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From the Confederacy's first call to arms, to the Appomattox surrender, Robert E. Lee forged his reputation as perhaps the most daring soldier in American history, renowned for his shrewdness, courage and audacity.Gray Fox is the vivid chronicle of Lee's command, a book that humanizes this gentleman-soldier of tradition and makes him all the more awe-inspiring. From the Confederacy's first call to arms, to the Appomattox surrender, Robert E. Lee forged his reputation as perhaps the most daring soldier in American history, renowned for his shrewdness, courage and audacity.Gray Fox is the vivid chronicle of Lee's command, a book that humanizes this gentleman-soldier of tradition and makes him all the more awe-inspiring.


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From the Confederacy's first call to arms, to the Appomattox surrender, Robert E. Lee forged his reputation as perhaps the most daring soldier in American history, renowned for his shrewdness, courage and audacity.Gray Fox is the vivid chronicle of Lee's command, a book that humanizes this gentleman-soldier of tradition and makes him all the more awe-inspiring. From the Confederacy's first call to arms, to the Appomattox surrender, Robert E. Lee forged his reputation as perhaps the most daring soldier in American history, renowned for his shrewdness, courage and audacity.Gray Fox is the vivid chronicle of Lee's command, a book that humanizes this gentleman-soldier of tradition and makes him all the more awe-inspiring.

30 review for Gray Fox: Robert E. Lee and the Civil War

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    4.5 Stars Robert E. Lee was a mortal man who inspired so much love and loyalty in his soldiers that some stated, “I’d follow that man into hell” This was not just a platitude, they did follow Lee into hell. The love and loyalty of the southern soldier toward Lee was real. How else do you explain some men who being barefoot and armed only with a club would willingly charging a well-armed enemy? This book does an excellent job of explaining the trials faced by Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia 4.5 Stars Robert E. Lee was a mortal man who inspired so much love and loyalty in his soldiers that some stated, “I’d follow that man into hell” This was not just a platitude, they did follow Lee into hell. The love and loyalty of the southern soldier toward Lee was real. How else do you explain some men who being barefoot and armed only with a club would willingly charging a well-armed enemy? This book does an excellent job of explaining the trials faced by Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia during the Civil War. It doesn’t talk about his early life. A life that would have formed him into the man that could inspire such love and loyalty, nor does it discuss his life after the war. It does go into detail about the problems Lee faced in dealing with other strong-minded generals. How he worked to supply his army with their needs to conduct war. How he dealt with policies and politics that hampered his efforts. Most interesting is the reader is told of his ability to remain composed and steadfast in the face of disappointment, hardship, and disaster. Like other histories I have read this one leaves one with the inevitable “what ifs.” What if, Lee stayed in the service of the U. S. Army? What if, Gettysburg had never happened, or Lee had conquered the field rather than withdraw? What if, after the battles of Gettysburg, The Wilderness, and Spotsylvania, the cost in blood and treasure broke the northern citizen, and they demanded and forced a peace? Reading history gives me so many what ifs I’ll never stop. This is a worthwhile read and an easy recommendation

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hayes

    The Civil War's length and difficulty always centered around the leadership of each side. The Confederates from the start had the general that worked best for them, Lee, and many other of the military leaders, like Stonewall Jackson. This leaves an amazing look into Lee's life while still giving an overview of the Civil War, and we learn how things might have gone differently had Lee accepted an invitation to join the Union Army instead of joining the Confederates to defend his birth state of Vi The Civil War's length and difficulty always centered around the leadership of each side. The Confederates from the start had the general that worked best for them, Lee, and many other of the military leaders, like Stonewall Jackson. This leaves an amazing look into Lee's life while still giving an overview of the Civil War, and we learn how things might have gone differently had Lee accepted an invitation to join the Union Army instead of joining the Confederates to defend his birth state of Virginia.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Burns

    One of the reasons that I like to read, is that you are there, whether it be under the ocean in a submarine, walking with Moses during the Exodus, or traveling through foreign lands, or in this instance, on the war torn battle-fields with General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia during their struggles and the campaigns against the Union soldiers during "The (not so) Civil War." And Burke Davis's account is not a disappointment at all. You are there, with every Struggle,and disapp One of the reasons that I like to read, is that you are there, whether it be under the ocean in a submarine, walking with Moses during the Exodus, or traveling through foreign lands, or in this instance, on the war torn battle-fields with General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia during their struggles and the campaigns against the Union soldiers during "The (not so) Civil War." And Burke Davis's account is not a disappointment at all. You are there, with every Struggle,and disappointment, you experience death, heartbreak, loss, Victory and defeat. his descriptions are so poignant, compassion and deep feelings, I was so humbled I had to stop reading in silence, and ask in prayer to our most heavenly father how can inflict so much horror and destruction on each other. Using eye-witness accounts and his broad knowledge of history to introduce you to General Robert E. Lee, the flawed and the brilliance, his loving compassion for his fellow man, and his unerring faith in God and his undying faith in the majesty of our Lord and Savior. He was and is now considered one of the great Generals in American Military history. A daring Strategist, brilliant and daring in his offensive tactics, and second to none at the defensive. A Southern Gentleman by all accounts by friends and foe, who never waivered from his personal convictions, of honor and his integrity. Hampered by the President of the CSA, Jefferson Dav is in interferring in day to day operations until March of 1865 when it was much too late. Resigning from the United States Army must have been one of hardest things for him to do and then take up the sword in Virginia's defense must of been devastating for him. Drawing his sword and taking the field was probably the most dis-service that he could have done to the South, by prolonging the final results for by all accounts by at least two years or more. This is only Conjecture on my part, I believe if he would had accepted the Commanding General of the Union Army the war would of been over alot quicker and would have been more humane and kinder to the south. Lee did with a depleted Command that the Generals of the north could not do with plenty including Grant. Lee Had an uncanny way of anticipating his apponents next move and acting on it without evidence and then proved right. Grant was also good General Who realized that he possessed unlimited man-power, provissions and materials and that what Gen. Lee lost in man-power and provissions could not replaced. Gen. Grant had an added influx of man-power by recruiting and enlisting the recently ammancipated slaves and free men of color, He also crippled Lee and the South by discontiuing prisoner exchanges. At the end even taking POW's was a strain on the Lee because he had to feed them when his own army was starving. To really appreciate the struggles of the South and the Army of Northern Virginia I would like to recommend reading: April 1865 "The Month That Saved America" by Jay Winik. Jefferson Davis "Confederate President" by Hudson Strode

  4. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I have skipped much of the Civil War history perhaps the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War dominated my formative years. However in celebration of the 150th anniversary of this war, I have discovered General Robert E Lee. He opposed the Southern decision to secede from the Union and as a Virginian he wrestled with his choices when his state followed the South. If Virginia had been a Northern State, his leadership and military aptitude would have shortened the war. Lee possessed great dig I have skipped much of the Civil War history perhaps the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War dominated my formative years. However in celebration of the 150th anniversary of this war, I have discovered General Robert E Lee. He opposed the Southern decision to secede from the Union and as a Virginian he wrestled with his choices when his state followed the South. If Virginia had been a Northern State, his leadership and military aptitude would have shortened the war. Lee possessed great dignity as well as a touching compassion for troops blended with uncanny military insight and skill. One can see why Lee has been revered. In a war with devastating carnage and loss of life, he rose as a quiet hero and became a role model. I, too, have to admire him as a man and leader! Too bad Lee had no control over the infamous Andersonville Prison where my Great-Grandfather survived as a prisoner of war during his teens!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gerard Costello

    A very good book with well researched and related detail and lots of fun anecdotes. The currently in vogue historiographical view is that anything that in any way praises the south is a 'lost cause' work. As such, this book, written in the 50s, would be criticized as such. It is not. It is a frank account of Lee's generalship, and includes criticisms of him from Longstreet, and examines mistakes he made. In the modern age of the eternal current year, it is difficult for many to understand how an A very good book with well researched and related detail and lots of fun anecdotes. The currently in vogue historiographical view is that anything that in any way praises the south is a 'lost cause' work. As such, this book, written in the 50s, would be criticized as such. It is not. It is a frank account of Lee's generalship, and includes criticisms of him from Longstreet, and examines mistakes he made. In the modern age of the eternal current year, it is difficult for many to understand how and why General Lee was a great man, because he fought to defend a a country that was established in large part to defend slavery (yes, it was, don't give me that states rights nonsense); but Lee was a great man, and a great general; and this is a great book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Camie Hillegonds

    I listened to this book. I had to get used to the southern accent of the reader, but once I did he was easy to listen to. I have an empathy for the South now that I have never had before. I do believe General Lee deserves all the praise that everyone continues to give him.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Charly

    remarkable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    This is a Civil War biography of Robert Edward Lee (1/19/1807–10/12/1870), commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, then, after 1864, General-in-Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States of America. Little is noted of his life before succession, nothing of his life afterwards. The focus is on the man as a military commander. But that does not mean that the book is entirely about strategy, tactics and politics. The character of Lee is well represented, primarily through the testimony of th This is a Civil War biography of Robert Edward Lee (1/19/1807–10/12/1870), commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, then, after 1864, General-in-Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States of America. Little is noted of his life before succession, nothing of his life afterwards. The focus is on the man as a military commander. But that does not mean that the book is entirely about strategy, tactics and politics. The character of Lee is well represented, primarily through the testimony of those who knew him during the war. While not as charming a writer as Bruce Catton, Davis writes clearly and well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Les Wolf

    Gives the feeling of actually being there and meeting the generals, infantrymen and artillerymen. A highly descriptive narrative of the war that is never weighed down with statistics. Davis simply tells the story of the Confederate general, his triumphs and struggles, without hyperbole or unnecessary fanfare. As a result, Lee emerges as a real man, at times, strong and capable and, at other times, weak and culpable. No wonder the book is widely acknowledged as a ground-breaking biography.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joe Rodeck

    Retelling of the Civil War from a Southern perspective. Goes into the character of the Rebel forces generalship and shows by example the elements of what makes great leaders. Credit to the author for putting exciting narration over boring fact, stats, etc. Not sure if the Davis' veneration of his subject biases the account. Gettysburg featured one of the most colossal blunders, Pickett's Charge, in history; a fatal Lee flaw, not just a frustrated attack. Retelling of the Civil War from a Southern perspective. Goes into the character of the Rebel forces generalship and shows by example the elements of what makes great leaders. Credit to the author for putting exciting narration over boring fact, stats, etc. Not sure if the Davis' veneration of his subject biases the account. Gettysburg featured one of the most colossal blunders, Pickett's Charge, in history; a fatal Lee flaw, not just a frustrated attack.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    Enjoyed this book full of first hand accounts of the civil war and Robert E. Lee. The author did a good job covering a lot of history while keeping the read interesting all the way through. A few bad words sprinkled here and there as I guess may be expected during war. Hard to skip in an audiobook. :/

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    A look at the leadership of Robert E. Lee during the Civil War. Lee started out as an engineer during the Mexican American War and when the Civil War started was the commander of a regiment stationed in Texas. President Lincoln offered him command of the Union army but he turned it down to support Virginia.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    This was my second time through this book. What a sad, sad tale in our nation's history. Burke Davis adds many interesting details regarding R.E. Lee's personality that I did enjoy hearing about despite the horrific war accounts. This was my second time through this book. What a sad, sad tale in our nation's history. Burke Davis adds many interesting details regarding R.E. Lee's personality that I did enjoy hearing about despite the horrific war accounts.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sheena Rodriguez

    This book was awesome! I learned much about Lee and have a new found respect for him and his legacy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Brown

    I ithoroughly enjoyed this narrative of Lee during the Civil War years. You see him as a flesh and blood man, not a marble statue on a gray horse.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

    One of the best on Lee.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jim Bouchard

    Whether you see Lee as hero or villain, this book shows you the very real human being behind the legend and mythology. Must read for fans of North and South!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    A really great book, that is well written, and very informative. I would highly recommend this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Salvatore Leone

    Terrific bio of Lee.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Very gripping account of the War--from the South's hopeless, losing-from-the-start side. Lee comes across as the dedicated, caring, sober commander that legend says he was. Very gripping account of the War--from the South's hopeless, losing-from-the-start side. Lee comes across as the dedicated, caring, sober commander that legend says he was.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sean Jacobs

    Superb writing. Great description of the life and times of Robert E. Lee. Good job Burke!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maude

    A wonderful picture of the Man and his Mind!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Great book, read it years ago.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Enjoyed it. A little dry at the start. Skipped part of it to get to the chapter on Gettysburg and then finished it. Learned a lot about how the war ended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robbie Thompson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ravi

  27. 5 out of 5

    William Sariego

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gill Eastland

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne Szabo

  30. 5 out of 5

    Debra Nagel

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