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Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers: The Texas Victory That Changed American History

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The heart-stopping story of the fight for Texas by The New York Times bestselling author of George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates. In his now-trademark style, Brian Kilmeade brings alive one of the most pivotal moments in American history, this time telling the heart-stopping story of America's fight for Texas. While the story of the Al The heart-stopping story of the fight for Texas by The New York Times bestselling author of George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates. In his now-trademark style, Brian Kilmeade brings alive one of the most pivotal moments in American history, this time telling the heart-stopping story of America's fight for Texas. While the story of the Alamo is familiar to most, few remember how Sam Houston led Texians after a crushing loss to a shocking victory that secured their freedom and paved the way for America's growth. In March 1836, the Mexican army led by General Santa Anna massacred more than two hundred Texians who had been trapped in a tiny adobe mission in San Antonio for thirteen days. American legends Jim Bowie and Davey Crockett died there, along with other Americans who had moved to Texas looking for a fresh start. The defeat galvanized the surviving Texians. Under General Sam Houston, a maverick with a rocky past, the tiny army of settlers rallied--only to retreat time and time again. Having learned from the bloody battles that characterized his past, Houston knew it was poor strategy to aggressively retaliate. He held off until just one month after the massacre, when he and his army of underdog Texians soundly defeated Santa Anna's troops in under eighteen minutes at the Battle of San Jacinto, and in doing so won the independence for which so many had died. Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers recaptures this pivotal war that changed America forever, and sheds light on the tightrope all war heroes walk between courage and calculation. Thanks to Kilmeade's storytelling, a new generation of readers will remember the Alamo--and recognize the lesser-known heroes who snatched victory from the jaws of defeat.


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The heart-stopping story of the fight for Texas by The New York Times bestselling author of George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates. In his now-trademark style, Brian Kilmeade brings alive one of the most pivotal moments in American history, this time telling the heart-stopping story of America's fight for Texas. While the story of the Al The heart-stopping story of the fight for Texas by The New York Times bestselling author of George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates. In his now-trademark style, Brian Kilmeade brings alive one of the most pivotal moments in American history, this time telling the heart-stopping story of America's fight for Texas. While the story of the Alamo is familiar to most, few remember how Sam Houston led Texians after a crushing loss to a shocking victory that secured their freedom and paved the way for America's growth. In March 1836, the Mexican army led by General Santa Anna massacred more than two hundred Texians who had been trapped in a tiny adobe mission in San Antonio for thirteen days. American legends Jim Bowie and Davey Crockett died there, along with other Americans who had moved to Texas looking for a fresh start. The defeat galvanized the surviving Texians. Under General Sam Houston, a maverick with a rocky past, the tiny army of settlers rallied--only to retreat time and time again. Having learned from the bloody battles that characterized his past, Houston knew it was poor strategy to aggressively retaliate. He held off until just one month after the massacre, when he and his army of underdog Texians soundly defeated Santa Anna's troops in under eighteen minutes at the Battle of San Jacinto, and in doing so won the independence for which so many had died. Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers recaptures this pivotal war that changed America forever, and sheds light on the tightrope all war heroes walk between courage and calculation. Thanks to Kilmeade's storytelling, a new generation of readers will remember the Alamo--and recognize the lesser-known heroes who snatched victory from the jaws of defeat.

30 review for Sam Houston and the Alamo Avengers: The Texas Victory That Changed American History

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Gilmore

    Originally I gave this book 4 stars as the author makes this a fun dramatic story. I enjoy the details on the Texas Revolution trail, or events leading up to the Alamo. As usual Travis, Crockett, and Bowie are highlighted as defenders of the Alamo. I think it was a bit unfortunate that more time was not spend telling the story of the soldiers. Also, the Alamo eye witness accounts vary greatly. The author seems to pick the most popular theories of how Bowie and Crockett died. Theories I have hear Originally I gave this book 4 stars as the author makes this a fun dramatic story. I enjoy the details on the Texas Revolution trail, or events leading up to the Alamo. As usual Travis, Crockett, and Bowie are highlighted as defenders of the Alamo. I think it was a bit unfortunate that more time was not spend telling the story of the soldiers. Also, the Alamo eye witness accounts vary greatly. The author seems to pick the most popular theories of how Bowie and Crockett died. Theories I have heard or read include Crockett was captured and executed by swords. Or shot. Or died from a bayonet to the heart. Or he died fighting. First he was using his famous knife to stab Mexican soldiers as the entered a building. He was shot in his right arm and then used his left arm and rifle to club more soldiers. He was then hit with a bayonet in the heart. Or under his right eye. One eye witness said he was dead on the ground surrounded by dead Mexican soldiers with his famous hat laying next to him on the ground. By writing details that sound like proven fact in a book that should be non fiction is a mistake in my opinion. The story of the Alamo is both heartbreaking and inspiring. This book is heavy on the inspiring. Perhaps this book was meant for people who don’t usually enjoy nonfiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Clay Davis

    The diagrams in the book were not easy to make out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    With Bill O'Reilly off the network, FOX News personality Brian Kilmeade has taken up the "pop history" slack...Kilmeade delivers, just like O'Reilly, a narrative in an easy to read structure that makes us want to come back for more...Very similar to the Walter Lord's "A Time to Stand," but with more of a focus on the role of Sam Houston in the creation of the nation/state Texas!!!...Good Stuff...More please!!! With Bill O'Reilly off the network, FOX News personality Brian Kilmeade has taken up the "pop history" slack...Kilmeade delivers, just like O'Reilly, a narrative in an easy to read structure that makes us want to come back for more...Very similar to the Walter Lord's "A Time to Stand," but with more of a focus on the role of Sam Houston in the creation of the nation/state Texas!!!...Good Stuff...More please!!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peggy Parsons

    Another great book by Kilmeade. So readable. I loved getting to know the men who fled to Mexican territory to start their lives over after they'd messed up royally in the states. Most of these Texians (initial spelling) were drunks and cheats and failures in their previous lives. Their second chance was to settle in Mexico, which meant facing the shear brutality of starting from nothing while always on the lookout for Indian attacks. It was a tough life, but nothing compared to the callous cruel Another great book by Kilmeade. So readable. I loved getting to know the men who fled to Mexican territory to start their lives over after they'd messed up royally in the states. Most of these Texians (initial spelling) were drunks and cheats and failures in their previous lives. Their second chance was to settle in Mexico, which meant facing the shear brutality of starting from nothing while always on the lookout for Indian attacks. It was a tough life, but nothing compared to the callous cruelty and viciousness of Santa Anna. Loved reading about the good and bad choices made at the Alamo and the battles that occurred afterward. Excellent detail. Helped me to finally understand how Texas became an independent nation from Mexico and then part of the US.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Neil McKinlay

    A must read for all lovers of liberty. Kilmeade skims off the cowardly patriot’s dross by placing us right in the action of freedom’s furnace. There we are beaten on the anvil of the example of Texas liberation: “God and Texas - Liberty or Death.” History shows that freedom comes only through acts of bravery. Just ask Jesus.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve Hall

    Disappointing — this book comes across more as a school book report than a scholarly examination of the Alamo and its aftermath. It seemed Mr. Kilmeade watched the movie and then wrote a book. I paid $30 for this at an airport bookstore. What a mistake.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This was an easy-to-read history of Texas and its founders as a Republic. As with other Kilmeade books, there is obviously a lot of assumption and triangulation (which the author acknowledges) in order to have a readable story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    SusanwithaGoodBook

    This was really great! I expected it to be good and informative, but it was much more lively and riveting than I expected. I'm a Texan, so I know the story and most of the details, but Brian's style kept me on the edge of my seat as we marched toward Texas Independence at the Battle of San Jacinto. Along the way I learned some details I didn't know, and got to know the personalities of several important Texas Heroes I only knew from a distance before. This was really great! I expected it to be good and informative, but it was much more lively and riveting than I expected. I'm a Texan, so I know the story and most of the details, but Brian's style kept me on the edge of my seat as we marched toward Texas Independence at the Battle of San Jacinto. Along the way I learned some details I didn't know, and got to know the personalities of several important Texas Heroes I only knew from a distance before.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cynda

    Having been educated in Texas, it would be easy for me to say that this book is an overview of the Texas Revolution. By saying the easy thing, I would be ignoring how Killmeade worked to include women's presence and participation in the Texas Revolution, how he worked to indicate the importance of the fledging newspaper the Telegraph and the Texas Register. Maybe someone who still can will seek out the newspapers records and write a historical/rhetorical analysis of the part the newspaper played Having been educated in Texas, it would be easy for me to say that this book is an overview of the Texas Revolution. By saying the easy thing, I would be ignoring how Killmeade worked to include women's presence and participation in the Texas Revolution, how he worked to indicate the importance of the fledging newspaper the Telegraph and the Texas Register. Maybe someone who still can will seek out the newspapers records and write a historical/rhetorical analysis of the part the newspaper played in spreading information or propaganda. This is the second book by Killmeade that I have read. I have also read Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates: The Forgotten War that Changed American History. I hope to read more. Read as part of my nonfiction personal challenge: 21 All About Texas in 2021.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    A very action packed and dramatic accounting of the losses at the Alamo and at Goliad. He also describes Houston’s often controversial journey leading up to his stunning victory over Santa Anna at San Jacinto. All major characters and founders of Texas are brought to life and help weave the story of Texas independence. Excellent book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I’m glad I read it. It was a good historical read. I’m traveling to San Antonio and wanted to know the history of this region before I head down there. Kept me interested unlike other history books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    From the host of Fox and Friends comes the epic story of Texas independence. I will respect the author's copyright by refraining from quoting this book, but this book should be required reading for all high school civics classes. It tells of the struggle for Texas independence without fluff and prose/poetry. A very satisfying summertime read. From the host of Fox and Friends comes the epic story of Texas independence. I will respect the author's copyright by refraining from quoting this book, but this book should be required reading for all high school civics classes. It tells of the struggle for Texas independence without fluff and prose/poetry. A very satisfying summertime read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    Two-stars might be a stretch. Who among us (of a certain age) was not at some point caught up in the fight for Texas independence with the siege of the Alamo at the core. The question always remained what part myth, what part reality? Kilmeade does little to move past myth. Indeed, in the 'Acknowledgements' he concedes that the historic record is cloudy and conflicting and faced with such he compared, examined, contrasted . . . and used his judgement for what 'most likely happened'. In short, he Two-stars might be a stretch. Who among us (of a certain age) was not at some point caught up in the fight for Texas independence with the siege of the Alamo at the core. The question always remained what part myth, what part reality? Kilmeade does little to move past myth. Indeed, in the 'Acknowledgements' he concedes that the historic record is cloudy and conflicting and faced with such he compared, examined, contrasted . . . and used his judgement for what 'most likely happened'. In short, he runs with myth. The expansion of slavery, the No. 1 political topics of that era, was underneath the Texas Revolution. The Anglo-Americans swore to obey the laws of Mexico, including the 1829 emancipation proclamation. Mexico was ardently Catholic and wanted nothing to do with the peculiar institution that was slowly ripping the US apart. You will find none of that here.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen Ditsch

    I actually only read this because I live in Texas and figured it would be good to actually learn something about the names of some cities and counties here. I didn't like it. I'm probably losing my Texan status because I'm firmly convinced that these founding fathers were incompetent blowhards and your typical entitled white guys who just got really lucky. The narrative is very much military history and I don't really like retellings of who marched where and when. I much prefer social histories I actually only read this because I live in Texas and figured it would be good to actually learn something about the names of some cities and counties here. I didn't like it. I'm probably losing my Texan status because I'm firmly convinced that these founding fathers were incompetent blowhards and your typical entitled white guys who just got really lucky. The narrative is very much military history and I don't really like retellings of who marched where and when. I much prefer social histories that give me perspective on how people actually lived in a particular era. So my rating may have as much to do with my personal preferences as the writing. Because I'm an entitled white woman who didn't get all that lucky with this reading choice.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Gleicher

    Kilmeade's book is clearly pop history. Written at a very low level for easy reading, this is not a challenging or thought-provoking book in the slightest. Kilmeade takes extreme liberties in his depiction of Jackson's policies, and worse, he takes great pains to erase the accomplishments and sacrifices of Tejano fighters and enslaved men. He fails to even mention the possibility of slavery as being one of the factors in the desire for independence from Mexico. This is a slimmed-down, whitewashe Kilmeade's book is clearly pop history. Written at a very low level for easy reading, this is not a challenging or thought-provoking book in the slightest. Kilmeade takes extreme liberties in his depiction of Jackson's policies, and worse, he takes great pains to erase the accomplishments and sacrifices of Tejano fighters and enslaved men. He fails to even mention the possibility of slavery as being one of the factors in the desire for independence from Mexico. This is a slimmed-down, whitewashed retelling of a story of great bravery but also of flawed men and women rising up against an autocratic despot.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    The book content was good, but I did not enjoy the author reading the book. The inflection was all wrong making sad events appear exciting. It just made the book hard to listen to when the author read it with the excitement of a party instead of a war. Sorry Brian. Please let someone else do the audio version next time. :-(

  17. 4 out of 5

    John Chapman

    Excellent! Great detail but never gets bogged down and boring like some nonfiction. A must-read for all Texans as well as anyone interested in American History.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Larry Peninger

    The history of Texas and especially the The Alamo and its brave heroes is always fascinating. As always I try to read along with the audiobook. However the ebook was not available with the audiobook. To hear Brian (the bolillio) Kilmeade murder the pronunciation of most counties and rivers is hilarious. He did his homework as far as resources and research he might have gone a step further to get the pronunciations correct. That does not take away from the book. This is a first rate book and shoul The history of Texas and especially the The Alamo and its brave heroes is always fascinating. As always I try to read along with the audiobook. However the ebook was not available with the audiobook. To hear Brian (the bolillio) Kilmeade murder the pronunciation of most counties and rivers is hilarious. He did his homework as far as resources and research he might have gone a step further to get the pronunciations correct. That does not take away from the book. This is a first rate book and should be read by all. Sam Houston a flawed man in his own right made up for it with bravery and leadership. After his first wife left and him abandoning his second wife and children he made Texas his life long mistress. I have not read any books on Sam Houston and really enjoyed my first. Thankfully my first focused on the battles which led to his successes. The stories did not include much if any time that he spent with the Cherokee Indians. Although with such a long career it is much easier to focus on a shorter period. And the Alamo is a great place to start. This really was a brief focused telling on the events leading up to the slaughter at the Alamo, and the slaughter at Goliad, and final Texian victory at San Jacinto. If you are looking for an on depth telling of Sam Houston's life and times this is not it. However if you want a down and dirty working making mans telling of those events. You will enjoy this . So enjoy!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda Schmidt

    Brian Kilmeade’s Sam Huston and the Alamo Avengers presents a thorough account of the pre-and post- Alamo events and personalities. Even if you know and enjoy historical writing, Kilmeade’s research will still inform you. He footnotes information so you can research areas which specifically interest you. Kilmeade also includes photos, maps, and paintings of people like Stephen F. Austin, Houston, and General Santa Ana.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt Shimerdla

    Kilmeade is a great story teller. The perilous journey to Texas independence is wonderfully told.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    I knew very little about the Battle of the Alamo going into Brian Kilmeade’s latest historical nonfiction book, “Sam Houston & the Alamo Avengers”, and that’s a shame, because while I consider myself somewhat learned in American history, clearly there are major gaps in my knowledge. I can only imagine that the average American knows very little about it as well, unless you are a Texan, and you are probably taught it starting in Kindergarten, in which case you know everything about Texas history. I knew very little about the Battle of the Alamo going into Brian Kilmeade’s latest historical nonfiction book, “Sam Houston & the Alamo Avengers”, and that’s a shame, because while I consider myself somewhat learned in American history, clearly there are major gaps in my knowledge. I can only imagine that the average American knows very little about it as well, unless you are a Texan, and you are probably taught it starting in Kindergarten, in which case you know everything about Texas history. I was not born in Texas, so the story of the brave men who fought and died at the Alamo Mission church in what is today the city of San Antonio, was not a major part of the curriculum of American history in school. Sure, it was mentioned briefly as a vital battle that ultimately led to Texas becoming a state of the Union, but it tended to get short shrift compared to the American Revolution and the Civil War. As a kid we were taught to “Remember the Alamo!”, but we just weren’t taught exactly what to remember it for. Kilmeade has done another fine job of telling a piece of American history in a way that makes it real and relevant. He has managed to humanize and bring to life the many colorful characters involved, including James Bowie, David “Davy” Crockett, William Travis, and El Presidente General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (a most vicious and cruel villain if there ever was one). Houston, of course, is the focal point in Kilmeade’s book. Starting with his stint, under General Andrew Jackson, at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend against marauding Red Stick Creek American Indians, where he learned a valuable lesson in leadership, Houston went on to live an extremely exciting life: living among the Cherokee tribe, winning the war against Mexico, capturing Santa Anna, becoming president of the Texas Republic before it became a state, becoming a Congressman, governor of Tennessee, and later retiring with his Cherokee friends in Arkansas. But that list of achievements tells only a small part of the fascinating story of the man and his life experiences, as well as the intersection of other fascinating people in his lifetime. I’ll be honest: I don’t normally like books about war and battles. Most of the time, it is an endless stream of boring numbers and dates---troop counts, casualties, when this happened, when that happened---and strategy that I simply don’t find interesting. While Kilmeade succumbs to this preoccupation occasionally, he keeps coming back to what I feel is the most important part of the story: the human drama, the real people and how they felt and what they believed and why they fought. This is why I felt “Sam Houston & the Alamo Avengers” was a great book. It’s certainly the best one among Kilmeade’s four other historical books he has written and co-written, all of which I have enjoyed. And while I know that there is more story to tell than the 232 pages in Kilmeade’s book, this is certainly a good starting point. If Kilmeade succeeds in merely sowing the seed of interest in American history in a reader where none existed before, then he has done a good job. I can honestly say that he has certainly ignited a passion for reading more history in me.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Blaine Welgraven

    "In the end, this isn't a story of politics, local or geopolitical. The brief war of independence is a story of redemption...." -- Brian Kilmeade An engaging narrative that clearly outlines the critical events of 1935-1936, centered loosely around the character of Sam Houston. However, Kilmeade's narrative doesn't even mention--let alone define--the substantial geopolitical issue of slavery until the last few pages of his work. Failure to discuss the nature of this issue and the role it played in "In the end, this isn't a story of politics, local or geopolitical. The brief war of independence is a story of redemption...." -- Brian Kilmeade An engaging narrative that clearly outlines the critical events of 1935-1936, centered loosely around the character of Sam Houston. However, Kilmeade's narrative doesn't even mention--let alone define--the substantial geopolitical issue of slavery until the last few pages of his work. Failure to discuss the nature of this issue and the role it played in Texas politics is a glaring historical oversight, and leads to an incomplete view of the motivations behind many of the key men involved in the struggle for Texas's independence from Mexico. Where Kilmeade sees a historical event ripe with heroism, redemption, and convenient parallels to the American Revolution, a more nuanced, formally trained historian would have certainly embedded the stark politics of slavery directly into the narrative of Texas' formation. For additional context, this review proved helpful: https://www.texasmonthly.com/the-cult....

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Satterfield

    This is the fourth book written by Kilmeade in the "thriller non-fiction" genre. All four books are fast paced, high level books written about historical stories from U.S. History. Make no mistake this is not an all encompassing, slow, paper weight story about Texas. It is 230 pages and starts with SFA and Sam Houston showing up in Texas, very quickly gets to the Alamo and Goliad, and then finishes off with the Battle of San Jacinto. For native Texans this is a rehash of much of what we learned i This is the fourth book written by Kilmeade in the "thriller non-fiction" genre. All four books are fast paced, high level books written about historical stories from U.S. History. Make no mistake this is not an all encompassing, slow, paper weight story about Texas. It is 230 pages and starts with SFA and Sam Houston showing up in Texas, very quickly gets to the Alamo and Goliad, and then finishes off with the Battle of San Jacinto. For native Texans this is a rehash of much of what we learned in seventh grade Texas History class, but it is still a great reminder of the founding of our great state. It is quite a story and Kilmeade does a great job telling it. This volume is fast paced like the other three books by Kilmeade, but I think the Jefferson and GW books are better. Still for those that don't know the history of Texas this is an absolute MUST read. In less than 300 pages you will learn all about the legend of the Alamo and founding of Texas.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Backoff51

    I am a Texan. I thought I had a pretty good understanding of this era. I overappreciated my knowledge. Kilmeade did a great job of filling in the gaps and explaining in detail how, where, why and when circumstances occured that assured Texas of its place in history. This is a great book. Houston, Austin, Bowie, Travis, Crockett, Dickinson, Fannin, Milam, Lamar, Rusk, Seguin, and de Zavala. San Antonio de Bexar, Goliad, Gonzales, San Jacinto, San Felipe and Washington on the Brazos. Davy Crockett d I am a Texan. I thought I had a pretty good understanding of this era. I overappreciated my knowledge. Kilmeade did a great job of filling in the gaps and explaining in detail how, where, why and when circumstances occured that assured Texas of its place in history. This is a great book. Houston, Austin, Bowie, Travis, Crockett, Dickinson, Fannin, Milam, Lamar, Rusk, Seguin, and de Zavala. San Antonio de Bexar, Goliad, Gonzales, San Jacinto, San Felipe and Washington on the Brazos. Davy Crockett died at the Alamo. Right? If you care about Texas history read thus book. If you think you don't care, read this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Todd Kiger

    Brian Kilmeade did another excellent job in recording history. As we lived nine years in Texas and both boys were born there, I consider it my second home. I thoroughly enjoyed the account of Texas becoming independent. Kilmeade didn’t get bogged down in the minutiae of details but he kept the reader wondering when Sam Houston was going to battle the arrogant Santa Anna. While there is some historical question about Houston’s leadership, Kilmeade took the high road yet did make reference to the Brian Kilmeade did another excellent job in recording history. As we lived nine years in Texas and both boys were born there, I consider it my second home. I thoroughly enjoyed the account of Texas becoming independent. Kilmeade didn’t get bogged down in the minutiae of details but he kept the reader wondering when Sam Houston was going to battle the arrogant Santa Anna. While there is some historical question about Houston’s leadership, Kilmeade took the high road yet did make reference to the opposing position. Great story about underdogs winning the day, driven by the now famous motto, “Remember the Alamo!”

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert Melnyk

    Good book by Kilmeade about the Texas fight for independence. The book focuses on the battle of the Alamo, where Mexican forces under Santa Anna defeated a much smaller group of Texans who were defending the Alamo in San Antonio. American legends Jim Bowie and David Crockett were killed in the battle. "Remember the Alamo" was the battle cry for the Texas army, led by Sam Houston, as they defeated the Mexicans at the battle of San Jacinto, and avenged the loss they had incurred at the Alamo, and Good book by Kilmeade about the Texas fight for independence. The book focuses on the battle of the Alamo, where Mexican forces under Santa Anna defeated a much smaller group of Texans who were defending the Alamo in San Antonio. American legends Jim Bowie and David Crockett were killed in the battle. "Remember the Alamo" was the battle cry for the Texas army, led by Sam Houston, as they defeated the Mexicans at the battle of San Jacinto, and avenged the loss they had incurred at the Alamo, and won independence for Texas.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tori

    This book has no nuance. It's a very basic overview of an event which is already fairly well known. If you want something that's super light reading and doesn't touch on anything but the action, this could be something you enjoy. This book has no nuance. It's a very basic overview of an event which is already fairly well known. If you want something that's super light reading and doesn't touch on anything but the action, this could be something you enjoy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rick Fifield

    "I found this book easy to read and follow the characters. I loved the maps included in this book, as it allowed the readers to follow the various routes taken and the location of the places mentioned in the book." "I found this book easy to read and follow the characters. I loved the maps included in this book, as it allowed the readers to follow the various routes taken and the location of the places mentioned in the book."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Etta

    A must read for anyone interested in Texas history and culture. Engaging writing that breathes life into the familiar names that have been reduced to caricature by simplistic history books and cheap fiction.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Excellent! I really got a sense of the battles and timeline as well as the men involved. Very well done!

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