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Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth's water from harm and corruption--a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade. Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all . . . When a black snake threatens Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth's water from harm and corruption--a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade. Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all . . . When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth And poison her people's water, one young water protector Takes a stand to defend Earth's most sacred resource.


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Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth's water from harm and corruption--a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade. Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all . . . When a black snake threatens Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth's water from harm and corruption--a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade. Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all . . . When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth And poison her people's water, one young water protector Takes a stand to defend Earth's most sacred resource.

30 review for We Are Water Protectors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    This is one of those books that feels written for me. I love this story. The author wrote this after the incident at Standing Rock happened with the water and the oil pipe. She tells of the stories told to the people of the land. They are told to protect the water and one day a black serpent will come to poison the water and they must protect against this serpent. The serpent is oil pipes that crisscross our land and leak. The story is about this girl and her village and the important of all the This is one of those books that feels written for me. I love this story. The author wrote this after the incident at Standing Rock happened with the water and the oil pipe. She tells of the stories told to the people of the land. They are told to protect the water and one day a black serpent will come to poison the water and they must protect against this serpent. The serpent is oil pipes that crisscross our land and leak. The story is about this girl and her village and the important of all the water, land and animals. They are stewards of the land and that fits right in with the bible which tells us we are stewards of the land as well. The artwork is swirls of water and beautiful blue tones. It's dreamlike and it takes me back to my days in the sweat lodges. I miss those days. I have prayed with the people and for the land. I went to South Dakota for 4 years in a row and did a vision quest and prayed on the land with the people. I haven't found a place in Maryland to connect with that again. I know the stories of the 4 legged and the winged ones. I love the poetry and the way of thinking about life. Our world is out of balance and indigenous tribes have tried to tell us for decades how to live in harmony with the world and we are so lost in our culture, we don't have the will as a group to stand up and help ourselves. I love the uplifting loving message of this book. The interconnectedness. I learned something too. In her tribe, the mend protect fire and the women protect water. The Lakota tradition didn't mention that. There is also a little pledge at the back of the book and if it weren't a library book I would sign it. It says: I will do my best to honor Mother Earth and all its living beings, including the water and the land. I will always remember to treat the Earth as I would like to be treated. I will treat the winged ones, the crawling ones, the four-legged, the two-legged, the plants, trees, rivers, lakes, the Earth with Kindness and respect. I pledge to make this world a better place by being a steward of the Earth and a protector of the water. One the cover, the girl is wearing earrings of the 4 directions and the colors. I miss that. This book makes me realize I miss being part of the seasons and the land and celebrating it. I need to connect to life again. I love this little book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Annual Goodreads Choice Awards reading project: Read all the Picture Book nominees! (12 of 20) A call to activism in support of a good cause is beautifully illustrated in this book exploring the environmental and spiritual reasons behind the Dakota Access Pipeline protests by the Standing Rock Sioux and their supporters.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Featured in grandma reads session. The author, Carole Lindstrom, is a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe, located in North Dakota. The illustrator, Michaela Goade, was raised in Southeast Alaska, home of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian tribes. Both have a profound reverence for water. Their thoughtful words and stunning artwork show that it is the responsibility of humans to care for water, keep it clean and healthy, and to approach care for Earth in its entirety with the same diligen Featured in grandma reads session. The author, Carole Lindstrom, is a citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe, located in North Dakota. The illustrator, Michaela Goade, was raised in Southeast Alaska, home of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian tribes. Both have a profound reverence for water. Their thoughtful words and stunning artwork show that it is the responsibility of humans to care for water, keep it clean and healthy, and to approach care for Earth in its entirety with the same diligent and considered accountability, as owed to all generations of humankind, past, present and future. The book closes with this heartfelt pledge, worthy for all readers and listeners to take (we did!): Earth Steward and Water Protector Pledge I will do my best to honor Mother Earth and all its living beings, including the water and land. I will always remember to treat the Earth as If would like to be treated. I will treat. . . the winged ones, the crawling ones, the four-legged, the two-legged, the plants, trees, rivers, lakes, the Earth with kindness and respect. I pledge to make this world a better place by being a stewardof the Earth and a protector of the water. (name) (date)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Led to a great conversation with my kids about Native Americans, the environment, and the protection of land/water.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    A great book for the ecologically minded to share with their children. Written and illustrated by two indigenous women, this book is narrated by a Ojibwe girl recalling a life lesson from her grandmother: the supreme importance of water to all life forms. Humans come from water, from mothers’ wombs, and how water nurtures all throughout their living existence … people, animals, plants, etc. Evil takes the form of a black snake that will spoil the water and destroy the land, and is the representa A great book for the ecologically minded to share with their children. Written and illustrated by two indigenous women, this book is narrated by a Ojibwe girl recalling a life lesson from her grandmother: the supreme importance of water to all life forms. Humans come from water, from mothers’ wombs, and how water nurtures all throughout their living existence … people, animals, plants, etc. Evil takes the form of a black snake that will spoil the water and destroy the land, and is the representation of oil pipelines. And following the example of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, the young girl and her tribe make a stand, fighting to preserve clean and unspoiled water.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    This is a gorgeous and thought-provoking book about a young girl and her tribe, who vow to protect their homeland and heritage from a vast and destructive enemy--an oil pipeline. Through inspiring and strong words, kids are empowered to know they can stand for what is right, too. Although I wasn't a huge fan of representing the pipeline as a "black snake"--snakes already have it pretty bad and the vast majority of species are harmless and beneficial, but perhaps this would make a good discussion This is a gorgeous and thought-provoking book about a young girl and her tribe, who vow to protect their homeland and heritage from a vast and destructive enemy--an oil pipeline. Through inspiring and strong words, kids are empowered to know they can stand for what is right, too. Although I wasn't a huge fan of representing the pipeline as a "black snake"--snakes already have it pretty bad and the vast majority of species are harmless and beneficial, but perhaps this would make a good discussion point for the use of metaphor in books. Is the enemy actually a snake? What does the black snake represent? How could oil spills hurt snakes and other wildlife?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Heise

    Michaela Goade is rapidly becoming a favorite illustrator of mine! This book is gorgeous, and so important for the representation and perspective that is shares. It's a beautiful book that should be in all elementary libraries!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    This book is phenomenal. The art, the message - both are simply incredible. The text is poetic, yet accessible, and the art is just stunning. This deserves all the stars. All of them. Twelve. Twelve stars. That seems fair and reasonable.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana Al-Basha دانة الباشا

    Amazing book, message, art, and goal. This book should win!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bek MoonyReadsByStarlight

    This was an incredible story with important discussion on tough subjects that are approached without sugar-coating, but also without being overwhelming for children. The extra information after the story takes this book to the next level for teaching and conversation with children on the topics in the story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Water is threatened. A girl stands up with her people to drive back the danger. A beautifully illustrated story of courage sharing the true story of the Standing Rock Sioux Trip who stood up to protect their land from a pipeline company.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Baby Bookworm

    Hello, friends! Our book today is We Are Water Protectors, written by Carole Lindstrom and illustrated by Michaela Goade, a conservational call to action and celebration of Indigenous pride. A young girl of Ojibwe descent recounts a lesson her grandmother imparted to her: “Water is the first medicine.” She points out that we come from water, from the earliest days in our mothers’ wombs; once born, the planet we all share nurtures us with water in the same way. Her people talk of a black snake tha Hello, friends! Our book today is We Are Water Protectors, written by Carole Lindstrom and illustrated by Michaela Goade, a conservational call to action and celebration of Indigenous pride. A young girl of Ojibwe descent recounts a lesson her grandmother imparted to her: “Water is the first medicine.” She points out that we come from water, from the earliest days in our mothers’ wombs; once born, the planet we all share nurtures us with water in the same way. Her people talk of a black snake that will spoil the water and destroy the land, and in the form of high-volume oil pipelines, the black snake has arrived. So the girl and her people make a stand, fighting for their rights… and protecting the sacred safety of the water. Beautiful. This deeply passionate and original tale, written and illustrated by Indigenous creators, is part historical account, part rallying cry, and part unabashed expression of cultural pride. Drawing inspiration from the Standing Rock protests and ongoing fight to prevent oil pipelines from being built on tribal nations’ lands and waterways, the text reads like flowing, free-form poetry, yet manages to incorporate themes like stewardship of nature, community, and heritage throughout. The dreamy, rich artwork is absolutely stunning, and JJ and I found ourselves marveling at every page. This length is great for any storytime, and the message within is a critical one for right now and always: we must rise to protect life and what sustains it from those who would destroy it – it is our responsibility to the planet, and to each other. A fantastic title, and we adored it. Baby Bookworm approved! (Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abby Johnson

    Oh Caldecott committeeeee..... Buy, buy, buy this gorgeous book. The artwork is absolutely stunning. Ojibwe author and Tlingit illustrator Lindstrom and Goade have created a magnificent book that celebrates the people standing against oil pipelines to protect the environment. A repeating chorus of "We stand / with our songs / and our drums. / We are still here." reminds readers that Native Nations still exist. Illustrations include Native people with light skin and hair. I'm for sure buying this Oh Caldecott committeeeee..... Buy, buy, buy this gorgeous book. The artwork is absolutely stunning. Ojibwe author and Tlingit illustrator Lindstrom and Goade have created a magnificent book that celebrates the people standing against oil pipelines to protect the environment. A repeating chorus of "We stand / with our songs / and our drums. / We are still here." reminds readers that Native Nations still exist. Illustrations include Native people with light skin and hair. I'm for sure buying this for my collection and will be buying for several gifts, too.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    The illustrations and word choices are absolutely gorgeous. This book would be incredible to prompt more inquiry for grades K-4 and could be revisited often for continued discussion and analysis.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cara (Wilde Book Garden)

    Stunning art and message. I will never cease to be amazed at the power a short book can have. Older readers who have drifted away from picture books like I had, you are missing out! Trust me. We Are Water Protectors would make an excellent place to (re)start. (And of course this would make a wonderful gift for young readers in your life as well!)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Holyn

    Beautiful illustrations! Lovely way to teach ecology, care of the earth, and activism while honoring indigenous people’s stories and experiences.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Powerful message. Beautiful illustrations. Definitely a great book to share with your kids and take the opportunity to talk about environmental issues.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erin Banham

    An important message with absolutely stunning illustrations.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meg Sedillo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am obsessed with the illustrations! Michaela Goade’s work is captivating and just absolutely stunning. The book introduces readers to the strength and persistence of the Standing Rock Sioux, and all those who stood by them, protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. It calls on readers to understand that everything is connected and we must work together to protect the Earth and each other. The writing is beautiful, the illustrations are beautiful - what’s not to love about this book?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Two indigenous book creators have created a picture book that celebrates the North American indigenous battles to protect our water. Water is the the first medicine; it is where we all come from and nourishes us in the womb and on earth. There is talk of a black snake that will spoil the water, poisoning it. The black snake had been foretold for many years, and now it is here. Courage is the answer to it and the willingness to stand up and insist that water be protected. Nature cannot speak for Two indigenous book creators have created a picture book that celebrates the North American indigenous battles to protect our water. Water is the the first medicine; it is where we all come from and nourishes us in the womb and on earth. There is talk of a black snake that will spoil the water, poisoning it. The black snake had been foretold for many years, and now it is here. Courage is the answer to it and the willingness to stand up and insist that water be protected. Nature cannot speak for itself, so we must speak and fight on its behalf. We can all be water protectors. Lindstrom has written a book that calls out to be shared aloud. She has used an effective refrain: “We stand/ With our songs/ And our drums./ We are still here.” The importance of standing up and of Native people being visible as modern members of our society is vital here. The call to action in this picture book is also clarion clear and incredibly empowering. This book explains to the youngest children what the protests on Native lands are all about and why they are vital to all of us. Goade’s illustrations are done in watercolor that washes across the pages in waves, swirls, and skies. The colors are deep and dynamic, showing nature in all of its beauty and demonstrating page after page what we are fighting to protect. Strong and important. Appropriate for ages 4-6.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    A vitally important and inspiring message delivered with absolutely beautiful illustrations!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle Carolina

    Incredible, just incredible.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    A bold, symphonic treat.

  24. 4 out of 5

    DaNae

    Powerful and hopeful. A great avenue to introduce both stewardship over the land and a time to protest.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This is an inspiring and beautiful call to action. A young indigenous girl relates the tale told to her by her grandmother. "We come from water." She tells also of the tale of the black snake that will destroy the land. There is poetry in the lines here, reflecting the rhythms of the river and of traditional storytelling. There is a power in this text in the urgent call to all of us to stand up for the earth and guard the waters that flow through all of us. Michaela Goade's flowing illustrations This is an inspiring and beautiful call to action. A young indigenous girl relates the tale told to her by her grandmother. "We come from water." She tells also of the tale of the black snake that will destroy the land. There is poetry in the lines here, reflecting the rhythms of the river and of traditional storytelling. There is a power in this text in the urgent call to all of us to stand up for the earth and guard the waters that flow through all of us. Michaela Goade's flowing illustrations are simply beautiful, created in glowing tones that make each page memorable. This is a tribute to the courageous stand by the many tribal nations fighting the gas pipelines crossing their lands and in particular the effort of the Standing Rock Sioux Trip in 2016. The author is a tribally enrolled member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe and the illustrator enrolled with the Tlinglit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska. An essential book for all collections and an essential read aloud.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adele

    This is one of those picture books where the point is mainly in the dense text afterword and not in the story itself. However, because I went in already familiar with Standing Rock, and because the illustrations are flat-out gorgeous, and probably because as a liberal, an environmentalist, and a decent human being I am sympathetic to the cause, and as a Unitarian Universalist and Religious Naturalist the philosophy resonates with me, I am inclined to be forgiving in this case.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (FabBookReviews)

    Water is the first medicine, Nokomis told me...Water is sacred, she said...The river's rhythm runs through my veins. Runs through my people's veins. My people talk of a black snake that will destroy the land.". We Are Water Protectors is the lauded picture book collaboration from author Carole Lindstrom and illustrator Michaela Goade. Lindstorm, Anishinaabe/Métis and tribally enrolled with the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe, uses elements of Ojibwe culture and of Anishinaabe prophecy to tell a p Water is the first medicine, Nokomis told me...Water is sacred, she said...The river's rhythm runs through my veins. Runs through my people's veins. My people talk of a black snake that will destroy the land.". We Are Water Protectors is the lauded picture book collaboration from author Carole Lindstrom and illustrator Michaela Goade. Lindstorm, Anishinaabe/Métis and tribally enrolled with the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe, uses elements of Ojibwe culture and of Anishinaabe prophecy to tell a powerful, viscerally affecting story of earth's descent into environmental devastation. Even more specifically, the story within We Are Water Protectors calls to real-life events in the United States affecting Native Americans: the fight of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and other Indigenous Nations and allies against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline just a few years ago. "Take courage! I must keep the black snake away from my village's water. I must rally my people together. We fight for those who cannot fight for themselves...". With text as steady and lyrical as it is galvanizing, We Are Water Protectors shows the necessity of standing up and fighting, even as destruction on earth occurs. Even when things "will not be easy" and the "venom [of the black snake] burns the land [and] courses through the water, making it unfit to drink", readers see how the characters within the story continue to stand and fight. In tandem with the author's commanding text, artist Michaela Goade's illustrations are truly breathtaking and impactful, with unmissable images of bravery, of story, of ruination, and last but not least, of hope. Goade, an enrolled member of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, details in the Illustrator's Note at the book's end how particular illustrative elements were included to honour Lindstrom's Ojibwe culture. A story that may- and hopefully will- lead to reflection, research into recent historical events, and believing in the power of taking action to safeguard our planet, We Are Water Protectors is exceptional, arguably imperative, reading. Be sure to take time and read through the entirety of the book's back matter: More on Water Protectors, Further Reading, Glossary, Illustrator's Note, as well as the Earth Steward and Water Protector Pledge for readers of the book. I received a copy of this title courtesy of Raincoast Books in exchange for an honest review. All opinions and comments are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura Giessler

    The illustrations in this book are BEAUTIFUL--I love the color palette; the swirls in the hills and the hair; all the beautiful illustrations of nature and animals and the sky and indigenous people. The young Water Protector leads the fight against the black snake, aka the pipelines, threatening her land and her people. Great for prompting discussion on Standing Rock, indigenous people, environmental justice. And just plain beautiful. The narrator is a young Ojibwe girl, from the same tribe as t The illustrations in this book are BEAUTIFUL--I love the color palette; the swirls in the hills and the hair; all the beautiful illustrations of nature and animals and the sky and indigenous people. The young Water Protector leads the fight against the black snake, aka the pipelines, threatening her land and her people. Great for prompting discussion on Standing Rock, indigenous people, environmental justice. And just plain beautiful. The narrator is a young Ojibwe girl, from the same tribe as the author; illustrator is tribally enrolled with the Tlingit and Haida Indian tribes of Alaska.

  29. 5 out of 5

    June

    Acknowledges inspiration from the many Native American movements/protests. I have placed a hold on the picture book since I was unable to read the backmatter in the kindle app. Very moving portrayal of the sacredness of water and a rallying cry to people to protect it from contamination.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    For some it starts at an early age. We are taught by our parents, grandparents or adult mentors, to nurture and care for Earth in her entirety. For me it was my father. We spent early morning and evening hours in summer on the lakes and rivers fishing. He taught me to watch the weather, the time of day and how fish might think. We walked for miles in the woods in autumn during bow hunting season. To and from our spot, he was always whispering to me about the various trees and plants and how to l For some it starts at an early age. We are taught by our parents, grandparents or adult mentors, to nurture and care for Earth in her entirety. For me it was my father. We spent early morning and evening hours in summer on the lakes and rivers fishing. He taught me to watch the weather, the time of day and how fish might think. We walked for miles in the woods in autumn during bow hunting season. To and from our spot, he was always whispering to me about the various trees and plants and how to look for signs left by all animals. (On our hunting trips, an animal never lost its life in our presence. There is a reason for this, but that's another story.) When it came to water, my dad had rules. You never put anything on or into the ground which might harm the water table or any animals who frequented that area. You used water sparingly, except for keeping a garden healthy or for drinking. To this day, I'm the one homeowner digging out hundreds of certain unwanted weeds from my gardens and lawn rather than applying harmful chemicals. Having lived near many different small lakes and rivers or one of the Great Lakes in Michigan for more than sixty-eight years, I have witnessed their splendor and their challenges due to the careless hands of humans. We Are Water Protectors (Roaring Brook Press, March 17, 2020) written by Carole Lindstrom (Anishinaabe/Metis and tribally enrolled with the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe) with illustrations by Michaela Goade (of Tlingit descent and tribally enrolled with the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska) is powerful in both words and artwork. It speaks to the fierce dedication of Indigenous Peoples to guard our water and invites everyone to stand strong against those who wish to do it harm. My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...

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