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The author of the Millennium novels laid out the clues. Now a journalist is following them. When Stieg Larsson died, the author of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo had been working on a true mystery that out-twisted his Millennium novels: the assassination on February 28, 1986, of Olof Palme, the Swedish prime minister. It was the first time in history that a head of state h The author of the Millennium novels laid out the clues. Now a journalist is following them. When Stieg Larsson died, the author of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo had been working on a true mystery that out-twisted his Millennium novels: the assassination on February 28, 1986, of Olof Palme, the Swedish prime minister. It was the first time in history that a head of state had been murdered without a clue who’d done it—and on a Stockholm street at point-blank range. Internationally known for his fictional far-right villains, Larsson was well acquainted with their real-life counterparts and documented extremist activities throughout the world. For years he’d been amassing evidence that linked their terrorist acts to what he called “one of the most astounding murder cases” he’d ever covered. Larsson’s archive was forgotten until journalist Jan Stocklassa was given exclusive access to the author’s secret project. In The Man Who Played with Fire, Stocklassa collects the pieces of Larsson’s true-crime puzzle to follow the trail of intrigue, espionage, and conspiracy begun by one of the world’s most famous thriller writers. Together they set out to solve a mystery that no one else could.


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The author of the Millennium novels laid out the clues. Now a journalist is following them. When Stieg Larsson died, the author of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo had been working on a true mystery that out-twisted his Millennium novels: the assassination on February 28, 1986, of Olof Palme, the Swedish prime minister. It was the first time in history that a head of state h The author of the Millennium novels laid out the clues. Now a journalist is following them. When Stieg Larsson died, the author of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo had been working on a true mystery that out-twisted his Millennium novels: the assassination on February 28, 1986, of Olof Palme, the Swedish prime minister. It was the first time in history that a head of state had been murdered without a clue who’d done it—and on a Stockholm street at point-blank range. Internationally known for his fictional far-right villains, Larsson was well acquainted with their real-life counterparts and documented extremist activities throughout the world. For years he’d been amassing evidence that linked their terrorist acts to what he called “one of the most astounding murder cases” he’d ever covered. Larsson’s archive was forgotten until journalist Jan Stocklassa was given exclusive access to the author’s secret project. In The Man Who Played with Fire, Stocklassa collects the pieces of Larsson’s true-crime puzzle to follow the trail of intrigue, espionage, and conspiracy begun by one of the world’s most famous thriller writers. Together they set out to solve a mystery that no one else could.

30 review for The Man Who Played with Fire: Stieg Larsson's Lost Files and the Hunt for an Assassin

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    ”Stieg Larsson’s three books—known as the Millennium Trilogy or The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series—have sold more than eighty million copies, but his greatest achievement wasn’t writing thrillers. He devoted his entire adult life to fighting right-wing extremism.” There was a lot of speculation after Stieg Larsson died at the tender age of 50 that one of the numerous right-wing groups he had been investigating had murdered him. Maybe even the very people who assassinated Swedish Prime Ministe ”Stieg Larsson’s three books—known as the Millennium Trilogy or The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series—have sold more than eighty million copies, but his greatest achievement wasn’t writing thrillers. He devoted his entire adult life to fighting right-wing extremism.” There was a lot of speculation after Stieg Larsson died at the tender age of 50 that one of the numerous right-wing groups he had been investigating had murdered him. Maybe even the very people who assassinated Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme on February 28th, 1986. The thought of Stieg dying at the hands of the unprincipled people he investigated made a better story and a more fascinating end to an investigative journalist’s life than that he died from climbing a flight of stairs. The fact was that heart trouble had plagued his family. His grandfather died from a massive heart attack in his 50s. Couple that with the evidence that Stieg spent years working a crushing number of hours, eating poorly, and sleeping for too few hours. It was as if he knew he had a short time to live. He left behind boxes and boxes of files on right-wing extremism in Sweden. He drew diagrams. He investigated the assassination of Palme and put forth theories of who could have been behind it. The incompetence of the police was a constant source of irritation to him and also to the man tasked with going through his files, Jan Stocklassa. It proved a treasure trove for a writer on his own quest to figure out who the actual triggerman was and who helped him. Like with most murder investigations, you start with motive. Palme had made a lot of enemies. He had thrwarted the aims of the South Africans regarding apartheid. He had made enemies of most of the extremist groups in Sweden, who either thought through his policies he did too little or overstepped by doing too much. ”There were up to ten people who claimed that they knew about the assassination in advance and notified the press or the police (and the police then leaked this to the press). Two of these warnings stuck out because they had unquestionably been passed on to the authorities prior to the assassination and should therefore have resulted in Säpo raising the threat level for Palme’s security team, which might have prevented the assassination from taking place.” Now wasn’t that interesting? There was also a lot of chatter previous to the JFK assassination, which reportedly Kennedy dismissed. He was going to Texas, a hostile state, come hell or high water. Depending on where you fall on the spectrum of Lee Harvey Oswald conspiracy theories, there was even some evidence that Oswald tried to warn someone in the government that the assassination plans were in place. So was it incompetence or complicity? That was a question that Larsson and Stocklassa asked themselves numerous times as they sifted through the same information decades apart. Here was Stocklassa’s final take on the police force: ”Once again, the Swedish police failed where others succeeded, but as Hanlon’s razor says: never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.” After they warned about a potential assassination attempt nothing was done to beef up security around Palme. What was interesting about watching Stocklassa accumulate information was the tenacity with which he approached the evidence. He was determined to run after this story until he ran out of land to support his feet. He had to strip away some of Larsson’s suppositions as he found evidence to lead him in a different direction. He went undercover and found a perfect Mata Hari in the enigmatic Lída Komárková who gained him valuable information that clicked over several tumblers that made him confident that he was close to unlocking the solution. The resolution of the most egregious crime in Swedish history was nearly in his grasp. This read like a thriller. I felt like I was there with Stocklassa, combing through the files and putting together charts of who knew whom and when. The shooting itself was indicative of an amateur shooter. The assassin only shot Palme once through the body and missed his wife with a second bullet. A professional would have certainly put an extra bullet or two into the main target. The one bullet was a lucky shot, passing through Palme at the one place to do the most damage. A slight deviation in bullet track and he very well might have lived. I’m not sure the assassin ever expected to be allowed to get away, but he did. It was puzzling exactly how he did? The ineptitude and lack of formalized planning made me think about what Oswald kept yelling to the press…”I’m a patsy.” Could this shooter have been a patsy as well, but put in place by a nefarious organization to do the job? You’ll have to decide for yourself as Stocklassa presents you with his evidence. I want to thank Amazon for providing me with a free copy as part of their First Reads Program. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com I also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    4.5 stars This work of creative non-fiction by Jan Stocklassa offers a comprehensive overview of the murder of Olof Palme. Author Jan Stocklassa Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme ***** On February 28, 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was assassinated on the corner of Sveavägen and Tunnelgaten in Stockholm. Corner of Sveavägen and Tunnelgaten in Stockholm After dismissing his security guards for the evening, Palme and his wife Lisbeth went to the movies, then decided to walk home. Olof Palme and 4.5 stars This work of creative non-fiction by Jan Stocklassa offers a comprehensive overview of the murder of Olof Palme. Author Jan Stocklassa Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme ***** On February 28, 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was assassinated on the corner of Sveavägen and Tunnelgaten in Stockholm. Corner of Sveavägen and Tunnelgaten in Stockholm After dismissing his security guards for the evening, Palme and his wife Lisbeth went to the movies, then decided to walk home. Olof Palme and his wife Lisbeth As the couple was strolling along a gunman closed in and shot Palme in the back, killing him almost instantly. A second shot in Lisbeth's direction only drilled two holes into her coat, and she was unharmed. The killer then ran away and escaped. The hunt for the shooter spawned a laundry list of suspects and a plethora of conspiracy theories, but at the time of this book's publication - more than three decades later - the killer still hasn't been unequivocally identified. To write this narrative, Jan Stocklassa relied heavily on the archives of Stieg Larsson , the author of 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' series. Writer Stieg Larsson Most people aren't aware that Larsson was originally an investigative journalist and illustrator who did extensive research on white-nationalist, right-wing, and neo-Nazi groups in Sweden. Larsson suspected that far-right organizations conspired to assassinate Palme, and immediately began investigating the murder from that point of view. Larsson's theory morphed over time to include pro-apartheid groups in South Africa, because Palme strongly and vocally opposed this policy of racial segregation. Apartheid signs in South Africa Larsson died in 2004, but left reams of research about Palme's murder in the archives of 'Expo' magazine, which he published. Stieg Larsson's Expo magazine The Swedish authorities in charge of the Palme investigation were either as incompetent as Keystone Kops or scandalously corrupt because - year after year - they ignored valid clues and tried to nail their own bugbears for the crime. Keystone Kops Files related to the Palme assassination could probably fill a room, and Stocklassa read innumerable documents for this book. After immersing himself in the existing paperwork, Stocklassa launched his own investigation - doing research; traveling to South Africa and Cyprus; interviewing persons of interest; forming hypotheses; and working with a female 'spy' to gather additional information. The result is this book, which contains a fascinating analysis of the Palme killing. Some reviewers kvetch about the length of the book and the large number of people with hard-to-pronounce names, but this didn't bother me. After describing the actual shooting, Stocklassa devotes many pages to the observations of various witnesses - some of whom (allegedly) saw surveillers with walkie-talkies following the Palmes and some of whom think they saw the killer running away or climbing into a getaway car. In addition, the author discusses wife Lisbeth Palme's confusion about the shooter's appearance, and the creation of a composite photo from the observations of a nightclub worker on a cigarette break. Composite drawing of Palme's shooter (left) beside a photo of Jan Stocklassa As the assassination tale unfolds, Stocklassa identifies the multiple persons and law enforcement agencies who ran the Palme investigation. The first man in charge, Police Commissioner Hans Holmér, was dubbed Sherlock Holmér 😊. Unfortunately, Hans didn't have Sherlock's success, and was replaced after a time. In fact the investigative personnel changed several times over the years as one alleged perpetrator after another fizzled out. Police Commissioner Hans Holmér The main suspects targeted by Swedish officials were, in turn: the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK); Swedish extremist Viktor Gunnarsson; and criminal drug addict Christer Pettersson. Kurdistan Workers Party Extremist Viktor Gunnarsson Criminal Christer Pettersson When these targets didn't lead to an ultimate conviction, the Swedish cops were seemingly at a loss - though investigative reporters and true crime aficionados suggested many other suspects. A good part of the book is devoted to journalists' and authors' speculations about who might have conspired to kill Palme. Suspects include Swedish right-wing zealots; Swedish intelligence officers; Swedish cops; Iran-Contra schemers; South African spies; South African political organizations; Americans who supported apartheid for monetary purposes; and more. Once Stocklassa formed a solid theory about the perpetrators, he conducted his own intelligence operation with Lída Komárková. Lída Komárková Lída is a beautiful, fearless Czech woman who buddied up to a prime suspect while sporting spy paraphernalia, including a pen camera-recorder; a GPS device; and eyeglasses with a hidden camera. In the end, Stocklassa's discoveries DO suggest a likely shooter, and a location for the murder gun. Moreover, Stocklassa outlines an entire assassination operation that involves a leader; a planning group; a murder group; a surveillance group; and a patsy. The Swedish authorities have this information and may eventually resolve the mystery.....or not (given their woeful history). A fascinating (to me) chapter of the book includes a report from Stieg Larsson's archives, called "A Study of Assassination", which outlines pros and cons of assorted assassination techniques (possibly compiled by the CIA). The methods included are: - Manual: Use your bare hands (which is very hard unless you're an expert); use a tool like an axe, hammer, or screwdriver; use a rock or heavy object to administer blunt force trauma to the head; employ a rope or belt for strangulation; etc. - Accidents: Arrange a fall from a height of 75 feet or more; cause a car/truck accident; push someone in front of a train or bus; etc. - Drugs: Administer a lethal dose of some sedative or painkiller, like morphine (if you're a doctor or nurse, this is especially convenient). - Edge weapons (knives, swords, bayonets, etc.): Either pierce the heart or sever the spinal cord in the cervical region. - Firearms: These are less reliable than many people think; if you use a gun, it should have immense destructive power. - Explosives: Very effective; make sure the victim is less than six feet from the detonation. In fact, Palme's assassination was associated with the demise of MANY individuals who may have colluded to commit the crime, or worked to unmask the perpetrators. And lots of these deaths were 'accidents.' 😲 Stocklassa speculates that this may have been an attempt to tie up loose ends and/or protect the most prominent conspirators. Stieg Larsson and Jan Stocklassa also endured repercussions from their investigations, but these were largely self-inflicted. Larsson smoked incessantly and both men hung out in cafes with strong coffee and delicious pastries....which piled on the pounds. Café in Stockholm This is an excellent true crime narrative that reads like a mystery thriller. Highly recommended to readers interested in the subject. Olof Palme Memorial Plaque in Stockholm You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    In this unique book—mixing true crime, political assassination, espionage, and journal entries—Jan Stocklassa recounts events surrounding one of Sweden’s most baffling cold cases. On the evening of February 28th, 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was out with his wife, when he was shot in the back and died. The assailant fled the scene and police were forced to cobble together eyewitness accounts, though they remained quite flimsy. Struggling journalist Stieg Larsson took up the case when In this unique book—mixing true crime, political assassination, espionage, and journal entries—Jan Stocklassa recounts events surrounding one of Sweden’s most baffling cold cases. On the evening of February 28th, 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was out with his wife, when he was shot in the back and died. The assailant fled the scene and police were forced to cobble together eyewitness accounts, though they remained quite flimsy. Struggling journalist Stieg Larsson took up the case when he was roused from bed and began trying to piece together what he knew. Sightings and evidence from the scene led some of believe that Victor Gunnarsson might be a likely suspect. Gunnarsson was well-known to Larsson, who had a history of working to uncover and topple those on the political right with his strong articles. However, Gunnarsson’s guilt soon wavered and the country was clueless as to what might have happened. Larsson used his intuitive nature and some friends in the British press to help him scope out new leads, including some ties to other right-wing organisations. Larsson’s primary focus was a man with strong ties to the South African government, at the time still strong in their apartheid movement, something that Palme had been vocally against during his time in Swedish politics. When the case went cold and Larsson could go no further, he turned to writing what would become his most popular Millennium Trilogy, for which he is best known by many readers. When Larsson dies soon thereafter, Jan Stocklassa was given all his research on the Palme case and thus began a resurgence in the fact checking and pushing for answers. In the latter portion of the book, Stocklassa moves away from laying out what Larsson offered up and followed new and decisive leads to find a killer in a case that had long gone cold but was never far from the minds of Swedish officials. Using these leads and some of his own dabbling into new technology not available at the time, Stocklassa offers readers a new suspect with strong evidence to support the claims. In an investigation that Stieg Larsson began on March 1, 1986, Jan Stocklassa may have finally locked-in an answer, though the authorities have yet to act on everything in this book. Highly entertaining as well as informative, Stocklassa (and Larsson) presents loads of prevalent information and leave the reader with a strong sense that the case might finally have an answer. Recommended to those who love a good true crime mystery, as well as the reader who wishes to learn much about Stieg Larsson before any talk of dragon tattoos came to light. I was eager to read this book as soon as it crossed my radar. There is much to learn about the case, especially since I knew nothing about it from the outset. Stocklassa does a wonderful job of laying out the basics and using Stieg Larsson’s early notes and work to give the reader the proper context. From there, through a series of formats, the reader is plunged into the middle of the investigation. Stocklassa admits to using first-hand documentation, which further strengthens the Larsson angle of the entire investigation. The case is full of suspects and branch-off possibilities—much like a strong murder mystery—with espionage and the murder of many in a variety of political and social situations, going to show that South Africa was keen to rid itself of dissenters and those who sought to criticise. Even when Stocklassa took over the case himself, there were so many loose ends and trying to tie them off proved difficult for anyone, even a seasoned journalist. The themes brought up throughout make a strong case for a new suspect, one who could likely be convicted. That being said, when dealing with cases that have gone cold for so long, as well as the need to apply for extradition, the waters become murkier, even if the truth shines strong. In a book full of information, Stocklassa mixes journal entries, press clippings, private musings, and evidence analysis to prove a point and make a strong case. With brief chapters, the momentum of the case is not lost on the reader who may worry about being drowned in minutiae. Sweden appears keen to close the case out, as there is still a Palme Investigation taking place, albeit on a smaller scale. A wonderful piece of true crime that reads like a spy novel at times, which will educate the reader with any interest in the subject. Kudos, Mr. Stocklassa, for such a wonderful piece that not only revives the case of Olof Palme, but also helps readers see a Stieg Larsson before he became a household name in Scandinavian crime thrillers. I know he would be proud of the work you put into this book. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ankit Garg

    The Man Who Played with Fire by Jan Stocklassa is a true crime book which gives us comprehensive details about the assassination of the then Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986. It is very strange and uncommon that the murder of a head of state remains unsolved for decades. After getting interested in the case, the author sets about trying to solve it. During his research, he comes across the research done by journalist-turned-author of the Millenium series of novels, Stieg Larsson, when he The Man Who Played with Fire by Jan Stocklassa is a true crime book which gives us comprehensive details about the assassination of the then Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986. It is very strange and uncommon that the murder of a head of state remains unsolved for decades. After getting interested in the case, the author sets about trying to solve it. During his research, he comes across the research done by journalist-turned-author of the Millenium series of novels, Stieg Larsson, when he was alive. Jan then uses both their researches to bring the case to a satisfactory conclusion, though not the evidence that could be held up in a court of law. As it stands, the case is officially closed. It is sad that the line of research Jan took wasn't really followed by the detectives assigned to the case. After all, he has generated some pretty solid leads, which, if followed, might have turned out different results than the official one. This book has got me interested in the life and works of Stieg. Though neither have I read any of his books, nor watched their movie adaptations, they are now on my TBR and to-watch lists respectively. Verdict: Highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Good heavens, this was boring! Boring, boring, boring. The premise sounded good. The author combined his research with years of research left behind by the famous novelist Stieg Larsson in regards to the unsolved assassination of the Swedish prime minister Olof Palme in 1986. The investigation was hopelessly botched by the police. The author provides too much tedious detail, which shows all his and Larsson's intense efforts, but you know what? It's still unsolved, so the book is rather pointless Good heavens, this was boring! Boring, boring, boring. The premise sounded good. The author combined his research with years of research left behind by the famous novelist Stieg Larsson in regards to the unsolved assassination of the Swedish prime minister Olof Palme in 1986. The investigation was hopelessly botched by the police. The author provides too much tedious detail, which shows all his and Larsson's intense efforts, but you know what? It's still unsolved, so the book is rather pointless in addition to being a boring litany of excessive detail. It might resonate better if you are Swedish, but having read many true crime books, I can say this is the worst.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Passas (TapTheLine)

    This is a tremendous true crime novel, based on the meticulous and detailed research made by the author, who had access to Stieg Larsson's archive from his years as publisher of the infamous "Expo" magazine. We all know Stieg Larsson as the man who was behind the publishing phenomenon of the "Millenium" trilogy, but only a few are aware of his work as a journalist which was dedicated to unmasking the extreme right in Sweden that gradually gained power from the beginning of the 1980s. Larsson beg This is a tremendous true crime novel, based on the meticulous and detailed research made by the author, who had access to Stieg Larsson's archive from his years as publisher of the infamous "Expo" magazine. We all know Stieg Larsson as the man who was behind the publishing phenomenon of the "Millenium" trilogy, but only a few are aware of his work as a journalist which was dedicated to unmasking the extreme right in Sweden that gradually gained power from the beginning of the 1980s. Larsson began working in one of Sweden's biggest news agencies, "TT", as an illustrator and while he was working there, the unbelievable happened. The country's Prime Minister, Olof Palme, was shot in the middle of Stockholm's center as he was returning home along with his wife, Lisbet. Palme who was by nature an inquiring individual began immediately to gather information regarding the murder that soon led him to some of his own theories. The presentation of those theories is the main objective for Stocklaasa in "The Man Who Played With Fire". To read my full review, visit https://tapthelinemag.com/post/the-ma...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    Jan Stocklassa consulted Eva Gabrielsson, Steig Larrson’s long time companion, on a research project relating to architecture/geography and crime. What she had to say took his research in a totally different direction that consumed him for the next 7 years. Well known for his fictional trilogy, Larrson’s life work was in countering right wing and Nazi extremism. He investigated, researched and wrote for his own publications and others. The intersection of Stocklassa’s interests and Larsson’s was Jan Stocklassa consulted Eva Gabrielsson, Steig Larrson’s long time companion, on a research project relating to architecture/geography and crime. What she had to say took his research in a totally different direction that consumed him for the next 7 years. Well known for his fictional trilogy, Larrson’s life work was in countering right wing and Nazi extremism. He investigated, researched and wrote for his own publications and others. The intersection of Stocklassa’s interests and Larsson’s was the 1986 assassination of Sweden’s Prime Minister, Olof Palme. Larsson’s extensive files containing clippings, hand written notes, biographies and government reports became the framework for Stocklassa’s research. Palme’s anti-Apartheid stance and his disruption of the South African and Swedish parts of the US’s Iran-Contra Arms deal earned him powerful enemies. His social policies set off right wingers who convinced themselves he was giving Sweden to the USSR. His research took Stocklassa to Cyprus, South Africa and rural Sweden. He describes his spy craft (cameras in pens and glasses and use of Facebook) and those who assist him and those he interviews. South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation testimony contained applicable confessions and gave prosecutorial immunity such that some were willing to be interviewed. A chart on pages 380-383 shows the broad reach of the bombings and assassinations by those who most likely planned the Palme assassination. Of all the people playing with fire, Lida is the most intriguing. Her identity is well screened (Mossad? CIA?). She was fearless, comfortable with spycraft and an excellent actress. I didn’t know (but was not surprised) that the CIA had an assassination manual. Recommended is having a hapless person who is (or appears to be) a true believer either pull the trigger or stand at the crime scene. In the Kennedy assassination (to which the Palme assassination can be compared for its impact and cover up), it was Lee Harvey Oswarld and in this case it is Jakob Thedelin, who looks like the composite drawing of the 10 witness who saw the likely assassin fleeing. He was not interrogated during the investigation; Was the investigation corrupted by sympathizers of the assassins in the various investigation teams? The lack of an index is a serious omission. There are so many people it is hard to keep track of them. The List of Characters at the end lacks sufficient detail to be of help. Entries for “Suspects” and the “ South African Connections” are so spare you cannot distinguish one from the other. I suggest that readers take notes on the characters to place them when they re-appear. Not as serious an omission, but still a need, is the lack of documentation. While Larsson’s files, books and news reports are noted in the text, full documentation would be helpful. As of the date of this book review, the murder has still not been officially solved. Although the evidence is circumstantial, I believe Stocklassa has found the killer. This is an excellent research report. Short chapters make for a quick read. A lot of it feels like a mystery novel. The lack of a much needed index (or at least a more helpful character list) takes it from a 5 star to a 4 star book for me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Armand Rosamilia

    Before starting this book, I'd never known anything about an assassination in Sweden or the personal life of Stieg Larsson. I'd never even read his fiction books. The author, Jan Stocklassa, makes an exhaustive and interesting case for who not only who the assassin was, but all the moving parts that went into getting there and having it still unresolved.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    The description starts hard-boiled as true-crime can get with tantalizing lost research of author/journalist Stieg Larsson on the ultimate cold-case the assassination Prime Minister Olof Palme February 28, 1986. That's one hell of a pitch, and I couldn't resist taking a crack at it. The reality is, Jan Stocklassa's globe-trotting, multi-lingual adventure has less to with Steig than catching the bug of citizen investigation in the vein of Michelle McNamara, with roughly the same results: not much The description starts hard-boiled as true-crime can get with tantalizing lost research of author/journalist Stieg Larsson on the ultimate cold-case the assassination Prime Minister Olof Palme February 28, 1986. That's one hell of a pitch, and I couldn't resist taking a crack at it. The reality is, Jan Stocklassa's globe-trotting, multi-lingual adventure has less to with Steig than catching the bug of citizen investigation in the vein of Michelle McNamara, with roughly the same results: not much. Jan's antics involve a few interesting characters like the over-sold mysterious Leahta, who boldly inserts herself the case. Was there a multinational, South African assassination attempt? I'd probably hedge my bets "no." Instead of uncovering the truth, Stocklassa presents an interesting-but-less-compelling alternative narrative. Certainly, the actors were capable but instead felt like lonely old men who society has forgotten, looking to regale any listener, be it a foreign journalist or mysterious, attractive younger woman. Stocklassa chases the ghost of Larsson, at every corner asking, "What would Stieg do?" and Stocklassa seems intent on name dropping latter portions of the book to remind us why we bought the book. Had this been simply a roleplay exercise, this would have fizzled out, but Jan has caught a clinical-grade case of the whodunits and leads him to do just about anything to get close to his targets. Also interesting is the mild-controversy over the novel here in the US. Amazon included it with its Prime book club, which ruffled the feathers of conservatives, as any book that makes the right-wing (in this case, across the globe involving fascist groups with Nazi/Neo-Nazi ties) clearly the work of the *shaking fist at sky* liberals. Of course, this book has very little to do with the United States (sans cold-war geopolitics) or has little to say about Trumpism (sans general statements berating racism/xenophobia). Anyone complaining hasn't read it, or has paper-thin-skin. There's a greater irony of the outrage, but it's not worth unpacking here. Even if the book is tangentially about Stieg, we do get a peek in the paranoid, shadowy spook-filled, cabals of right-wing power brokers that made up Stieg's Millennium Trilogy, and the story is interesting, even if I don't buy the final conclusion. To circle back to Michelle McNamara's "I'll Be Gone in the Dark," the victory wasn't unearthing groundbreaking clues or finding community in a group of like-minded wannabes. If Palme's killer is caught, it likely won't be Stieg or Jan's work but rather renewing interest in a cold-case to motivate the pros to finish.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura Noggle

    Drags on a bit, but still reads *almost* like fiction. Not as much Stieg Larsson as I wanted, more of a continuation into his research on the assassination of the Swedish prime minister in the 80s. ”What you are holding in your hands is a work of creative nonfiction. It is written like a thriller, but it’s factual.”

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Passas (TapTheLine)

    This is a tremendous true crime novel, based on the meticulous and detailed research made by the author, who had access to Stieg Larsson's archive from his years as publisher of the infamous "Expo" magazine. We all know Stieg Larsson as the man who was behind the publishing phenomenon of the "Millenium" trilogy, but only a few are aware of his work as a journalist which was dedicated to unmasking the extreme right in Sweden that gradually gained power from the beginning of the 1980s. Larsson beg This is a tremendous true crime novel, based on the meticulous and detailed research made by the author, who had access to Stieg Larsson's archive from his years as publisher of the infamous "Expo" magazine. We all know Stieg Larsson as the man who was behind the publishing phenomenon of the "Millenium" trilogy, but only a few are aware of his work as a journalist which was dedicated to unmasking the extreme right in Sweden that gradually gained power from the beginning of the 1980s. Larsson began working in one of Sweden's biggest news agencies, "TT", as an illustrator and while he was working there, the unbelievable happened. The country's Prime Minister, Olof Palme, was shot in the middle of Stockholm's center as he was returning home along with his wife, Lisbet. Palme who was by nature an inquiring individual began immediately to gather information regarding the murder that soon led him to some of his own theories. The presentation of those theories is the main objective for Stocklaasa in "The Man Who Played With Fire". To read my full review, visit https://tapthelinemag.com/post/the-ma...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rick Harsch

    Read it if for some reason you feel you have to. Given that my current novel, an anthological maxi novel, padded by the contributions of an expected 75 to 100 contributors, is called The Assassination of Olof Palme, a People's Novel, I had to. It provided nothing convincingly new, but served to refresh my memory of certain details. The guy who wrote it tends toward shabby logic, the drama promised is second-rate, better left unpromised, the entire Stieg Larsson connection overplayed and underwhe Read it if for some reason you feel you have to. Given that my current novel, an anthological maxi novel, padded by the contributions of an expected 75 to 100 contributors, is called The Assassination of Olof Palme, a People's Novel, I had to. It provided nothing convincingly new, but served to refresh my memory of certain details. The guy who wrote it tends toward shabby logic, the drama promised is second-rate, better left unpromised, the entire Stieg Larsson connection overplayed and underwhelming, and, apparently, though the recent Swedish determination that 'Skandia Man' pulled the trigger requires a great deal of explanation (for instance, then who the hell ran off after the shooting?) and is likey a salve offered up to prevent the perpetual roiling of theories, most of which that have lasted have too much merit to utterly dismiss (Bofors, Iran/Contra/South African arms deals and apartheid) and the best of which coalesce into something likely enough to be near the truth, the guy this guy fingers peudonymously didn't pan out. Back to Miguel Marmol, first hand reportage, the humble story of a Salvadoran revolutionary.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Bowen

    This book was not what I expected. I got through the first fifty or so pages and it didn't draw me in. I knew it would be about Larsson, but it was billed as a thriller so I thought it would be written like one. Maybe the backstory and press accounts would have been more interesting interspersed with the story, instead of all up front where I had to plow through it without knowing how it would fit in. Perhaps it got better after another fifty pages, but if I wanted to read a documentary I would This book was not what I expected. I got through the first fifty or so pages and it didn't draw me in. I knew it would be about Larsson, but it was billed as a thriller so I thought it would be written like one. Maybe the backstory and press accounts would have been more interesting interspersed with the story, instead of all up front where I had to plow through it without knowing how it would fit in. Perhaps it got better after another fifty pages, but if I wanted to read a documentary I would have chosen one. Tricked me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Bastin

    This was interesting for a while, but it got old long before I got to the end. Count this one as a DNF.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wilson

    The author is investigating the the assassination of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986. He uses Stieg Larsons research into the murder as a stepping off point. Larsson who is known to readers as the author of the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series, was actually a respected political reporter before his death. Larsson had spent quite a bit of time trying to solve the unsolved murder and left behind a treasure trove of notes and letters on the subject. Stocklassa takes this information and builds The author is investigating the the assassination of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986. He uses Stieg Larsons research into the murder as a stepping off point. Larsson who is known to readers as the author of the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series, was actually a respected political reporter before his death. Larsson had spent quite a bit of time trying to solve the unsolved murder and left behind a treasure trove of notes and letters on the subject. Stocklassa takes this information and builds on it quite a bit. The book is certainly well researched and presented but I'm frustrated that I still don't know who murdered Prime Minister Olof Palme. Stocklassa presents many great theories on who and why the PM might have been killed. Among other possible motives mentioned is Swedens ties to South Africa and their involvement in the Iran Contra Affair. I actually found this scenario to be one of the most interesting, maybe because I was already familiar with some of the scandal. I admit that I did have a little trouble keeping all the players straight with such strong Swedish names which I'm not used to. I'm glad I read the book I just wish I knew who did it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Louwes

    This book was choppy and yet congruent. It was quick paced and so packed full of information it verged on overwhelm. To keep the "players" straight you'd almost need to create your own wall map of interconnectedness with pictures, string, and thumbtacks! Of course, it's these very things that lead me to give "The Man Who Played With Fire" 4 stars. I might very well be in the minority; but, I didn't fully realize who Steig Larsson was until I read this book. I have yet to read his Millinnium Trio This book was choppy and yet congruent. It was quick paced and so packed full of information it verged on overwhelm. To keep the "players" straight you'd almost need to create your own wall map of interconnectedness with pictures, string, and thumbtacks! Of course, it's these very things that lead me to give "The Man Who Played With Fire" 4 stars. I might very well be in the minority; but, I didn't fully realize who Steig Larsson was until I read this book. I have yet to read his Millinnium Triology nor have I seen the movie(s). This book wasn't based upon those things though, this book was based upon his investigative journalism and his fixation on extremists and his dedication/obsession with solving the murder of Olof Palme. In turn, how Steig's life's work became the basis and propulsion behind Jan Stocklassa's own. The author of this book, the lengths he went to within his own research, is impressive and to be lauded. I appreciate that he carried the torch forward in regards to Steig's work but also within his own. No small feat to have the pieces of the puzzle put together, presented to the police, and to know and believe it should/will help the Palme murder become a solved case is an amazing thing to bear witness to even if only via the pages within this book. Things are never what they seem or appear to be at first glance. There are so many levels of life being lived around us, at any given time, that we'd be hard pressed to discern the truth if asked about any particular one. Layers upon layers of humanity, secrets, lies, and the truth hidden in plain sight. A good read. Hard to put down. Factual and yet written with creative license. The facts are heavy but the writing style makes the load light. A read that informs, enlightens, defines; teaches, reaches, and puts together pieces. "The Man Who Played With Fire" - I daresay you cannot find a better book than this one on the topic(s) presented within it's pages.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    I read a few books by Stieg Larsson. I recall one of them mentioning the Olof Palme mystery. But "many Portuguese names" connected with the murder, is completely new to me. The author came to Portugal, last 15th of June. https://www.dn.pt/edicao-do-dia/15-ju... -- UPDATE Last Friday [13th September] edition of Ípsilon had an interesting article about the book of Stocklassa. A Portuguese writer called José Direitinho had recently an interview with Stocklassa, in Oslo. Most important, I read a few books by Stieg Larsson. I recall one of them mentioning the Olof Palme mystery. But "many Portuguese names" connected with the murder, is completely new to me. The author came to Portugal, last 15th of June. https://www.dn.pt/edicao-do-dia/15-ju... -- UPDATE Last Friday [13th September] edition of Ípsilon had an interesting article about the book of Stocklassa. A Portuguese writer called José Direitinho had recently an interview with Stocklassa, in Oslo. Most important, it seems the book shows what happened on that night of 28th February 1986, and points the identity of those who were in the crime spot. Finally, shall we know WHO DID IT? --- UPDATE Maybe soon. https://elpais.com/internacional/2020...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    Wow, this was an eye-opener! I knew a little about the late Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme and his murder, but I didn't know that novelist Stieg Larsson had taken such a keen interest in the case. Jan Stocklassa, using his own research and tons of material Stieg Larsson had accumulated throughout the years, wrote a book that left me in stunned disbelief! Oh my goodness, the story of Olof Palme's unresolved murder is the stuff bestselling thrillers are made of! THE MAN WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE rela Wow, this was an eye-opener! I knew a little about the late Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme and his murder, but I didn't know that novelist Stieg Larsson had taken such a keen interest in the case. Jan Stocklassa, using his own research and tons of material Stieg Larsson had accumulated throughout the years, wrote a book that left me in stunned disbelief! Oh my goodness, the story of Olof Palme's unresolved murder is the stuff bestselling thrillers are made of! THE MAN WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE relates how Jan Stocklassa became interested in the Palme assassination when he was given access to Larsson's files on right-wing extremism in Sweden, which also included Larsson's theories on the Palme investigation. Mr. Stocklassa writes a comprehensive narrative, detailing Stieg's and his own experiences with the Palme investigation, almost as if it were happening in real time. It is fascinating and extraordinarily compelling. I just couldn't believe what I was reading! There is one person whose story was barely looked at, even though it appears full of holes. Although this person is definitely not the killer, I feel that something is off, and yet never looked into. Jan Stocklassa - as Stieg Larsson before him - seems to have very sound hypotheses, but one wonders if the Palme assassination will ever officially be solved. Solved, most likely - it might already be - but officially... If THE MAN WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE had been submitted to a publisher as a work of fiction, it would certainly have been immediately rejected as too outlandish; it is just that mind-boggling. It is obvious that Stieg Larsson based his Millennium hero Mikael Blomkvist on himself, which made me appreciate the late author even more. I had wondered if Stieg Larsson might have been murdered because of his tireless work against right-wing extremism, but it appears that he worked himself to death fighting fascists, and trying to find Olof Palme's murderer. Jan Stocklassa and a few people who helped him in his quest also put themselves in real danger, and what they accomplished is awe-inspiring as well. THE MAN WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE is very well written, the prose is concise and clear, abundantly detailed yet easy to follow. The text is adequately translated and edited, and the story utterly spellbinding. It reads like a political thriller, but it's all real! I still can't wrap my head around this mystery and all its political implications. It gives an altogether different perspective on recent world history (Olof Palme was murdered in 1986). Stieg Larsson and Jan Stocklassa did play with fire.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Only Wants to Read

    I found this book informative and interesting. I learned more about Stieg Larsson, a favorite. It’s a shame he died so young. One can only wonder how much better at research he would’ve been with the current technology available. And, how the lack of technology at that time (not cameras in every corner, smart phones, etc) has helped to keep this assassination a mystery. It was a slow read for me. I took my time with it. Second half was more engaging than the first, for sure.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Javier

    When Olof Palme, the Swedish Primer Minister, was assassinated on February 28, 1986, while going back home after being at the movies, Stieg Larsson, who would become world wide known years later with the “Millenium” trilogy, worked as a graphic designer and journalist for a news agency. One of his passions was investigating the extreme right groups that were growing up in Sweden, publishing a couple of books on the subject. After the death of Olof Palme he carried out a parallel investigation to When Olof Palme, the Swedish Primer Minister, was assassinated on February 28, 1986, while going back home after being at the movies, Stieg Larsson, who would become world wide known years later with the “Millenium” trilogy, worked as a graphic designer and journalist for a news agency. One of his passions was investigating the extreme right groups that were growing up in Sweden, publishing a couple of books on the subject. After the death of Olof Palme he carried out a parallel investigation to the police, becoming convinced that these groups were behind the assassination. Several years after his death, swedish journalist Jan Stocklassa had access to Larsson’s huge research , becoming also obsessed with Palme’s murder and continuing the investigation. “The man who played with fire” is the result of those investigations. While it could have resulted in a tedious essay with lots of data, names, political groups, etc. the author manages for it to read like a novel (the plot could be up there with one of Larsson’s books), taking us through the investigation carried out by Larsson and his subsequent findings years later. At the end, the author just presents his findings, leaving it up to the readers to decide what to believe happened. When I came upon this book, the only information I had about the Olof Palme murder was that he was shot on the street after being at the cinema, so this book was a real treat, finding out about all the different theories the police and media had run throughout the years: the extreme right groups, the South African secret service, etc. Knowing next to nothing about Swedish politics I was afraid I would get lost in all the data presented, but nothing farther from reality. I was completely engrossed while reading, as the story had all the twists and turns you could expect of a page-turner thriller. Thanks to Netgalley and Amazon Crossing for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chitra Ahanthem

    I am a sucker for reading up unsolved cases especially when it involves the assassination of political leaders. So there was no way that I would let this one pass: not when it involved an unsolved assassination case and certainly not when it involved an association to Steig Larsson! Famous the world over for his Millennium Trilogy books, Steig Larsson was not only an ace journalist but someone who actively investigated into the rise of the far right extremism in Sweden. What many do not know is t I am a sucker for reading up unsolved cases especially when it involves the assassination of political leaders. So there was no way that I would let this one pass: not when it involved an unsolved assassination case and certainly not when it involved an association to Steig Larsson! Famous the world over for his Millennium Trilogy books, Steig Larsson was not only an ace journalist but someone who actively investigated into the rise of the far right extremism in Sweden. What many do not know is that the journalist author was methodically looking into the loose ends of the assassination of Olof Palme, the Prime Minister of Sweden (in 1986) for over years. The assassination left no strong leads and the case remains unsolved all these years with investigation teams going on different tracks.  The Man Who Played with Fire ( a clever nod to the Millennium books) by former diplomat and journalist Jan Stocklassa looks into Larsson's files and follow the leads that Larsson had followed up. What follows is not just a well structured analysis from the notes and archived material that Larsson left behind but the manner in which the author took further investigations. What the reader gets then is not just what happened all those long years ago and the reasons but also a fascinating account into the geo political relations between Sweden, South Africa and the US. Readers who have loved the Millennium trilogy will also find the manner in which the series was based as much on the rise of extremism in Sweden but also the nature of its secret service. Those who love non fiction and follow unsolved cases will surely love this book. I so thoroughly enjoyed this one and had no idea how the 500 pages went by!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    This was a much more engrossing read than I thought it would be. Be prepared for a grisly look into the right-wing extremist scene in Sweden - there are people interviewed in this book whom we wish only lived in movies and thriller novels.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ken Fredette

    I knew it, I read the whole book and only came away with a best case scenario. It was a hard read at first because of all the names but this cleared up when it got to maybe 15 or so. It took him 8 years but it took me two weeks on and off, to read. But I read other books in the mean time. I couldn't get myself motivated in reading it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    James Lewis

    Fascinating theory, not clearly presented This book was written for European audiences, particularly those in Scandinavia, and may be difficult for Americans to follow. My interest is that I lived in snd reported from Sweden the year Olof Palme become Prime Minister, interviewed both him and his predecessor, Tage Erlander, on the day they transferred power, and have followed Swedish politics ever since. I was shocked the day Palme was assassinated. Such things didn’t happen in Sweden. And I was p Fascinating theory, not clearly presented This book was written for European audiences, particularly those in Scandinavia, and may be difficult for Americans to follow. My interest is that I lived in snd reported from Sweden the year Olof Palme become Prime Minister, interviewed both him and his predecessor, Tage Erlander, on the day they transferred power, and have followed Swedish politics ever since. I was shocked the day Palme was assassinated. Such things didn’t happen in Sweden. And I was perplexed when the murder went unsolved. As we learn, the novelist Stieg Larsson devoted much of his life to unraveling the mystery. He died of a heart attack before he could bring his investigation to a conclusion, but left a paper trail of clues. The author picked up that trail and spent eight years pursuing it. He reaches a valid conclusion, and it is well documented. Younger readers who did not live through the period from 1985-1990 will find it farfetched, but those of us who did will settle into the assumptions without difficulty. Because the book assumes a context for Palme’s politics, most American readers will bring no appreciation for who he was and what he represented. Suspects in this narrative believe Palme was a Soviet agent, and the perception goes unchallenged. It forces the reader into a position of accepting one of Trump’s incessant lies about his opponents as Gospel without the background to challenge it. (In fact, the parallels between today’s American right-wingers and those in Sweden three decades before is remarkable. Characters like Stephen Miller fairly jump off the page.) A second problem is that the author tells this story as though it were a thriller—first Stieg did this, then he died, then I found his papers, then I pursued X, then Y, etc. What should come over as a page-turner is instead tedious. The story is sound, the conclusions are supported by the facts, and the book would have benefited from a more matter-of-fact, documentary approach. For those interested in contemporary Swedish politics and its relationship to what else was happening in the world at the time, this is an important contribution. For those who lack context or who are mainly intrigued by the Larsson connection, it will disappoint. Which is disappointing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ujjwala Singhania

    A Swedish Prime Minister got assassinated on a February night of 1986 in a almost deserted street while walking home with his wife. The murder remains unsolved for decades. Many books written on it and many conspiracy theories doing the rounds. One may ask but why a person would like to read about it in India in the year 2020. The answer lies in the many theories involving the dark and strong tentacles of an apartheid regime in South Africa, European arms dealers, people dying "accidentally" and A Swedish Prime Minister got assassinated on a February night of 1986 in a almost deserted street while walking home with his wife. The murder remains unsolved for decades. Many books written on it and many conspiracy theories doing the rounds. One may ask but why a person would like to read about it in India in the year 2020. The answer lies in the many theories involving the dark and strong tentacles of an apartheid regime in South Africa, European arms dealers, people dying "accidentally" and a strong anti-incumbent lobby working behind the scenes. The one name that will stick out for the readers is Bofors and if one is interested in History and Politics that interest will stick with one tiny mention of a certain name. Though with the recent closer of the case in Sweden, it feels like anti-climactic but still I wonder if it has something to do with "let the sleeping dogs lie". The book, though a research work, is written like a thriller and is a gripping read. The author takes up Stieg's decades of research materials and tries to make sense of the many threads going in several directions and puts the pieces together in this book that would have made Stieg proud.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    Wavered between 2 and 3 stars. It was hard to get into this book, perhaps because I read a translation and didn’t know much about the assassination - or about any of the theories connected to it. But as much as it was explained, I still found a lot of the intricacies confusing. However, I really enjoyed learning more about Steig Larsson’s research. I especially liked reading about him and his focus on uncovering extremism...I found myself thinking there seemed to be a lot of parallels to his wor Wavered between 2 and 3 stars. It was hard to get into this book, perhaps because I read a translation and didn’t know much about the assassination - or about any of the theories connected to it. But as much as it was explained, I still found a lot of the intricacies confusing. However, I really enjoyed learning more about Steig Larsson’s research. I especially liked reading about him and his focus on uncovering extremism...I found myself thinking there seemed to be a lot of parallels to his work in the Millennium series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kamlesh Gandhi

    Brilliant one word

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Birdy

    Tedious!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    An exhaustive - and exhausting - trip through the files Stieg Larsson collected on right wing groups, some of whom may have been responsible for the assassination of Swedish prime minister Olof Palme in 1986. But 33+ years later the crime has not been solved. Though I can't claim to have given all this my full attention - did a lot of flipping pages - it is a truly-mind-boggling collection of information that travels from South African apartheid to Iran Contra. There is a composite photo of a su An exhaustive - and exhausting - trip through the files Stieg Larsson collected on right wing groups, some of whom may have been responsible for the assassination of Swedish prime minister Olof Palme in 1986. But 33+ years later the crime has not been solved. Though I can't claim to have given all this my full attention - did a lot of flipping pages - it is a truly-mind-boggling collection of information that travels from South African apartheid to Iran Contra. There is a composite photo of a suspect, multiple and conflicting eyewitness accounts, and suspects galore - six of them are listed in an appendix - and even one trial based on Palme's wife's questionable identification; the suspect is acquitted. I guess we are supposed to think that Jakob Thedelin (who has the only fake name in this book, I think) is the culprit and he has the gun - the "rocket that would never come again" - hidden in a safe deposit box? The Jacob and Lida story is the most interesting park of the book. My money's on Bertil Wedin who is connected to a nework of 25 other right wingers. In the end, no one is any closer to solving the murder. This book could have used a few expository pages that contained a synopsis. Instead, we get a repetitious recounting of the contents of the documents, and an amazing rat's nest illustration of connecting relationships. That illustration is a comment on the entire investigation. The author tried to make it readable, but maybe something's lost in the translation. It's good that it exists as documentary evidence; doesn't work so well for me as a book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Campbell

    I read this book because I greatly enjoyed Stieg Larsson's novels. I knew next to nothing about the Palme assassination. Jan Stocklassa is too much of a Larrson fan boy to write this book objectively. Larsson was an avowed Trotskite. He work hard to find any evidentiary linkage between the perpetrators of the assination and his real life political opponents. I read the whole book. A lot of it is a pedantic run on description of Larsson's investigation of the assassination with a concomitant re-in I read this book because I greatly enjoyed Stieg Larsson's novels. I knew next to nothing about the Palme assassination. Jan Stocklassa is too much of a Larrson fan boy to write this book objectively. Larsson was an avowed Trotskite. He work hard to find any evidentiary linkage between the perpetrators of the assination and his real life political opponents. I read the whole book. A lot of it is a pedantic run on description of Larsson's investigation of the assassination with a concomitant re-investigation by Stocklassa. It is arduous to follow a large number of source and suspect names, dates and places just to get to an admittedly unprovable group of theoretical perpetrators. Waste of time.... his, theirs and yours.

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