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An investigation into the nature of violence, terror, and trauma through conversations with a notorious war criminal by Jessica Stern, one of the world's foremost experts on terrorism. Between October 2014 and November 2016, global terrorism expert Jessica Stern held a series of conversations in a prison cell in The Hague with Radovan Karadzic, a Bosnian Serb former politic An investigation into the nature of violence, terror, and trauma through conversations with a notorious war criminal by Jessica Stern, one of the world's foremost experts on terrorism. Between October 2014 and November 2016, global terrorism expert Jessica Stern held a series of conversations in a prison cell in The Hague with Radovan Karadzic, a Bosnian Serb former politician who had been indicted for genocide and other war crimes during the Bosnian War and who became an inspiration for white nationalists. Though Stern was used to interviewing terrorists in the field in an effort to understand their hidden motives, the conversations she had with Karadzic would profoundly alter her understanding of the mechanics of fear, the motivations of violence, and the psychology of those who perpetrate mass atrocities at a state level and who—like the terrorists she had previously studied—target noncombatants, in violation of ethical norms and international law. How do leaders persuade ordinary people to kill their neighbors? What is the “ecosystem” that creates and nurtures genocidal leaders? Could anything about their personal histories, personalities, or exposure to historical trauma shed light on the formation of a war criminal’s identity in opposition to a targeted Other? In My War Criminal, Jessica Stern brings to bear her incisive analysis and her own deeply considered reactions to her interactions with Karadzic, a brilliant and often shockingly charming psychiatrist and poet who spent twelve years in hiding, disguising himself as an energy healer, while also offering a deeply insightful and sometimes chilling account of the complex and even seductive powers of a magnetic leader—and what can happen when you spend many, many hours with that person.  


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An investigation into the nature of violence, terror, and trauma through conversations with a notorious war criminal by Jessica Stern, one of the world's foremost experts on terrorism. Between October 2014 and November 2016, global terrorism expert Jessica Stern held a series of conversations in a prison cell in The Hague with Radovan Karadzic, a Bosnian Serb former politic An investigation into the nature of violence, terror, and trauma through conversations with a notorious war criminal by Jessica Stern, one of the world's foremost experts on terrorism. Between October 2014 and November 2016, global terrorism expert Jessica Stern held a series of conversations in a prison cell in The Hague with Radovan Karadzic, a Bosnian Serb former politician who had been indicted for genocide and other war crimes during the Bosnian War and who became an inspiration for white nationalists. Though Stern was used to interviewing terrorists in the field in an effort to understand their hidden motives, the conversations she had with Karadzic would profoundly alter her understanding of the mechanics of fear, the motivations of violence, and the psychology of those who perpetrate mass atrocities at a state level and who—like the terrorists she had previously studied—target noncombatants, in violation of ethical norms and international law. How do leaders persuade ordinary people to kill their neighbors? What is the “ecosystem” that creates and nurtures genocidal leaders? Could anything about their personal histories, personalities, or exposure to historical trauma shed light on the formation of a war criminal’s identity in opposition to a targeted Other? In My War Criminal, Jessica Stern brings to bear her incisive analysis and her own deeply considered reactions to her interactions with Karadzic, a brilliant and often shockingly charming psychiatrist and poet who spent twelve years in hiding, disguising himself as an energy healer, while also offering a deeply insightful and sometimes chilling account of the complex and even seductive powers of a magnetic leader—and what can happen when you spend many, many hours with that person.  

30 review for My War Criminal: Personal Encounters with an Architect of Genocide

  1. 5 out of 5

    Panasko

    Usually I do not write reviews, especially of books I will never read. Reason I am writing this is that some excerpts from NYT written by author I find most disturbing. This book is written about Radovan Karadźić, Bosnian Serbs warlord and a man convicted of genocide, first time in Europe since WWII. Even tough the main protagonist of her book is convicted of genocide, in whole book you do not hear victims point of view, but at the end the Author bought this monsters statement and conclude that Usually I do not write reviews, especially of books I will never read. Reason I am writing this is that some excerpts from NYT written by author I find most disturbing. This book is written about Radovan Karadźić, Bosnian Serbs warlord and a man convicted of genocide, first time in Europe since WWII. Even tough the main protagonist of her book is convicted of genocide, in whole book you do not hear victims point of view, but at the end the Author bought this monsters statement and conclude that he believed his people were threatened which was grotesque excuse. She even wrote "opening herself up to Karadzic’s odious insistence that he and his fellow Serbian nationalists did “perceive a real threat” before beginning their campaign of extermination". Sound like genocide apologist to me. Definitely not a book I will read and/or buying.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bronwyn

    Edit 1/31/20: Morbid curiosity got the best of me, so I listened to the audiobook. I've since edited my review to reflect that. Edit 1/23/20: This damning review from the NYT confirms my worst fears. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/23/bo... I don't think I can read this, as it centers the perpetrator as opposed to the victims. On the "hell no" shelf it goes. Initially, I was extremely mislead by a blurb I read about this book. I had assumed that it would be a biography of Karadzic that combined h Edit 1/31/20: Morbid curiosity got the best of me, so I listened to the audiobook. I've since edited my review to reflect that. Edit 1/23/20: This damning review from the NYT confirms my worst fears. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/23/bo... I don't think I can read this, as it centers the perpetrator as opposed to the victims. On the "hell no" shelf it goes. Initially, I was extremely mislead by a blurb I read about this book. I had assumed that it would be a biography of Karadzic that combined his own delusional perception of his life and actions with fact-checking and interviews with others who knew him, as well as his victims. Apparently, the author chooses to focus more on how RK makes her feel during their interviews (the NYT piece related an instance when RK "performed" some of his "mystical healing" on her and talked about how soft his hands were, "the hands of a gentleman"--actual line from the book--and that's just the tip of the iceberg of gross and bizarre fetishization of this evil man). Countless survivors of the Bosnian war have spoken out about how such an overly romantic portrayal of RK, a man directly responsible for genocide is not only offensive to them but also contributes to an overall culture of denial that surrounds this genocide and the crimes committed during this war specifically (Peter Handke's Nobel is another recent example of this phenomenon). Having read/listened to more of this, I can confirm that at times, there's a "50 Shades of Grey" vibe going on with the way she writes about her interactions with RK. No doubt RK is a manipulative piece of shit (aside from being a literal convicted war criminal), but the author fell right into his trap and doesn't seem to realize it. And worse, she seems to enjoy it. Aside from the romantic portrayal of Karadzic, essentially allowing him to tell his version of events with little to no fact-checking or correction of his delusions from the author, the author herself frequently engages to what amounts to genocide denial--not out and out denial of the facts, but a type of "questioning" or "both sides-ism" that plants the seeds of doubt among her intended and probably clueless (at least about BiH) audience. Read Robert Donia's book "Radovan Karadzic, Architect of the Bosnian Genocide" if you want a book about RK without the bizarre sensationalism/fetishism and genocide denial.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan Paxton

    This is a potentially valuable book with lessons and warnings for the present, but it is wretchedly poorly executed. Many reviewers have complained that Stern appears to find Karadzic fascinating, even attractive; this in itself is not the problem with the book, as there is a model for this kind of thing, namely the late Gitta Sereny's biography of Albert Speer. Sereny clearly liked Speer a great deal; that did not prevent her from taking a cold-eyed look at what Speer could never come to admit, This is a potentially valuable book with lessons and warnings for the present, but it is wretchedly poorly executed. Many reviewers have complained that Stern appears to find Karadzic fascinating, even attractive; this in itself is not the problem with the book, as there is a model for this kind of thing, namely the late Gitta Sereny's biography of Albert Speer. Sereny clearly liked Speer a great deal; that did not prevent her from taking a cold-eyed look at what Speer could never come to admit, that he had known a lot more about the holocaust than he was ever able to confess. Stern is not as psychologically acute as Sereny was, and her format here is just horrid, in particular the endless, interminable chapter endnotes that break the text up and wreck the continuity. Evidently there was no editor to tell her that not every single note required a prolix explanation. All that said, there are clearly moments here - and the last chapter stands by itself. We have our own monster now, after all. But it takes a lot of digging, and I suspect most readers will lose interest quickly.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tea Sefer

    I really gave this book a shot after all the uproar over the NY Times article about it, but it is absolutely offensive. Stern idolizes Karadzic - a convicted war criminal, and continuously explains how mesmerized she is by his demeanor and stature. She "wants an A" from him - actual language she uses. She spent 48 hours interviewing Karadzic which was enough time for her to learn and regurgitate genocide denial propaganda throughout the book. My dad was interned in a concentration camp in Bosans I really gave this book a shot after all the uproar over the NY Times article about it, but it is absolutely offensive. Stern idolizes Karadzic - a convicted war criminal, and continuously explains how mesmerized she is by his demeanor and stature. She "wants an A" from him - actual language she uses. She spent 48 hours interviewing Karadzic which was enough time for her to learn and regurgitate genocide denial propaganda throughout the book. My dad was interned in a concentration camp in Bosanski Novi for a lot longer than 48 hours and this supposed "insight" into a war criminal's mind is nothing more than fodder for white supremacists and fascists. There is much better writing out there about the Bosnian Genocide and Karadzic and I recommend you spend your time reading about survivors' stories instead of a genocide sympathizer take from an academic.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alisson F.w. Burgher

    Dissapointed. I love to read about loose minds of persons from the now and past. About war criminals/convicts/killers. If you would ask me why? The answer is simple: They all have something twisted in their mind in a sick way. This book shows a completely different view on a war criminal: He gave orders that killed and slaughtered lots of people, BUT NOT ON PURPOSE. The Serbs were attacked first. The Serbs think they are becoming a minority. The Serbs think Yugoslavia limited them from becoming the Dissapointed. I love to read about loose minds of persons from the now and past. About war criminals/convicts/killers. If you would ask me why? The answer is simple: They all have something twisted in their mind in a sick way. This book shows a completely different view on a war criminal: He gave orders that killed and slaughtered lots of people, BUT NOT ON PURPOSE. The Serbs were attacked first. The Serbs think they are becoming a minority. The Serbs think Yugoslavia limited them from becoming the superior nation they are. Kind of reminds me to the Germans from 1918 and their Dolchstoß legende: We could have won the war, we were the strongest. We did not lost, the enemy won becuase we got tricked. We all know what that thought led to (and to which person). There is no forgiveness for killing (fellow) human beings. There is no forgiveness for taking rights into your own hands. There is no explanation why Mladic, Karadzic, Milosevic, Amin, Hussein, Stalin or Hitler did what they did. They are sick and twisted. Do not humanize them, or you will humanize modern lonewolfs for killing your own close ones. Simply because they ought their actions lawfull: The biggest jew/muslim killer was also a human.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Corin

    This book is as much about the author's reaction to Karadzic as it about Karadzic himself. Not quite what I signed up for.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Style & engagement: (2/5) I was skeptical of the outrage surrounding the release of My War Criminal. I’ve read a number of reviews that criticize the “50 Shades of Grey”-style writing that colors the book, and that claim sounded overblown to me. But I have been surprised to feel that that criticism is completely warranted, at least for parts of the book. Stern describes a personal infatuation with Radovan Karađić that is definitely unsettling. The author's almost-romantic wording feels inappropri Style & engagement: (2/5) I was skeptical of the outrage surrounding the release of My War Criminal. I’ve read a number of reviews that criticize the “50 Shades of Grey”-style writing that colors the book, and that claim sounded overblown to me. But I have been surprised to feel that that criticism is completely warranted, at least for parts of the book. Stern describes a personal infatuation with Radovan Karađić that is definitely unsettling. The author's almost-romantic wording feels inappropriate given the nature of Karađić's crimes. What I find most frustrating about this approach is that the author inserts herself into the narrative in a way that is distracting and unnecessary. There is very little information to be gained from descriptions of her subjective experiences with Karađić. Ultimately that tone, which is most dominant at the beginning and the end, comes off as a gimmick—like clickbait—because the rest of the book is quite good by my estimation. Karađić is actually a useful prism through which to view not only the Yugoslav wars but ethno-nationalism generally. Reading this book gives one a sense of what kind of leadership can lead to wide-spread tragedy. Stern presented the recent history of the South Slavs clearly and concisely as she laid out the biography of Karađić. Intellectual rigor & honesty: (4/5) Stern’s account of Balkan history is more-or-less in line with other accounts I’ve read in the past, with slight deviations that don’t seem out of bounds. For example she seems fairly willing to entertain the argument that at the outbreak of the Yugoslav wars the Serbs had some legitimate fears of resurgent Croatian fascism and emerging Bosniak Muslim extremism, which is mentioned but not emphasized in other histories I’ve read. All-in-all the book seemed accurate with some editorializing, which I found useful and interesting. Appropriate medium & duration: (3/5) The duration was fine (i.e. pretty short), and I am glad a book like this exists; but I wish the author had chosen to write a more straight-forward account of how Karađić shaped the conflict in Yugoslavia. This book at its best was doing just that. When the author inserted herself into the story I found it tactless, self-absorbed, and uninformative. New & useful information: (3/5) I learned a little bit about how influential Serbian mythology is in some white power circles, and I certainly learned more about Karađić himself. It was useful to see how a terrible person can be made so terrible and how that person in turn can shape societies. There are certainly some insights to be gained from the book, but nothing earth shattering. Comparison to similar books: (2/5) Mostly because of stylistic concerns, I’d recommend almost any other book on the topic of the Yugoslav wars over this one. 2.8/5 overall

  8. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Even the title is cringe. I was unaware of the NYT article until today but there's no denying Stern bizarrely romanticizes Radovan Karadzic and relates his genocide denial to us though she does also dismantle it later in the text. Even though she writes romantic descriptions of his figure she also writes of how disturbed she was by some of his behavior towards herself such as calling her on her cellphone and instances where she thinks he's being threatening, attempting to manipulate, or trying to Even the title is cringe. I was unaware of the NYT article until today but there's no denying Stern bizarrely romanticizes Radovan Karadzic and relates his genocide denial to us though she does also dismantle it later in the text. Even though she writes romantic descriptions of his figure she also writes of how disturbed she was by some of his behavior towards herself such as calling her on her cellphone and instances where she thinks he's being threatening, attempting to manipulate, or trying to assert dominance. This whole book feels like it's about their power struggle in between the historical bits. While this text ends up being more about Stern than anyone but she does shows how his genocide denial (and that of other believers) is in fact made up of multiple falsehoods that might seem credible to some people at first but history and sources show that Karadzic is a chameleon who was responsible for the deaths of nearly 10,000 people. He signed his name to the law/ordinance that led to it, made no move to stop it once it began, basked in the praise of those supporting it until he got scared he'd be held responsible, etc., etc. This book needed an author not in love with the idea of winning over Karadzic and somehow having him admit his responsibility, or with Dr. Douglas Kelley's study and liking of Goering, the Nazi war criminal, as person (which led to Dr. Kelley's eventual suicide).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Samuelson

    Well balanced and worth a read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Malachy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The best version of this book would probably be amazing, but there are many directions it could go that lead it to mediocrity. The thrust behind My War Criminal is terrorism expert Jessica Stern's desire to understand the psychology behind "evil" men like terrorists and war criminals combined with her belief that sitting down with them one-on-one will achieve that. She (miraculously, given the apparently ironclad rules against interviews with war criminals) was able to convince the Hague to allo The best version of this book would probably be amazing, but there are many directions it could go that lead it to mediocrity. The thrust behind My War Criminal is terrorism expert Jessica Stern's desire to understand the psychology behind "evil" men like terrorists and war criminals combined with her belief that sitting down with them one-on-one will achieve that. She (miraculously, given the apparently ironclad rules against interviews with war criminals) was able to convince the Hague to allow a handful of hours-long interviews with Radovan Karadzic, one of the Bosnian Serbs charged with crimes against humanity for the Siege of Sarajevo and the genocide of Bosniaks in Srebrenica. But the book provided little to no insight in Karadzic's psychology. Stern was practically uninterested in the crimes he committed, instead allowing many of the sessions to focus on his (pretty straightforward) poetry or the time he spent on the run from the ICTY as a new age healer. When the book does steer back toward his misdeeds, Stern expresses her shock that there are some potential grains of truth in various claims he makes about timelines or agreements, as though she expected him to tell very easily disprovable lies to someone who was fact-checking him. It sets the bar bizarrely low. Even then, I got the impression (not knowing much about the details myself) that there were exaggerations or embellishments that she let slide. According to people who have studied the history, there were in fact several inaccuracies throughout the book. I feel bad trashing the book since the subject material is so difficult and since Stern clearly did try to do it justice, but it really felt shoddily done. Even the scattering of photos throughout were captionless and blurry. I wouldn't recommend.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John McDonald

    This is an extraordinary book in many ways and provides some insight into the thinking, aspirations, and manipulations that war criminals and dictators engage in to seek and retain political power. Not least of these manipulations are those measures the leader takes to appeal to a nationalist and racist base of support, and the analogy to Donald Trump, in many aspects of his character, is neither misplaced nor too distant from Karadzic'. At their essences, both Karadzic and Trump are con men and This is an extraordinary book in many ways and provides some insight into the thinking, aspirations, and manipulations that war criminals and dictators engage in to seek and retain political power. Not least of these manipulations are those measures the leader takes to appeal to a nationalist and racist base of support, and the analogy to Donald Trump, in many aspects of his character, is neither misplaced nor too distant from Karadzic'. At their essences, both Karadzic and Trump are con men and rose to and maintained power by creating division and fear from nationalist strains evident in nations where one ethnic group sees and feels the loss of influence over the culture. This fear and division are cultivated today as it was by dictators from Caesar and Constantine. This work is unusual in that the author, an intellectual and academic, places her notes and annotations of her interview at the conclusion of each chapter. These notes and annotations are not simply identifications of sources, either. They are detailed summaries of other historians, political scientists and researchers who have studied Karadzic, his genocide of the Bosnian Muslims, and his rise to office. I became engrossed in reading the footnotes in their entireties because they offered what I think was a very detailed context for the crimes Karadzic committed both in and out of office. The author, a descendant of a Holocaust survivor, has experienced violence herself and has made a career of studying evil. In her interviews, she tries to put herself in the mindset of the person she interviews and, although there are unintended consequences of this method, the result is one of integrity providing the clearest possible picture of the manipulative and fraudulent mind of the evildoer, here Karadctz'.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    I'm not sure that I can say enough bad things about this one. Sure, there are plenty of worse books out there, but this is a special kind of abomination. An ostensibly serious war crimes investigator tries to repackage herself as some sort of series-ready TV profiler with an international twist—and fails at every turn. You'll find every cliche of the genre here—the mild-mannered investigator with a preternatural ability to connect with criminals, which inevitably hints at a shadowy past; the gen I'm not sure that I can say enough bad things about this one. Sure, there are plenty of worse books out there, but this is a special kind of abomination. An ostensibly serious war crimes investigator tries to repackage herself as some sort of series-ready TV profiler with an international twist—and fails at every turn. You'll find every cliche of the genre here—the mild-mannered investigator with a preternatural ability to connect with criminals, which inevitably hints at a shadowy past; the genius villain that she draws too close to in the pursuit of justice; the manipulations she fails to avoid; the darkness she grapples with; the reluctant realization that maybe they aren't so different after all—and it's all pure cringe, only made worse by the fact that the subject here is a real genocide, a real racist demagogue, real suffering and death. A better writer might have been able to pull this off, but as it is not even established facts seem convincing in Stern's hands, and her insights as she conveys them—that war creates an atmosphere of fear, that terror can be used a weapon, that people try to find commonalities with others in order to be more appealing—are laughable. Throw in some ineffectual handwringing about the 2016 election and you've got something truly exasperating on your hands. There's a very compelling story to be told here, but it's not in this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Reader

    Eye opener for all those not being already and totally manipulated by media coverage and terrible reporting, believing that the bosnian history of war and suffering has only one side and that everything was black and white. And yes, analogy with Trump is sooo spot on... so, dear american readers, so conscious and aware of rights and wrongs in bosnian war, people, politics and history, you should read this book and understand that the world is mainly grey, not black, not white. And the only corre Eye opener for all those not being already and totally manipulated by media coverage and terrible reporting, believing that the bosnian history of war and suffering has only one side and that everything was black and white. And yes, analogy with Trump is sooo spot on... so, dear american readers, so conscious and aware of rights and wrongs in bosnian war, people, politics and history, you should read this book and understand that the world is mainly grey, not black, not white. And the only correct outcome of the war in bosnia that we witnessed (or you did not witness it per se... you watched the televised version and listened to completely misinformed and not the least objective reporters) would have been three prison cells... three representatives of the involved religions... sentenced in exactly same way. If that had been the outcome that country and poor people living there would have SOME future, maybe... Now, when the "objective" public (mainly american, even if the most of them cannot even point bosnia on a map) see all historical wrongdoings through a picture of dr. Karadzic... do not be surprised if another war breaks out soon. Book itself was pretty clumsy written. She should have dictated it to a real writer, would be much better. But content-vise... spot on!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nikola Todorić

    I listened to the author on the Lawfare Podcast and decided to read the book. My first impression is that the majority of reviewers had overblown expectations. The title clearly says "personal encounters", and that is exactly what the book is about. It's not a biography nor a historical book, but a record of personal encounters. Yes, some sort of weird attraction is definitely present within the book, but the author is honest about it. On the other hand, the author is not an academic historian I listened to the author on the Lawfare Podcast and decided to read the book. My first impression is that the majority of reviewers had overblown expectations. The title clearly says "personal encounters", and that is exactly what the book is about. It's not a biography nor a historical book, but a record of personal encounters. Yes, some sort of weird attraction is definitely present within the book, but the author is honest about it. On the other hand, the author is not an academic historian nor a political scientist, so her clumsy use of literature and frequent jumping to conclusions in semi-rhetorical, dramatic questions are the weakest points of this book. Nevertheless, the majority of negative reviews seem to come from imputing some hidden political agenda to the author, which, in my opinion, is just not there.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Frederique Courard-Hauri

    An eye-opening read about the Bosnian War. In short: there were no good guys, just a whole lot of bad guys with civilians of all stripes caught in the cross-fire. I did feel at times that in making parallels between Karadzic and Trump, or Bosnia-then and the USA-now, Stern is trying to fit a round peg in a square hole. Yes, there are similarities in the broad strokes, and yes, the same fears resulting from a loss of power of one group (Serbs/white Americans) are visible, but I don't think we are An eye-opening read about the Bosnian War. In short: there were no good guys, just a whole lot of bad guys with civilians of all stripes caught in the cross-fire. I did feel at times that in making parallels between Karadzic and Trump, or Bosnia-then and the USA-now, Stern is trying to fit a round peg in a square hole. Yes, there are similarities in the broad strokes, and yes, the same fears resulting from a loss of power of one group (Serbs/white Americans) are visible, but I don't think we are there ... yet. I did flag many points in the book, and I now have lots of things I want to look into in more detail (e.g., the Ustashe, Dr. Douglas Kelley's writings post-Nuremberg), and I'm glad I read this.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eimear O’Donoghue

    Stern did not confront Karadžić nearly as much as I expected, this was a wasted opportunity to go beyond what he would be comfortable with. Hardly constitutes groundbreaking journalism allowing him to indulge in proving his healing powers etc.

  17. 5 out of 5

    NonFiction 24/7

    Not quite what I expected but an interesting read. I respect the amount of fact checking the author put into the book. The story was a little hard to follow because I knew nothing about the events in the book. I don't think we will truly understand these events.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hotbookgirl

    Excellent book

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mac

    Wish I could do half stars. 3 is too much, 2 is too many. Just wasn't great.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janet Gordon

    Very interesting look at a war criminal.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Davies

    Poorly edited.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tres Fuller

    Loved the idea but it was poorly executed. A better editor would have helped. Still enjoyed it and learned a lot

  23. 4 out of 5

    Keeley

    I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway I thought this book was good. I wasn’t a huge fan of the format (5-10 pages of notes after every chapter) but the content was interesting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Walter Neto

    I'll probably need to read the bible or something else after...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amra Pajalic

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrzej

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yacoob Hussain

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

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