange, he not only nails an Australian accent, he nails a SOUTH Australian accent. They’re different. He talks at length before each volume on how Holmes affected his own life. And I learned some things about Doyle as well. I did not know he was obsessed with magic and unexplained phenomena. It strikes me as most amusing that Doyle gave us the most clear headed and logical character; one who was so completely at odds with his own nature. Sadly, he was fleeced by such people. 5 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bart

    Sherlock Holmes stories are remarkable, and with Stephen Fry as narrator, it's a magical story! Sherlock Holmes stories are remarkable, and with Stephen Fry as narrator, it's a magical story!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    Sherlock Holmes is reliably good-not-great for me, and still worth the occasional nostalgic re-read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Muphyn

    This will take some time... 72 hours of Sherlock Holmes, phew. I expect that I'll have listened to most of these previously but Stephen Fry narrates them so deliciously and these stories never seem to get old that it'll be hours of audio fun. :) Wow, I've done it! 2 1/2 months and 73 hours later, I've listened to EVERY SINGLE SHERLOCK HOLMES story ever published! They are all deliciously ingenious, some more than others but it's amazing how 100 years later, they are still captivating and withstand This will take some time... 72 hours of Sherlock Holmes, phew. I expect that I'll have listened to most of these previously but Stephen Fry narrates them so deliciously and these stories never seem to get old that it'll be hours of audio fun. :) Wow, I've done it! 2 1/2 months and 73 hours later, I've listened to EVERY SINGLE SHERLOCK HOLMES story ever published! They are all deliciously ingenious, some more than others but it's amazing how 100 years later, they are still captivating and withstand the test of time. Of course, there are plenty of patriarchal ideas, some outdated stereotypes around femininity and such but the characters are incredibly resilient and entertain the reader/listener nonetheless. And Stephen Fry is an absolute delight to listen to. Half the time you forget that it's only one person creating all the different voices and characters. The introductions to each Sherlock Holmes volume is a nice touch, enjoyed that. * A Study in Scarlet ★★★★☆ * The Sign of Four ★★★★☆ * The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - A Scandal in Bohemia ★★★★☆ - The Adventure of the Red-Headed League ★★★☆☆ - A Case of Identity ★★★☆☆ - The Boscombe Valley Mystery ★★★★☆ - Five Orange Pips ★★★☆☆ - The Man with the Twisted Lip ★★★★☆ - The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle ★★★★☆ - The Adventure of the Speckled Band ★★★☆☆ - The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb ★★★☆☆ - The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor ★★★★☆ - The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet ★★★☆☆ - The Adventure of the Copper Beeches ★★★★☆ * The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    Brilliant read, Stephen does all the accents and makes the stories such a pleasure !

  20. 5 out of 5

    bookish_nessie

    Audiobook not finished. Completed: A Study in Scarlet ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ The Sign of Four ⭐⭐⭐ The Adventures of S. Holmes ⭐⭐⭐⭐ The Hound of Baskervilles ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ His Last Bow ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Stephen Fry's voice ✨✨✨✨✨ Audiobook not finished. Completed: A Study in Scarlet ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ The Sign of Four ⭐⭐⭐ The Adventures of S. Holmes ⭐⭐⭐⭐ The Hound of Baskervilles ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ His Last Bow ⭐⭐⭐⭐ Stephen Fry's voice ✨✨✨✨✨

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nancie Lafferty

    Masterful narration by Stephen Fry of a timeless set of detective stories. Thanks Audible for producing this wonderful experience - and free, even!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cloak88

    This here is a true literary classic! The Sherlock Holmes collection of novels and short stories is in it's entirety, a work of art. This massive audio-collection of 72 hours includes all of Holmes's stories, and a true delight to listen to. Especially so because of the added context and flare given by narrator Stephen Fry (who in his own right is a SH fan). In short this is an almost mandatory example of quality literature for any old school detective stories. Ps. As a side note I would like to a This here is a true literary classic! The Sherlock Holmes collection of novels and short stories is in it's entirety, a work of art. This massive audio-collection of 72 hours includes all of Holmes's stories, and a true delight to listen to. Especially so because of the added context and flare given by narrator Stephen Fry (who in his own right is a SH fan). In short this is an almost mandatory example of quality literature for any old school detective stories. Ps. As a side note I would like to add that, in all I was surprised by how modern the language use was in this novel. Even though it was written well over a century ago, I had no problems following everything that happened.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kiesha ~ 1Cheekylass

    I am totally in love with this collection. It's taken me 3 decades to finally appreciate the GENIUS of Sherlock Holmes and my Dear Watson. There are so many great stories in this collection. I think A Study in Scarlett was my favorite but many other short stories were equally as brilliant. I'm totally hooked, so much so that I'm considering STARTING the series again. This was 70+ hours of bliss! Highly recommended for anyone who loves Mysteries. Stephen Fry's narration was UTTERLY brilliant. I wis I am totally in love with this collection. It's taken me 3 decades to finally appreciate the GENIUS of Sherlock Holmes and my Dear Watson. There are so many great stories in this collection. I think A Study in Scarlett was my favorite but many other short stories were equally as brilliant. I'm totally hooked, so much so that I'm considering STARTING the series again. This was 70+ hours of bliss! Highly recommended for anyone who loves Mysteries. Stephen Fry's narration was UTTERLY brilliant. I wish that I could give this 10 stars! This will go in my favorites pile, top 10 easily.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I always wanted to read the Sherlock Holmes books but I'm glad I waited for this set. This single title contains all the novels as well as 4 of the 5 short stories (I don't know why they left out the case-book) and its delivered spectacularly by Stephen Fry. I'm only through the first book and partially into the second but I feel safe to say that giving the entire collection 5 stars at this point is a no-brainer. Best part is, you can own it for free is you sign up for a 30-day membership to Audibl I always wanted to read the Sherlock Holmes books but I'm glad I waited for this set. This single title contains all the novels as well as 4 of the 5 short stories (I don't know why they left out the case-book) and its delivered spectacularly by Stephen Fry. I'm only through the first book and partially into the second but I feel safe to say that giving the entire collection 5 stars at this point is a no-brainer. Best part is, you can own it for free is you sign up for a 30-day membership to Audible (or use a single credit in lieu of the $50+ price tag).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Sublime. Having all of Sherlock's adventures in one place is awesome enough, but Stephen Fry does a masterful job of bringing the audio version to life. At times I felt as if I was watching the stories unfurl, not listening. Highly recommended for those new to -and familiar with - the Conan Doyle masterpiece. Sublime. Having all of Sherlock's adventures in one place is awesome enough, but Stephen Fry does a masterful job of bringing the audio version to life. At times I felt as if I was watching the stories unfurl, not listening. Highly recommended for those new to -and familiar with - the Conan Doyle masterpiece.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex ♈

    One of my 1st authors, who made me love reading. It's a classic, it's a literature. So, why not to reread it for 175th time? 😉 66 stories, it will be marked as read at least 10 times 😎👩🏻‍🎓 One of my 1st authors, who made me love reading. It's a classic, it's a literature. So, why not to reread it for 175th time? 😉 66 stories, it will be marked as read at least 10 times 😎👩🏻‍🎓

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erik Warming

    All of Sherlock Holmes - 72 hours with Steven Fry. Loved it! But I did cheat a bit, taking breaks with others books, as this is a heavy meal to go through in one sitting.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marjo

    Stick a fork in it! It's done! I don't regret the time and money spent on this, it's generally pretty good. But there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. Stick a fork in it! It's done! I don't regret the time and money spent on this, it's generally pretty good. But there is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Take that you 71 hour bitch! I think I’ve been working on this for more than a year!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy Mills

    Enjoyable, but a bit long to get through. Stephen Fry is a very, very good narrator, and might be the only reason I pushed myself to get all the way through each part rather than listening to a story here and there in isolation and not getting through for a year or more. The problem with going through all these in a short time period is that you start to notice the patterns of plot, the similarities of names, and a few other recurring oddities. Still, it was overall enjoyable, and it's clear why Enjoyable, but a bit long to get through. Stephen Fry is a very, very good narrator, and might be the only reason I pushed myself to get all the way through each part rather than listening to a story here and there in isolation and not getting through for a year or more. The problem with going through all these in a short time period is that you start to notice the patterns of plot, the similarities of names, and a few other recurring oddities. Still, it was overall enjoyable, and it's clear why the stories have lasted. One note: there is another volume of ACD Holmes stories that is nearly always left out of "complete" collections, probably because it tends towards the SF of Doyle's later years. It is also left out of this one. A Study in Scarlet - Were it not for Warlock Holmes: A Study in Brimstone, I might not have noticed that that Lucy fails the "sexy lamp" test. In SiB, she is replaced by a fancy donut wrapper, and the story works about as well. I also found myself yelling first a Lucy's father and later at Jefferson Hope. The father had a month and the only action he took was to send word to Jefferson? He didn't look for other help when he received no reply? Why was he just sitting there, waiting? Then Jefferson had a month in which he could have rescued Lucy before she pined to death, and, no, he just waited for her to die, then swore unending revenge ... which took 20 years?!? And even then, he had to play around with the villains before killing them. Kinda glad Lucy didn't get to marry this guy. The most compelling part is Holmes' deductions about the case. The Sign of Four Listening to this right after Study in Scarlet, I couldn't help but notice that it was another tale of someone going to fairly ridiculous lengths for revenge, though this time the perpetrator was not intended to be particularly sympathetic. I'm not entirely sure what to make of the portrayal of people-of-color in this one. It was varied, but I always had the sense that they weren't quite being portrayed as people in the same sense as the white characters. The pygmy, in particular, is described in an extremely white-centric way (barbaric, cannibal, hideous). Additionally, the only character who seems to treat them as people is the villain of the piece, and I can't help but wonder if this was intended to make him less sympathetic to the original audience. Still interesting for the mystery itself, but ... more problematic than I remember from my first read. A Scandal in Bohemia - Much better than the first two, and the first of the shorter stories in the collection. Irene Adler is probably the most reused side character after Moriarty in updates and later versions of the Holmes stories, and for good reason. I still find it odd that Watson was perfectly happy to throw a smoke bomb through a window for Holmes, without even asking why. The Adventure of the Red-Headed League - One of the sillier ones, as it's fairly obvious that the so-called "League" is a dodge of some sort from the beginning, and there are only so many reasons for getting someone out of a building for specific hours each day. Still fun, though. A Case of Identity - Disappointing ending (I think Holmes could have, for instance, made sure the young lady was present for the confession), but an interesting case otherwise. The Boscombe Valley Mystery - One that illustrates Holmes' priorities are not always the same as those of the police would be. The Five Orange Pips - Two thoughts. (1) All top results for a web search related to the KKK and orange pips are related to this story, so I have no idea if this was a messaging tactic they ever actually used (but suspect it was not); (2) This is another instance where more action on Holmes part (view spoiler)[could have prevented a tragic result. Why not go with the fellow to protect him, or get him local police, or ... something? * sigh * (hide spoiler)] . The Man with the Twisted Lip - Amusing case of, shall we say, mistaken identity. The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle - Christmas hijinks, with a stolen gem hidden in a goose, and an overly detailed analysis of a hat. The Adventure of the Speckled Band - Another that is shown up by the Warlock Holmes version, which asks the pertinent question: (view spoiler)[Why didn't she just say, "Oi! A bloody great snake!" (in defense of the Conan Doyle version, it could be argued she was delirious from the snake bite, and not thinking clearly) (hide spoiler)] , and omits treating the Roma people as ominous harbingers of doom. The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb - Deals that sound too good to be true usually are. I find it rather surprising that the Engineer didn't complain more about what the loss of his thumb, as it seems like he's in a business where not having both thumbs would be a significant disadvantage. I'm not sure if I remembered the trick with the carriage from earlier reading or not (as I don't specifically remember anything else about this one), but the solution to him finding himself so close to the station seemed fairly obvious to me. The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor - Sometimes a bride has a good reason to run away. The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet - Another where I'd figured out who the most likely culprit was, for the same reason Holmes did. The Adventure of the Copper Beeches - See above, re: Deals that sound too good to be true usually are. Also, we finally have some female characters who are NOT named "Mary". Seriously, there have been at least 4, including Watson's wife. End of Part 2 (weirdly, the linked pdf claims Copper Beeches is in Part 3) Part 3 Silver Blaze Okay, this one is as enjoyable now as it was the first time I read it. There is a brief mention of the Roma people, but only as a red herring, and Homes immediately dismisses them as unlikely to be involved. The Adventure of the Cardboard Box Okay, yet another "Mary", and yet another revenge-killing-over-a-woman. A few interesting points, but Warlock Holmes' "The Case of the Cardboard ... Case" was much more enjoyable. The Adventure of the Yellow Face Finally one done by Warlock Holmes where the original can stand on its own (though the WH solution was certainly weirder and less expected). The Adventure of the Stock-broker's Clerk Another on the theme of "If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is." The Adventure of the Gloria Scott One that acknowledges that Sherlock's showing off can occasionally annoy and worry people, but with an interesting enough mystery at its heart. The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual Interesting, but the "ritual" is so obviously directions like those of a treasure map that I found it difficult to believe that its readers had not realized that simple fact (more believable would be that they'd lost track of some aspect of it, making it impossible to finish). The Adventure of the Reigate Squire Bad luck to stage a crime when Sherlock is out in the country, settling his nerves. Of course, having a case to solve steadies his nerves more than a rest cure would... The Adventure of the Crooked Man Odd vignette, where the mysterious death is not the real mystery. The Adventure of the Resident Patient Another one where Holmes doing more could have prevented a death (though he seems rather self-satisfied about that in this case). I suspect this one is the primary inspiration for the Warlock Holmes tale featuring a box that is also a portal. The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter Another long-mysterious carriage ride into trouble (this time for a translator rather than an engineer). At least the translator got out of it with both thumbs... The Adventure of the Naval Treaty One of the more interesting ones, solution-wise. Also contains a female character not named Mary. The Final Problem Reichenbach Falls, here we come. Introduces Moriarty as Holmes' equal. Another inconsistency in the pdf: it claims Hound of the Baskervilles starts in Part 3 and is concluded in Part 4, but the whole thing seems to actually be in Part 4. Part 4 The Hound of the Baskervilles Of the longer pieces, I enjoyed this one the most this time around. Partly because the female characters are more interesting than in most (and neither is named Mary!), and partly because it reminded me of one of the Simon Feximal stories (a paranormal detective created by KJ Charles). Both feature a villainous (view spoiler)[butterfly (hide spoiler)] collector, trying to claim something that does not belong to him, and a beast (view spoiler)[or swarm of beasts (hide spoiler)] The Adventure of the Empty House - Another where Watson is disbelievably agreeable. Holmes dead and missing for some unspecified amount of time, and he just turns up with no warning? Despite that, I think the writing is better on this one than on most of the early ones. And I'm curious if an air-powered long-range rifle is really feasible. The Adventure of the Norwood Builder - Fascinating (view spoiler)[faked (hide spoiler)] murder case. The Adventure of the Dancing Men - Another "revenge over a woman" tale, but I do like the device of a cipher intended to pass as silly drawings rather than as a coded message. The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist - Attempted forced marriage, thwarted by Holmes. The female cyclist is one of the better female characters to appear in the stories thusfar. The Adventure of the Priory School - Odd mix of things, with a possibly unintended message that one should not acknowledge one's bastard children. I also get the impression that Conan Doyle approves of the "entail" system, as it keeps property away from such bastard children. Interesting story and set of clues, at least. Part 5 The Adventure of Black Peter - Overall enjoyable yarn about a corrupt seadog getting his comeuppance, complete with red herring, but I question the level of erudite discourse the captured murderer engaged in. A lot of incoherent yelling and attempting to escape would have been more believable. The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton - Ah, this one was done early on in the Warlock Holmes series, which made the engagement an accident and featured "the woman" as the murderer. My favorite moment in this one is Holmes' blithely telling Lestrade that the description of one of the people seen running from the crime was so vague it could even have been of Watson (It was of Watson). The Adventure of the Six Napoleons - Enjoyable yarn where I remembered the twist (and it seems fairly obvious, all things considered). The Adventure of the Three Students - This one I figured out because I remembered the Warlock Holmes tale that was based on it. Both versions are quite entertaining. The Adventure of the Golden Pince Nez - One that I don't remember at all, but where I rather liked the way Holmes went about solving it. The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter - Missing football player (view spoiler)[not actually missing (hide spoiler)] . Probably the least interesting of this set, so far. I found myself wondering if it was inspired by Conan Doyle running into a footballer who rambled on about the sport at great speed. The Adventure of the Abbey Grange Much better than the one above, though we have yet another female character named "Mary". There's a suggestion here that Conan Doyle was in favor of more equal divorce laws, which inspired me to research a bit. That was the case, but he was against women's suffrage (because, ahem, they would be influenced by their husbands; * sigh *). The Adventure of the Second Stain Rather odd one, dependent on the utter naivete of a politician's wife. On the plus side, her name is Hilda (not Mary). The Warlock Holmes version was more entertaining, and introduced a second woman, impersonating Hilda, which helped. The Valley of Fear, Part I Much better written than the earliest full length novels, with a satisfyingly circuitous solution (at least, to Part I). I saw it coming very shortly before Holmes announced it, which made me happy. I have no idea what Mrs. Douglass' first name was, other than not Mary, which is good. Part 6 The Valley of Fear, Part IIAnd, well, YAWN. Tiresomely long tale of a violent "union" and its eventual downfall, at the hands of the person known as Douglass in part I. At least Moriarty gets a mention at the end. The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge - Feels a bit like passing the torch, as the featured inspector, Baines, only tangentially needs Holmes' help. There are some unfortunate racial references (a primitive savage who practice voodoo (view spoiler)[At least he's a red herring (hide spoiler)] , a reference to a "yellow devil"). The Adventure of the Red Circle - It's starting to feel a bit formulaic. This is another with a sinister organization and people fighting boldly against it. Also another where the police only tangentially needed Holmes' help. The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans - Enjoyable spy caper, but I find I like the smaller mysteries better. Still, at least this one didn't involve yet another secret American organization. The Adventure of the Dying Detective - The most interesting thing about this one is how many versions of Holmes have drawn on his behavior here (view spoiler)[while feigning a serious illness (hide spoiler)] and taken it as the default. The next most interesting bit was the lengths that Holmes would go to in order to catch someone. The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax - Odd and interesting one, and one of the few where I figured out part of the solution before Holmes did. (view spoiler)[Hiding a body in a coffin (or place) known to already contain a body. I don't know how often this has been used in murder stories, but it shows up in Dexter at least. (hide spoiler)] The Adventure of the Devil's Foot - Another good one, despite being a revenge tale. It doesn't feel like a copy of the others, and is notable shorter than they are. I had a strong suspicion about the second murder, but had not figured out the first before the reveal. His Last Bow - Rather propagandist, but does the "fictional local hero pulls one over on the country's enemies" thing decently well.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.