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Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but for the last year, 30H has felt like an unsolvable equation - one that's made her world a very small, very lonely place. 30H is her bra size - or it was the last time anyone checked. She stopped letting people get that close to her with a tape measure a while ago. Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this way. Despite carefully avoiding physical contact and anything tighter than a puffy coat, Greer finds an unexpected community on the volleyball squad, the team that hugs between every point and wears a uniform "so tight it can squeeze out tears." And then there's Jackson Oates, newly arrived at her school and maybe actually more interested in her banter than her breasts. Laura Zimmermann's debut is both laugh-out-loud funny and beautifully blunt, vulnerable and witty, heartbreaking and hopeful. And it will invite listeners to look carefully at a girl who just wants to be seen for all she is.


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Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but Insightful, frank, and funny, My Eyes Are Up Here is a razor-sharp debut about a teenage girl struggling to rediscover her sense of self in the year after her body decided to change all the rules. A "monomial" is a simple algebraic expression consisting of a single term. 30H, for example. Fifteen-year-old Greer Walsh hasn't been fazed by basic algebra since fifth grade, but for the last year, 30H has felt like an unsolvable equation - one that's made her world a very small, very lonely place. 30H is her bra size - or it was the last time anyone checked. She stopped letting people get that close to her with a tape measure a while ago. Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this way. Despite carefully avoiding physical contact and anything tighter than a puffy coat, Greer finds an unexpected community on the volleyball squad, the team that hugs between every point and wears a uniform "so tight it can squeeze out tears." And then there's Jackson Oates, newly arrived at her school and maybe actually more interested in her banter than her breasts. Laura Zimmermann's debut is both laugh-out-loud funny and beautifully blunt, vulnerable and witty, heartbreaking and hopeful. And it will invite listeners to look carefully at a girl who just wants to be seen for all she is.

30 review for My Eyes Are Up Here

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Resources for anyone like Greer: A Bra That Fits Bratabase Busty Resources Edited to add 04.08.20: I removed a star last week because the more I think about this book, the more it upsets me. I'm seeing so many positive reviews, including from professional journals, and I am increasingly baffled by their praise of the body positivity in this book. Yes, Greer learns to be okay with her body, but the body positive message that’s being praised in this book isn’t that your boobs are part of your body an Resources for anyone like Greer: A Bra That Fits Bratabase Busty Resources Edited to add 04.08.20: I removed a star last week because the more I think about this book, the more it upsets me. I'm seeing so many positive reviews, including from professional journals, and I am increasingly baffled by their praise of the body positivity in this book. Yes, Greer learns to be okay with her body, but the body positive message that’s being praised in this book isn’t that your boobs are part of your body and your body is good, it’s that your boobs are enormous and everyone thinks so but it’s okay because you’re not just your enormous boobs that everyone notices constantly. Seriously, folks, it's not body positive to exoticize large breasts. It's not body positive to make it sound like 30H is a size reserved for porn stars, it's not body positive to make it sound like DD+ bras are weird and nonexistent, and it sure as hell isn't body positive to make it sound like it's normal that the first thing every character in this entire book notices about Greer is her huge breasts. America has a really messed up view of big boobs, and this book goes all in on that view. /edit I am so conflicted about this book. On the one hand, I absolutely loved it. Greer is so realistic, and I remember doing so many of the things that she did when I was her age. But, y’all. 30H is not that big. Check out the 30H gallery on Bratabase, which shows real bodies wearing real 30H bras. Every single body looks proportional and average and NORMAL. They might need clothes tailored, but absolutely none of them can’t fit into anything off the rack. It might be super baggy around the waist, but it’ll fit. And they would probably fit into size small. (Just an FYI, someone who wears a 30H is going to be about 41 inches around the fullest part of the bust and about 30 inches around the underbust.) So.... there’s something messed up about this book that I feel like I really need to mention: Greer’s breasts are treated as abnormally large when her bra size does not support that. I get it; I was the girl who lived in an oversized hoodie because I felt like nothing fit and everyone would stare at my boobs if I didn’t hide them, just like Greer. A teenage girl who’s self-conscious about her body isn’t gonna be able to tell herself that she’s totally normal and her big boobs aren’t alarmingly huge because they feel alarmingly huge to her. That’s all well and good and I am so glad it’s represented in a book. BUT. Greer never learns that 30H is actually a pretty common size. That size is available in so many brands! And you can get them for cheap from Amazon! But no, EVERYONE acts like that’s the biggest boobs can get in Greer’s world. Never mind that this book takes place in a suburb of Chicago, explicitly stated to be a 45 minute drive from downtown. Never mind that Chicago is home to Bras Galore, which carries bands from 28 to 46 and cups from A to P. Never mind that Greer apparently Googled extensively enough to find a British YouTuber who rants about her enormous breasts but somehow couldn’t find Bravissimo or Panache or Curvy Kate or literally any brand that has extended sizes. Like, seriously, Greer’s bra predicament is laughably unbelievable to me, and I have been exactly where Greer was. Sure, Greer’s emotional journey is spot on. But, were I reading this as my teenage self, the lack of a resolution for her practical physical problems would have left me feeling hopeless. Like I’d need all my clothes custom-made and I’d never find a cute, supportive, comfy bra. And, more than that, since my boobs were bigger than Greer’s are stated to be, I would have felt like everyone was constantly staring in shock at my (perfectly normal) body. I think this book falls into the damaging trap that DDs are enormous and anything bigger is ridiculously huge, like larger than a beach ball huge. I’d recommend it for the emotional journey, but I would never give it to a self-conscious busty teenage girl without a hell of a lot of additional resources.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Brunson

    As someone who wears a 40H bra size, to say I’m excited this book is an understatement.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angela Staudt

    Thank you for Penguin Teen for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. “I am ashamed of being ashamed of being ashamed. And that is the part that no one else understands.” My Eyes are Up Here is such an amazing book. I felt every emotion in this book and I could totally relate to the main character Greer. She was such a well-developed character and so relatable. She is a sophomore in high school and her chest has not only filled out, but she has ginormous boobs. She has even named her boobs (whi Thank you for Penguin Teen for an eARC in exchange for an honest review. “I am ashamed of being ashamed of being ashamed. And that is the part that no one else understands.” My Eyes are Up Here is such an amazing book. I felt every emotion in this book and I could totally relate to the main character Greer. She was such a well-developed character and so relatable. She is a sophomore in high school and her chest has not only filled out, but she has ginormous boobs. She has even named her boobs (which I thought was hilarious). Greer wears oversized sweatshirts 365 days a year and slouches so no one notices her breasts. She is super self-conscious; I mean who wouldn’t be and is trying to deal with that. I really loved how realistic this whole entire book was, Greer’s thoughts, her awkwardness, and just about everything else. I loved the female friendships. I WISH I had some amazing friends like Greer has. Jessa and Maggie are side characters, but they have so much to do with this story and are amazing friends to Greer. What Greer goes through especially in a high school setting happens to so many other girls and women. In this world so many people are judging people by their looks, and this book goes to show that you should never judge anyone ever by their looks. Greer is so much more than just a teenage girl with big boobs, I loved her transformation. I knew romance would play a part in this, but it was such a side note that it made me love it even more. Greer does not change because of a boy, she learns so much and becomes such a better more confident girl because she wants to. Her friends and mother help her gain confidence and are there for her. Yes, the romance was very cute, but it didn’t overshadow the main point of this book. I really can’t stress enough how much I enjoyed this book. I think many girls/women of all ages will appreciate this book and love every character. I have to admit some parts are heavy and my heart ached for Greer, but that’s the point. High school and life are hard enough without people judging you for how perfect your makeup is, your hair, and how big your boobs are.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I'm going to need to write a lot more about this, but high school me who never found dresses that fit my boobs and didn't make me swim in the rest of it, who didn't get to wear cute bras like other folks, who always had to get a "special" uniform for badminton....is so grateful for a book about a girl with big boobs figuring it out, too. It's funny and heartwarming and Greer is so painfully relatable. Could she go online and find a special store for a 30H bra? Sure, but she's a teenager without I'm going to need to write a lot more about this, but high school me who never found dresses that fit my boobs and didn't make me swim in the rest of it, who didn't get to wear cute bras like other folks, who always had to get a "special" uniform for badminton....is so grateful for a book about a girl with big boobs figuring it out, too. It's funny and heartwarming and Greer is so painfully relatable. Could she go online and find a special store for a 30H bra? Sure, but she's a teenager without a credit card, and it was hard enough for her to ask her mother for a special sports bra. Is 30H especially big? No, but when you're in high school, it is (I know because I was there--they don't make clothes that fit you then, especially, and it doesn't get better as you age, except you have access to more online resources, which ultimately cost more money and you don't get to try on, so). My favorite character is Jessa, the rad volleyball teammate who was a helluva team player all around.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mena

    Actual Rating: 4.1/5 This was just what I needed to get my ass out of a reading slump, and I enjoyed it immensely, even as it gave me the feels. My Eyes Are Up Here is about a teenage girl’s struggle with her body image. 15 year old Greer’s is busty, and like some people at that age with that one “issue” with their body, she constantly obsesses over it. Even when she’s hiding in her men’s XXL sweatshirt and slouching, she’s preoccupied about the size of her breasts, and struggles with feelings of Actual Rating: 4.1/5 This was just what I needed to get my ass out of a reading slump, and I enjoyed it immensely, even as it gave me the feels. My Eyes Are Up Here is about a teenage girl’s struggle with her body image. 15 year old Greer’s is busty, and like some people at that age with that one “issue” with their body, she constantly obsesses over it. Even when she’s hiding in her men’s XXL sweatshirt and slouching, she’s preoccupied about the size of her breasts, and struggles with feelings of shame and anxiety, and frequently compares her body with that of other people. The first thing people seem to notice about her are were her breasts which she hilariously and self-deprecatingly named Maude and Mavis. It also felt like she was the only busty one in the world (well, her neighborhood) and that having a big chest was some kind of abnormality. You see, you’d either get frustrated with this book and how it handled the issue of Greer, Maude and Mavis, or you’d love it for how relatable it is. The story might feel like an overreaction to some people, but I remember being a teenager with slightly larger front teeth. I was Bugs Bunny and I was certain that the only thing anyone who looked at my face would see was teeth, so I frowned a lot. Heck yes, I was irrational, but in the world of 13-14 year old me, there was nothing more horrendous in this world than my central incisors. It was a different situation, yes, but I could understand Greer. A lot. The story also explores what I’d call the “choose-ables”. Be pretty or smart. Make statement or be cute. Why be this or that when you can be both? Sure, these messages are not new, but it still needs to be shouted out for the people sitting at the back. The importance of making connections and interpersonal relationships to our emotional health was also touched on. I absolutely adored the supporting characters. They were very, well, supportive. It’s always great to have a good support system, because Greer would have been worse off without Jessa and Maggie, even if they didn’t really understand how she felt all the time. Her mom could have handled it better, but well, I can understand why she didn’t…or couldn’t have. There’s also a bit of a romance here that complimented the main story.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jay G

    Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review* 3.5/5 Stars 15-year-old Greer is a sophomore, just trying to find her way through high school. Unfortunately, she is self-conscious about her size 30H boobs. Then a boy named Jackson steps into her life and she needs to navigate her growing feelings for him as well as her insecurities with her body and th Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review* 3.5/5 Stars 15-year-old Greer is a sophomore, just trying to find her way through high school. Unfortunately, she is self-conscious about her size 30H boobs. Then a boy named Jackson steps into her life and she needs to navigate her growing feelings for him as well as her insecurities with her body and the way people view her. I really liked Greer as the main character, I thought she was a huge dork and definitely relatable for those her age. I think her humour was a lot of fun and I really enjoyed watching Greer develop and become more confident as the story went on. I loved the female friendships in this! Maggie and Jessa were great additions to the story, and I loved how they always had each others backs. I also really liked how the romance was not the MAIN focus of Greer's story. I also really liked how volleyball and team dynamics was a big focus in the book too, as I spent most of my teenage years in team sports which definitely developed me into the person I am today.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    What a wonderful debut novel! Seriously, this book made me smile and feel things and laugh. If you like contemporaries with a powerful narrative voice and themes of body image and owning who you are, absolutely do not miss My Eyes Are Up Here The central relationship in My Eyes Are Up Here is the one between Greer and her breasts. No, really. Greer has an H-cup, and ever since the breasts ballooned out basically overnight, they've completely dominated her life. Maude and Mavis, aka the names she What a wonderful debut novel! Seriously, this book made me smile and feel things and laugh. If you like contemporaries with a powerful narrative voice and themes of body image and owning who you are, absolutely do not miss My Eyes Are Up Here The central relationship in My Eyes Are Up Here is the one between Greer and her breasts. No, really. Greer has an H-cup, and ever since the breasts ballooned out basically overnight, they've completely dominated her life. Maude and Mavis, aka the names she gave her breasts, prevent her from doing pretty much everything. She wears way oversize clothing, like men's XL t-shirts and sweatshirts, because they're one of the only things she can wear that fits and also will mask how large her chest is somewhat, because she also does not want attention because of her breasts. Athletic activities hurt. She doesn't swim because of the coverage issue. So, at its core, this book is about Greer coming to have a more positive relationship with her own body. Now, I have never had large breasts, so almost none of this was a lived experience for me in the boob department, though I think most every woman who has ever worn a bra understands how freaking difficult it is to find one that fits well. Even though these weren't experiences I had, everything still felt so freaking relatable because of how great Greer's voice is. She talks about her life and her struggles in a way that is open and clear. This is a great book for pretty much any pre-teen or teen (or adult woman) to help her learn to appreciate her breasts at whatever size. American culture glorifies large breasts, so it can be easy to envy women who have them, but it's important to remember they present their own struggles. There's also some discussion of public hair and what to do with it, which is a nice thing to see in YA. And I think this is the only YA book I've ever read with discussions about breast reduction surgery! A big part of Greer's journey is discovering she has some natural skill for volleyball and joining the team, even though she thinks it's a terrible idea. Learning that she can have power over her body (and buying a super intense sports bra that can actually contain Maude and Mavis) is key to her developing a healthier relationship with her body. The relationships between Greer and other people are amazing too. Some standouts for me were her best friend, Jackson, and Jackson's little sister. There are a lot of moments where Greer gets help from others, people who notice her struggle and give her practical advice, starting with the volleyball coach who recommends the sports bra, but one of the emotional highlights of the book for me was when she stood beside her bestie during a stressful moment for her outspoken bestie; in that moment, Greer realizes that, even if she can't do anything, just having someone there can be so powerful. It's nice because that moment remembers that by not being there for herself, she maybe hasn't been there for others either. Jackson's her love interest, and they're absolutely precious and adorable. It's a very high school romance, which I mean in the best way. Like, a lot of YA romance, things evolve in this way that is amazing for fiction but not necessarily realistic (no shade, I love that too), but this one is awkward and missed cues and overthinking and just so so real. I totally ship these two dorks. (Even if the pronunciation of the German in the audiobook is absolutely atrocious, as are Greer's thoughts about the girl in his German class crushing on him—I know Greer doesn't know German, but GAH!) The emotional punch I really was not expecting was Jackson's little sister, who's introduced as a little devil basically. She's a kleptomaniac and seems emotionally off in the early scenes. And those things are definitely true; she's weird and she does steal. But Greer connects with her, and she's this lonely girl, and HELP I am having a feeling. Someone save me. This is one of those books that I liked immediately but that then proceeded to completely emotionally enrapture me by the end. Seriously, this is such a fantastic and relatable YA contemporary, and I thoroughly recommend it. An excellent readalike is We Are Not the Perfect Girl, also all about body image with a voice like whoa.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I was not really thinking when I picked this book. Otherwise, I would not have gotten it. The title alone would have been a good reason for me to give it a pass. Mostly because such titles lead to stories/writing that makes me cringe and uncomfortable. All I knew when I got it was that I needed something to get me through the weekend. I started reading it on Saturday evening pretty sure I wasn't going to go far with it(because my brain cells were working and I had noticed the title) Surprise, surp I was not really thinking when I picked this book. Otherwise, I would not have gotten it. The title alone would have been a good reason for me to give it a pass. Mostly because such titles lead to stories/writing that makes me cringe and uncomfortable. All I knew when I got it was that I needed something to get me through the weekend. I started reading it on Saturday evening pretty sure I wasn't going to go far with it(because my brain cells were working and I had noticed the title) Surprise, surprise I couldn't put it down. Four hours later I was done and a little teary after that last chapter. This was amazing. It was inspiring and I was totally getting feminist vibes the entire time. I have started compiling a list of RECs for my future daughter. I don't know what number this will be placed in, but it will definitely feature in the list. I still can't believe I got through a YA book that wasn't fantasy and one which was completely clean *gasp*.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Abbie | epochnovels

    A book that every girl needs to read at some point in their life. “Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this wa A book that every girl needs to read at some point in their life. “Ever since everything changed the summer before ninth grade, Greer has felt out of control. She can't control her first impressions, the whispers that follow, or the stares that linger after. The best she can do is put on her faithful XXL sweatshirt and let her posture - and her expectations for other people - slump. But people - strangers and friends - seem strangely determined to remind her that life is not supposed to be this way. Despite carefully avoiding physical contact and anything tighter than a puffy coat, Greer finds an unexpected community on the volleyball squad, the team that hugs between every point and wears a uniform ‘so tight it can squeeze out tears.’ And then there's Jackson Oates, newly arrived at her school and maybe actually more interested in her banter than her breasts.” I laughed out loud so many times while reading this book that I lost count. Zimmerman’s writing is frank, heartfelt, and hilarious. The honesty in this book is infused with hope and warmth, as lonely as Greer is. I ached for her so much in this story! “I am ashamed of being ashamed of being ashamed. And that is the part that no one else understands.” I was lucky enough to be around women in my early adolescence who celebrated their different body types. Growing up, I had always been curvier and stronger than my friends; my boobs, hips, butt, and thighs had always been bigger than theirs, no question. And I was definitely harassed for it. But I never took shame in my appearance (though it’s still hard), because I had an amazing mother and sister whose bodies were - are - strong too. “Voluptuous Abbie” was one of the nicknames I had in school. Whether the intention was meant to flatter or not, I wore that title like a crown regardless. Just as Greer learns to do in this beautiful book. “...I went to a lot of trouble to learn how to wear it. To wear this patchwork of parts. To wear this girl that is twirly and smart and funny and strong all at the same time. To wear this body.” It’s still very hard sometimes, especially when the media is constantly telling you what beauty is. But it’s books like these that remind me that beauty comes in all colors, shapes, and sizes. And I’m not so ashamed anymore. P.S. Also: JACKSON. WHAT A CINNAMON ROLL. The romance was SO freaking sweet. I can’t stop thinking about this adorable human. A big thank you to Penguin Teen for gifting me with this ARC! To check out my My Eyes Are Up Here post on Bookstagram, click here: https://www.instagram.com/p/CB09Er4g6Rg/

  10. 4 out of 5

    ;3

    4.5 i love love loved this so much

  11. 5 out of 5

    soph

    2.5* i hate that i had to feel this way about this book. cons: - i was looking for a lot more body positivity & to see confidence built over the course of greer’s insecurities. sadly, it was more information then i wanted. it was always about her-chest this and that. i was bored and annoyed of it. - christ, there were so many immature jokes that i just couldn’t take. people. do. not. talk. like. this. - i kept forgetting that most of the characters in the book were sophomores and not 8th graders, 2.5* i hate that i had to feel this way about this book. cons: - i was looking for a lot more body positivity & to see confidence built over the course of greer’s insecurities. sadly, it was more information then i wanted. it was always about her-chest this and that. i was bored and annoyed of it. - christ, there were so many immature jokes that i just couldn’t take. people. do. not. talk. like. this. - i kept forgetting that most of the characters in the book were sophomores and not 8th graders, and this book probably would have done better if it was targeted towards a younger audience. - the similes and metaphors comparing her chest to something got annoying really fast. - jackson is the most boring, basic horny guy that nobody cares about, or me in that case. -the ending... jackson FINALLY confessed his supposed love for greer, but i never got the vibes that he even genuinely cared for her, tbh. they barely even talked to her in the course of 6 months or whatever. & so he is telling her that he honestly noticed her chest when they first met, and that he thinks about her body all the time. it was just kinda weird and made me cringe. their “romance” is fueled by hormones severely. -the shift from greer being so immensely insecure to not giving a flying shoff what people think was so fast and badly paced. the pacing is just really bad. so many times, where i didn’t know what the setting was or who was talking. pros: - supporting characters were decent. - body confidence - short chapters

  12. 4 out of 5

    Trisha Tomy

    I really really liked it!! This was one of those books that make you think......Do people out there seriously face problems because their breasts are big? On my own, I would have never imagined it; I mean almost every girl faces problems with breasts in jumping, running, sweating, trying on clothes, etc., but I never knew that these could be very serious problems, causing other health problems. So, this book was a bit of an eye-opener in that way. Also, like I commented on one of my updates, I did I really really liked it!! This was one of those books that make you think......Do people out there seriously face problems because their breasts are big? On my own, I would have never imagined it; I mean almost every girl faces problems with breasts in jumping, running, sweating, trying on clothes, etc., but I never knew that these could be very serious problems, causing other health problems. So, this book was a bit of an eye-opener in that way. Also, like I commented on one of my updates, I did not know that girls in America too have to face problems with availability of bras in different sizes. I, personally, haven't faced a lot of problems in this department, but it is mostly relatable. The thing I did not like a lot, was the romance; I mean, don't get me wrong, it was good but I thought it could have been written a bit better? Because nearing the end of the book, I wasn't really sure whether I wanted these two to end up together. I really liked that her support in this book was a solid one; I mean no one cared that she might be different, and everyone was really supportive. I really liked this book, and I recommend it to any girl who has ever faced the slightest problem with her decolletage (I really miss Sophronia), and likes a bit of romance thrown in with a good plot.

  13. 4 out of 5

    BookLover

    I love this book. It made me laugh the whole entire time and it's just a fabulous book for girls of all sizes

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zoe and MB

    This was a great contemporary book! It focused on women’s body image, while having a super cute romance. This book is great for people to understand the struggles that other women have with their body image, so you can learn to respect what they are going through. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read about a cute “new boy in town” romance or to learn about body positivity!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Greer Walsh is a confident, amazing math student. She tries to listen to her, sometimes, out of touch parents and manages around her, often times, gross younger brother. A lot of Greer's life is relatable to any teen girl, however, she also has a size 30H bra. This book follows Greer as she attempts to maintain status quo, which consists of hiding under her XXL hoodie and never, ever talking about her breasts. Life has a way of drawing Greer out of her comfort zone in the shape of a new boy in sc Greer Walsh is a confident, amazing math student. She tries to listen to her, sometimes, out of touch parents and manages around her, often times, gross younger brother. A lot of Greer's life is relatable to any teen girl, however, she also has a size 30H bra. This book follows Greer as she attempts to maintain status quo, which consists of hiding under her XXL hoodie and never, ever talking about her breasts. Life has a way of drawing Greer out of her comfort zone in the shape of a new boy in school and a newly discovered talent for volleyball. As Greer slowly comes out of her shell, she realizes her situation is maybe not the end of the world and it definitely does not have to dictate her life. I did love the overall message of accepting one's body and learning not to avoid/hide. Greer does learn to accept herself and even teaches others acceptance. What I did not like so much is the relationship Greer had with her parents. Admittedly, it can be difficult to talk to one's parents especially when they don't seem interested and that appeared to be the case at times but Greer never seemed to make peace with her mother. The mother believes throughout most of this book that Greer is larger than she is due to all the hiding under XXL clothing and Greer never corrects her. I don't want to be spoilery but I would've liked the mother to at least attempt to talk to the daughter about feelings and emotions or even just the practicalities of obtaining a sports bra. Overall, I did like this book and I did connect with it as I think many readers will but I just wished it had gone a bit further. It is not as difficult as Greer seems to think to find a size 30H bra and I was ultimately waiting for the mother/daughter relationship to guide Greer in that direction but I feel it never happened. I hope readers do feel the normalization of the experience depicted in this book but I also hope they realize there is much more out there as far as resources to help. There's no reason not to talk about what you need with a trusted adult. Okay off the soap box now. Ultimately, I did enjoy this audiobook, I did laugh out loud at times, and I do think it deserves four stars. :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    mindful.librarian ☀️

    SLJ review title - can’t rate or review here

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish // YA Book Blogger

    Happy release day! I need to read more fun books.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Netgalley Greer's mother has a relocation help business, so she is always being dragged off to meet the children of clients. Kids her age generally don't want to talk to her, but when she meets Jackson Oates and his mom at the habitual coffee shop, he's different. Friendly, smart, helpful, funny-- Greer instantly likes him. The problem? Greer is so uncomfortable about her large breasts that she retreats from a lot of social connections, and figures that Jackson will immediately E ARC provided by Netgalley Greer's mother has a relocation help business, so she is always being dragged off to meet the children of clients. Kids her age generally don't want to talk to her, but when she meets Jackson Oates and his mom at the habitual coffee shop, he's different. Friendly, smart, helpful, funny-- Greer instantly likes him. The problem? Greer is so uncomfortable about her large breasts that she retreats from a lot of social connections, and figures that Jackson will immediately make new friends and ignore her. He does make friends, including her best friend Maggie's brother and a lot of other baseball players, but he still continues to talk to her. Usually more concerned with advanced academics than other activities (which can often involve people looking at her), Greer becomes interested in volleyball and tries out for the team. It's difficult to play with a sports bra squeezed over her regular, but the coach sends her a link to a garment called "the Stabilizer" that works wonders. Greer makes the teams, but another hurdle is getting a uniform to fit her 30H figure. Greer and Jackson' families spend some tiem together, and his problematic younger sister takes to Greer. At the same time, Maggie is involved with the school production of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and is being her usual outspoken self when questioning the wisdom of doing such an outdated play. Greer is hopeful about volleyball and Jackson until events complicate matters and she almost disengages, retreating into her XXL sweatshirts instead of confronting her problems. Will she ever be able to make peace with herself? Strengths: I loved this one SO much. Greer was smart and funny, and I think that so many of us can commiserate with wanting to hide behind clothes. Jackson was absolutely crush worthy, and treated Greer really well even when her actions were confusing. In fact, all of the characters were well drawn; the pushy, uncommunicative mother, the squirrel younger brother, Maggie, the phenomenal home ec teacher-- whew. Smart, smart writing, and such a vivid description of what Greer felt like living in her body. After I finishes this, I couldn't pick up any other books because I knew I wouldn't like anything I read half as well. Greer, with all of her humor, insecurity, and misguided attempts to get through high school, reminded me a lot of myself, and of my daughter who probably wore an oversized hoodie to high school 90% of the time. Weaknesses: Some reviewers have mentioned that this isn't quite in line with "body positivity" and that there would be more resources for Greer for bras, because her size was not unusual. I didn't immediately think about the "body positivity" aspect; as someone who is absolutely average sized and still wants to live in obscuring clothes, I just saw this as how one girl who was a little different than her classmates took that difference to heart in wanting to hide from the world. More "effenheimers" that I like for middle grade readers, and once scene between Jackson and Greer that was delicately done, circumspect, and probably not instructional to younger readers but which about melted my socks off. Also, I think I learned some things about personal hygiene I didn't know. What I really think: Do we need books about this for middle school readers? Yes. Is this the book they need? I am really debating because I loved Greer and Jackson so much.

  19. 5 out of 5

    polca

    My reading partner betrayed me but I am happy for her she didn't get to read this bullshit! I mean what was the point ! And damn girl take a chill pill they are your boobs not some mountain on grassland ( her line not mine)

  20. 5 out of 5

    dani

    it was powerful and inspiring and beautiful

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tiffani Reads

    I never fully understood the importance of seeing yourself in books until I read this book. As someone who is white and female, I see myself in lots of books but then I read My Eyes Are Up Here and oh my, Greer could have been me in high school. This was my struggle in high school, having an identity beyond "the girl with the big boobs". I am so glad that this book exists and that other girls going through this very same thing will be able to know that they are not alone, they are not just a pai I never fully understood the importance of seeing yourself in books until I read this book. As someone who is white and female, I see myself in lots of books but then I read My Eyes Are Up Here and oh my, Greer could have been me in high school. This was my struggle in high school, having an identity beyond "the girl with the big boobs". I am so glad that this book exists and that other girls going through this very same thing will be able to know that they are not alone, they are not just a pair of breasts, their identity as a person extends beyond their chest. I love this book and I will be singing it's praises for a long time to come. Greer, is a fantastic character. She is sarcastic, funny, loyal, but also she is someone who doesn't know her self-worth. She doesn't know how to live in her own skin because of the jokes, the staring, the whispers from boys who seem to follow her. She hides in bulky clothes to hide her form and she talks about the struggles of finding cute, proper fitting bras for girls bigger than a C-cup. She is so real, that several times I remember having some of those exact same moments. Then there is Jackson. I definitely dated a guy like Jackson in high school. Everyone in their life should be lucky enough to date a Jackson. His character was paired to Greer's perfectly, while also having his own identity within the story. I just loved him and I will admit that I squealed with joy when they finally got together in the end. Honourable character mention to Maude and Mavis because *chefs kiss* . Every time Greer refers to them I was howling with laughter, tears streaming down my face laughing. Some of the funniest lines were about them and I loved it! For example: "You know who gets to touch my stomach all they want? My breasts. They can hardly help themselves." I read that line to my husband with no context and he snorted his drink out his nose. This book is funny, and raw, and real, and you need to read it. Irregardless of whether you had big boobs growing up or not, you need to read this book. *Thank you to Edelweiss and Penguin Teen for giving me an E-ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julia Sapphire

    Thank you Penguin Teen for sending this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. This story follows a fifteen-year-old girl named Greer Walsh and her coming of age story. It discusses body representation especially due to the fact that her bra size is a 30H. She talks about her insecurities and how other people react to how she looks. Also how she views herself and struggles to feel comfortable. I was expecting this book to really discuss body positivity, body rep, and feminism. I, unfortunately Thank you Penguin Teen for sending this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. This story follows a fifteen-year-old girl named Greer Walsh and her coming of age story. It discusses body representation especially due to the fact that her bra size is a 30H. She talks about her insecurities and how other people react to how she looks. Also how she views herself and struggles to feel comfortable. I was expecting this book to really discuss body positivity, body rep, and feminism. I, unfortunately, had several issues with this book and felt disconnected from the book consistently. The writing style was just okay, though it had some humour that was a miss for me personally. Something that irked me was that Greer's boobs are personified throughout the course of this book. Maude and Mavis were the names and she constantly referred to them as such. Greer was a character who I did not care for many times throughout this book. She gave off the "I'm not like other girls" vibe and her character lacked depth. The love interest in this book was also just a flop. I disliked how the book ended and thought it was a cop-out, especially in terms of romance. I did enjoy reading about how Greer did have a few positive people in her life that helped her. Though most people were horrible to her, I was glad to see that a member of the school had her back. Overall, I think this book had a great concept and idea but unfortunately, I thought the execution lacked. This book took me a while to get through because I was not very invested and did not care for many aspects of the story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Slaa!!!

    SO!!! I really enjoyed this. I could relate a lot to Greer and understand her ways of coping, ie: wearing super baggy clothes to hide her breasts, slouching, keeping her arms crossed over her chest, never hugging anyone and never talking about it. I know how hard it is to deal with a body that's doing things that you don't want it to as a young adult, trying to hide and always being scared people will acknowledge the things that make you different. I enjoyed watching her eventually be a little m SO!!! I really enjoyed this. I could relate a lot to Greer and understand her ways of coping, ie: wearing super baggy clothes to hide her breasts, slouching, keeping her arms crossed over her chest, never hugging anyone and never talking about it. I know how hard it is to deal with a body that's doing things that you don't want it to as a young adult, trying to hide and always being scared people will acknowledge the things that make you different. I enjoyed watching her eventually be a little more okay with her situation and hiding a little bit less and standing up for herself a little bit more. I know some reviewers are upset that she didn't get to a place of fully loving herself, but I think a lot of progress was made and it was realistic. I think it was more than self consciousness and really more of an ongoing trauma that she was going through, and we can have compassion for her and applaud her for the steps she took to move forward! I also loved how all of her friends were such good people and so supportive, particularly Maggie, Jessa (the real MVP!! I want to be her when I grow up), the volleyball team as a whole, and of course Jackson. Speaking of Jackson!!! The one thing that really drove me off the deep end was how she kept sabotaging herself and not letting a relationship happen (because if they got close, he would of course discover her breasts), which in turn repeatedly hurt his feelings because she wasn't telling him the truth of why she was pushing him away and he thought she just didn't like him. Understandable (I have to remember that she is only 15), but not okay and upsetting for me personally!!!!!! Tbh. The other thing I realized after the fact, was that if you look up pictures of women wearing Greer's bra size, 30H, their chests really don't look that startlingly large. I know that it's all from Greer's perspective and maybe her breasts just feel huge to HER. But if that was the case, we wouldn't have these situations where people do double takes when they see her chest, or where she can't get her volleyball uniform down over her chest, or where she can't find any kind of dress that fits when she's shopping for the dance, and the kids in her math class probably wouldn't make her the butt of their jokes etc etc etc. I also realize that for the most part, Greer wasn't wearing a bra that fit right and that could make her chest look larger than if she was properly fitted, and also that it might be more unusual to see breasts of this size on a young teen than it would be on a grown woman. Basically I feel like the story works better if she's got REALLY QUITE LARGE BOOBS which is how I was picturing it, and I don't know that the bra size matches up.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This is how comic makers would draw a girl Hulk; it wouldn't be her muscles, it'd be her boobs that would burst the seams. I stand in front of the mirror. Shit. I can't wear this thing. :') is my main feeling right now Greer is a fantastic character to spend time with, frustrating as she may be, and as much as you want to bundle her up and hug her - she's hilarious, whip-fast, full of heart, and completely understandable. I may not get her precise insecurity, but what really hit me about this book This is how comic makers would draw a girl Hulk; it wouldn't be her muscles, it'd be her boobs that would burst the seams. I stand in front of the mirror. Shit. I can't wear this thing. :') is my main feeling right now Greer is a fantastic character to spend time with, frustrating as she may be, and as much as you want to bundle her up and hug her - she's hilarious, whip-fast, full of heart, and completely understandable. I may not get her precise insecurity, but what really hit me about this book was how it highlighted the total self-sabotage that comes with being incredibly insecure about yourself. It's not all about the teasing or you vs the world. A huge part of what sucks is destroying things that give you a chance because you're too afraid to face them, and I loved the kinda-painful process of reading a character do that to herself when you just wanted to shake her and be like, love yourself!!! seriously!!!!!!!! I'll agree that it kiiinda skidded past the mark of complete self-acceptance (ended up more like self-tolerance?) and that was a bit of a bummer, but Greer was just so engaging that I fell in love with her right away and so fell in love with the book too. And Jackson was so gentle, genuine, and kind - i swear he's the actual guy teenage girls want to fall for, not the endless parade of brooding, cranky, stalker-y bad boys that I keep reading about. The side characters too were so lovable - Jessa, Maggie, Quin. I grabbed this one for the cute cover and was really surprised by what a great time I had with it. It was! Just so sweet! Maybe I wish there was a TOUCH more love for Greer to give herself but still!! :')

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Elaina

    The friendship group in this is frigging adorable! Love love love that! And I loved the main protagonist Greer, although her perspective is a little repetitive at times I related to her so much. I feel as though some people may find her a little whiny at times and she definitely is but her situation makes it realistic and if you don’t know you don’t know. 😅 I wish I could have read a book like this while I was still in high school, it would’ve been revolutionary for me, and I think a lot of teen The friendship group in this is frigging adorable! Love love love that! And I loved the main protagonist Greer, although her perspective is a little repetitive at times I related to her so much. I feel as though some people may find her a little whiny at times and she definitely is but her situation makes it realistic and if you don’t know you don’t know. 😅 I wish I could have read a book like this while I was still in high school, it would’ve been revolutionary for me, and I think a lot of teens will love it. This came really close to getting five stars, the first half of the book is definitely up there with some the best YA I’ve ever read, the second half did drag a little and I think towards the end it did feel a little generic plot wise. But it was still cute and very well written all the way through and is something I recommend any teen or adult read (especially adults with teenage kids!). I’m really excited to see what Laura Zimmermann releases in the future! Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  26. 4 out of 5

    Menna

    Hey friends, ✒️ Genre : contemporary ✒️ Storyline : fifteen year old Greer is insecure because she doesn’t fit the status Quota, her body grew up so fast and unfortunately for her it didn’t stop growing.... now nothing fits ( nothing cute meant for 15 year old girl at least ) .... Join Greer in her extraordinary journey where she discovers how to be proud of her own body and accepting her differences while living life to the Fullest. ✒️ Review : this book was extraordinarily good, and diverse Hey friends, ✒️ Genre : contemporary ✒️ Storyline : fifteen year old Greer is insecure because she doesn’t fit the status Quota, her body grew up so fast and unfortunately for her it didn’t stop growing.... now nothing fits ( nothing cute meant for 15 year old girl at least ) .... Join Greer in her extraordinary journey where she discovers how to be proud of her own body and accepting her differences while living life to the Fullest. ✒️ Review : this book was extraordinarily good, and diverse. Even though at certain scenes the problem was slightly exaggerated but that is the normal when portraying a new problem in society to society. The exaggeration helped the book be light and comedic which made it into a beautiful light contemporary read that presented a powerful message. I like how in the development of Greer’s character and through her maturation, many people helped her including teachers , high school friends , her best friend , and her own mother. What’s usually seen in this type of books is that the change is initiated by a love story , the cute boy in school but here the love story is just a side story in the journey of self discovery and self worth. It certainly helped Greer understand more about herself but it was the main cause of her maturation. The writing style made sure that I loved , cried , laughed and wanted to go bra shopping 😂😂😂. I also extremely loved the diversity, there was a Muslim character and it was explained how her beliefs where respected when she was receiving her volleyball uniform. I also loved how there was no high school mean group , it was More of we are all nice people but we don’t have to be all friends but we are friendly when need be and that was as close as my high school experience that I’ve ever read in a book. I love how the flashbacks were inserted sneakily within the chapters so that I understood more of the background Story yet i wasn’t bored of living in the past for too long. All In all an amazing read ❤️❤️ ✒️ Recommendation : to anyone and everyone it’s that awesome 👏 Stay safe , Stay home #Quarantine Read

  27. 5 out of 5

    Abby Cooper

    Heartfelt and HILARIOUS!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    My Eyes Are Up Here tells the story of teen girl, Greer, who assumes everyone else has it together while she struggles. As we all have that mentality to an extent, it is a theme we can all connect with. However, Greer has some added body issues that she wishes she could get rid of. Eventually she begins to see that everyone is not as put-together as they seem, and that there are cracks in everyone’s lives or families. She makes some strides in dealing with herself and she is able to get past tho My Eyes Are Up Here tells the story of teen girl, Greer, who assumes everyone else has it together while she struggles. As we all have that mentality to an extent, it is a theme we can all connect with. However, Greer has some added body issues that she wishes she could get rid of. Eventually she begins to see that everyone is not as put-together as they seem, and that there are cracks in everyone’s lives or families. She makes some strides in dealing with herself and she is able to get past those self derogatory terms enough to allow her to make friends as well. As she grows, she is able to reach out to others around her who she comes to find need some help, too. Overall, Greer is a wonderful character who isn’t as down on herself as some teen characters. She recognizes her strength even when she downplays them, so it makes her a more believable and relatable main character.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    Really a 3.5 but here we are in the year 2020 and goodreads still won't let us rate half stars. Full review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAqTw... Really a 3.5 but here we are in the year 2020 and goodreads still won't let us rate half stars. Full review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAqTw...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Review originally published on my blog, Turning Pages. I love me a good feminist book, especially when it’s a romcom. Especially when it speaks to beauty standards. Thank you, Laura Zimmermann for delivering this book to readers everywhere, especially those who have larger chests. As someone who has big breasts, I really appreciated a character with a similar body type in a book. I don’t think I’ve seen this done before, and it’ I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Review originally published on my blog, Turning Pages. I love me a good feminist book, especially when it’s a romcom. Especially when it speaks to beauty standards. Thank you, Laura Zimmermann for delivering this book to readers everywhere, especially those who have larger chests. As someone who has big breasts, I really appreciated a character with a similar body type in a book. I don’t think I’ve seen this done before, and it’s a shame. The book shows how much girls are sexualized as soon as they begin puberty and their breasts start to develop. What’s already an uncomfortable time is made even more so because of the way girls are treated not only by other females – who can, believe me, judge just as harshly – but also because of the way boys AND men treat them. It’s disturbing, it’s disrespectful, and it’s wrong. I appreciated the message of the book so much, and I think everyone should read it for the message alone. Greer is uncomfortable with her body because of the way people have treated her, but she tries to deflect, hide, and handle it with internal sarcasm and wit. Her POV is honestly hilarious and relatable, so much so that I didn’t want to put the book down. Where was this book when I was a young teen struggling with my body? But at the same time, as an adult it has just as much impact. Some other reviews have said they felt that her jokes about her breasts are frustrating and problematic, and I can definitely see that. I think that because she makes fun of herself in the prose so often and for 90% of the book, it DOES begin to lose its humour and instead just becomes sad. I would’ve liked to see a more gradual growth from her shame to her acceptance instead of leaving the revelation so late in the book. That would’ve made the story a little better for readers who are looking to this book for its message of self-love and calling out the way girls are sexualized and judged based on breast size. The female friendships are a lovely touch in the book. That, in combination with the romance, is what helps Greer step outside of her shame and gain some confidence. Jackson is adorable, and I love him and Greer. He’s funny, he genuinely seems to get her, and he supports her. I loved their interactions from the first time they meet. Not to be cheesy or anything, but they were meant to be. The banter between them is magical and makes the book so fun. (If there’s one thing this book can do, it’s banter). My Eyes Are Up Here is, quite frankly, a breath of fresh air. I’ve never read a book about a girl with larger breasts that tackles how that can affect a girl. I appreciate that it calls out the judgement, the beauty standards, and the way girls with big breasts are sexualized from a young age. The romance and the banter balances out the heavier moments very well. Overall, this is such a good contemporary and I was actually looking forward to writing this review. That speaks volumes.

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