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A Contemporary Reimagining of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens for Middle Graders Life is full of great expectations for Korean American Pippa Park. It seems like everyone, from her family to the other kids at school, has a plan for how her life should look. So when Pippa gets a mysterious basketball scholarship to Lakeview Private, she jumps at the chance to reinvent A Contemporary Reimagining of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens for Middle Graders Life is full of great expectations for Korean American Pippa Park. It seems like everyone, from her family to the other kids at school, has a plan for how her life should look. So when Pippa gets a mysterious basketball scholarship to Lakeview Private, she jumps at the chance to reinvent herself by following the “Rules of Cool.” At Lakeview, Pippa juggles old and new friends, an unrequited crush, and the pressure to perform academically and athletically while keeping her past and her family’s laundromat a secret from her elite new classmates. But when Pippa begins to receive a string of hateful, anonymous messages via social media, her carefully built persona is threatened. As things begin to spiral out of control, Pippa discovers the real reason she was admitted to Lakeview and wonders if she can keep her old and new lives separate, or if she should even try. Bonus Content Discussion Questions, Author Q&A, and Korean Language Glossary and Pronunciation Guide


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A Contemporary Reimagining of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens for Middle Graders Life is full of great expectations for Korean American Pippa Park. It seems like everyone, from her family to the other kids at school, has a plan for how her life should look. So when Pippa gets a mysterious basketball scholarship to Lakeview Private, she jumps at the chance to reinvent A Contemporary Reimagining of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens for Middle Graders Life is full of great expectations for Korean American Pippa Park. It seems like everyone, from her family to the other kids at school, has a plan for how her life should look. So when Pippa gets a mysterious basketball scholarship to Lakeview Private, she jumps at the chance to reinvent herself by following the “Rules of Cool.” At Lakeview, Pippa juggles old and new friends, an unrequited crush, and the pressure to perform academically and athletically while keeping her past and her family’s laundromat a secret from her elite new classmates. But when Pippa begins to receive a string of hateful, anonymous messages via social media, her carefully built persona is threatened. As things begin to spiral out of control, Pippa discovers the real reason she was admitted to Lakeview and wonders if she can keep her old and new lives separate, or if she should even try. Bonus Content Discussion Questions, Author Q&A, and Korean Language Glossary and Pronunciation Guide

30 review for Pippa Park Raises Her Game

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    When Pippa Park gets a basketball scholarship to a fancy private school, she feels pressured to pretend like she's rich and cool so that she can fit in with her elite classmates. But how long can she keep up the farce, when her Korean family owns a laundromat and Pippa barely has money to buy a slice of pizza at the school cafeteria? With her grades slipping and her relationships in turmoil, Pippa begins to realize that some of her new friends have family secrets of their own. This retelling of D When Pippa Park gets a basketball scholarship to a fancy private school, she feels pressured to pretend like she's rich and cool so that she can fit in with her elite classmates. But how long can she keep up the farce, when her Korean family owns a laundromat and Pippa barely has money to buy a slice of pizza at the school cafeteria? With her grades slipping and her relationships in turmoil, Pippa begins to realize that some of her new friends have family secrets of their own. This retelling of Dicken's "Great Expectations" is utterly brilliant from start to finish! Instead of "Pip", the main character is Pippa. And most of the main characters found in "Great Expectations" have their counterparts in Pippa's story. Not all of them make an appearance, and many are changed in significant ways, but play similar roles in the plot. Various characters are also gender-swapped, and I loved that! I had so much fun reading along, and suddenly realizing, "Oh! This character is supposed to be so-and-so from Great Expectations!" It's not always obvious from the start who each character represents. Many of the new characters names begin with the same letter as the original characters, like a little clue to their alternate identities. However, although many plot points and character roles are similar to "Great Expectations", this book has its own voice, its own story, and its own delightful style! It was especially interesting to see how the author took some basic plot points from Dickens and reimagined them in a modern setting with cell phones, school books, basketball, and the rich Korean-American culture that Pippa enjoys. Speaking of basketball and Korea, I had a unique experience with this book that affected me very closely from the very first page. (Personal story time... I was forced to attend a basketball camp for a week when I was in 6th grade, and I hated it. I have never been good at sports, and I spent the entire week just learning how to dribble. The other campers laughed at me because I had no skills at all, and it was one of the most embarrassing situations of my entire life. Needless to say, I hate basketball now, and you might be wondering... Why would I pick up a MG novel about basketball? Surely, the traumatic memories of my childhood would make me hate this book.) This is where the genius of this book begins to make MAGIC happen! The very first scene is of Pippa playing hoops by herself in a deserted playground. She describes how she loves playing basketball. She feels at home on the court, like she belongs, like all her problems just melt away when she feels the basketball between her fingertips. The writing does such a genius job of describing her passion for this sport, and it reminded me of my passion for music. I'm a professional pianist, and when I sit at the piano I feel at home, like I belong, and all the world just melts away. The writing uses a universal theme of having a passion for an activity, whether it is sports, or music, or art, or anything, so that I can understand that Pippa loves basketball. I can relate to her very closely, even though I don't like the same thing she likes. I understand her as a character because the writing drew me into her world. The writing does the same thing for Pippa's Korean-American family culture. I don't know the first thing about Korea, but I loved learning about it in this book! And I clearly understood Pippa's feeling different from other people, because her family celebrates different holidays and does things in their own way. We all feel different sometimes, and the author uses that universal theme to bring Pippa's story home to each of us. That is why classics remain popular for hundreds of years. They touch on universal ideas that transcend time and apply to any reader of any age anywhere. This book does an excellent job of capturing those deep themes and bringing them to life in a modern setting with a fresh voice. I loved reading this story and seeing which plot points stayed similar to "Great Expectations" and which things were changed. Pippa lives with her sister and brother-in-law, while her mother has stayed in Korea. One of my favorite characters in "Great Expectations" is Joe. He is so sweet and kind, and I loved seeing him reimagined in the character of Jung-Hwa, Pippa's brother-in-law. He really functions like a father figure in her life, encouraging her and working hard to support the family. Each of these characters are quickly given vibrant life in the first few scenes of book. For instance, Jung-Hwa has a little affectionate ritual that he does with Pippa where he boops her nose with his finger each day. Such a small detail with a world of meaning for this sweet family relationship. I loved the complexity of Pippa's relationship with her sister, Mina. Mina is tough on Pippa, nagging her about her grades, her chores, and making her work at the laundromat to earn her allowance. The two sisters argue and fight, but obviously love each other very much. They just aren't always the best at expressing that love to one another. Their character development and the growth of their relationship is one of the best things about this book. Of course, (in true Pip tradition) Pippa gets a crush on some rich boy who barely knows she's alive. The descriptions of how she feels, what she thinks, how she worries about her appearance, and wants to be cool to impress the guy... all these things are so spot on and expressive. We've all had that impossible crush at one time or another. I was so intrigued to read about the "cool" girls at Pippa's new school, The Royals. They seem to befriend Pippa, but we are always wondering what their agenda must be. Are they going to turn on her when they find out the truth about her being poor? Those girls are a mystery, and I loved reading about them right up to the last page when their true colors are revealed. I was delighted with how serious, comedic, and wild this plot ended up being. It starts out with some fairly tame school drama, but went into some intense tragedy and redemption near the end. If you like classics, you will love this Dickens retelling! If you like basketball, Korean-American culture, or just excellent story-telling, you will love this book. It's not just for middle-grade readers either. I'm 37, and I adore everything about Pippa Park! Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Media Master Publicity in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I won this book in a goodreads giveaway. It’s an interesting book that looks at what it means to follow your dream when everyone else wants you to live by their dreams

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Korean-American seventh grader Pippa Park's is a juggler: living with her older sister and brother-in-law, rather than her Mom, in Korea, she juggles the weight of their expectations; she juggles her responsibilities at home and school, and she juggles schoolwork with her first love, basketball. She receives an unexpected basketball scholarship to an affluent private school, Lakeview Private, and decides to reinvent herself: she doesn't want to stand out as the "scholarship student", especially Korean-American seventh grader Pippa Park's is a juggler: living with her older sister and brother-in-law, rather than her Mom, in Korea, she juggles the weight of their expectations; she juggles her responsibilities at home and school, and she juggles schoolwork with her first love, basketball. She receives an unexpected basketball scholarship to an affluent private school, Lakeview Private, and decides to reinvent herself: she doesn't want to stand out as the "scholarship student", especially among the rich kids, and especially among the members of the basketball team - her former middle school's rivals! But reinventing herself comes with a price, and Pippa discovers that she's getting further away from the person she wants to be while trying to keep pace with the Royals, Lakeview's version of Queen Bees/Mean Girls/the In-Crowd. She can't turn to her sister; she can't turn to her best friend, who won't talk to her anymore; and she certainly can't turn to the Royals. When a series of antagonistic social media messages start showing up, threatening to expose Pippa's real life, she really feels lost. Inspired by Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a relatable middle grade story about a middle schooler dealing with the school stress, family stress,  an unrequited crush (with his own family stress), and the stress of keeping her real life secret from her glam friends at school. She's witty and dorky and just wants to do the right thing, but why is the right thing so hard to do? We want Pippa to get it right, because she's us. Kudos to Erin Yun for making The Royals a complex, smart group of characters, too! They're not vapid Mean Girls, even if some of them - not all, by the way - are straight-up stereotypical. First off, they're not cheerleaders! Let's hear it for breaking the stereotype! They are unapologetically feminine, and they're all business on the basketball court, showing readers that real girls don't always wear pom-poms; sometimes, they slam dunk. There's an interesting subplot with Pippa's tutor-turned-crush, Eliot, and his family's long-standing emotional baggage, which feeds nicely into Pippa's main story. Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a slam-dunk for middle grade readers. It's smart, funny, and gives readers a heroine they can root for.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karen Arendt

    I thoroughly enjoyed this story. Pippa is a likable character, as is her friend Buddy. Her struggles to fit in at a new school are authentic as are the situations she experiences. I liked that some of the students at the expensive private school were portrayed as kind and true friends as well, dispelling the stereotype that all rich kids are spoiled. I am looking forward to sharing this story with my students.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff S

    Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a very good and entertaining debut novel by author Erin Yun. My wife couldn't put the book down when she began reading it one day last week, and read the entire 262 inviting, easy-reading pages in one night. I was also pulled in once I began reading, curious to remain by Pippa's side to see how her life unfolded at the prestigious Lakeview Private School, after being awarded a scholarship and transferring there from the less esteemed Victoria Middle School. As anyon Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a very good and entertaining debut novel by author Erin Yun. My wife couldn't put the book down when she began reading it one day last week, and read the entire 262 inviting, easy-reading pages in one night. I was also pulled in once I began reading, curious to remain by Pippa's side to see how her life unfolded at the prestigious Lakeview Private School, after being awarded a scholarship and transferring there from the less esteemed Victoria Middle School. As anyone who has survived adolescence knows, life in middle school--or as we called it where I was growing up, junior high--can be a time of anxiety, stressful situations, joy and laughter, tears and triumphs. It is the ultimate growing experience. Pippa goes through it all, leaving her familiar and comfortable surroundings and friends at Victoria for Lakeview. She wants to fit in with her new and "upper-income" classmates and basketball teammates, so she shelters her past--and current--life from them, not wanting to expose her modest upbringing and what they might consider her lower station in life. Like most kids of her age, Pippa just wants to fit in and be accepted. The book flows nicely with a warm tone and a descriptive narrative that is comforting and places you right at home and in school with Pippa. And the small details about her Korean-American upbringing--the family life and expectations, the Korean foods and snacks, and her loveable and kind brother-in-law, Jung-Hwa, bring an additional, savory level of ethnic seasoning to the story. Pippa is an endearing character that you find yourself feeling for, hurting with, relating to, cheering for, and, ultimately, hoping to celebrate with. The book, geared to young readers, yet entirely enjoyable to an older audience such as this 50-something man and his wife, is sweet and charming, interlaced with life lessons, suspense, drama, and fun. I think Pippa Park is destined for even bigger and better things! I hope we will see much more of her and Ms. Yun in the future.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tara Weiss

    A play on Great Expectations with some fast-paced moves of its own, Pippa Park Raises her Game is the story of a seventh grade girl from a local public school who receives a mysterious scholarship to the prestigious private school in her town to help the basketball team put one in the win column over their rivals. And the rival just happens to be the school from which Pippa transferred. Wanting to keep her roots as a first generation Korean American who works at her family's laundry a secret fro A play on Great Expectations with some fast-paced moves of its own, Pippa Park Raises her Game is the story of a seventh grade girl from a local public school who receives a mysterious scholarship to the prestigious private school in her town to help the basketball team put one in the win column over their rivals. And the rival just happens to be the school from which Pippa transferred. Wanting to keep her roots as a first generation Korean American who works at her family's laundry a secret from the seemingly perfect private school crowd, Pippa has nothing but challenges on her way to fitting in at her new school, not to mention keeping up her GPA, especially in Algebra. But solving for X becomes only one of Pippa's problems as trouble seems to be guarding her like the defense at the three point line. When it all comes down to the buzzer, Pippa finds a way to take the shot that could put her on the winning team. Erin Yun's debut novel is a slam dunk of a story that takes on major issues like stereotypes, friendship, and fitting in with others. Middle school readers will identify with Pippa's challenges and cheer her on as she learns what it takes to be proud of who you are.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Pippa Park is a plucky heroine and I love having a new middle grade novel with basketball and Korean culture for readers. Pippa is awarded a scholarship to an elite school with the condition that she keep her GPA at 3.0 and above. Immediately she feels the pressure in keeping up with practice, homework, and helping her sister with the family business. On top of that are the difficulties of finding real friends in her new school. She has real concerns about sharing her life with them as she sees Pippa Park is a plucky heroine and I love having a new middle grade novel with basketball and Korean culture for readers. Pippa is awarded a scholarship to an elite school with the condition that she keep her GPA at 3.0 and above. Immediately she feels the pressure in keeping up with practice, homework, and helping her sister with the family business. On top of that are the difficulties of finding real friends in her new school. She has real concerns about sharing her life with them as she sees them casually dropping large sums of money for mani-pedis and movie marathons. What do you do when your new friends and old friends are side by side in a restaurant? Pippa's struggles are real and authentic. The additional layer of "Great Expectations" retelling was a bit of a stretch and may be confusing to middle grade readers who are still unfamiliar with Dickens. The basketball action and sweet ending will make up for that. Hand this to fans of "Front Desk." Thank you to Fabled Film Press and Edelweiss for a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sherri Silvera

    This book was such an enjoyable read and Pippa Park was such a great protagonist. The novel hit all the marks aimed at the target market in a very modern way. The author brought together an immigrant story with the typical themes of friendship and fitting in at school in a masterful way. I want to thank Fabled Films Press for sending an advance copy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Felicia

    Super cute middle grade retelling of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Disclaimer: I got an e-ARC from Edelweiss. This does not affect my review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ren (A Bookish Balance)

    4.25/5 stars ARC provided by Edelweiss and Fabled Films Press. Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a middle grade retelling of Great Expectations. In this retelling we follow sixth grader and talented basketball player Pippa Park who’s just been recruited into the most prestigious middle school she knows of and her current school’s rival, Lakeview Prep. Pippa jumps at this chance, getting to be at the same school as her crush and math tutor and leaving behind her best friend. I’ve never read Great Expec 4.25/5 stars ARC provided by Edelweiss and Fabled Films Press. Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a middle grade retelling of Great Expectations. In this retelling we follow sixth grader and talented basketball player Pippa Park who’s just been recruited into the most prestigious middle school she knows of and her current school’s rival, Lakeview Prep. Pippa jumps at this chance, getting to be at the same school as her crush and math tutor and leaving behind her best friend. I’ve never read Great Expectations nor do I have any major plans to do so, but I did decide to read a summary of it before going into Pippa Park Raises Her Game to get an idea of how the story changes. I’d say overall this is a pretty faithful yet modern retelling, though Yun took a few liberties with the ending, her changes being something I really liked and appreciated. As for the writing, I thought Pippa’s voice sounded a bit older than a sixth grader, but I won’t fault the book too much for that. If anything I dislike it when middle grade feels dumbed down and that definitely was not the case here. I also don’t always find reading about sports exciting, but the games in Pippa Park Raises Her Game were well written and exciting, and I think this reflects well on Yun's writing skills. One of my favourite aspects of the novel was the inclusion of Korean culture, Pippa celebrates Korean holidays with her family, watches K-dramas I caught that You’re Beautiful reference, listens to K-pop, includes Korean words in her dialogue, and eats really delicious sounding Korean food. The difficulties she encounters because of her heritage and economic situation make her a character that is easy to root for and relatable. The embarrassment she experiences when she brings a lunch to school full of foods her classmates are unfamiliar with is I'm sure something a lot of kids can relate to, and I'm glad she ultimately sees how much love and care goes into the meals her family prepares for her. As for what I didn't like, there isn't much. I didn't enjoy how boy crazy Pippa was in the first half of the novel, but I was ultimately satisfied by the way her crush progressed. Whenever I pick up middle grade I always ask myself whether this is a book I’d share with my children if I had any, and the answer is a definite yes in this case. Pippa doesn’t always make the best choices in this novel, but her decisions are understandable given her situation, and they’re in no way unforgivable. This is the type of diverse middle grade I'd actively want my kids to read. Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicole M. Hewitt

    This review and many more can be found on my blog: Feed Your Fiction Addiction To sum this book up, it’s Mean Girls for middle graders with the addition of basketball and a big lie that threatens to blow up everything! I know this is a Great Expectations retelling, but honestly, as I was reading this, I couldn’t help but think of Mean Girls often—it just has that vibe (I guess I’d forgotten most of GA, which I read in my high school days, but that didn’t cut down on my enjoyment of the book). Pipp This review and many more can be found on my blog: Feed Your Fiction Addiction To sum this book up, it’s Mean Girls for middle graders with the addition of basketball and a big lie that threatens to blow up everything! I know this is a Great Expectations retelling, but honestly, as I was reading this, I couldn’t help but think of Mean Girls often—it just has that vibe (I guess I’d forgotten most of GA, which I read in my high school days, but that didn’t cut down on my enjoyment of the book). Pippa has just transferred to a private school from the local public school, and she feels like a fish out of water. She wants so much to fit in, but she isn’t really sure how. All of the kids in her class come from money, and they seem to have a bunch of expectations that she has no idea how to live up to. So, she lies. Or, at least, leaves out a whole bunch of details. She doesn’t want them to know that she’s poor or that she came from the public school they seem to despise, so she just leaves those little facts out. Problem is, it gets harder and harder to hide. Plus, she has a crush on the boy that the leader of the Royals also has her eye on—not good—and her relationship with her best friend from her old school ends up becoming very strained. But I have to say that this story ended up veering from the Mean Girls formula in the end, and I was quite pleased with how everything turned out. Pippa not only learned to be proud of who she is, but she also realized that everyone else may not have been judging her nearly as much as she thought (which is probably true 99% of the time in real life). Pippa messes up in this book—she makes some big mistakes, but she also learns from them. And I fell in love with her and found myself rooting for her the whole time! Having basketball as a backdrop will appeal to quite a few kids, but they definitely don’t have to be sports fans to enjoy it—the basketball team is really just used to show the dynamics of Pippa’s new friends. But kids who do like sports will be drawn to that—there are a couple of scenes that highlight basketball, and I felt like they were very well written and I could easily imagine what was happening in the games and practices without having to know a whole lot about the sport. The book also features aspects of Korean-American culture, especially the food, which is described wonderfully! Overall, I think this is a wholly appealing story that will keep kids reading! ***Disclosure: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. No other compensation was given and all opinions are my own.***

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Everyone seemed to have great expectations for Pippa, but she was struggling to live up to them. Pippa was disappointed, that her sister Mina made her give up her beloved basketball, when her math grade drops. Then fate intervened, and Pippa was offered a basketball scholarship from the local prep school. Not only did they expect her to help them break their losing streak, but she had to maintain a 3.0 GPA, and start over in a new school. Being a "have-not" among the "haves", Pippa hid parts of Everyone seemed to have great expectations for Pippa, but she was struggling to live up to them. Pippa was disappointed, that her sister Mina made her give up her beloved basketball, when her math grade drops. Then fate intervened, and Pippa was offered a basketball scholarship from the local prep school. Not only did they expect her to help them break their losing streak, but she had to maintain a 3.0 GPA, and start over in a new school. Being a "have-not" among the "haves", Pippa hid parts of herself. But, as often happens with secrets and lies, the web of deceit grew and grew, until it collapsed on Pippa, and she was on the verge of losing everything that was important to her - her real friends, her identity, and her sport. Being the odd man out is tough at any age, and being able to handle yourself in such a situation can be tricky. Therefore, I really felt for Pippa, even if I didn't agree with how she handled it. Despite her poor choices, Pippa was a good person. I knew that for sure, because she was so remorseful about her actions, she learned from her mistakes, and she took action to try and fix the mess she made. Yun treated us to some really wonderful things in this story, and I loved the role that family and friendship played. Her older sister, Mina, meant well, and I was glad to see those two start to meet in the middle on some things, but the star was her brother-in-law, Jung-Hwa. He was so wonderful! The relationship he shared with Pippa was pretty special, and I couldn't help but adore this tenderhearted guy. I was also a big fan of Buddy, Pippa's long time bestie, and Helen, one of the "Royals" she befriended at Lakeside. Overall, Pippa won me over as she tried to figure out how to navigate this new world and manage other people's expectations. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    In this fun, fast-paced homage to Great Expectations, middle-schooler Pippa Park is struggling to find balance. She has the opportunity of a lifetime at a new school, but it also means new challenges and new insecurities. Anyone who has ever struggled to fit in, meet family expectations, or to maintain their cool in front of their crush will easily be able to relate to Pippa as she tries to navigate a new situation and her attempts to live up to her newly-created persona start to spiral out of c In this fun, fast-paced homage to Great Expectations, middle-schooler Pippa Park is struggling to find balance. She has the opportunity of a lifetime at a new school, but it also means new challenges and new insecurities. Anyone who has ever struggled to fit in, meet family expectations, or to maintain their cool in front of their crush will easily be able to relate to Pippa as she tries to navigate a new situation and her attempts to live up to her newly-created persona start to spiral out of control. Charming, relatable, funny, and unputdownable. My one criticism would be the use of the word "poor"in the book. Pippa considers herself poor and lives in fear of her classmates learning that she is poor. However, her family owns a business, has everything they need, can afford cell phones for everyone including her, and she has access to spending money every week. This is not poor. This is the middle class. As someone who lacked access to adequate food as a child, and sometimes as an adult, I feel using the word like this diminishes and disrespects the experiences of those who live in poverty. I received a complimentary copy of this book via a LibraryThing giveaway. Many thanks to all involved in providing me with this opportunity.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    An homage to GREAT EXPECTATIONS by Charles Dickens, what a feat (!), I just loved this! I loved the character of Pippa,,,her outlook,,,her amazing basketball skills,,,her love for her Korean family,,,her growth in this book. The lesson is simple, being rich does not guarantee happiness. And conversely, you can seem to have very little and actually have a lot. The adventure to getting to these conclusions involves Pippa getting a scholarship to a swanky school who would like her basketball talents An homage to GREAT EXPECTATIONS by Charles Dickens, what a feat (!), I just loved this! I loved the character of Pippa,,,her outlook,,,her amazing basketball skills,,,her love for her Korean family,,,her growth in this book. The lesson is simple, being rich does not guarantee happiness. And conversely, you can seem to have very little and actually have a lot. The adventure to getting to these conclusions involves Pippa getting a scholarship to a swanky school who would like her basketball talents. It is about fitting in at the new school and the somewhat rejection of her old school. And a whole lot more! Very enjoyable! P.S. Absolutely adored the lovable, sweet and encouraging Jung-Hwa (Pippa's brother-in-law).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tracey Walsh

    I loved this!!! We need more great books with girls as athletes and this fits the bill!! Pippa is so lovable-flawed in such a realistic way. It is engaging right from the beginning. My middle schoolers will love this!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Reid

    Ugh, Pippa is a brat! And her brattiness is exhausting. Read my full review here: https://agoodreid.blogspot.com/2020/0... Ugh, Pippa is a brat! And her brattiness is exhausting. Read my full review here: https://agoodreid.blogspot.com/2020/0...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol Szczechowski Makuch

    Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book by a young author. The style and flow made it so easy to read - took me less than a week to finish. The story line and humor kept me glued so much so that I could not put the book down. I couldn't wait to see what would happen in each progressive chapter. I hope there is a Pippa part 2 or maybe another similar book by this author from another students' perspective from the same school. I am a middle-school principal and cannot wait to put a number of copies o Thoroughly enjoyed reading this book by a young author. The style and flow made it so easy to read - took me less than a week to finish. The story line and humor kept me glued so much so that I could not put the book down. I couldn't wait to see what would happen in each progressive chapter. I hope there is a Pippa part 2 or maybe another similar book by this author from another students' perspective from the same school. I am a middle-school principal and cannot wait to put a number of copies of this book in my school library! It is PERFECT for middle-school students and is refreshingly innocent! Semi-ironically, it is that it is also a great read for other age groups as well. I'm obviously an adult, and I LOVED it! Elementary students who read at a higher level would enjoy it, and high-school readers who simply want an easy read would actually enjoy it as well. (If they are honest and aren't "too cool" for such an feel-good book.) Great job, Ms. Yun! Keep writing...and I promise to keep reading!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    3.5 Stars. A loose re-telling of Great Expectations, though it’s the original aspects like Pippa’s family where this shone brightest. There still aren’t that many books that feature female athletes, so it was great to see Pippa participating in this sport she loves, playing basketball with the aggression of a star player yet at the same time being a good teammate. Since Pippa spends much of the novel pursuing popularity at the expense of friends and family, she makes plenty of choices along the w 3.5 Stars. A loose re-telling of Great Expectations, though it’s the original aspects like Pippa’s family where this shone brightest. There still aren’t that many books that feature female athletes, so it was great to see Pippa participating in this sport she loves, playing basketball with the aggression of a star player yet at the same time being a good teammate. Since Pippa spends much of the novel pursuing popularity at the expense of friends and family, she makes plenty of choices along the way that will make you cringe, but at the same time, it’s such an identifiable situation, at some point practically everyone has compromised who they are to some degree in an effort to fit in only to regret it later, so you can’t help but feel for Pippa and root for her to see the errors of her ways, to see that despite how others make you feel, there really isn’t any shame in having less money or a different culture. When it came to the character of Eliot, hewing close to Great Expectations, having him be cold and aloof like Estella, well, it kind of sucked the joy out of experiencing Pippa’s crush alongside her since this boy never ever felt worthy of her admiration, ninety-nine percent of the time he’s rude to her for no reason and I just found myself wishing she would tell him off. Ultimately, I thought Eliot and his family drama didn’t feel all that necessary to telling Pippa’s story, it just kind of seemed like something wedged in to represent that part of Great Expectations, not that it was poorly written, I just felt like I would have rather those pages maybe focused on her friendship with Buddy or something else that was more personal to Pippa than Eliot’s family. That’s why Pippa’s family scenes were easily my favorites in the book because of how intimate and personal they felt. I loved the dynamics of their family, the sister who has to step in as mom to Pippa, who feels she has to be harder on her than a sister would want to be, the brother-in-law who is the sweetest guy around, I can’t imagine any reader not adoring him, and Pippa, who fights Mina at every turn as kids will do, she is very much their daughter even if it isn’t in the conventional sense. I had such empathy for each of them, for Mina so often having to be the “bad guy,” for Jung forever trying to play peacemaker, and for Pippa, too, who has these painful moments of being ashamed of her family circumstances because the outside world has made her feel that way, there’s something very real about those emotions, their household, in the arguments with the undercurrent of warmth, in comforting with food, in being there for Pippa when she’s messed up and all she expects is their disappointment in her, those are the moments I’ll remember, the reasons I’ll read more from this author.

  20. 5 out of 5

    delph ✨

    Check my review on my blog : here. An e-ARC was provided by the publisher Fabled Film Press in exchange of an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way. PIPPA PARK RAISES HER GAME is a straight-forward middle-grade story about a girl, Pippa, who ends up in a private school where rich kids go. She takes it as an opportunity to renew herself, to become the cool kid and be part of the popular one while becoming the star player of her new school’s basketball team. You know what I like t Check my review on my blog : here. An e-ARC was provided by the publisher Fabled Film Press in exchange of an honest review. This does not effect my opinion in any way. PIPPA PARK RAISES HER GAME is a straight-forward middle-grade story about a girl, Pippa, who ends up in a private school where rich kids go. She takes it as an opportunity to renew herself, to become the cool kid and be part of the popular one while becoming the star player of her new school’s basketball team. You know what I like the most when I read a book? When I can relate to the story and its main character. Honestly, I knew it was going to be a great story when I thought “if only I had read this story when I was younger.” There were so many times where I could totally relate to Pippa, that young girl who wanted to fit in, to look cool even if it meant to deny her Asian roots. And it’s something that I could totally understand even if it sounds awful. I can’t think about how many times I thought “my classmates won’t like me if I act too Asian” (now that I’m writing this review, I’m thinking: “wtf does too Asian mean.”) There was that one scene in the book where Pippa brings a lunch box from home and one of her new friend tells her that the food — kimchi — smells funny and Pippa feels so embarrassed that she just closes her lunch box and says she’s actually not hungry. Some may think that it won’t happen in real life but it did happen to me when I was in middle school. And it’s all those little things I could relate to that made my reading so much more enjoyable. Pippa was a great protagonist even if some may think that she’s a bit over dramatic especially when it comes to her crush. I totally agree with that but only because I’m a 22 years old young woman. It’s only because I’m that old that I think that it can be seen as over dramatic. But you know what? Who didn’t act like Pippa when they were her age? Who didn’t over think everything when it comes to their crush? Erin Yun wrote a great cast of side characters. I really like her new take on the “popular girls/mean girls” trope. The girls weren’t the cheerleaders but were all part of the basketball team, and I loved that so much? They were all feminine but weren’t scared of breaking that image. Actually not all of them really fit the “mean girls” trope. I mean, Helen was so kind, so sweet and so supportive I just want to hug her. One thing bothered me and it’s actually why I couldn’t give a 5* to this book. I wished the book was a bit longer, maybe one or two chapters longer. I felt like the ending was rushed and some subplots could have been more developed (like with Pippa’s mom at the end). I wished I could have seen more of Mathew, especially since he played an important role. Overall, PIPPA PARK RAISES HER GAME is a great middle-grade book, tackling important subjects as friendship, family and school. I believe young readers will relate to Pippa and her feelings as she tries to fit in an environment that may not want her.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Pippa loves to play basketball and struggles a tiny bit in school. She lives with her much older sister, Mina, and Mina's husband, and works in her sister's laundry to help out. Her mother's visa has expired, and she has returned to Korea. Mina pressures Pippa to do well in school, and when Pippa gets a letter that she is invited to attend Lakeview, a local private school on scholarship for her basketball skills, she is very pleased. Even though it means leaving h E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Pippa loves to play basketball and struggles a tiny bit in school. She lives with her much older sister, Mina, and Mina's husband, and works in her sister's laundry to help out. Her mother's visa has expired, and she has returned to Korea. Mina pressures Pippa to do well in school, and when Pippa gets a letter that she is invited to attend Lakeview, a local private school on scholarship for her basketball skills, she is very pleased. Even though it means leaving her best friend, Buddy, and embracing a new way of life, Pippa does her best to fit in. She still struggles with math, but gets tutoring help from the very cute Eliot Haverford, who has his own troubled family life, including a father who is headmaster of Lakeview. She does get in with the popular Bianca and "the Royals"- the popular girls at school, but she has trouble getting along with Olive, and is dismayed to find out that Bianca also has a crush on Eliot. Pippa continues to struggle with math,has to deal with the fact that her mother has been in a car accident and Mina must go to Korea to be with her, and gets mean anonymous notes, but when she helps out Eliot's brother, she manages to get herself in line to be suspended. Will Pippa be able to hold onto her place at Lakeview and not alienate her friends and family? Strengths: This was very reminiscent of The Dork Diaries, with the private school setting, mean girls, and jockeying for popularity. It also had a feel of Elena Delle Donne's Elle of the Ball series, where Elle has to balance school, sports, and her family life. It was nice to see a student having to work in a family business and dealing with a bit of monetary insecurity. The Korean culture was very welcome, as I have had several students with Korean backgrounds who ask to have more books about students with similar backgrounds. I loved the brother-in-law and how well he took care of Pippa. Weaknesses: I'm not a fan of the meanness in The Dork Diaries, and I doubt that anyone in the target demographic will understand that this is a "reimagining of Great Expectations". If it weren't for Aunt Haverford, I wouldn't have seen it at all. Eliot's family backstory was convoluted and seemed out of place. What I really think: I'll purchase this to fill a need for books with girls who play basketball and characters who are Korean, but this wasn't particularly stellar.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Teri Parks

    I am a huge fan of sports, but I never played. Both of my girls have, and after reading Pippa Park, I have a better understanding of the pressures that were put on them in middle school because they played. This book is more than just about playing sports. It touches on just about every conceivable pressure a child faces in middle school and junior high: going to a new school, trying to fit in, trying to be popular, just having friends, choosing new friends over old friends, struggling to get goo I am a huge fan of sports, but I never played. Both of my girls have, and after reading Pippa Park, I have a better understanding of the pressures that were put on them in middle school because they played. This book is more than just about playing sports. It touches on just about every conceivable pressure a child faces in middle school and junior high: going to a new school, trying to fit in, trying to be popular, just having friends, choosing new friends over old friends, struggling to get good grades, requirements for maintaining a scholarship, keeping secrets so you can fit in, having a crush, family obligations, family emergencies, failing your friends, bullying and cyber bullying, consequences for doing the wrong thing with the right intentions, and competitive pressure to win. (Do you feel the weight on your shoulders yet?) I appreciate this book on so many levels. First, I think it should definitely be a “Mom and Me” book. Parents and daughters/sons should read it together. Use it as a learning tool. Use it to open discussions about the pressures your children are facing. Second, use it to talk about the pressures that sports puts on young children to determine if they can handle it. Third, use it to talk about how financial status does equal a perfect life or even a better life. What matters is what makes the home. There are so many lessons to be learned. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Character development in a Young Reader Book is hard for me to rate, because of the audience it caters to. While I didn’t “fall in love” with any one character, each one was thoroughly developed with their own unique personalities. They had strengths and weaknesses, and each fit the different characters of life well. A ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ rating. The story moved well, kept my attention, and was easy to read. While I don’t think a child would read through it as quickly as I did, I think they would stay with the story. Only a minor storyline seems a little far-fetched for me, but it set up a lesson nicely enough that I won’t dock many points for it. A very high ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ rating. Overall, a 4.95⭐️ rating. This book would be good for “Mom and Me” book clubs, young readers thinking of playing sports, any child getting ready to change school districts, or someone needing help coping with middle school/ junior high school pressures. Thank You to Stacey and Nicole at Fabled Films Press for the opportunity to review this book in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stacie

    Pippa Park, a Korean American, has a lot of changes in her life as a middle-schooler. She is living with her sister and brother-in-law while her mom is back in Korea. She has just received a mysterious scholarship to go to a fancy private school and she made the basketball team and will play against her former middle school. She doesn’t feel like she belongs at the private school with all the other kids since she is there on scholarship and lives in a small apartment above the laundromat her sis Pippa Park, a Korean American, has a lot of changes in her life as a middle-schooler. She is living with her sister and brother-in-law while her mom is back in Korea. She has just received a mysterious scholarship to go to a fancy private school and she made the basketball team and will play against her former middle school. She doesn’t feel like she belongs at the private school with all the other kids since she is there on scholarship and lives in a small apartment above the laundromat her sister owns. As she begins to feel her way through the social norms of her new school, she tries hard to fit in. When she is taken in by the popular “Royals” she tries her best to meet their expectations and instead falls short and her lies start to become harder and harder to keep straight. I love that Pippa is a Korean American and she shares her culture in the story. Her sister is demanding of her studies and her high expectations can be a lot for Pippa to handle. Pippa often shares some of the delicious food and even the holidays that are part of her culture. Pippa’s passion for basketball and how she uses her love for the sport to help her handle the stress in her life is a great lesson readers can relate to. Her struggles adjusting to a new school and a new friend group are extremely realistic and relatable for readers. Her little white lies and evasive answers build up and eventually come crashing down on her. Pippa offers good lessons for all middle-grade readers about relating to friends, fitting in, sticking to your values, and telling the truth. She is also determined to meet the expectations of her new school by working hard on her classes and practicing her basketball skills. Unfortunately, her determination is affected with there is a crisis in her family and some of her secrets come out. But, how Pippa handles this crisis is one of the best lessons in the book. Readers who have ever been the new kid, love participating in sports, or those of a minority in their school will be able to relate and enjoy Pippa’s story. This story is based on Dicken’s GREAT EXPECTATIONS and is part of a new series of books by Fabled Films Press to modernize and diversify classics for middle-grade readers. They hope to have stories with relatable characters that will help students understand the classics once they enter the high school curriculum.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tonja Drecker

    Pippa Park's spunk, determination and heart make her a character to love as she dribbles through all sorts of unexpected troubles. Pippa Park might be great at basketball, but math is not her thing, and that causes some major troubles. Being raised by her older sister and her husband—since their mother had to return to Korea due to a lack of a green card—life wouldn't be too bad, but her older sister is strict. That means no basketball until Pippa gets her grades back up. When she's suddenly info Pippa Park's spunk, determination and heart make her a character to love as she dribbles through all sorts of unexpected troubles. Pippa Park might be great at basketball, but math is not her thing, and that causes some major troubles. Being raised by her older sister and her husband—since their mother had to return to Korea due to a lack of a green card—life wouldn't be too bad, but her older sister is strict. That means no basketball until Pippa gets her grades back up. When she's suddenly informed that she's been given a scholarship to the private school with expectations that she'll improve their basketball team, she not only can't believer her luck, she has no clue where it came from. She might be thrilled, but she's also knows that going to a rich school won't be easy. And it's even worse than she suspected. What a engaging read! Pippa has the perfect balance of problems, humor, drama, determination and a little suspense. While it appears at times to hit cliche moments from a poor-kid-hits-rich-kid drama, these usually swing into completely different and unexpected directions, making it hard to know what Pippa's really up against and who she can depend on. Every scene adds something new to the story, making it a read, which isn't easily put down as she tries to find her spot in life and figure out how she can juggle everything. Not only is this a school drama, but the author hits upon other topics. Pippa is Korean, and her family has been divided thanks to her mother's inability to remain in the US. Yet, she wants the best for her kids and leaves them behind...but the love and connections are still there. Aspects of the Korean culture flows in with ease, offering insight without becoming forced or overpowering. Even the other characters deal with their own problems, ranging from jealousy to dealing with family loss. And yet all of this never comes across as too serious thanks to the author's ability to sprinkle in just the right amount of humor and ease at just the right time. It's definitely a read to recommend. I won an ARC copy through Library Thing and enjoyed reading this even more than I thought I would.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica (Spooky KidLit & We Who Walk Here, Walk Alone)

    Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a charming, relatable, and occasionally painful middle grade retelling of Great Expectations. When Pippa—a first-generation Korean-American being raised by her sister ever since her mother had to return to South Korea—is offered a basketball scholarship to a prestigious and expensive private school, she jumps at the chance to start over as a new person in a new place. Following the "Rules of Cool" that she learns from a tween girls' magazine, she becomes the confide Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a charming, relatable, and occasionally painful middle grade retelling of Great Expectations. When Pippa—a first-generation Korean-American being raised by her sister ever since her mother had to return to South Korea—is offered a basketball scholarship to a prestigious and expensive private school, she jumps at the chance to start over as a new person in a new place. Following the "Rules of Cool" that she learns from a tween girls' magazine, she becomes the confident, aloof New Pippa and soon gets invited to hang out with the coolest clique at school. But trying to hide her modest financial circumstances and true personality gets harder and harder, especially once she receives a threatening message from an anonymous cyberbully. As her façade crumbles, Pippa has to make some hard choices about who she really wants to be, learning valuable lessons along the way about personal integrity and true friendship. Pippa is an engaging character with a great sense of humor and a kind heart. She's someone that other kids will root for, especially as she tries to hide her social awkwardness and deal with the mean girls at her new school. I particularly appreciated author Erin Yun's approach to Pippa's basketball skills. She's a team player who works very hard and never wavers in her confidence; as an athlete, she's a great role model for young readers, especially girls. Pippa is also a refreshingly realistic kid who defies gender and racial stereotypes, which Yun often tackles directly in the text. There are even discussion questions, an author interview, and a Korean glossary in the back matter. The story is entertaining and has something for nearly everyone: drama, suspense, romance, humor, a nuanced treatment of immigration and class issues, an exciting sports element, and a heartwarming message about the value of friends and family. Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a terrific #ownvoices middle grade novel with a fun, lovable heroine.

  26. 4 out of 5

    michelle

    *Thank you to Fabled Films Press and Media Masters Publicity for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. Erin Yun has created a modern day twist on Great Expectations with Pippa Park Raises Her Game. It adds a nice twist to compare it to the original, but Pippa stands on her own. A quality look at the challenges of being a teen, especially being one who doesn't quite fit in for whatever the reason. Pippa struggles with feeling the need to hide who she really is, where she previously *Thank you to Fabled Films Press and Media Masters Publicity for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. Erin Yun has created a modern day twist on Great Expectations with Pippa Park Raises Her Game. It adds a nice twist to compare it to the original, but Pippa stands on her own. A quality look at the challenges of being a teen, especially being one who doesn't quite fit in for whatever the reason. Pippa struggles with feeling the need to hide who she really is, where she previously went to school, trying to live up to everyone else's expectations, and thinking you know someone when you really don't know anything. I have a feeling that Pippa's experiences are going to resonate with middle schoolers. Pippa is Korean American and a magnificent basketball player. Unfortunately, she is not so great at math and with bad grades her sister won't let her play basketball. Instead she has to go to private tutoring with a student from Lakeview, the preppy local private school. The twist? Soon after starting tutoring a mysterious benefactor gets her into Lakeview on full scholarship to help their girls' basketball team. At Lakeview, Pippa wants to reinvent herself, but she also feels the need to hide where she went to school and the fact that her family owns a laundromat. The characters are realistic even if some of the plot is a bit far-fetched. But Yun was trying to make the story of Great Expectations a bit more relevant for today's students. I love having a Korean-American girl on the cover and that she is a basketball player. Pippa isn't perfect. She makes mistakes and a number of bad choices, but she tries to fix them. Great to have a good story like this that takes on realistic issues but isn't a depressing topic. I definitely think there is a place for this book in a school library.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    What a fantastic book!  Discussing topics such as socioeconomic status, scholarships, immigration, and loyalty, Pippa Park Raises Her Game makes an incredible statement on what it means to deal with all of these and only be in middle school.  Pippa misses her mother dearly, who she hasn't seen since her mother was deported, and now she must deal with her older sister being her caretaker--awkward, right?  Her sister wants nothing but the best for Pippa, and wants her to take every opportunity tha What a fantastic book!  Discussing topics such as socioeconomic status, scholarships, immigration, and loyalty, Pippa Park Raises Her Game makes an incredible statement on what it means to deal with all of these and only be in middle school.  Pippa misses her mother dearly, who she hasn't seen since her mother was deported, and now she must deal with her older sister being her caretaker--awkward, right?  Her sister wants nothing but the best for Pippa, and wants her to take every opportunity that she never had for herself.  But Pippa just wants a normal life where she's allowed to play basketball and get average grades in math.  Not a life where she and her sister and sister's husband live in a small apartment, and not a life where she sometimes has to run shifts at their family's laundromat. But when she's offered a full ride scholarship to the prestigious school on the other side of town, her sister jumps at the opportunity.  This induction to a glimpse at a new, richer life enchants Pippa, and she soon forgets her old friends in preference of her new friends who spend Friday afternoons getting manicures and exchanging charms on their bracelets.  But how long can she hold up against her own deception?  Especially when someone claims to know Pippa's secret... This book flowed well, made use of the awkwardness it is to be thirteen, and brought back memories of what it was like to buy J-14 and Teen Vogue at the grocery store.  I hope that this book helps create the same memories that I have and that I have seen myself represented in.  Overall, this book was so endearing and enthusiastic in its characters.  I definitely recommend this to anyone who wants to decolonize their bookshelf and to those who love middle grade dramas about money, boys, and grades. Review cross-listed here!

  28. 5 out of 5

    V

    The Premise: Great Expectations for modern middle graders with a female Korean-American Pip. Mom's Review: Seventh grade Pippa Park lives with her sister and brother-in-law in the US; her mother lives in Korea. Pippa is an exceptional basketball player but a poor mathematician, and her sister has stipulated math grades must rise before Pippa can rejoin the school's basketball team. Shortly after the start of the school year, Pippa is offered a basketball scholarship to an elite private school. She The Premise: Great Expectations for modern middle graders with a female Korean-American Pip. Mom's Review: Seventh grade Pippa Park lives with her sister and brother-in-law in the US; her mother lives in Korea. Pippa is an exceptional basketball player but a poor mathematician, and her sister has stipulated math grades must rise before Pippa can rejoin the school's basketball team. Shortly after the start of the school year, Pippa is offered a basketball scholarship to an elite private school. She accepts and tries to reinvent herself as totally cool and confident. Between academics, basketball, working at her sister's laundromat, coping with her mother's poor health half a world away, trying to fit in at the new school, and enduring a cyberbully's attacks, it is small wonder that Pippa struggles to meet all her obligations and fails. All in all, Pippa Park Raises Her Game is a fast read. Pippa and her best friend Buddy are relatable, her brother-in-law is admirable and sympathetic, and mean girls Bianca and Caroline are delightfully detestable. At a certain point, readers will be disgusted with Pippa – she denies herself, her family, and Buddy. But she is relatable in her insecurity, her poor choices, and also her efforts to make amends. In the end, Pippa stands up for herself, recognizes her true friends, and realizes what she values. The quick pace of the book, a bit middle-school romance, and some mean-girl drama, make for an exciting page turner. Middle grade and middle school students will find a fun, tense, and gratifying novel in Pippa Park Raises Her Game. Note: An Advance Reading Copy was provided in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Parkhill

    Pippa Park, a middle-school student whose family owns a laundromat, receives a basketball scholarship to go to a private school. Once there, she faces new pressures along with her new opportunities, as she sets out to reinvent herself and hide her background from her classmates. The book is intended to be a reimagining of Charles Dickens' Great Expecations so it amused me to look for parallels between this and the classic work. The first, and most overt similarity is in the names of the protagoni Pippa Park, a middle-school student whose family owns a laundromat, receives a basketball scholarship to go to a private school. Once there, she faces new pressures along with her new opportunities, as she sets out to reinvent herself and hide her background from her classmates. The book is intended to be a reimagining of Charles Dickens' Great Expecations so it amused me to look for parallels between this and the classic work. The first, and most overt similarity is in the names of the protagonists: Pippa and Pippin. Similar, too, are the protagonists' family circumstance. Pippin lived with his sister and her husband, Joe whereas Pippa lives with her sister Mina and her husband, Jung-Hwa, because their mother, Ji-Mon, had to leave America when her work visa expired. Details of the story-line are updated and subtly changed, but still follow their Dickensian precedent. Hence, instead of a convict named Magwitch whom Pippin encounters in a cemetery, Erin Yun's protagonist is startled one night by a hoodie-wearing stranger in the woods by the basketball court. The Haverford family, of whom the father is administrator at Pippa's new school, also includes upper-classman Eliot who tutors Pippa in math. And the Haverford family is overshadowed by a tragedy that befell their Aunt Evelyn. Whether or not readers recognize parallels between this and Dickens' work, I think that they will enjoy the story for its individual merits. Fitting in, both on and off the court, trying to juggle school and home ... readers will find a lot to relate to in Pippa Park's first-person story. I received a copy of this book through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Marie

    I bought this book for my 12 yr old daughter because a friend recommended it, so I bought it ~ even though my daughter hates basketball hahaha Well, to her surprise she LOVED this book (and so did I, at age 53!!) and she even hopes the author has plans on writing more books about Pippa Parks!! I couldn't be more thrilled since I usually have to force my daughter to do her 30 minutes of reading a day, but with this book she did more than 30 minutes and I didn't even have to tell her to read - she I bought this book for my 12 yr old daughter because a friend recommended it, so I bought it ~ even though my daughter hates basketball hahaha Well, to her surprise she LOVED this book (and so did I, at age 53!!) and she even hopes the author has plans on writing more books about Pippa Parks!! I couldn't be more thrilled since I usually have to force my daughter to do her 30 minutes of reading a day, but with this book she did more than 30 minutes and I didn't even have to tell her to read - she happily was reading this book without being told!!! Thank you Ms Yun, for creating such amazing characters that my daughter could really relate to and truly grew fond of! Especially Pippa, not necessary the basketball player, but the middle schooler wanting to fit in, and all the ups and downs that come along with it! And, also all the ups and downs that life throws at you ~ outside of school, too!! I just want everyone to know that this isn't a book just about a girl that loves basketball, it is that but so much more, and with Ms Yun's choice of very descriptive words it is almost like you are watching a movie in your head while reading, if that makes sense!! Like you are SEEING everything not just READING words!! It takes a talented author to do that, I am in awe that Ms Yun is so young and that this is her first book, yet she has that amazing capability of making you feel like you are personally in each scene with the characters!! This is a great book for all pre-teens and older - great first book for Ms Yun!! 2 thumbs up from me👍👍 and 2 thumbs up from my daughter 👍👍

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