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Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but for the last year, 30H has felt like an unsolvable equation - one that's made her world a very small, very lonely place. 30H is her bra size - or it was the last time anyone checked. She stopped letting people get that close to her with a tape measure a while ago. Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this way. Despite carefully avoiding physical contact and anything tighter than a puffy coat, Greer finds an unexpected community on the volleyball squad, the team that hugs between every point and wears a uniform "so tight it can squeeze out tears." And then there's Jackson Oates, newly arrived at her school and maybe actually more interested in her banter than her breasts. Laura Zimmermann's debut is both laugh-out-loud funny and beautifully blunt, vulnerable and witty, heartbreaking and hopeful. And it will invite listeners to look carefully at a girl who just wants to be seen for all she is.


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Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but for the last year, 30H has felt like an unsolvable equation - one that's made her world a very small, very lonely place. 30H is her bra size - or it was the last time anyone checked. She stopped letting people get that close to her with a tape measure a while ago. Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this way. Despite carefully avoiding physical contact and anything tighter than a puffy coat, Greer finds an unexpected community on the volleyball squad, the team that hugs between every point and wears a uniform "so tight it can squeeze out tears." And then there's Jackson Oates, newly arrived at her school and maybe actually more interested in her banter than her breasts. Laura Zimmermann's debut is both laugh-out-loud funny and beautifully blunt, vulnerable and witty, heartbreaking and hopeful. And it will invite listeners to look carefully at a girl who just wants to be seen for all she is.

30 review for My Eyes Are Up Here

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Brunson

    As someone who wears a 40H bra size, to say I’m excited this book is an understatement.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Resources for anyone like Greer: A Bra That Fits Bratabase Busty Resources Edited to add 04.08.20: I removed a star last week because the more I think about this book, the more it upsets me. I'm seeing so many positive reviews, including from professional journals, and I am increasingly baffled by their praise of the body positivity in this book. Yes, Greer learns to be okay with her body, but the body positive message that’s being praised in this book isn’t that your boobs are part of your body an Resources for anyone like Greer: A Bra That Fits Bratabase Busty Resources Edited to add 04.08.20: I removed a star last week because the more I think about this book, the more it upsets me. I'm seeing so many positive reviews, including from professional journals, and I am increasingly baffled by their praise of the body positivity in this book. Yes, Greer learns to be okay with her body, but the body positive message that’s being praised in this book isn’t that your boobs are part of your body and your body is good, it’s that your boobs are enormous and everyone thinks so but it’s okay because you’re not just your enormous boobs that everyone notices constantly. Seriously, folks, it's not body positive to exoticize large breasts. It's not body positive to make it sound like 30H is a size reserved for porn stars, it's not body positive to make it sound like DD+ bras are weird and nonexistent, and it sure as hell isn't body positive to make it sound like it's normal that the first thing every character in this entire book notices about Greer is her huge breasts. America has a really messed up view of big boobs, and this book goes all in on that view. /edit I am so conflicted about this book. On the one hand, I absolutely loved it. Greer is so realistic, and I remember doing so many of the things that she did when I was her age. But, y’all. 30H is not that big. Check out the 30H gallery on Bratabase, which shows real bodies wearing real 30H bras. Every single body looks proportional and average and NORMAL. They might need clothes tailored, but absolutely none of them can’t fit into anything off the rack. It might be super baggy around the waist, but it’ll fit. And they would probably fit into size small. (Just an FYI, someone who wears a 30H is going to be about 41 inches around the fullest part of the bust and about 30 inches around the underbust.) So.... there’s something messed up about this book that I feel like I really need to mention: Greer’s breasts are treated as abnormally large when her bra size does not support that. I get it; I was the girl who lived in an oversized hoodie because I felt like nothing fit and everyone would stare at my boobs if I didn’t hide them, just like Greer. A teenage girl who’s self-conscious about her body isn’t gonna be able to tell herself that she’s totally normal and her big boobs aren’t alarmingly huge because they feel alarmingly huge to her. That’s all well and good and I am so glad it’s represented in a book. BUT. Greer never learns that 30H is actually a pretty common size. That size is available in so many brands! And you can get them for cheap from Amazon! But no, EVERYONE acts like that’s the biggest boobs can get in Greer’s world. Never mind that this book takes place in a suburb of Chicago, explicitly stated to be a 45 minute drive from downtown. Never mind that Chicago is home to Bras Galore, which carries bands from 28 to 46 and cups from A to P. Never mind that Greer apparently Googled extensively enough to find a British YouTuber who rants about her enormous breasts but somehow couldn’t find Bravissimo or Panache or Curvy Kate or literally any brand that has extended sizes. Like, seriously, Greer’s bra predicament is laughably unbelievable to me, and I have been exactly where Greer was. Sure, Greer’s emotional journey is spot on. But, were I reading this as my teenage self, the lack of a resolution for her practical physical problems would have left me feeling hopeless. Like I’d need all my clothes custom-made and I’d never find a cute, supportive, comfy bra. And, more than that, since my boobs were bigger than Greer’s are stated to be, I would have felt like everyone was constantly staring in shock at my (perfectly normal) body. I think this book falls into the damaging trap that DDs are enormous and anything bigger is ridiculously huge, like larger than a beach ball huge. I’d recommend it for the emotional journey, but I would never give it to a self-conscious busty teenage girl without a hell of a lot of additional resources.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angela Staudt

    Thank you for Penguin Teen for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. “I am ashamed of being ashamed of being ashamed. And that is the part that no one else understands.” My Eyes are Up Here is such an amazing book. I felt every emotion in this book and I could totally relate to the main character Greer. She was such a well-developed character and so relatable. She is a sophomore in high school and her chest has not only filled out, but she has ginormous boobs. She has even named her boobs (whi Thank you for Penguin Teen for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. “I am ashamed of being ashamed of being ashamed. And that is the part that no one else understands.” My Eyes are Up Here is such an amazing book. I felt every emotion in this book and I could totally relate to the main character Greer. She was such a well-developed character and so relatable. She is a sophomore in high school and her chest has not only filled out, but she has ginormous boobs. She has even named her boobs (which I thought was hilarious). Greer wears oversized sweatshirts 365 days a year and slouches so no one notices her breasts. She is super self-conscious; I mean who wouldn’t be and is trying to deal with that. I really loved how realistic this whole entire book was, Greer’s thoughts, her awkwardness, and just about everything else. I loved the female friendships. I WISH I had some amazing friends like Greer has. Jessa and Maggie are side characters, but they have so much to do with this story and are amazing friends to Greer. What Greer goes through especially in a high school setting happens to so many other girls and women. In this world so many people are judging people by their looks, and this book goes to show that you should never judge anyone ever by their looks. Greer is so much more than just a teenage girl with big boobs, I loved her transformation. I knew romance would play a part in this, but it was such a side note that it made me love it even more. Greer does not change because of a boy, she learns so much and becomes such a better more confident girl because she wants to. Her friends and mother help her gain confidence and are there for her. Yes, the romance was very cute, but it didn’t overshadow the main point of this book. I really can’t stress enough how much I enjoyed this book. I think many girls/women of all ages will appreciate this book and love every character. I have to admit some parts are heavy and my heart ached for Greer, but that’s the point. High school and life are hard enough without people judging you for how perfect your makeup is, your hair, and how big your boobs are.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abbie | epochnovels

    A book that every girl needs to read at some point in their life. “Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this wa A book that every girl needs to read at some point in their life. “Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this way. Despite carefully avoiding physical contact and anything tighter than a puffy coat, Greer finds an unexpected community on the volleyball squad, the team that hugs between every point and wears a uniform ‘so tight it can squeeze out tears.’ And then there's Jackson Oates, newly arrived at her school and maybe actually more interested in her banter than her breasts.” I laughed out loud so many times while reading this book that I lost count. Zimmerman’s writing is frank, heartfelt, and hilarious. The honesty in this book is infused with hope and warmth, as lonely as Greer is. I ached for her so much in this story! “I am ashamed of being ashamed of being ashamed. And that is the part that no one else understands.” I was lucky enough to be around women in my early adolescence who celebrated their different body types. Growing up, I had always been curvier and stronger than my friends; my boobs, hips, butt, and thighs had always been bigger than theirs, no question. And I was definitely harassed for it. But I never took shame in my appearance (though it’s still hard), because I had an amazing mother and sister whose bodies were - are - strong too. “Voluptuous Abbie” was one of the nicknames I had in school. Whether the intention was meant to flatter or not, I wore that title like a crown regardless. Just as Greer learns to do in this beautiful book. “...I went to a lot of trouble to learn how to wear it. To wear this patchwork of parts. To wear this girl that is twirly and smart and funny and strong all at the same time. To wear this body.” It’s still very hard sometimes, especially when the media is constantly telling you what beauty is. But it’s books like these that remind me that beauty comes in all colors, shapes, and sizes. And I’m not so ashamed anymore. P.S. Also: JACKSON. WHAT A CINNAMON ROLL. The romance was SO freaking sweet. I can’t stop thinking about this adorable human. A big thank you to Penguin Teen for gifting me with this ARC! To check out my My Eyes Are Up Here post on Bookstagram, click here: https://www.instagram.com/p/CB09Er4g6Rg/

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zoe and MB

    This was a great contemporary book! It focused on women’s body image, while having a super cute romance. This book is great for people to understand the struggles that other women have with their body image, so you can learn to respect what they are going through. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read about a cute “new boy in town” romance or to learn about body positivity!

  6. 5 out of 5

    mindful.librarian ☀️

    SLJ review title - can’t rate or review here

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish // stan shea couleé

    Happy release day! I need to read more fun books.

  8. 4 out of 5

    ;3

    4.5 i love love loved this so much

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Netgalley Greer's mother has a relocation help business, so she is always being dragged off to meet the children of clients. Kids her age generally don't want to talk to her, but when she meets Jackson Oates and his mom at the habitual coffee shop, he's different. Friendly, smart, helpful, funny-- Greer instantly likes him. The problem? Greer is so uncomfortable about her large breasts that she retreats from a lot of social connections, and figures that Jackson will immediately E ARC provided by Netgalley Greer's mother has a relocation help business, so she is always being dragged off to meet the children of clients. Kids her age generally don't want to talk to her, but when she meets Jackson Oates and his mom at the habitual coffee shop, he's different. Friendly, smart, helpful, funny-- Greer instantly likes him. The problem? Greer is so uncomfortable about her large breasts that she retreats from a lot of social connections, and figures that Jackson will immediately make new friends and ignore her. He does make friends, including her best friend Maggie's brother and a lot of other baseball players, but he still continues to talk to her. Usually more concerned with advanced academics than other activities (which can often involve people looking at her), Greer becomes interested in volleyball and tries out for the team. It's difficult to play with a sports bra squeezed over her regular, but the coach sends her a link to a garment called "the Stabilizer" that works wonders. Greer makes the teams, but another hurdle is getting a uniform to fit her 30H figure. Greer and Jackson' families spend some tiem together, and his problematic younger sister takes to Greer. At the same time, Maggie is involved with the school production of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and is being her usual outspoken self when questioning the wisdom of doing such an outdated play. Greer is hopeful about volleyball and Jackson until events complicate matters and she almost disengages, retreating into her XXL sweatshirts instead of confronting her problems. Will she ever be able to make peace with herself? Strengths: I loved this one SO much. Greer was smart and funny, and I think that so many of us can commiserate with wanting to hide behind clothes. Jackson was absolutely crush worthy, and treated Greer really well even when her actions were confusing. In fact, all of the characters were well drawn; the pushy, uncommunicative mother, the squirrel younger brother, Maggie, the phenomenal home ec teacher-- whew. Smart, smart writing, and such a vivid description of what Greer felt like living in her body. After I finishes this, I couldn't pick up any other books because I knew I wouldn't like anything I read half as well. Greer, with all of her humor, insecurity, and misguided attempts to get through high school, reminded me a lot of myself, and of my daughter who probably wore an oversized hoodie to high school 90% of the time. Weaknesses: Some reviewers have mentioned that this isn't quite in line with "body positivity" and that there would be more resources for Greer for bras, because her size was not unusual. I didn't immediately think about the "body positivity" aspect; as someone who is absolutely average sized and still wants to live in obscuring clothes, I just saw this as how one girl who was a little different than her classmates took that difference to heart in wanting to hide from the world. More "effenheimers" that I like for middle grade readers, and once scene between Jackson and Greer that was delicately done, circumspect, and probably not instructional to younger readers but which about melted my socks off. Also, I think I learned some things about personal hygiene I didn't know. What I really think: Do we need books about this for middle school readers? Yes. Is this the book they need? I am really debating because I loved Greer and Jackson so much.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This is how comic makers would draw a girl Hulk; it wouldn't be her muscles, it'd be her boobs that would burst the seams. I stand in front of the mirror. Shit. I can't wear this thing. :') is my main feeling right now Greer is a fantastic character to spend time with, frustrating as she may be, and as much as you want to bundle her up and hug her - she's hilarious, whip-fast, full of heart, and completely understandable. I may not get her precise insecurity, but what really hit me about this book This is how comic makers would draw a girl Hulk; it wouldn't be her muscles, it'd be her boobs that would burst the seams. I stand in front of the mirror. Shit. I can't wear this thing. :') is my main feeling right now Greer is a fantastic character to spend time with, frustrating as she may be, and as much as you want to bundle her up and hug her - she's hilarious, whip-fast, full of heart, and completely understandable. I may not get her precise insecurity, but what really hit me about this book was how it highlighted the total self-sabotage that comes with being incredibly insecure about yourself. It's not all about the teasing or you vs the world. A huge part of what sucks is destroying things that give you a chance because you're too afraid to face them, and I loved the kinda-painful process of reading a character do that to herself when you just wanted to shake her and be like, love yourself!!! seriously!!!!!!!! I'll agree that it kiiinda skidded past the mark of complete self-acceptance (ended up more like self-tolerance?) and that was a bit of a bummer, but Greer was just so engaging that I fell in love with her right away and so fell in love with the book too. And Jackson was so gentle, genuine, and kind - i swear he's the actual guy teenage girls want to fall for, not the endless parade of brooding, cranky, stalker-y bad boys that I keep reading about. The side characters too were so lovable - Jessa, Maggie, Quin. I grabbed this one for the cute cover and was really surprised by what a great time I had with it. It was! Just so sweet! Maybe I wish there was a TOUCH more love for Greer to give herself but still!! :')

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julia Sapphire

    Thank you Penguin Teen for sending this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. This story follows a fifteen-year-old girl named Greer Walsh and her coming of age story. It discusses body representation especially due to the fact that her bra size is a 30H. She talks about her insecurities and how other people react to how she looks. Also how she views herself and struggles to feel comfortable. I was expecting this book to really discuss body positivity, body rep, and feminism. I, unfortunately Thank you Penguin Teen for sending this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. This story follows a fifteen-year-old girl named Greer Walsh and her coming of age story. It discusses body representation especially due to the fact that her bra size is a 30H. She talks about her insecurities and how other people react to how she looks. Also how she views herself and struggles to feel comfortable. I was expecting this book to really discuss body positivity, body rep, and feminism. I, unfortunately, had several issues with this book and felt disconnected from the book consistently. The writing style was just okay, though it had some humour that was a miss for me personally. Something that irked me was that Greer's boobs are personified throughout the course of this book. Maude and Mavis were the names and she constantly referred to them as such. Greer was a character who I did not care for many times throughout this book. She gave off the "I'm not like other girls" vibe and her character lacked depth. The love interest in this book was also just a flop. I disliked how the book ended and thought it was a cop-out, especially in terms of romance. I did enjoy reading about how Greer did have a few positive people in her life that helped her. Though most people were horrible to her, I was glad to see that a member of the school had her back. Overall, I think this book had a great concept and idea but unfortunately, I thought the execution lacked. This book took me a while to get through because I was not very invested and did not care for many aspects of the story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tiffani Reads

    I never fully understood the importance of seeing yourself in books until I read this book. As someone who is white and female, I see myself in lots of books but then I read My Eyes Are Up Here and oh my, Greer could have been me in high school. This was my struggle in high school, having an identity beyond "the girl with the big boobs". I am so glad that this book exists and that other girls going through this very same thing will be able to know that they are not alone, they are not just a pai I never fully understood the importance of seeing yourself in books until I read this book. As someone who is white and female, I see myself in lots of books but then I read My Eyes Are Up Here and oh my, Greer could have been me in high school. This was my struggle in high school, having an identity beyond "the girl with the big boobs". I am so glad that this book exists and that other girls going through this very same thing will be able to know that they are not alone, they are not just a pair of breasts, their identity as a person extends beyond their chest. I love this book and I will be singing it's praises for a long time to come. Greer, is a fantastic character. She is sarcastic, funny, loyal, but also she is someone who doesn't know her self-worth. She doesn't know how to live in her own skin because of the jokes, the staring, the whispers from boys who seem to follow her. She hides in bulky clothes to hide her form and she talks about the struggles of finding cute, proper fitting bras for girls bigger than a C-cup. She is so real, that several times I remember having some of those exact same moments. Then there is Jackson. I definitely dated a guy like Jackson in high school. Everyone in their life should be lucky enough to date a Jackson. His character was paired to Greer's perfectly, while also having his own identity within the story. I just loved him and I will admit that I squealed with joy when they finally got together in the end. Honourable character mention to Maude and Mavis because *chefs kiss* . Every time Greer refers to them I was howling with laughter, tears streaming down my face laughing. Some of the funniest lines were about them and I loved it! For example: "You know who gets to touch my stomach all they want? My breasts. They can hardly help themselves." I read that line to my husband with no context and he snorted his drink out his nose. This book is funny, and raw, and real, and you need to read it. Irregardless of whether you had big boobs growing up or not, you need to read this book. *Thank you to Edelweiss and Penguin Teen for giving me an E-ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    My Eyes Are Up Here tells the story of teen girl, Greer, who assumes everyone else has it together while she struggles. As we all have that mentality to an extent, it is a theme we can all connect with. However, Greer has some added body issues that she wishes she could get rid of. Eventually she begins to see that everyone is not as put-together as they seem, and that there are cracks in everyone’s lives or families. She makes some strides in dealing with herself and she is able to get past tho My Eyes Are Up Here tells the story of teen girl, Greer, who assumes everyone else has it together while she struggles. As we all have that mentality to an extent, it is a theme we can all connect with. However, Greer has some added body issues that she wishes she could get rid of. Eventually she begins to see that everyone is not as put-together as they seem, and that there are cracks in everyone’s lives or families. She makes some strides in dealing with herself and she is able to get past those self derogatory terms enough to allow her to make friends as well. As she grows, she is able to reach out to others around her who she comes to find need some help, too. Overall, Greer is a wonderful character who isn’t as down on herself as some teen characters. She recognizes her strength even when she downplays them, so it makes her a more believable and relatable main character.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miranda

    Really a 3.5 but here we are in the year 2020 and goodreads still won't let us rate half stars. Full review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAqTw... Really a 3.5 but here we are in the year 2020 and goodreads still won't let us rate half stars. Full review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAqTw...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Smit Zaveri

    It’s not perfect but it’s so so so so good! I’m so glad a book like this exists. I’ll be recommending this to so many people!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Received advanced reader copy from publisher at PLA 2020 For thirteen years, Greer did not think about her body. Then, in ninth grade, her body consumed her life; she is so tired of everyone else’s obsession with her breasts. So she hides herself in an oversized hoodie and tries to blend into the crowd. But Greer finds herself surrounded by new friends – and a new guy – who seem to notice she is so much more than a body. Every single woman has a different struggle with body image. No struggle is Received advanced reader copy from publisher at PLA 2020 For thirteen years, Greer did not think about her body. Then, in ninth grade, her body consumed her life; she is so tired of everyone else’s obsession with her breasts. So she hides herself in an oversized hoodie and tries to blend into the crowd. But Greer finds herself surrounded by new friends – and a new guy – who seem to notice she is so much more than a body. Every single woman has a different struggle with body image. No struggle is the same – and maybe a blessed few do not even have a struggle. So, there is a slim chance that a single book, a single story, will encapsulate every experience. Thankfully, Laura Zimmermann didn’t try to do it all; she focused on Greer. Wonderful, delightful, intelligent, new volleyball player Greer. I laughed. I nodded my head. I snorted. I mused “what if…” I hoped for change. And, upon reading the last line, I thought “Well, THAT is going to be a huge comfort to many teens.” Our society’s obsession with the “perfect” body {would someone tell me what that is exactly?} is preposterous. The pressure put on women to look a “certain way” is ridiculous. We cannot all look the same way or have the same shape because … wait for it … WE. ARE. NOT. THE. SAME! When Greer’s mom shared the story of her building Lego cars at the store in the mall – and having the salesWOMAN call her a “pretty princess” even though it was Greer’s cars that were kicking the ass of every other car being built by … little boys – I wept. Did it happen to you? A turn of focus from your intellectual accomplishments to what you look like? The Lego story definitely illustrates that, the guilt of forcing a certain definition on a person, is on all sexes. Is the book a perfect depiction of a struggle with body image? Nope. But bodies aren’t perfect so why should stories be. It holds its own though. It tells one girl’s story, one girl’s dreams, one girl’s successes, one girl’s resolutions. I think this is a book that will provide comfort and confidence. And, dare I hope, inspire a bit of change? Will the readers walk away and stop judging others bodies? Maybe not completely … but maybe they’ll hesitate. And it is a start.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This book is a humorous contemporary about a teenage girl learning to feel at home in her body, and especially with the size of her breasts (30H). I enjoyed this book because it was funny, and had a very cute romance. The characters were also really enjoyable, I especially loved to see Jessa, a girl on Greer's volleyball team, who is always so supportive and caring of the other girls on the team. We need more Jessas in the world. I also thought the love interest was sweet and wholesome, and I wa This book is a humorous contemporary about a teenage girl learning to feel at home in her body, and especially with the size of her breasts (30H). I enjoyed this book because it was funny, and had a very cute romance. The characters were also really enjoyable, I especially loved to see Jessa, a girl on Greer's volleyball team, who is always so supportive and caring of the other girls on the team. We need more Jessas in the world. I also thought the love interest was sweet and wholesome, and I was rooting for him and Greer the whole book. On the note of body positivity and the topic of larger breasts, I felt that this book had some issues. For the entire first half of the book, it seemed like Greer had no personality BESIDES being a girl with big boobs. We were told that she liked math, and that she had friends, but every other sentence was about her boobs. While this did help put the reader in the perspective of the constant insecurity and fixation that many teen girls feel about their bodies, it also, I believe, took away from the idea that Greer's breasts are not and should not be her defining feature. Her journey to accepting her body felt less like self-love and more like "well I can't do anything about it". However, I did still love the message that even if you ARE insecure about your body, you don't have to let it stop you from living your life and having fun/being happy. It also had a lot of insightful moments that felt so true and relatable to my experience as a woman. Overall, I thought this book was funny, engaging, and a cute read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Greer wanted to be noticed for her passion for mathematics, but all everyone seemed to notice were Maude and Mavis, her right and left breasts. The constant scrutiny of her body, from friends, family, and even strangers, made it hard for her to be comfortable in her own skin, but in this story, I got to cheer for Greer as she began breaking her own self-imposed rules regarding her body. I won't lie. Greer's story was quite heartbreaking at times, and though I never dealt with her exact issue, I Greer wanted to be noticed for her passion for mathematics, but all everyone seemed to notice were Maude and Mavis, her right and left breasts. The constant scrutiny of her body, from friends, family, and even strangers, made it hard for her to be comfortable in her own skin, but in this story, I got to cheer for Greer as she began breaking her own self-imposed rules regarding her body. I won't lie. Greer's story was quite heartbreaking at times, and though I never dealt with her exact issue, I did grapple with body issues. I remember my sister battling with her growing chest as a young teen. She employed many of the same tactics as Greer. She wore large, oversized clothing, and hunched her shoulders in an effort to make herself look smaller. How sad, that someone is made to feel like that. I felt Greer's pain throughout this book, and there were so many times I wanted to hug her, or encourage her to talk to someone. I appreciated that Zimmermann took us through all the difficulties people with large breasts encounter. How their top may be a way different size from their bottom. How finding a good support garment is difficult and extremely expensive, and lack of such garments is a barrier to enjoying certain activities. I have heard about the physical pain large breasted people experience, but how many other people have? Zimmermann took on the topic with a touch of humor, but there were many very real moments shared with us. That was why it felt so good to see Greer become part of the volleyball team. She had avoided athletics in the past, because of the physical difficulties she experienced as she played. With the help of good sports bra, and an awesome home ec teacher, who was able to modify her uniform top, Greer was able to be part of a team for the first time. She was able to seen for her skill on the court, and she found a lot of support from some of her teammates as well. Jessa, the captain of the team, was especially wonderful, as she embraced her own body for its strength and what it could do, never dwelling on her size. She also spoke honestly about her body, and this was such a big thing for Greer, who always felt ashamed, and wanted to avoid anything that pertained to how she looked. In a nutshell, this was a humorous and honest story about learning to love yourself. It was about not letting other people determine what your body can or cannot do, and wanting to be seen as a whole person, which is something everyone deserves. *ARC won via a publisher giveaway BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    4 ⭐️ Content warnings: misogyny/sexism, bullying I feel like this is a very niche book that tackles a much larger subject. Greer has big boobs. That’s the only basis for this book, and that might make some people want to put it down because her entire personality is shadowed by the fact that she’s heavy chested. It would have been problematic for an adult, but less so for a teen. She’s at that stage where everything is measured in your appearance and how your peers see you, so I can understand how 4 ⭐️ Content warnings: misogyny/sexism, bullying I feel like this is a very niche book that tackles a much larger subject. Greer has big boobs. That’s the only basis for this book, and that might make some people want to put it down because her entire personality is shadowed by the fact that she’s heavy chested. It would have been problematic for an adult, but less so for a teen. She’s at that stage where everything is measured in your appearance and how your peers see you, so I can understand how a girl with larger breasts would feel the need to hide them. I wasn’t set on giving this more than 3 stars, because of Greer’s personality flaws (she’s kind of a doormat in the beginning, and it takes a lot for her to come out of her shell) and some obvious lack of research by the author (there are some really popular brands making plus size bras that Greer should have found if she did her research). But then I read the dressing room scene and I recognized myself a little too perfectly. I’m a size 30H. I don’t even have remotely large breasts. But I have a belly slightly too big and I have large hips. I know what it’s like to fall apart in a dressing room because nobody thought of you when designing clothes. And I’m sure a lot of people will too. Although I do have to say: 30H and a size 4 at the waist? Really? She could’ve made Greer a size 8 or 10 at least, so that I didn’t feel like I was reading a porn star biography 😐 It’s not a masterpiece. The writing is all right and the story is fine, but it won’t win awards or anything. But it’s a good read and it gives a lot of food for thoughts.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natalie - FerryGoodBooks

    I really enjoyed this book and the message within it. The writing was done really well and I love how the author was able to capture the struggles and emotional and physical pain that Greer went through. Greer is witty and sarcastic and I just loved how she dealt with her body image issues. There was a realistic voice to Greer that made her very relatable, even if you haven’t experienced the struggles she's going though. The short burst of chapters made this a fast read for me. I enjoyed this boo I really enjoyed this book and the message within it. The writing was done really well and I love how the author was able to capture the struggles and emotional and physical pain that Greer went through. Greer is witty and sarcastic and I just loved how she dealt with her body image issues. There was a realistic voice to Greer that made her very relatable, even if you haven’t experienced the struggles she's going though. The short burst of chapters made this a fast read for me. I enjoyed this book a lot but as it progressed, it seemed to be a bit repetitive and monotonous. There were many times throughout this story where I felt Greer would take a step forward to only take 3 steps back. I hated how much she let this define who she is because I saw her as this strong amazing young lady and I just wanted so badly for that to outshine her self demise. I did appreciate how this book covered the struggles young women experience about their own body image and the constant comparing with other girls. I think it’s so important that young women realize there is no perfect image. I also loved her support system. Her friends were there to uplift here when she was knocked down and defended her when others were rude. There was a wonderful sisterhood and camaraderie with her group and it was refreshing to see

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

    4.5 stars *Thanks to Penguin for providing me with an ARC MY EYES ARE UP HERE was a hilarious and relatable story that I honestly adored. Greer was an incredible main character; while her situation was different from others’, I think everyone can relate to her in some way. She was so charming and her narration was amazing. I laughed out loud so many times while reading and felt connected with Greer throughout the story. The side characters were developed so well, as were the relationships. This b 4.5 stars *Thanks to Penguin for providing me with an ARC MY EYES ARE UP HERE was a hilarious and relatable story that I honestly adored. Greer was an incredible main character; while her situation was different from others’, I think everyone can relate to her in some way. She was so charming and her narration was amazing. I laughed out loud so many times while reading and felt connected with Greer throughout the story. The side characters were developed so well, as were the relationships. This book has empowering female friendships, a family that has its struggles but is there for each other in the end, and an awesome romance that is so sweet and builds over the perfect amount of time. The story was so much fun but also incredibly meaningful; Greer’s journey to finding and accepting herself was so well done and heartwarming. I genuinely adored this story and I think everyone can fall easily in love with it too.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I was instantly intrigued by the synopsis of this novel and I really enjoyed Greer's story. Greer is a high school sophmore that's trying to find love for a body she feels betrayed by. Zimmerman wrote an extremely captivating story that most women will find highly relatable. What I loved about this book: 1. Greer is a witty and intelligent character that I found quite relatable. While her insecurities and self-consciousness is related to her above average breast size, many teenagers will be able t I was instantly intrigued by the synopsis of this novel and I really enjoyed Greer's story. Greer is a high school sophmore that's trying to find love for a body she feels betrayed by. Zimmerman wrote an extremely captivating story that most women will find highly relatable. What I loved about this book: 1. Greer is a witty and intelligent character that I found quite relatable. While her insecurities and self-consciousness is related to her above average breast size, many teenagers will be able to relate to her feelings and struggles. 2. I loved the positive female relationships in this book and how they all lifted each other up. High school girls are often portrayed quite differently in books so this was a nice change. 3. While the romance isn't the main focus of this book, I still found it to be enjoyable. Greer and Jackson's banter was amazing and they were so cute together. When Greer found the word searched altered I may have swooned a bit for Jackson because it was such a sweet gesture. 4. I loved how even though Greer was struggling to love her body, she stood up to the bullies and put them in their place. I was cheering for her the whole time. This uplifting coming age of story of self acceptance that celebrates every body type is the kind of book I wish was available as a teenager. Y'all should definitely check out this amazing debut novel! Thank you for my gifted copy ❤

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Five stars is too few for this book. This has easily become one of my favorite books of all time. It has EVERYTHING - moments that made me laugh til I cried (actually, a lot of moments that did this), moments that made my heart ache, and moments that made me want to jump off the couch and say YES GIRL. I kept telling myself I needed to go to bed, but couldn’t put the book down until I finished it. I love. Love. LOVE. This book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cathi - LovesBooksMore

    As a sophomore in high school, Greer already has enough emotions. Now her boobs are out of control ginormous- she has even named them “Maude and Mavis” and has a mission to find a bra to help tame them. When she meets a new transfer student, Jackson, Greer isn’t convinced he is interested in her rather than her boobs. Lots of laughs and humor in this YA book. Learning to self accept and dig deep into friendships.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fierymermaidbooks

    I really enjoyed this book! I absolutely adored the self love message it conveys! Greer is a self conscious teenager with a bigger than average chest. Through this novel you see her struggle with self shaming and immature jokes from others, but you also see friends who don’t judge and a boy who notices other things besides her chest. I really enjoyed the friends to lovers aspect and the sibling rivalry! The volleyball aspect was really fun too! This is a great book and I highly recommend it!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leo

    I really want to pick this one up, however the fact that the story focuses on how certain body appendages are seen (and there's probably going to be a lot of those) makes me not want to pick this up because of reasons ._. #nonbinarydilemmas

  27. 4 out of 5

    polca

    My reading partner betrayed me but I am happy for her she didn't get to read this bullshit! I mean what was the point ! And damn girl take a chill pill they are your boobs not some mountain on grassland ( her line not mine)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Taschima

    Such a great, wholesome, funny, fantastic book! Full review to come.

  29. 4 out of 5

    hayaat ♥

    books like this just ... make me feel so warm and fuzzy on the inside. there's honestly nothing more i love than reading a story about a teenage girl finding her place in the world. so fucking glorious.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (Samsara Parchment)

    “My eyes are up here.” There’s a very good chance, especially if you’re a woman or a girl in today’s day and age, that you’ve uttered this phrase at some point in your life. Or at the very least, you’ve thought it. That’s exactly the case for Greer Walsh, the main character of the soon-to-be-released (due out June 23rd, in fact) YA novel My Eyes Are Up Here by Laura Zimmermann. My Eyes Are Up Here is, at its simplest, about a young woman who’s a sophomore in high school and struggling with some bo “My eyes are up here.” There’s a very good chance, especially if you’re a woman or a girl in today’s day and age, that you’ve uttered this phrase at some point in your life. Or at the very least, you’ve thought it. That’s exactly the case for Greer Walsh, the main character of the soon-to-be-released (due out June 23rd, in fact) YA novel My Eyes Are Up Here by Laura Zimmermann. My Eyes Are Up Here is, at its simplest, about a young woman who’s a sophomore in high school and struggling with some body image issues. But I assure you, it’s also much more than that. Before I get further into the review, a big, big thank you to Penguin Teen for inviting me to read this e-ARC! I really appreciate it & I'm so excited to have gotten early access to this novel. You all know I love a good YA contemporary! Now, more about the book: Our MC, Greer, is known for a few things at school—being incredibly good at math, being the best friend of the eternally outspoken Maggie, and pretty much always wearing the same baggie hoodie. But the reason she hides inside her baggie hoodie is exactly what she doesn’t want to be known for—the size of her breasts. At such a young age, Greer is already suffering not just from the emotional stress of having inconveniently large breasts (or as she describes them, “bigger than her head”), but also the physical toll, as well. And just the general logistics of getting dressed and going about her day to day life. Despite the fact that she doesn’t want them (she has named them “Maude and Mavis”, by the way) to be her defining characteristic for others, they are very much her defining characteristic to herself. She thinks constantly about how they feel physically, how much they hurt, how to deal with them, how to hide them, and the things they prevent her from doing and enjoying—like playing sports or or dating the cute new guy or buying a nice dress for the school dance. This contemporary YA follows Greer as she learns more about herself and how she fits into the world around her as more than just the girl with the huge breasts, and learns to accept herself how she is and not let her body image problems stop her from living her life—even if she does have to live it a little differently from other people. In my opinion, the three best things about this book are the characters, the humor, and the uplifting message. You all know I love a good character-driven book. I prefer it, actually. The plot could be anything (or nothing, for all I care). To me, if the characters are good enough and are written well, they alone can be the driving force behind a story. And My Eyes Are Up Here is not lacking on wonderful, well-developed characters. Greer Walsh is great as a main character because she is someone a lot of young readers will find extremely relatable—but not just young readers. The way she talks about her image of herself, her own anxiety, and the way she wishes she could fold in on herself are aspects that I think a lot of people can identify with, no matter what their age or what their insecurities. Whether you struggle with body image issues like Greer, or insecurities about anything—skin, voice, hair, the way you talk—the author speaks through Greer about these feelings in a way that you will be able to nod at and say, “Yes. That’s exactly it. I feel that.” But Greer has a great supporting cast backing her up, too. Her best friend Maggie, for one, is hilarious but lovable. Lovable like a porcupine. Maggie is fierce and woke and ready to fight anyone, anywhere about any injustice. Whether it’s animal rights or feminism or societal expectations or environmental activism, Maggie is there, and she’s loud, and she’s proud, and she will not back down. Everyone in school knows her because she has something to say about everything and while her classmates roll her eyes at yet another of her outbursts, you can’t help but laugh along and kind of quietly cheer her on. In the vein of Gremma from The Hearts We Sold or Reagan from Fangirl, Maggie is exactly the type of BFF you want on your side. But funny enough, one of the smaller side characters ended up being probably my favorite character in the whole book, and that was Jessa. When Greer eventually works up the courage (and finds the right bra) to try out for the volleyball team, Jessa Timms becomes her JV captain. Jessa is loyal and confident and instead of being a stereotypical, flatly written jock character, she’s a lowkey badass who really stands out. She helps teach Greer that it’s okay to talk about the female body—after all, it is your body. There’s this moment where all the girls leave volleyball practice and Jessa waits with them to make sure every single player on the team gets picked up safely before she leaves, and even though it was a small gesture, it made my little heart grow three sizes too big when I saw how much she cared about her girls and was looking out for them. She’s probably one of the best people in the book. She’s one of those side characters I’d read a whole novel about if there was one. Jessa has a lot of standout moments in the book, but I don’t want to spoil the whole thing, so you really just have to read it to see how much of a badass she is and how much she helps the other characters throughout. I also absolutely loved the humor in this book. As you may also know, there are few things I adore more than a snarky YA character, and Greer fits that bill perfectly (as do some of her friends). Despite her insecurities about her breasts, she brings a lot of humor to the situation, as well as a lot of wry, hilarious observations about high school, other people, and the world around her. You will be touched by the messages about self-love and body image in this book—but you will also be laughing your butt off as you go. Which leads me to my other favorite thing about this book—the overall message. Greer learns a lot throughout the book, and I think readers will, too. Like life, this novel is an ongoing journey of tough experiences and personal growth. But the messages of loving yourself, of female empowerment, and of sticking up for yourself (even when your worst enemy lives inside your own head) are enduring. I think this will be a great book for young readers who are struggling or learning about body confidence. But again, you don’t have to be a teen to appreciate these messages. I felt so uplifted by the confidence and attitude coming out of this book, it was hard not to close my e-reader cover without uttering a triumphant “hell, yeah!” in honor of these characters. If I were to say anything negative about this book, it would be that Greer mentions her favorite childhood toy a couple times, and I was absolutely horrified. She notes that she used to love playing with her American Girl dolls and at one point says that Maggie’s baseball loving brother Max would pitch them pine cones and they would swing at them with their American Dolls. Horrified by the image of a pine cone exploding into shards across Josefina Montoya’s face, I highlighted the passage on my e-reader in pink and added a digital note that said “YOU DID WHAT?! THOSE DOLLS ARE EXPENSIVE.” So I’m officially either old or frugal or both. I jest. (I mean I really did make that note, but I’m joking. I had to laugh, both at the passage, and at my own reaction to it.) I don’t see any reason to rate this any less than five stars. It’s great. My Eyes Are Up Here is out June 23rd from Penguin Teen, and I highly recommend it to any fans of YA, contemporaries, feminism, and body positivity. Zimmermann did some excellent work here, and you will not be disappointed.

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