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That Will Never Work: The Birth of Netflix and the Amazing Life of an Idea

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In the tradition of Phil Knight's Shoe Dog comes the incredible untold story of how Netflix went from concept to company-all revealed by co-founder and first CEO Marc Randolph. Once upon a time, brick-and-mortar video stores were king. Late fees were ubiquitous, video-streaming unheard was of, and widespread DVD adoption seemed about as imminent as flying cars. Indeed, thes In the tradition of Phil Knight's Shoe Dog comes the incredible untold story of how Netflix went from concept to company-all revealed by co-founder and first CEO Marc Randolph. Once upon a time, brick-and-mortar video stores were king. Late fees were ubiquitous, video-streaming unheard was of, and widespread DVD adoption seemed about as imminent as flying cars. Indeed, these were the widely accepted laws of the land in 1997, when Marc Randolph had an idea. It was a simple thought-leveraging the internet to rent movies-and was just one of many more and far worse proposals, like personalized baseball bats and a shampoo delivery service, that Randolph would pitch to his business partner, Reed Hastings, on their commute to work each morning. But Hastings was intrigued, and the pair-with Hastings as the primary investor and Randolph as the CEO-founded a company. Now with over 150 million subscribers, Netflix's triumph feels inevitable, but the twenty first century's most disruptive start up began with few believers and calamity at every turn. From having to pitch his own mother on being an early investor, to the motel conference room that served as a first office, to server crashes on launch day, to the now-infamous meeting when Netflix brass pitched Blockbuster to acquire them, Marc Randolph's transformational journey exemplifies how anyone with grit, gut instincts and determination can change the world-even with an idea that many think will never work. What emerges,though, isn't just the inside story of one of the world's most iconic companies. Full of counter-intuitive concepts and written in binge-worthy prose, it answers some of our most fundamental questions about taking that leap of faith in business or in life: How do you begin? How do you weather disappointment and failure? How do you deal with success? What even is success? From idea generation to team building to knowing when it's time to let go, That Will Never Work is not only the ultimate follow-your-dreams parable, but also one of the most dramatic and insightful entrepreneurial stories of our time.


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In the tradition of Phil Knight's Shoe Dog comes the incredible untold story of how Netflix went from concept to company-all revealed by co-founder and first CEO Marc Randolph. Once upon a time, brick-and-mortar video stores were king. Late fees were ubiquitous, video-streaming unheard was of, and widespread DVD adoption seemed about as imminent as flying cars. Indeed, thes In the tradition of Phil Knight's Shoe Dog comes the incredible untold story of how Netflix went from concept to company-all revealed by co-founder and first CEO Marc Randolph. Once upon a time, brick-and-mortar video stores were king. Late fees were ubiquitous, video-streaming unheard was of, and widespread DVD adoption seemed about as imminent as flying cars. Indeed, these were the widely accepted laws of the land in 1997, when Marc Randolph had an idea. It was a simple thought-leveraging the internet to rent movies-and was just one of many more and far worse proposals, like personalized baseball bats and a shampoo delivery service, that Randolph would pitch to his business partner, Reed Hastings, on their commute to work each morning. But Hastings was intrigued, and the pair-with Hastings as the primary investor and Randolph as the CEO-founded a company. Now with over 150 million subscribers, Netflix's triumph feels inevitable, but the twenty first century's most disruptive start up began with few believers and calamity at every turn. From having to pitch his own mother on being an early investor, to the motel conference room that served as a first office, to server crashes on launch day, to the now-infamous meeting when Netflix brass pitched Blockbuster to acquire them, Marc Randolph's transformational journey exemplifies how anyone with grit, gut instincts and determination can change the world-even with an idea that many think will never work. What emerges,though, isn't just the inside story of one of the world's most iconic companies. Full of counter-intuitive concepts and written in binge-worthy prose, it answers some of our most fundamental questions about taking that leap of faith in business or in life: How do you begin? How do you weather disappointment and failure? How do you deal with success? What even is success? From idea generation to team building to knowing when it's time to let go, That Will Never Work is not only the ultimate follow-your-dreams parable, but also one of the most dramatic and insightful entrepreneurial stories of our time.

30 review for That Will Never Work: The Birth of Netflix and the Amazing Life of an Idea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    3.5 stars "[Author & screenwriter] William Goldman is most famous for writing three words: 'Nobody Knows Anything' . . . Nobody really knows how well a movie is going to do, until after it's already done it . . . [It] isn't an indictment. It's a reminder, an encouragement . . . you have to trust yourself. You have to test yourself. And you have to be willing to fail." -- the author, on pages 211-212 Marc Randolph's That Will Never Work is a book that untidily - though not really meant in a negativ 3.5 stars "[Author & screenwriter] William Goldman is most famous for writing three words: 'Nobody Knows Anything' . . . Nobody really knows how well a movie is going to do, until after it's already done it . . . [It] isn't an indictment. It's a reminder, an encouragement . . . you have to trust yourself. You have to test yourself. And you have to be willing to fail." -- the author, on pages 211-212 Marc Randolph's That Will Never Work is a book that untidily - though not really meant in a negative way - combines memoir, some modern history, and business 'self-help' (or just plain luck, depending on your point of view) to detail the start of the 21st century mega-success story known as 'Netflix.' On paper Randolph seems to be engaging and self-deprecating, recounting his role as a co-founder (along with Reed Hastings, the 'Mr. Spock' personality of the duo; Randolph is more the 'Capt. Kirk,' obviously) and the initial CEO of the company during its salad years of 1998-2003. Searching for the next great money-making idea, they more-or-less stumbled onto mail-service DVD rentals online, which pretty much sounded the death knell for the ubiquitous local video stores of the 80's and 90's. Unusually - for an American mini-saga set firmly in the big business world - there is a pleasant lack of back-stabbing or ethically-challenged players involved here; for all I know this version of events is sanitized, but maybe that's just my rote cynicism. Still, it was actually sort of amazing to read how an initially ragtag, cash-strapped group in a strip-mall storefront grew to having 150 million customers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Pretty sure all the good reviews are from people the author knows. There’s no reason this book should be 13 hours long. The Epilogue was 30 minutes!! He drones on and on with personal stories, how he already has a few successful start ups, and tips for success. By the end I found him unlikeable and unrelatable.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Val

    Fascinating AND entertaining! I'm not sure what I was expecting when I won this book in a giveaway. (Thank you Hachette Book Group!) I was a little worried I would find That Will Never Work a bit dry but I was totally wrong. I found myself smiling/chuckling many times as I was reading it. Marc Randolph SO has a way with words and if he ever writes another book, I will be first in line to read it. I loved reading how Marc would pitch ideas (customized dog food, customized baseball bats, customized Fascinating AND entertaining! I'm not sure what I was expecting when I won this book in a giveaway. (Thank you Hachette Book Group!) I was a little worried I would find That Will Never Work a bit dry but I was totally wrong. I found myself smiling/chuckling many times as I was reading it. Marc Randolph SO has a way with words and if he ever writes another book, I will be first in line to read it. I loved reading how Marc would pitch ideas (customized dog food, customized baseball bats, customized shampoo — all sold over the internet and delivered by mail), and since Reed was the one with the cash, he was free to shoot down ideas without worrying about hurt feelings. I truly came to care about every one of the original ten employees. What a rollercoaster ride they all had the first few years. Just reading about how they came up with the first DVD mailers was fascinating. The part about what Amazon was like when it first started and was selling only books, was astonishing and hilarious! I think I laughed the hardest at this, though: "I can't help but note that as of this writing, the little DVD-by-mail company that Blockbuster could have purchased for $50 million is now worth $150 billion. And guess where Blockbuster is? They're down to one last store. It's in Bend Oregon." Maybe I like that part so much because I live in Bend, Oregon.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John

    I tend to find Netflix a very interesting company and so the story itself is interesting. That said the writing style is such that I found myself skimming through large chunks of it without feeling like I was missing much. Lots of memoir-ish stuff that just added nothing. If I didn’t find the topic particularly interesting I probably would have bailed on this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    This book was like listening to an annoying uncle brag about how good he is at business. It seems like he just wrote it so he could reminisce about the good old days. It took him a long time tell stories we already know the end to. And some of his stories were so contrived. [My wife] said, "You look like a chameleon." In a way...I was! I really thought this was going to be a book about Netflix (more like Creativity, Inc.). It was more like an autobiography. We never get to the streaming...it ends This book was like listening to an annoying uncle brag about how good he is at business. It seems like he just wrote it so he could reminisce about the good old days. It took him a long time tell stories we already know the end to. And some of his stories were so contrived. [My wife] said, "You look like a chameleon." In a way...I was! I really thought this was going to be a book about Netflix (more like Creativity, Inc.). It was more like an autobiography. We never get to the streaming...it ends right after the IPO. In the epilogue he takes the opportunity to take a potshot at Blockbuster, who didn't buy them...like he doesn't realize if they did he's be significantly less wealthy. If you're thinking about reading this, just know the it should be called, "How I made Netflix Work: The Marc Randolph Story."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    Some neat details about difficult moments in Netflix’s early history. Really great stories. But the author has a chip on his shoulder that interfered with my ability to trust the narrative. Careful lies of omission made me yearn for a less conflicted historian.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Got this from a work acquaintance as a Christmas gift. Not a fan. The author comes across as a giant money-obsessed douchebag, with chapter titles like "show me the money" and "how it feels to deposit a check for almost $2 million". Not relatable at all to the average non-millionaire, and comes off as flaunting wealth in a nation with millions of people unemployed, homeless and in poverty. Wish I could return this trashy book. Got this from a work acquaintance as a Christmas gift. Not a fan. The author comes across as a giant money-obsessed douchebag, with chapter titles like "show me the money" and "how it feels to deposit a check for almost $2 million". Not relatable at all to the average non-millionaire, and comes off as flaunting wealth in a nation with millions of people unemployed, homeless and in poverty. Wish I could return this trashy book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sam Ng

    I really don't get all the glowing reviews. It's one thing to write a book sharing your experiences and some vague, common sense "success tips". On the other hand, I really doubt someone is going to give away the very business strategies that, say, a father would pass down to his son. This would only generate more competition to himself and would not be very bright! So don't expect anything like that in this book. Another consideration that wasn't really touched on in this book is that networking I really don't get all the glowing reviews. It's one thing to write a book sharing your experiences and some vague, common sense "success tips". On the other hand, I really doubt someone is going to give away the very business strategies that, say, a father would pass down to his son. This would only generate more competition to himself and would not be very bright! So don't expect anything like that in this book. Another consideration that wasn't really touched on in this book is that networking is essential to being successful in business. As an Asian in the U.S.A. inheriting a family business, I can see that this happens along racial or ethnic lines, most of the time. In my experience this happens organically, without it coming from a source of negative feelings towards other demographics, but I can't speak for everyone. Now, this may be a sensitive topic, but let's look at this with a clear unemotional understanding to better critique what is missing from this book. The author, a Jewish man, has the benefits or privileges that go along with his extensive Jewish contacts in the entertainment and media industries (95% of the world's media are in the hands of 6 Jewish-owned companies). With networking comes promotion of your business and good PR (isn't the author related to the Bernays family, as in Edward Bernays the propagandist and father of public relations?) So this factor cannot be underestimated in his success. Also, this book could have discussed what influenced the direction of the business (the shows, content, and messages that Netflix allows or doesn't allow). The author's Jewish background appears to have highly influenced the content that Netflix promotes. For example, if you look at the Jewish Talmud (a major influencer in Jewish culture, regardless of religious or secular background "It is our common law" as Herman Wouk Jewish author and Pulitzer Prize winner said) we can see verses like Gittin 56b and 57a, which describes Jesus Christ boiling in excrement in hell (yes, really). The Jewish disdain for Jesus Christ may have influenced Netflix to portray Jesus as a homosexual (like many other negative portrayals of Him). Entertainment is not everything, and despite some people's addiction to it, it is not a "need" like food or water. If anything, it can be used to shape culture and inject ideas into society that were previously unknown. It can dumb down s0ciety and make people complacent, pacified and distracted from what really matters. The rise of independent content creators on numerous websites and social media sites provide stiff competition in entertainment and other media categories. Who knows - the future of Netflix may go the way of Blockbuster in the 2020's. Overall, this book is more useful to light a fireplace than to read - a common problem in this genre.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    One of the main things I wanted to note from this book is that being an entrepreneur is a lot easier when you've a wad of cash behind you. Jeff Bezos was given some "seed capital" by his folks to start Amazon, the not unforgettable sum of three hundred grand. To be fair, Marc Randolph is very open about the fact that Netflix was funded initially by family and friends - or rather, make that "friend", his main partner Reed Hastings. Of the two million dollars "raised" to kick off the idea of renti One of the main things I wanted to note from this book is that being an entrepreneur is a lot easier when you've a wad of cash behind you. Jeff Bezos was given some "seed capital" by his folks to start Amazon, the not unforgettable sum of three hundred grand. To be fair, Marc Randolph is very open about the fact that Netflix was funded initially by family and friends - or rather, make that "friend", his main partner Reed Hastings. Of the two million dollars "raised" to kick off the idea of renting DVDs by mail, $1.9 million came from Hastings who had vested options from another tech venture, and the other hundred grand came from Randolph's family and friends, including his mum. But with his breezy style and devil-take-the-hindmost attitude to risk, you're prepared to forgive Randolph this bit of good fortune. If a mate lent me $1.9m, I may have beat it to the Bahamas for a few month's thinking time. Or a few years. Or permanently, given I think I could yield 10% out of that by investing. That's the difference between guys like me and guys like Randolph and Bezos though, the willingness to gamble and the drive to make things happen. Of course, if I was Bezos, I'd be richer than him because I'd clean windows on the side, but fair play, he's probably kept busy with Amazon. Randolph is clearly the ideas man behind Netflix and concerns himself with a lot of the softer side of business in the early days, such as nurturing and developing the culture of the organisation he was creating. As a marketing man, he's always interested in what the consumer wants as opposed to what the accountants or the software engineers are fixated on, and admits that he was probably not as hard headed as he needed to be to run the whole business in the round. One of the more interesting parts of the book is when his original partner, Reed Hastings, decides similar, and seemingly elbows his way into the Netflix business to try and take more control of it. Even I became a bit angry over this power play, and I wondered how much of the whys and wherefores were being edited out of the account? Randolph moves on quickly back to the business of giving his consumers what they wanted, sometimes through luck and sometimes through good guidance. The story continues up to and beyond the initial Netflix IPO where they all suddenly become mega rich, although you’re left to wonder and consult Google to find out how much. This being America, sadly that seems to be all that matters, despite Randolph’s protestations otherwise, and you feel that Randolph lost the company to Reed Hastings. Which then makes you wonder how much control Randolph actually had in the first place, and I began to think that this book was a protesting wail of Randolph’s for recognition, “Netflix was my idea, it was, it was, it was!” And maybe it was. But as Randolph himself says in the very first chapters, ideas are ten a penny. Making an idea work, that’ s a different story, and perhaps that is Hasting’s story. Randolph left in 2003, and look what’s happened to Netflix since he’s not been around and Reed has been in the chair. Randolph argues that his DNA is still in the company, but unfortunately he’s been written out of the narrative. This book is a good attempt to write him back in (at least for a short time until Hastings commissions a movie about the Netflix story. After this book, I wonder if Randolph will even feature in it.) This isn't quite as enjoyable a read as Shoe Dog, but as business books go it's pretty good. It's also nice to see Randolph's family mentioned often as an inspiration and his wife as a support and counterbalance to his working life. It's quite a Silicon Valley story all the same, and you can't help but think that Netflix triumphed largely because it was knitted in to this culture and network from the start. Still, credit where it's due and there's no doubt that this company has shaped and is still shaping the internet culture that we have today. Given that, do we really care who started it all off? Marc Randolph clearly does.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Allegra Shaw

    So good. Great insight into Marc Randolphs brain, how he thinks and works. Lots of great ideas to implement into your own business!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Rapier

    Ok book. I enjoyed hearing about the start of Netflix but it got bogged down. It was like the author wasn't sure if he was writing a business book, a biography or a company story. There were parts I loved but others I sped through just to be done. Ok book. I enjoyed hearing about the start of Netflix but it got bogged down. It was like the author wasn't sure if he was writing a business book, a biography or a company story. There were parts I loved but others I sped through just to be done.

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    Engaging, well-told. Great prose. And lots of fun to read. Was NetFlix - AKA "movie rental by mail" a good idea? Maybe. Maybe not. But it wasn't a bad idea. And if there was a way to make it work, Randolph and his team were determined to find it... Thanks to streaming, NetFlix is now nearly as ubiquitous as in-home TV. But it was born from a litter of bad ideas, and its early days were marked by experimenting with more of the same. Its business model was incredibly vulnerable, especially after the Engaging, well-told. Great prose. And lots of fun to read. Was NetFlix - AKA "movie rental by mail" a good idea? Maybe. Maybe not. But it wasn't a bad idea. And if there was a way to make it work, Randolph and his team were determined to find it... Thanks to streaming, NetFlix is now nearly as ubiquitous as in-home TV. But it was born from a litter of bad ideas, and its early days were marked by experimenting with more of the same. Its business model was incredibly vulnerable, especially after they figured it out. But established competition (coughBlockbustercoughcough) dismissed the concept, dismissed the market, and, ultimately, dismissed their own customers. So NetFlix won. But it very easily might not have. So here it is: NetFlix, The Early Years. The story of a business concept going from "that will never work" to "that might work" to becoming a household name. The perfect story to debunk the myth of the million-dollar idea. Ideas are easy and cheap. Ideas don't work. People do.

  13. 5 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    I am a Netflix user, even though it is through my friend's account lol. I wanted to read about the birth of Netflix, how it started and what led this revolution on how we now consume content. I loved that Marc Randolph gave us an in-depth look into Netflix was the idea stage, before capital was involved, people were hired and the first DVD purchased. A lot happened to get this giant company started and it was great getting insights into what makes and break a start-up. Culture of course is a hug I am a Netflix user, even though it is through my friend's account lol. I wanted to read about the birth of Netflix, how it started and what led this revolution on how we now consume content. I loved that Marc Randolph gave us an in-depth look into Netflix was the idea stage, before capital was involved, people were hired and the first DVD purchased. A lot happened to get this giant company started and it was great getting insights into what makes and break a start-up. Culture of course is a huge part of it, but what more is drive and determination. If you have ever wondered what went into making Netflix what it is today, this is the perfect read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I generally don't care for business books, but Marc Randolph's story of Netflix hit home, as I was part of the Blockbuster group working directly for Wayne Huizenga in the very early days (way before the company was sold, moved to Dallas post 1994 and ruined). Didn't have to be that way. Classic story of a big company's failure to adapt. But more importantly, classic story of a small company's will to adapt, survive and prosper. Kudos Marc. I wish we worked together back then. I generally don't care for business books, but Marc Randolph's story of Netflix hit home, as I was part of the Blockbuster group working directly for Wayne Huizenga in the very early days (way before the company was sold, moved to Dallas post 1994 and ruined). Didn't have to be that way. Classic story of a big company's failure to adapt. But more importantly, classic story of a small company's will to adapt, survive and prosper. Kudos Marc. I wish we worked together back then.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rikki

    Interesting story, painfully folksy book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fefyy Antela

    I REALLY enjoyed this book. It was fascinating to learn more about the beginning of [probably] the biggest entertainment institution in our modern days 😄

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    This book is very different from other well-known titles about Netflix (Powerful, No Rules Rules). It's not a book about growth or culture. It's a personal story about founding the company - a start-up, to be precise. It's about playing bold, facing uncertainty, searching for a market, and revealing the product's identity. About picking the correct people, making hard decisions, events, and encounters that have gelled the 'early team' together. It covers the very early days only (because Randolph This book is very different from other well-known titles about Netflix (Powerful, No Rules Rules). It's not a book about growth or culture. It's a personal story about founding the company - a start-up, to be precise. It's about playing bold, facing uncertainty, searching for a market, and revealing the product's identity. About picking the correct people, making hard decisions, events, and encounters that have gelled the 'early team' together. It covers the very early days only (because Randolph has left Netflix early). You won't learn much out of it, probably it won't inspire you either - but it's quite a decent read, e.g. while running. 2.7-2.9 stars

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lyubov

    Nice, short and informative read about the founding and initial stages of development of Netflix. Between the pages we meet again some of the well known heroes of the Silicone Valley such as Jeff Bezos.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nirooj Bista

    Intriguing. There's so much to learn from the journey through birth and life of Netflix. Up to the point, only thing I knew about Netflix was just the tip of the Iceberg, but there is so much underneath it. I am glad I got chance to read this book! Intriguing. There's so much to learn from the journey through birth and life of Netflix. Up to the point, only thing I knew about Netflix was just the tip of the Iceberg, but there is so much underneath it. I am glad I got chance to read this book!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hiran Venugopalan

    Amazing!!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Apeksha

    Simply loved this book. For starters, I did not know that Netflix actually was conceptualised in 1997, still seems a nascent 21st century startup to me. What I most admired about the book is that Marc has clearly articulated that it’s not just the idea which makes a startup, in many cases the idea grows over a period of time till you finally realise this is the one. To know how Netflix actually evolved over these period of 20 yrs actually helps. Somewhere I think it definitely strikes a chord wi Simply loved this book. For starters, I did not know that Netflix actually was conceptualised in 1997, still seems a nascent 21st century startup to me. What I most admired about the book is that Marc has clearly articulated that it’s not just the idea which makes a startup, in many cases the idea grows over a period of time till you finally realise this is the one. To know how Netflix actually evolved over these period of 20 yrs actually helps. Somewhere I think it definitely strikes a chord with the startup founders and families, the facts are too real to ignore. If you want to be inspired, read it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bjoern Rochel

    Great, for me highly relatable start-up story. The majority of the book plays out in the first year of Netflix. So don’t expect a full rendition of the Netflix story here. Instead it depicts how they ended up with the DVD subscription model that was the first step of Netflix success. And it also details the phase when and how Reed took over leadership. Marc Randolph probably gets not enough kudos for his contribution to the Netflix success. But this book gives you a glimpse where some elements o Great, for me highly relatable start-up story. The majority of the book plays out in the first year of Netflix. So don’t expect a full rendition of the Netflix story here. Instead it depicts how they ended up with the DVD subscription model that was the first step of Netflix success. And it also details the phase when and how Reed took over leadership. Marc Randolph probably gets not enough kudos for his contribution to the Netflix success. But this book gives you a glimpse where some elements of the famous Netflix culture came from, before it was formalized. Ideally you should read this book before Patty McCords „Powerful“ and Reeds „No Rules Rules“..

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vartika

    It is only fitting that I binge read this book - binged enough to miss a hike in Patagonia and just stay in. I loved this simple, honest, inspiring and humbling account from one of the founders of Netflix. Also given I didn’t know about the early history of a company and product I love so much before this, I had a blast reading the origin stories and the aha moments. Written well, told with authenticity and purpose.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Simona Saplacan

    I oscillated between 3 and 4 stars but went with 4 because their story and what they accomplished is quite impressive. It's a combination of American dream, crazy start-up world, memoir/autobiography and motivational self help. It felt a bit too focused on personal stuff but I guess this is supposed to make it more human. I could have lived, though, without the very accurate descriptions of what everyone was wearing all the time 😅 I oscillated between 3 and 4 stars but went with 4 because their story and what they accomplished is quite impressive. It's a combination of American dream, crazy start-up world, memoir/autobiography and motivational self help. It felt a bit too focused on personal stuff but I guess this is supposed to make it more human. I could have lived, though, without the very accurate descriptions of what everyone was wearing all the time 😅

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sadia Nahreen

    Good narration of Netflix’s story of the first 3-5 years. I definitely looked forward to learning about Netflix’s business model shift from DVD rentals to Web Streaming at later stages but were bummed to find out that isn’t captured in this book since the author had left the company before the plan came into fruition. Also some bits of the book were prolonged with subjective remarks which I found less interesting than the rest. But overall a pretty good read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vishal Desai

    The origin story of a company that started before the 'dot com' bubble era. It is about Netflix’s inception and founding years all the way till it’s IPO(1997 to 2002). Overall it is an interesting story about a bunch of people who worked hard to implement an idea that ended up changing the way we consume entertainment. (Just a note: The book ends even before Netflix the streaming site is launched.) The origin story of a company that started before the 'dot com' bubble era. It is about Netflix’s inception and founding years all the way till it’s IPO(1997 to 2002). Overall it is an interesting story about a bunch of people who worked hard to implement an idea that ended up changing the way we consume entertainment. (Just a note: The book ends even before Netflix the streaming site is launched.)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maja

    Loved the book! If you are into memoirs and autobiographies, this is a great one. It is definitely up there with Shoedog. I read Patty McCord's bok first ("Powerful: Building a Culture of Freedom and Responsibility") and loved it, as well. I saw that Reed Hastings also has had a book on Netflix out recently so am looking to put that in my TBR pile. Loved the book! If you are into memoirs and autobiographies, this is a great one. It is definitely up there with Shoedog. I read Patty McCord's bok first ("Powerful: Building a Culture of Freedom and Responsibility") and loved it, as well. I saw that Reed Hastings also has had a book on Netflix out recently so am looking to put that in my TBR pile.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sumedh Mool

    This book was supposed to be about how netflix came into being and evolved in its early days. But the author, who is the co-founder of Netflix, delves too much into the details about his personal life while not doing justice to the central idea on which the book was expected to be based on.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    4.5 easy way to learn about the creation of Netflix and how this idea ended up being the amazing success Netflix is today. Great insight from Marc Randolph about pursuing your dreams and try and not to be afraid of failure.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sanju

    Not a right book to learn about Netflix which we know today. But it's a good one to know about the early days of the streaming giant. Not a right book to learn about Netflix which we know today. But it's a good one to know about the early days of the streaming giant.

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