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Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life

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You sit down at your desk to work on an important project, but a notification on your phone interrupts your morning. Later, as you're about to get back to work, a colleague taps you on the shoulder to chat. At home, screens get in the way of quality time with your family. Another day goes by, and once again, your most important personal and professional goals are put on ho You sit down at your desk to work on an important project, but a notification on your phone interrupts your morning. Later, as you're about to get back to work, a colleague taps you on the shoulder to chat. At home, screens get in the way of quality time with your family. Another day goes by, and once again, your most important personal and professional goals are put on hold.   What would be possible if you followed through on your best intentions? What could you accomplish if you could stay focused and overcome distractions? What if you had the power to become "indistractable"?   International best-selling author, former Stanford lecturer, and behavioral design expert, Nir Eyal, wrote Silicon Valley's handbook for making technology habit-forming. Five years after publishing Hooked, Eyal reveals distraction's Achilles' heel in his groundbreaking new book.   In Indistractable, Eyal reveals the hidden psychology driving us to distraction. He describes why solving the problem is not as simple as swearing off our devices: Abstinence is impractical and often makes us want more.   Eyal lays bare the secret of finally doing what you say you will do with a four-step, research-backed model. Indistractable reveals the key to getting the best out of technology, without letting it get the best of us.   Inside, Eyal overturns conventional wisdom and reveals:  Why distraction at work is a symptom of a dysfunctional company culture - and how to fix it   What really drives human behavior and why "time management is pain management"   Why your relationships (and your sex life) depend on you becoming indistractable   How to raise indistractable children in an increasingly distracting world  Empowering and optimistic, Indistractable provides practical, novel techniques to control your time and attention - helping you live the life you really want.


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You sit down at your desk to work on an important project, but a notification on your phone interrupts your morning. Later, as you're about to get back to work, a colleague taps you on the shoulder to chat. At home, screens get in the way of quality time with your family. Another day goes by, and once again, your most important personal and professional goals are put on ho You sit down at your desk to work on an important project, but a notification on your phone interrupts your morning. Later, as you're about to get back to work, a colleague taps you on the shoulder to chat. At home, screens get in the way of quality time with your family. Another day goes by, and once again, your most important personal and professional goals are put on hold.   What would be possible if you followed through on your best intentions? What could you accomplish if you could stay focused and overcome distractions? What if you had the power to become "indistractable"?   International best-selling author, former Stanford lecturer, and behavioral design expert, Nir Eyal, wrote Silicon Valley's handbook for making technology habit-forming. Five years after publishing Hooked, Eyal reveals distraction's Achilles' heel in his groundbreaking new book.   In Indistractable, Eyal reveals the hidden psychology driving us to distraction. He describes why solving the problem is not as simple as swearing off our devices: Abstinence is impractical and often makes us want more.   Eyal lays bare the secret of finally doing what you say you will do with a four-step, research-backed model. Indistractable reveals the key to getting the best out of technology, without letting it get the best of us.   Inside, Eyal overturns conventional wisdom and reveals:  Why distraction at work is a symptom of a dysfunctional company culture - and how to fix it   What really drives human behavior and why "time management is pain management"   Why your relationships (and your sex life) depend on you becoming indistractable   How to raise indistractable children in an increasingly distracting world  Empowering and optimistic, Indistractable provides practical, novel techniques to control your time and attention - helping you live the life you really want.

30 review for Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Let’s get this out of the way up front: the guy who (literally) wrote the book on making addictive tech writing a guide on how to not get distracted by addictive tech is like someone writing a book on the merits of veganism and then writing a follow-up called “Eating Yummy Baby Cows and Other Ways to Fill Your Cramhole With the Savory Flesh of Delicious, Fluffy Creatures!” That said, I came into this hoping for a Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking-like exploration o Let’s get this out of the way up front: the guy who (literally) wrote the book on making addictive tech writing a guide on how to not get distracted by addictive tech is like someone writing a book on the merits of veganism and then writing a follow-up called “Eating Yummy Baby Cows and Other Ways to Fill Your Cramhole With the Savory Flesh of Delicious, Fluffy Creatures!” That said, I came into this hoping for a Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking-like exploration of science, psychology, and data that would inform recommendations; instead, I got a Quiet-light self-help tome that occasionally proffers some good ideas (timeboxing your schedule (in order to, for example, reserve time to respond to emails rather than responding as they come in), turning off notifications on all apps, and carving out time specifically for social media as opposed to checking intermittently all day), but is generally simplistically repetitive while also forcing the reader to picture the author working hard to put down his phone to make sexy times with his previously equally distracted wife (so, keep your mental eye bleach handy). Helpful? Yeah, sort of. Could it be condensed down to a much shorter version and make the same points? Like every self-help book, emphatically yes. Really, though, what really chapped my behind as I worked my way through the book was the fact that there’s a rational case for its existence. My god. What have we done to ourselves (and I include myself very much in the group of people doing it to himself…and yes, I realize that didn’t come out right)? Why have we packed our lives with so many empty interactions with technology and virtual people that we have to forcibly schedule time in our lives to just sit and think, or to talk to other real people, and or to just NOT respond to some dopamine-inducing ping? I don’t intend this to come off as an old guy, “BACK IN MY DAY WE ATE WEASELS FOR BREAKFAST BECAUSE THAT’S ALL WE HAD AND WE LIKED IT AND THEN WE USED EVERY PART OF THOSE DAMN WEASELS FOR SOME USEFUL PURPOSE, INCLUDING TURNING THEIR GUTS INTO BOWSTRINGS SO WE COULD HUNT MORE WEASELS FOR FOOD AND BOWSTRINGS AND YOUNG PEOPLE ARE ALL AWFUL SO LET’S IGNORE THEM” kind of screed. I really don’t. But, I am concerned about where we’re going. Heck, I’m concerned about where we are. And I’m really troubled that this book needs to exist, and that we have to fight and scrap to make time for things that are truly important in the face of an overwhelming onslaught of digital ephemera that—oh, hell yeah! You know what that ping means, people. That’s right: there’s a new Candy Crush update. I gotta run; you know how it is—stuff to do.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    ACT theory + time blocking + habit setting + digital minimalism. There. Now you don't need to read it. ACT theory + time blocking + habit setting + digital minimalism. There. Now you don't need to read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jorge David

    Could have been a blog post. Better off reading Atomic Habits, Deep Work or The Path of Least Resistance.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elvina Zafril

    I sometimes when I'm with friends, I constantly checking out my phone. I know my friends were annoyed. HAHAH until I read this book, I can call myself 'phubber' meaning phone snubber. I loved this book so much. It was really incredible. I loved that this book is relatable in some kind of ways in my personal life. I am always being distracted by something. I'm so glad I read this book. I can apply all the tips in my daily life. I really enjoyed the section in this book. I'm the type of people who l I sometimes when I'm with friends, I constantly checking out my phone. I know my friends were annoyed. HAHAH until I read this book, I can call myself 'phubber' meaning phone snubber. I loved this book so much. It was really incredible. I loved that this book is relatable in some kind of ways in my personal life. I am always being distracted by something. I'm so glad I read this book. I can apply all the tips in my daily life. I really enjoyed the section in this book. I'm the type of people who learn by example. This author put the section in his book. So I started with the section 5 first and then I will go back to section 1 to know more about the details in section 5. I think I have discovered some of the root cause why I'm easily get distracted. All the tips are practical and very useful. There are also reminders in the book and I have already recommended it to some of my friends. Thank you Pansing @definitlybooks for sending me a copy of Indistractable in return for an honest review. This book will be available at all good bookstores October onwards.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Azevedo

    Too many fillers. Go for Digital Minimalism, instead. Note to self: always be aware of books that have a lot of good reviews before publishing. Probably friends, fans or people who got the book as a gift.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    We live in a world where distractions exist around every corner, and I'll be the first to admit that I sometimes procrastinate. It's a timely and pretty important book as the modern age of technology appears to have become like opium to some. So what can we do to become more productive you ask? Well, Stanford Professor Nir Eyal is about to tell us in an understandable, conversational way how to get more done and there is plenty of technical detail included for those of us who enjoy knowing the i We live in a world where distractions exist around every corner, and I'll be the first to admit that I sometimes procrastinate. It's a timely and pretty important book as the modern age of technology appears to have become like opium to some. So what can we do to become more productive you ask? Well, Stanford Professor Nir Eyal is about to tell us in an understandable, conversational way how to get more done and there is plenty of technical detail included for those of us who enjoy knowing the ins and outs. Of course, it heavily focuses on social media given it is one of the habits most of us seem to have that takes our attention away from more important issues; I must admit that I rarely use social media as it simply doesn't hold my interest for very long, but I can see that this would help those who have let social sites take over their lives and could be applied to other situations easily too. Time is a finite resource and that means we should spend it wisely. I liked that Eyal admitted to falling victim to the dreaded time stealing monster himself and shares the solutions that helped him to overcome this. Being interested in psychology I particularly appreciated the parts in which he described the psychology behind the forming of habits, how to break them and how just being free of them will impact our lives for the better. He discusses how to implement the solutions to make use of them in everyday life and I found the book to be extensively-researched with case studies throughout to illustrate some of the points he makes. He also places bullet-point summaries at the end of each chapter to remind us of key points. Overall, it offers a refreshingly different approach to time management than other books on the subject. Indistractable is a helpful, comprehensive guide that should be on the reading list of all of those who wish to spend their time in a better manner. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing for an ARC.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charles Roels

    I was an early reader of the book and was fascinated from beginning to end. Indistractable is an in-depth, scientifically underpinned, guide on how to take back control of your life and removing distractions that take you away from being present in the moment. I loved the the very personal elements, for example the superpower story at the beginning and the end, which emphasise the arguments in a very gentle and kind way. The whole book is very relatable, from a professional point of view, but eq I was an early reader of the book and was fascinated from beginning to end. Indistractable is an in-depth, scientifically underpinned, guide on how to take back control of your life and removing distractions that take you away from being present in the moment. I loved the the very personal elements, for example the superpower story at the beginning and the end, which emphasise the arguments in a very gentle and kind way. The whole book is very relatable, from a professional point of view, but equally in your personal life with your kids or partner. The practical tips and recap at the end of each chapter are very useful if you want to put the learnings in practice and live without distractions!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Valentin

    I liked Nir's other book, "Hooked." It is one of my favorite and best product/business books ever (and also useful for non-product people). After "Hooked" taught the whole industry how to build addictive products, Nir is now basically selling the "cure." The first half of "Indistractable" is ok, and there is some good general idea on "why" you are so easily addicted to your smartphone, Facebook, etc. However, I think I was intuitively trying and applying most of them just because of the knowledg I liked Nir's other book, "Hooked." It is one of my favorite and best product/business books ever (and also useful for non-product people). After "Hooked" taught the whole industry how to build addictive products, Nir is now basically selling the "cure." The first half of "Indistractable" is ok, and there is some good general idea on "why" you are so easily addicted to your smartphone, Facebook, etc. However, I think I was intuitively trying and applying most of them just because of the knowledge I got from "Hooked." The second half goes into all sort of anecdotes, some very cheesy. And the last section deals a lot with kids & technology addiction. I'm quite surprised that after popularizing the "Hooked" model and even mentioning it at the beginning of this book; the author offers such impractical advice. The strategies feel so "frail" and require effort and have substantial "friction." The anecdotes are borderlines dystopian or from a black mirror episode. Not to mention some sound like a "one-off" success I think you can intuitively guess most of the advice in this book, or just by googling "how to stop tech addiction." I sincerely recommend reading his other book, though. Interesting note: The author also references an article by Paul Graham which I found very interesting http://www.paulgraham.com/addiction.html

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    There are some helpful hints and reminders in here that I will be adopting. I read a lot of books like this but it's amazing how distractions creep back in and you have to remind yourself to take control of your own time. There are some helpful hints and reminders in here that I will be adopting. I read a lot of books like this but it's amazing how distractions creep back in and you have to remind yourself to take control of your own time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alan Stout

    I am reviewing this book because I received a preliminary copy and think it is a vitally important topic. How many stars would I give Indistractable? (1-5) 5 out of 5 stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ How would I summarize the book in one sentence? Live a fulfilling life by becoming aware and controling both the internal and external triggers that constantly bombard me. What were the most memorable or helpful parts of the book? Changing some of my beliefs such the reframing of my thinking about will power. (Refuting E I am reviewing this book because I received a preliminary copy and think it is a vitally important topic. How many stars would I give Indistractable? (1-5) 5 out of 5 stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ How would I summarize the book in one sentence? Live a fulfilling life by becoming aware and controling both the internal and external triggers that constantly bombard me. What were the most memorable or helpful parts of the book? Changing some of my beliefs such the reframing of my thinking about will power. (Refuting Ego depletion). Although I was aware of some of the studies it really didn’t sink in before. Very important and wide ranging applications. This has important implications, for example, in the basic beliefs of the AA program. Also the overwhelming data about the improving focus of nurses when they were being constantly distracted and even when initially they resisted methods used to lower their distractibility. The distraction-traction matrix is a very useful way of thinking. Similar but different way to model like the urgent important matrix. Footnotes were excellent although ironically it made me want to click on them. Maybe best if I read them separately. All motivation is a desire to escape discomfort is IMHO an extremely important concept. 5 Stars. Although I once reported to the CEO of a major S & P 500 company, I am retired and almost 3 times the age of the author I am less interested in the company related and parent and children related topics and more interested in how these ideas can personably help me learn. However, I am sure there is a broad audience for the book. I thought that giving the why and underlying structure of distraction was perhaps the most important contribution. The individual “tricks” were less important to me than understanding why and how distractions occur and how I can minimize them. The remember this sections get an A+. I spend far too much time on Apple News (mostly saving stories to gmail folders or bookmarks in Chrome but I have a wide range of interests and they cover over 200 publications. I do not plan to stop using Apple News but am defiantly being more selective and delaying my reading to a later time. Also cleaning out my apps is a very good idea. And I very much relate to a googleplex of Tabs and did not realize that Pocket has a text to speech feature. Getting rid of Notations has been really helpful. Before I just took them for granted. The Hooked book was more about how we are being “Hooked” by social media and large corporations. This book is about being conscious and aware of what we can do to take back control of our lives. Although Hooked is a very highly rated book the new book is my favorite of the two.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    2.5 stars Like many self-help books, Indistractable is full of both hits and misses. While there are definitely some interesting and applicable points made (particularly the recommendation to timebox your schedule), most aren’t explored thoroughly enough or feel a little too generic. While there are definitely some benefits to the short-and-sweet approach—easy to digest, quick to read, and memorable sound bites—in this instance it felt light on content and substance... it felt like a drawn out blo 2.5 stars Like many self-help books, Indistractable is full of both hits and misses. While there are definitely some interesting and applicable points made (particularly the recommendation to timebox your schedule), most aren’t explored thoroughly enough or feel a little too generic. While there are definitely some benefits to the short-and-sweet approach—easy to digest, quick to read, and memorable sound bites—in this instance it felt light on content and substance... it felt like a drawn out blog post. This book would have benefitted from either additional evidence or deeper exploration of the information that was presented, along with more presentations of how to apply the approaches in practice. This also gave the book the feeling of being rushed, like the author didn’t thoughtfully flesh out the content of this book in favor of meeting a deadline. Which very well may have been the case, as we learned in Chapter 24 when the author revealed he made a price pact with his friend that Eyal would owe the friend $10,000 if he didn’t complete his book in time. Is it really meeting your deadline if the book feels unfinished? The final product feels like a long article rather than a full-fledge book, or a beginning draft, like the author got the surface-level high points to paper, but hadn’t yet reached the round of revision where he’d fill in the gaps with additional research, evidence and studies. While I appreciated the “Remember This” section at the end of each chapter because it made highlighting my ebook easy, it almost felt in unnecessary because of how short each chapter was and how little content was covered. I also found myself conflicted by the writing style of this book. While the simple, straightforward, and to-the-point approach made the content easily digestible and quick to read, it further exacerbated the feeling of the book being light on content. However, I will say one benefit of this sound bite writing style is it did make the tips easy to remember, even if the ideas, suggestions or action items weren’t necessarily novel concepts. For example, the reminder that allowing yourself to fall into distraction means you’re taking away time that can be spent on things you value makes a good mental note to tell yourself when you find yourself reaching for a distraction when you should be doing something else. Another aspect I found frustrating about the writing style was the slightly condescending or braggadocious tone that occasionally cropped up (especially when it came to subtly flaunting his wealth). I imagine that wasn’t the intention, but it was hard to ignore when he bragged about what other books he wrote and what companies he invested in. Overall, this book served the purpose of being a broad, high-level introduction to the topic of becoming indistractible, but didn’t have enough substance to take it all the way. You’d get about all you need to get out of this book by simply reading the the “Remember This” synopses at the end of each chapter, or the chapter takeaways that are helpfully compiles together towards the end of the book. Whether you read the summaries or the full book, don’t expect a fully flesh out investigation on what it takes to eliminate distractions from your life.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mario Tomic

    Simple and quick read covering helpful strategies and tactics for effectively managing attention in an ever more distracting world. The tips were backed by research data as well as some interesting anecdotes. The reason why I'm giving it 4/5 because I've heard and applied most of the tactics discussed in the brook. This is not to say that they don't work but I was expecting deeper insights. Having said all of this, I would recommend this book. It's a great read and I also recommend picking up Ho Simple and quick read covering helpful strategies and tactics for effectively managing attention in an ever more distracting world. The tips were backed by research data as well as some interesting anecdotes. The reason why I'm giving it 4/5 because I've heard and applied most of the tactics discussed in the brook. This is not to say that they don't work but I was expecting deeper insights. Having said all of this, I would recommend this book. It's a great read and I also recommend picking up Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products by the same author - It's one of my favorite books on the subject of habit formation.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rod Moser

    Have you ever gone out with friends or family and there is that one guy who is constantly checking out of the conversation and checking into his phone? Super annoying, right? Well, I'm that guy. I didn't realize what it was called until I read Nir Eyal's book but I am a 'phubber' (phone snubber). As a real estate broker, coach, and father of 6 boys, I am always being distracted by something. I would get anxious every time the phone chirped or beeped or pinged. Was it a client emergency, do my ki Have you ever gone out with friends or family and there is that one guy who is constantly checking out of the conversation and checking into his phone? Super annoying, right? Well, I'm that guy. I didn't realize what it was called until I read Nir Eyal's book but I am a 'phubber' (phone snubber). As a real estate broker, coach, and father of 6 boys, I am always being distracted by something. I would get anxious every time the phone chirped or beeped or pinged. Was it a client emergency, do my kids need me ... and most of the time it was nothing but a distraction. Wow! Practical advice galore in this one. I am already putting it to use and I am beginning to find peace. Spending more time following our life values in traction and being aware of the triggers that pull us away from what's important can lead to a more productive and peaceful life. Nir uses case studies that will challenge the way you have always thought of things and open your mind to other options. I especially enjoyed the section he put in the book on how to help our children become less distracted. As a father concerned with screen time and non-productive behaviors, there were some absolute gems here. Not surprisingly, I discovered where the problem lies. It's not the screen, it's the parenting and there are some brilliant ideas on how to achieve a better outcome. Now to put this all into practice. Don't miss this one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    The best part of this entire book was his advice on setting guidelines on tech usage with your kids, partner, and your friends. The rest was a very high-level introduction to behavioral adaption and change, with easy-to-use pointers to remember at the end of every chapter. It felt very informal, like a webinar or a collection of PowerPoint slides, and less in-depth or researched analysis, like I was hoping. Also, while the idea of timeboxing is appreciated, the truth is not everyone has the abil The best part of this entire book was his advice on setting guidelines on tech usage with your kids, partner, and your friends. The rest was a very high-level introduction to behavioral adaption and change, with easy-to-use pointers to remember at the end of every chapter. It felt very informal, like a webinar or a collection of PowerPoint slides, and less in-depth or researched analysis, like I was hoping. Also, while the idea of timeboxing is appreciated, the truth is not everyone has the ability to plan, at the beginning of each week, slots of work, personal and free time in boxed increments. Certainly pre-planning can prevent distraction, but as we are not highly efficient robots with consistent programming which we adhere to, it would have been more helpful to obtain new ideas on how to slowly adapt behavioral changes (like in Newport's Digital Minimalism), or how to further develop the desire to focus and commit to your personal driving motivations (like in McKeown's Essentialism, and others).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Newton

    I really wanted to like this book. Hooked was great and I was excited to develop techniques to combat the draw of my phone. Unfortunately, Indistractable just doesn't deliver. It's composed of 36 very short chapters that are loosely grouped into sections but that never really come together. And the lessons in each chapter mostly rehash generic productivity advice - plan your day, set aside enough time for family, etc. Ultimately I found the book to be generic and forgettable. I really wanted to like this book. Hooked was great and I was excited to develop techniques to combat the draw of my phone. Unfortunately, Indistractable just doesn't deliver. It's composed of 36 very short chapters that are loosely grouped into sections but that never really come together. And the lessons in each chapter mostly rehash generic productivity advice - plan your day, set aside enough time for family, etc. Ultimately I found the book to be generic and forgettable.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Austin Rief

    I read Indistractible last weekend in 1 sitting… it was really incredible. Very thought provoking, packed with lots of action items. Really enjoyed it and have already recommended it to multiple people!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Harshita Gupta

    Well, I completed this book today and was contemplating the right kind of words to pen down. I do love non-fiction reads be it belongs to self-help books, business reads, biographies or autobiographies, books on mind or life. I read all the styles of non-fiction. But Indistractable wasn’t the book for me. Indistractable focuses on the reduction of distractions that is mainly caused by the use of technology and gadgets. It comprises of easy to read short chapters with further sections talking abou Well, I completed this book today and was contemplating the right kind of words to pen down. I do love non-fiction reads be it belongs to self-help books, business reads, biographies or autobiographies, books on mind or life. I read all the styles of non-fiction. But Indistractable wasn’t the book for me. Indistractable focuses on the reduction of distractions that is mainly caused by the use of technology and gadgets. It comprises of easy to read short chapters with further sections talking about dealing with distractions from within, reimagining internal triggers, hacking back external triggers, workplace distractions, having Indistractable relationships and, etc. etc. The first few chapters were compelling, my interest was building up, but as I moved further to the next chapters, it looked like the addition of content was only done with the purpose to increase the volume of the book. It also includes a lot of research material just to present facts but I couldn’t understand how it is useful as a solution or benefits the readers. It is merely like a collection of numerous anecdotes. I found a lot of positive reviews of the book online, so some of you might like the book, but it wasn’t a great read for me. I recommend reading both reviews before picking it up to read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kerry-louise Jones

    This book is full of interesting studies and facts to help you understand why you are being distracted and gives you simple solutions to help improve how you spend the time you have. I would recommend this to anyone who is struggling with high screen time or work/life balance. It is really relatable and non-judgemental, the author himself admits to falling victim of so many of the struggles that we face today such as checking social media when spending time with his child. A lot of the findings r This book is full of interesting studies and facts to help you understand why you are being distracted and gives you simple solutions to help improve how you spend the time you have. I would recommend this to anyone who is struggling with high screen time or work/life balance. It is really relatable and non-judgemental, the author himself admits to falling victim of so many of the struggles that we face today such as checking social media when spending time with his child. A lot of the findings really resonated with me especially the part about lying awake at night stressing about not being able to get back to sleep! I have put Nir words in to effect and now those hours at 2am are not full of stress and I fall back to sleep much quicker! Thanks to Net Galley for the free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Milan

    When you collect your blog posts into a book this is what you get. Something which can be described in a couple of pages has been turned into a book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Ibrahim ♥

    He’s straightforward, no fluff, no nonsense. Each word he writes is in its place when others in the profession can ramble and chase rabbits.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Tobias Christian Fischer

    One kind of a book - me like! It helps to overwork your work habits, general habits and identifies wrong cultural habits at work. It’s an eye-opener and truly helps in your daily life.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    In a world filled with an ever increasing number of distractions, Nir Eyal comes to the rescue with a book full of well researched and thoroughly tested ideas to help you choose how to spend your time wisely. It's all in service of the idea that what you consistently do over time is going to make you the person you end up being. Are you spending your time according to your values and who you want to be? The book covers a lot from being more focused at work to parenting to relationships and I lear In a world filled with an ever increasing number of distractions, Nir Eyal comes to the rescue with a book full of well researched and thoroughly tested ideas to help you choose how to spend your time wisely. It's all in service of the idea that what you consistently do over time is going to make you the person you end up being. Are you spending your time according to your values and who you want to be? The book covers a lot from being more focused at work to parenting to relationships and I learned several new ideas. What I loved the most, though, is how practical this book is. There are solid recommendations on new approaches to try as well as lots of useful and creative app recommendations to help you stay focused. I'm already putting several things into practice and seeing good results. Some notes for myself: "When you invent the ship, you also invent the shipwreck." (philosopher Paul Virilio) <- Love this quote as it reinforces that technology can be used for good and/or bad, but it's up to the user to control it. Time management = pain management. The drive to relieve discomfort is the root cause of all our behavior. Everything else is a proximate cause. "How we deal with uncomfortable internal triggers determines whether we pursue healthful acts of traction or self-defeating distractions." "It's good to know that feeling bad isn't actually bad; it's exactly what survival of the fittest intended." One way to let go of thoughts or feelings that are not helpful is to use the "leaves on the stream" method. Imagine you sitting next to a gently flowing stream with leaves floating by. Put the thought or emotion on one of the leaves and watch the leaf carry on floating on down the river. If you're faced with a boring task, try and get curious about some part of it. Look for a way to add fun to it. According to Michael Inzlicht, professor at University of Toronto, willpower is not finite. It's more like an emotion. "Just as we don't 'run out' of joy or anger, willpower ebbs and flows in response to what's happening to us and how we feel." Let go of this belief as it encourages you to believe you have a reason to quit because you have used up your willpower. For anyone dealing with an inner critic, here's another reason to focus on being more self-compassionate. "A 2015 review of 79 studies looking at the responses of over 16,000 volunteers found that people who have 'a positive and caring attitude ... toward her- or himself in the face of failures and individual shortcomings' tend to be happier." And people who have a tendency towards self-blame, are more likely to deal with depression and anxiety. True friendship has three qualities: someone to talk to, to depend on, and to enjoy. But you need to nurture your friendships. One idea Nir does with his wife is to meet up with three other couples every two weeks for a picnic lunch and discuss one question ranging from practical (Should we push our kids to learn things they don't want, like learning a piano?) to deeper ideas (What is the one thing you are thankful your parents taught you?). The chapter around identity was interesting. Much easier to make good decisions when you identify as someone who eats healthily or isn't a smoker than if you identify as someone who has a sweet tooth or a smoker trying to give up. Timeboxing = decide not only what you're going to do but also when you're going to do it. And block off your calendar to protect that time. People want autonomy yet, according to Robert Epstein, author of "The Myth of the Teen Brain" in Scientific American, his surveys showed that "teens in the U.S. are subjected to more than ten times as many restrictions as are mainstream adults, twice as many restrictions as active-duty U.S. Marines, and even twice as many restrictions as incarcerated felons." No wonder they love playing video games that give them a sense of control. Anya Kamenetz, author of The Art of Screen Time, "writes that making sure kids get enough sleep is 'the one issues with the most incontrovertible evidence.' Kamenetz strongly advises that 'screens and sleep don't mix' and implores parents to keep all digital devices out of kids rooms at nighttime and to shut down screens at least an hour before bedtime." Thank you to BenBella Books for the ARC. My opinions are my own.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike Mulvey

    I've noticed WHO is reading an audiobook greatly affects how much I enjoy a book. Nir Eyal reads his own book and that was a mistake. Nir Eyal is a dork, he sounds like a dork, and much of the advice he gives in the book is dorky (scheduled get-togethers with couples he and his wife are friends with where they discuss a pre-planned topic? Hey, that's the worst idea I've ever heard). If it sounds like I'm hating on Eyal, I'll mention I much preferred his previous book, 'Hooked'. I also read the har I've noticed WHO is reading an audiobook greatly affects how much I enjoy a book. Nir Eyal reads his own book and that was a mistake. Nir Eyal is a dork, he sounds like a dork, and much of the advice he gives in the book is dorky (scheduled get-togethers with couples he and his wife are friends with where they discuss a pre-planned topic? Hey, that's the worst idea I've ever heard). If it sounds like I'm hating on Eyal, I'll mention I much preferred his previous book, 'Hooked'. I also read the hard cover version so I had no dorky voice in my ears. 'Hooked' is a great book and essential if you're a product designer. My advice is skip Indistractable and read 'Atomic Habits' by James Clear.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen Chung

    An outline of the problems we all face being distracted by and obsessed with our e-gadgets, along with concrete, realistic steps toward retaking control of our time and lives. I especially appreciated the parts on education. Finished in two sessions mostly using text-to-speech. Recommended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Manu

    Towards the end of the book, the author cites a survey which found that "almost a third of Americans would rather give up sex for a year than part with their mobile phone for that long". Sex has been hardwired in us by evolution, and it's a testament to technology that it has managed to hack even that! But then again, there was a time when even the printing press was called the biggest source of distraction. So this isn't a new story. But we do live in a world in which the attention economy has Towards the end of the book, the author cites a survey which found that "almost a third of Americans would rather give up sex for a year than part with their mobile phone for that long". Sex has been hardwired in us by evolution, and it's a testament to technology that it has managed to hack even that! But then again, there was a time when even the printing press was called the biggest source of distraction. So this isn't a new story. But we do live in a world in which the attention economy has optimised its notifications and nudges to ensure that it is heard/seen/felt. All the time. Whether we need it or not. It has us hooked and sometimes we don't even know how much! This is the challenge that Nir Eyal writes about in Indistractable. He approaches it with a simple framework of internal and external triggers and distraction and traction (some nifty wordplay, that). The first thing to focus on, he says, is our own motivations - internal triggers. Not just the proximal reasons that are making us distracted, but the root cause. Our distractions are more often than not a way of escaping something we do not want to confront. He also believes we never run out of willpower and warns us against labelling ourselves as "easily distracted" or "addictive personality". An opinion that I am not sure I agree with. The rest of the book is a step by step guide on how to get to an "indistractable" state - from making time for traction (things we value) to taking control of external triggers by various means in personal and professional lives, and in social settings as well as when you're by yourself. The suggestions are practical and quite doable once you decide that they need to be done. Ironically, the section that I found most interesting was how to inculcate this quality in children. Ironic, because I don't have any. What made it interesting was the logical approach, one that seemed quite feasible. The book keeps it simple, and is a good guide if you find yourself distracted more often than you'd like to be. I have been doing my own wrestling with "staying in the moment" for a while now and found most of the things mentioned a validation of what I try to practice.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vagabond of Letters, DLitt

    3/10. Quick and breezy. I was recommended this by a fellow computer scientist on Blind. I should have read the description. This Tribesman's book (i.e., bloviating blogpost) is mostly about cutting out digital distraction, not the mental fortitude necessary to tune out interruptions as I believed. I won't hold mismatched expectations against the author, but it's pretty run of the mill stuff. Alas, I will hold the following against the author: 1. His friend group is so exclusively Jewish that they 3/10. Quick and breezy. I was recommended this by a fellow computer scientist on Blind. I should have read the description. This Tribesman's book (i.e., bloviating blogpost) is mostly about cutting out digital distraction, not the mental fortitude necessary to tune out interruptions as I believed. I won't hold mismatched expectations against the author, but it's pretty run of the mill stuff. Alas, I will hold the following against the author: 1. His friend group is so exclusively Jewish that they describe themselves with Hebrew (and commie at that) words, while he preaches inclusion and diversity in his examples for the reader. He's too lacking in self-awareness to realize this is a bit hypocritical. -0.5 2. In the section on relationships, I was treated to a feminist tirade about gender roles and men doing housework and childcare for careerist women with homemakers treated as nonexistent. One of three bullet points summarizing the chapter, ostensibly about distraction, is to block off time to do women's work 'to live the value of equity at home'. He even places two of his rare footnotes here to attempt to give scientific backing to the idea that simps have better relationships. -2.5 3. The last quarter of the book is an excursus on permissive parenting after the style of Doctor Spock, which ruined the boomers and helped make them boomers. This is bolstered with evidence of the superiority of childrearing amongst the Mayan tribes of Paraguay, which is certainly a shining exemplar of a high-IQ, low time preference people who can build and sustain a civilization... -2

  27. 5 out of 5

    Echo C

    Interesting read. The irony of this guy writing this book can’t be lost on anyone because he literally wrote the book on how to get people hooked on products. That aside, it was full of good information. The author discusses the different types of distractions and provides plenty of tips on how to be “indistractable” in both your personal and professional lives. Eyal also includes a section on raising kids to be indistractable, which I appreciated. Some of the tips, like timeblocking and providi Interesting read. The irony of this guy writing this book can’t be lost on anyone because he literally wrote the book on how to get people hooked on products. That aside, it was full of good information. The author discusses the different types of distractions and provides plenty of tips on how to be “indistractable” in both your personal and professional lives. Eyal also includes a section on raising kids to be indistractable, which I appreciated. Some of the tips, like timeblocking and providing alternatives, were more common sense than anything else. All in all, I thought it was a good book and will probably buy a copy to own and share with others in the future.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Wheeler

    This one has been sitting on my kindle for a while and I guess I was distracted. Haha. This was a really good book that goes to the root of our distractions. It’s not a bash on technology but more about the underlying pain that makes us want to escape. It offered some really valuable suggestions — many I already knew and practice but also some nuggets I hadn’t heard. I’ve already started applying some principles, like scheduling things that I value the most.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

    What I loved the most about this book was the very succinct nature of the advice. Also the fact that it didn't demonize our devices or talk of simplistic fixes like 'unplugging', which often do not work. It was an easy read with very practical and good advice that I can actually see myself putting into practice. Some of the strategies are those that I learned from books like 'Deep Work' by Cal Newport, and have already implemented and they do work very well. Hence, I have high hopes for some of What I loved the most about this book was the very succinct nature of the advice. Also the fact that it didn't demonize our devices or talk of simplistic fixes like 'unplugging', which often do not work. It was an easy read with very practical and good advice that I can actually see myself putting into practice. Some of the strategies are those that I learned from books like 'Deep Work' by Cal Newport, and have already implemented and they do work very well. Hence, I have high hopes for some of the new strategies I learned in this book and hope to put in to practice. The section about bringing up 'Indistractable' kids was very educational, I will be implementing all of those suggestions immediately. I will be revisiting this book in about a year and will look back and review the strategies that I implement and fine tune them, further.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patricija - aparecium_libri

    3.5 Nothing remarkable. Got some insight about distractions, apps to use, but didn't find out anything new. 3.5 Nothing remarkable. Got some insight about distractions, apps to use, but didn't find out anything new.

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