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From Dunkirk to Benghazi

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“This book is a sequel to The War for World Power (1940) and proceeds on the same method. It is an attempt to select, now, what will prove to be the significant features of the war and, dealing with them episodically, to group about them the events which are logically connected with them. It carries the story of the war from the tragedy and glory of Dunkirk across the Liby “This book is a sequel to The War for World Power (1940) and proceeds on the same method. It is an attempt to select, now, what will prove to be the significant features of the war and, dealing with them episodically, to group about them the events which are logically connected with them. It carries the story of the war from the tragedy and glory of Dunkirk across the Libyan desert to Benghazi, where the latent promise of Dunkirk justified itself. “Its theme has almost a secular importance. In the months it covers, Hitler’s threat to the present world economy was more openly disclosed. In them, too, was fought out the most novel battle in the history of the world, a long-drawn out, skilful and most pitiless attack upon this country, by means of the weapon upon which the real architect of Germany’s armed might had lavished all his great powers of organization and upon which he depended for success in the enslavement of Europe and ultimately the world. A memorable conflict, summed up memorably by the Prime Minister. “This aspect of the war is more difficult to describe than any other. It seems to carry the art of warfare back to the barren matter of machines, mass and momentum which, in the teaching of all the great masters, are subsidiary to the real dominant, morale, upon which the decision of this battle turned. When all credit is paid to the honest craftsmanship and the old-fashioned prejudice for solid work, it must be admitted that it was the human skill and the human courage of a comparatively small number of men that proved decisive. They very rarely fought, if at all, except at great odds, and they never failed to inflict more damage than they received. If only for that episode, this would, indeed, deserve to be recorded as Britain’s most perfect hour.” (Strategicus)


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“This book is a sequel to The War for World Power (1940) and proceeds on the same method. It is an attempt to select, now, what will prove to be the significant features of the war and, dealing with them episodically, to group about them the events which are logically connected with them. It carries the story of the war from the tragedy and glory of Dunkirk across the Liby “This book is a sequel to The War for World Power (1940) and proceeds on the same method. It is an attempt to select, now, what will prove to be the significant features of the war and, dealing with them episodically, to group about them the events which are logically connected with them. It carries the story of the war from the tragedy and glory of Dunkirk across the Libyan desert to Benghazi, where the latent promise of Dunkirk justified itself. “Its theme has almost a secular importance. In the months it covers, Hitler’s threat to the present world economy was more openly disclosed. In them, too, was fought out the most novel battle in the history of the world, a long-drawn out, skilful and most pitiless attack upon this country, by means of the weapon upon which the real architect of Germany’s armed might had lavished all his great powers of organization and upon which he depended for success in the enslavement of Europe and ultimately the world. A memorable conflict, summed up memorably by the Prime Minister. “This aspect of the war is more difficult to describe than any other. It seems to carry the art of warfare back to the barren matter of machines, mass and momentum which, in the teaching of all the great masters, are subsidiary to the real dominant, morale, upon which the decision of this battle turned. When all credit is paid to the honest craftsmanship and the old-fashioned prejudice for solid work, it must be admitted that it was the human skill and the human courage of a comparatively small number of men that proved decisive. They very rarely fought, if at all, except at great odds, and they never failed to inflict more damage than they received. If only for that episode, this would, indeed, deserve to be recorded as Britain’s most perfect hour.” (Strategicus)

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