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New York September 11 by Magnum Photographers

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"The date, September 11, 2001, now has a certain permanence, graven on ourcollective memory, like a very few others December 7, 1941, and November 22, 1963, dates which seem to separate yesterday from today, and then from now. They become the rarest of moments; ordinary people will forever be able to tell you where they were and what they were doing when they first heard t "The date, September 11, 2001, now has a certain permanence, graven on ourcollective memory, like a very few others December 7, 1941, and November 22, 1963, dates which seem to separate yesterday from today, and then from now. They become the rarest of moments; ordinary people will forever be able to tell you where they were and what they were doing when they first heard the news, as if the terrible deed had happened to them, which in some ways it did." — from the introduction by David Halberstam By now, the story of September 11 has been burned into our collective memory, but few have seen New York from the perspective of Magnum photographers. Eleven members of the legendary photo agency immediately dispersed from their monthly meeting in New York as the events unfolded to document the incomprehensible. Their photographs, by turns haunting, surreal, and breathtaking, are collected together in 'New York September 11, by Magnum Photographers', compellingly presented in this high-quality edition from powerHouse Books. From their various vantage points we are transported to Ground Zero to witness the destruction of the World Trade Centre, the buildings’ implosion which sent thousands fleeing through the streets from debris, only to return to the scene in quiet observation and respect for the rescue workers whose jobs had only begun—and of the mourners who had been gathering struck with grief.


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"The date, September 11, 2001, now has a certain permanence, graven on ourcollective memory, like a very few others December 7, 1941, and November 22, 1963, dates which seem to separate yesterday from today, and then from now. They become the rarest of moments; ordinary people will forever be able to tell you where they were and what they were doing when they first heard t "The date, September 11, 2001, now has a certain permanence, graven on ourcollective memory, like a very few others December 7, 1941, and November 22, 1963, dates which seem to separate yesterday from today, and then from now. They become the rarest of moments; ordinary people will forever be able to tell you where they were and what they were doing when they first heard the news, as if the terrible deed had happened to them, which in some ways it did." — from the introduction by David Halberstam By now, the story of September 11 has been burned into our collective memory, but few have seen New York from the perspective of Magnum photographers. Eleven members of the legendary photo agency immediately dispersed from their monthly meeting in New York as the events unfolded to document the incomprehensible. Their photographs, by turns haunting, surreal, and breathtaking, are collected together in 'New York September 11, by Magnum Photographers', compellingly presented in this high-quality edition from powerHouse Books. From their various vantage points we are transported to Ground Zero to witness the destruction of the World Trade Centre, the buildings’ implosion which sent thousands fleeing through the streets from debris, only to return to the scene in quiet observation and respect for the rescue workers whose jobs had only begun—and of the mourners who had been gathering struck with grief.

55 review for New York September 11 by Magnum Photographers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gerry

    The 21 photographers whose work feature in this poignant book have produced some astonishing photographs and have put their lives at risk in capturing them. The result is an amazing book that captures much of the activity and the sadness that was experienced on 11 September 2001. In his introduction David Halberstam sets the twin towers in their geographic location, states what they mean to New Yorkers and the people of America and explains that over 87 years from World War I 'America had been sp The 21 photographers whose work feature in this poignant book have produced some astonishing photographs and have put their lives at risk in capturing them. The result is an amazing book that captures much of the activity and the sadness that was experienced on 11 September 2001. In his introduction David Halberstam sets the twin towers in their geographic location, states what they mean to New Yorkers and the people of America and explains that over 87 years from World War I 'America had been spared the ravages of the last century of modern warfare'. But he adds that all that ended with the bombing of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, ending his view with 'We had come to believe as a people, protected as we were for so long by our two great oceans, that we were immune to the awful damages and cruelties and viruses of the rest of the world.' As for the photographs, they are awful in their intensity but somehow they make for compulsive viewing as they do capture the devastation and horror of the situation. And many of the photographs have been taken very soon after disaster struck. Photographers, hearing the explosions or seeing the carnage on television, all dashed to the scene, taking their lives in their hands to capture the action. Ewan Fairbanks was working in downtown Manhattan when the first aircraft crashed into the first tower. When he heard the commotion he ran out of his office with his video camera and began filming, capturing the moment the second aircraft crashed into the second tower and he ended up with some extraordinary footage. Steve McCurry could not believe that one tower had collapsed and then the second went the same way - he captured it all on camera. And he was later to discover that his best friend had died in the disaster. Meanwhile Susan Meiselas had gone out from her apartment early to breakfast with a friend when she heard a radio report about a plane hitting one of the World Trade Center towers. She returned to her apartment, got out her bicycle and headed to the disaster area where she encountered messengers still delivering packages and crowds of people heading uptown. She eventually managed to get into Ground Zero to witness, and capture on camera, the devastation at close quarters. Alex Webb captures one remarkable photograph from the rooftops of Brooklyn Heights; in the foreground a mother feeds her infant son while in the distant background is dominated by the smoke, dust and fire of the towers. Paul Fusco could not get into Ground Zero and he ended up photographing people's reactions to what had happened, 'I think people were in a state of shock,' he said, adding, 'You could almost hear them thinking, "What does this mean? What do I do now?"' All the photographers have something personal to say about what they were photographing and their testimonies add to the horror of what was before them. It is a remarkable book, which ends with some historic shots of the Twin Towers in happier times.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

    I had never seen many of these photos before. Necessary documentation of an extraordinary day.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rahil

    Photographies tend to express lots of things about real deep human emotions( i.e you can see them clearly in their facial expressions ) , it was an amusement to read this documentary book to some extent . It contained mainly photos, witnesses , and some versions of how people lived these moments ..I was 04 when it happened , I was in my grandma's house , and I still do remember this day, I have clear visions and images of The tours , the planes, thr collapse, maybe it was the first time in my li Photographies tend to express lots of things about real deep human emotions( i.e you can see them clearly in their facial expressions ) , it was an amusement to read this documentary book to some extent . It contained mainly photos, witnesses , and some versions of how people lived these moments ..I was 04 when it happened , I was in my grandma's house , and I still do remember this day, I have clear visions and images of The tours , the planes, thr collapse, maybe it was the first time in my life I realised America existed XD :D I have clear rootY souvenirs of that day :3 !

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    "I don't trust words, I trust pictures." -Gilles Peress When you read this, remove all those 9/11 conspiracy theories in your head, remove all prejudices, this is one date that practically changed the whole world. If I have to choose, the strongest picture in this collection would be the one by Susan Meiselas: an eerie photograph of a lone sculpture covered in ashes and dust, accompanied by hundreds of papers around him. Made you understand what 'frozen in time' really means.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sean Harding

    A well presented photographic journey through the momentous historical day showing all the tragedy and the resilience in a way that only photos can. Real and terrible and yet with that glimpse of jope shining through the dark.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe Yu Lok Yi

    The photographs say everything. The book and the pictures move you to immediately and it felt like September 11 was just yesterday. Just seeing the pictures can get me into teary eyes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carol Irvin

    😢🙏💔

  8. 5 out of 5

    R.Friend

    Beautifully documented, stark and respectful compilation of images--probably the most ingrained, collectively. There was also a small but powerful exhibition of select photographs from this book at the Smithsonian Institution's Arts & Industries building in 2002. I was working next door at the Freer/Sackler Gallery at the time, and used to visit it every day when I went for coffee. Like the book, the exhibition was stark and understated; few visitors even seemed to notice it. Nor did they seem t Beautifully documented, stark and respectful compilation of images--probably the most ingrained, collectively. There was also a small but powerful exhibition of select photographs from this book at the Smithsonian Institution's Arts & Industries building in 2002. I was working next door at the Freer/Sackler Gallery at the time, and used to visit it every day when I went for coffee. Like the book, the exhibition was stark and understated; few visitors even seemed to notice it. Nor did they seem to notice the singed American flag, unceremoniously hanging within reach on the far wall. It was actually recovered from the World Trade Center site. So many people passed beneath it, rarely bothering to look up. This book reminds me as much of that experience as it does of 9/11 itself. And while it's certainly not a pleasant memory, it's an important one; and the book does an exceptional job of bringing that day and that event vividly to life.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Got this book at a box sale. It sat on a shelf and collected dust. Why did I keep it? I have no idea. I decided that I didn't need it clutteringup my life anymore and I decided that I'm going to give it to my library. Someone might appreciate it better. I was only 9, when it happened. I had no idea and I had no connection. I have never been to New York, and I have a different nationality, but I did feel just as vunerable. The pictures are powerful and wrenching, it would probably mean so much mor Got this book at a box sale. It sat on a shelf and collected dust. Why did I keep it? I have no idea. I decided that I didn't need it clutteringup my life anymore and I decided that I'm going to give it to my library. Someone might appreciate it better. I was only 9, when it happened. I had no idea and I had no connection. I have never been to New York, and I have a different nationality, but I did feel just as vunerable. The pictures are powerful and wrenching, it would probably mean so much more to someone who was actually there, maybe someone who lost a loved one. September 11, a day forever changed.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    The pictures really do an awesome job of telling the awful story of what happened that day. My students weren't even born on this terrible day, and I believe they need books that capture the pain and memories in an appropriate way. I'm taking this to school tomorrow to share with them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gary Brinker

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katie Shepherd

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Avis Black

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Roger

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Peterson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cam Gold

  21. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Whitehurst

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jazz Leat

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jason Lester

  24. 5 out of 5

    Milkman3367

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Moll

  27. 4 out of 5

    Iulian Crudu

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amruniel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cullen Rude

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Voss

  31. 5 out of 5

    Becca LovesBrooklyn

  32. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  33. 4 out of 5

    Gilbert

  34. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  35. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  36. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  37. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  38. 4 out of 5

    Deb

  39. 5 out of 5

    Adam Sharp

  40. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  41. 5 out of 5

    Iansmithdahl

  42. 4 out of 5

    Loretta

  43. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  44. 5 out of 5

    Joe Gosen

  45. 4 out of 5

    Mike Talley Jr

  46. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  47. 4 out of 5

    Teddie

  48. 4 out of 5

    Adam Matkowsky

  49. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Matkowsky

  50. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Curry

  51. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Stock

  52. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

  53. 5 out of 5

    Calton Bolick

  54. 5 out of 5

    Bojan Fürst

  55. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Vasquez

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