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A radical case for the repeal of the 2nd Amendment as the only way to control gun violence in America There's an average of one mass shooting per day in the United States. Given the ineffectiveness of the gun control lobby, it's time for a strategy with spine. In Repeal the Second Amendment, Allan J. Lichtman has written the first book that uses history, legal theory and up A radical case for the repeal of the 2nd Amendment as the only way to control gun violence in America There's an average of one mass shooting per day in the United States. Given the ineffectiveness of the gun control lobby, it's time for a strategy with spine. In Repeal the Second Amendment, Allan J. Lichtman has written the first book that uses history, legal theory and up-to-the-minute data to make a compelling case for the amendment's repeal in order to create a clear road to sensible gun control in the US. Repeal the Second Amendment explores both the true history and current interpretation of the Second Amendment to expose the NRA's blatant historical manipulations and irresponsible fake news releases. Lichtman looks at the history of firearms and gun regulations from colonial times to the present to explain how a historically forgotten sentence in the Constitution has become a flash point of recent politics that benefits only the gun industry, their lobbyists, and the politicians on their payroll. He probes court decisions and the effective lobbying and public relations strategies of the gun lobby as well as the ineffectiveness of the gun control movement for lessons in doing better. What emerges is a clear and cogent plan--repeal and replace the Second Amendment without taking guns away from anyone who has them now--to make the US a safer place. It's time to Repeal the Second Amendment, and Allan Lichtman is the man to bring this radical plan to America.


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A radical case for the repeal of the 2nd Amendment as the only way to control gun violence in America There's an average of one mass shooting per day in the United States. Given the ineffectiveness of the gun control lobby, it's time for a strategy with spine. In Repeal the Second Amendment, Allan J. Lichtman has written the first book that uses history, legal theory and up A radical case for the repeal of the 2nd Amendment as the only way to control gun violence in America There's an average of one mass shooting per day in the United States. Given the ineffectiveness of the gun control lobby, it's time for a strategy with spine. In Repeal the Second Amendment, Allan J. Lichtman has written the first book that uses history, legal theory and up-to-the-minute data to make a compelling case for the amendment's repeal in order to create a clear road to sensible gun control in the US. Repeal the Second Amendment explores both the true history and current interpretation of the Second Amendment to expose the NRA's blatant historical manipulations and irresponsible fake news releases. Lichtman looks at the history of firearms and gun regulations from colonial times to the present to explain how a historically forgotten sentence in the Constitution has become a flash point of recent politics that benefits only the gun industry, their lobbyists, and the politicians on their payroll. He probes court decisions and the effective lobbying and public relations strategies of the gun lobby as well as the ineffectiveness of the gun control movement for lessons in doing better. What emerges is a clear and cogent plan--repeal and replace the Second Amendment without taking guns away from anyone who has them now--to make the US a safer place. It's time to Repeal the Second Amendment, and Allan Lichtman is the man to bring this radical plan to America.

30 review for Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for a Safer America

  1. 4 out of 5

    jv poore

    In Mr. Lichtman’s non-fiction Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for A Safer America, he digs deeply into the history of the U.S.A. to detail what was happening then, providing perspective and understanding as to what prompted the writing of this amendment. Snippets from pertinent discussions and disagreements around drafting the document were enlightening. An original draft used “country” in “…being necessary to the security of a free _____”; but “country” was replaced with “state”. The reas In Mr. Lichtman’s non-fiction Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for A Safer America, he digs deeply into the history of the U.S.A. to detail what was happening then, providing perspective and understanding as to what prompted the writing of this amendment. Snippets from pertinent discussions and disagreements around drafting the document were enlightening. An original draft used “country” in “…being necessary to the security of a free _____”; but “country” was replaced with “state”. The reason isn’t surprising, but is remarkably disappointing. The amount of intricate research that went into this book was astounding. I certainly did not expect a review of historical documents for the use of the phrase “to bear arms” in order to determine if it referred to militia or individuals. Or for sentences to essentially be conjugated to show that if the amendment addressed the individual, the explanation clause would be redundant. Being born and raised in WV, with my paternal parental unit competing in shooting matches every Sunday, I’ve heard a lot about “The Second”. One tiny detail my father and his fellow firearm fanatics omit though is that the government conducted a census. There was a government-maintained list of every single gun-owner, and each and every gun he owned. The same men I’ve heard vehemently insist on their “right” to bear arms are the first people to bristle at the suggestion of anyone else on the planet knowing which and how many firearms are currently in his possession. The gun-owners of which I speak are also almost-angrily, proud members of the NRA. I guess by ignoring the fact that the National Rifle Association originally felt differently about the 2nd amendment. It wasn’t until late 20th century that the NRA reversed their own findings (without explanation or even acknowledgement). Maybe they are not bothered by the attempt to incorporate Santa Claus into gun ads. Or the NRA approaching the Vatican to name a “Patron Saint of Handgunners”. To me, these pages were packed with historical facts. Some I knew, some I suspected, and several became blatant when the bigger picture emerged. My understanding of both historic and present-day policies, rules and regulations has been enriched. Because of the plethora of interesting information that I’ve not found elsewhere, I introduced and donated this book to “my” high-school seniors and I am looking forward to hearing their thoughts. This review was written by jv poore for Buried Under Books, with huge thanks to St. Martin’s Publishing Group for the Advance Review Copy which was donated to my favorite high-school classroom library.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I have decided to embark on a mission to read a number of books on subjects that will be of great importance to the upcoming 2020 US Presidential Election. Many of these will focus on actors intricately involved in the process, in hopes that I can understand them better and, perhaps, educate others with the power to cast a ballot. I am, as always, open to serious recommendations from anyone who has a book I might like to include in the process. This is Book #10 (re-read) in my 2020 US Election P I have decided to embark on a mission to read a number of books on subjects that will be of great importance to the upcoming 2020 US Presidential Election. Many of these will focus on actors intricately involved in the process, in hopes that I can understand them better and, perhaps, educate others with the power to cast a ballot. I am, as always, open to serious recommendations from anyone who has a book I might like to include in the process. This is Book #10 (re-read) in my 2020 US Election Preparation Challenge. First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Allan J. Lichtman and St. Martin’s Press for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review. As I sit north of the 45th Parallel, I look down and notice that there is an issue with gun violence in the United States. No matter where one gets their news, it is plastered all over the place and has been for decades. Guns killing innocent people for no reason. Yet, as the blood flows and creates rivers of red across floors and asphalt, politicians have done little but ask for prayers directed to the families of victims, while gun manufacturers and the National Rifle Association (NRA) spouts that it is people killing people, not guns. Other countries have been able to notice the gun violence and legislate strong measures against it—take, for example, New Zealand in 2019–but America chooses to do nothing, citing something called the Second Amendment to the US Constitution. Known as the ‘right to bear arms’, this has been the battle cry of the NRA and the hardcore right in America, but there’s something that’s missing here; something that Allan J. Lichtman professes throughout this book and I have said all along. It was never an individual right in that amendment, nor should it be. But, that’s the controversy behind Lichtman’s desire to see the Second Amendment repealed a new measures put in place. The premise of the book is quite simple, people do not understand the amendment and spew inane falsehoods spoon-fed to them. Lichtman opens the book with a chilling discussion of some recent episodes of gun violence and how everyone was quick to point blame at a deranged killer, rather that discuss the issue of gun availability. From there, he takes the reader back to look at how guns were introduced into the region, brought from Europe, and how the firearm found a home in the Thirteen Colonies. After the play towards independence, the political figures sought to enshrine when and how guns should be made available, presenting the Second Amendment to the US Constitution. Lichtman discusses how the constitutional conventions and speeches by the Founding Fathers shaped the intention of this amendment, laid out as being the right of the collective to bear arms in the form of a militia, particularly at a time when invasion was still possible. Moving forward, Lichtman explores how guns were of little issue in America for decades after that. Politicians began seeking to regulate guns in the early 20th century, which led to some questions about how to define the Second Amendment in contrast to this. The early NRA had no issue with the collective idea of gun ownership for the greater good, fixated on its role of promoting gun ownership for sport and education. However, with the rise of assassinations in the 1960s, there was a greater push to legislate gun control, keeping firearms out of the hands of just anyone. This was met with a newly politicized and fiery NRA, who turned their views towards the individual right to possess firearms. With massive amounts of money used to influence politicians, any meaningful change seemed paralyzed. Lichtman discusses these issues at length, culminating in challenges wth legislation violating the Second Amendment in the courts, some reaching the Supreme Court of the United States. Shockingly, when things reached that point, one of the Court’s great intellectuals and originalist thinkers, Antonio Scalia, completely forgot his long-held views of accepting laws through original meaning of the Founding Fathers. Instead, Scalia sided with this view of individual rights and the ongoing accessibility of people to possess firearms, in the pocket of the NRA. As Lichtman scans the horizon to see where things have come in America, seeing an NRA bound and determined to use the Second Amendment’s bastardized interpretation to fill their coffers and hand guns over to anyone and everyone, the need for change seems dire. Citing former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, John Paul Stevens, Lichtman explores how Congress might go about dismantling this thorn and repeal the Second Amendment. It will not be pretty or easy (with threats of money and slander by the NRA), but will rid the country of a horribly misconstrued constitutional crutch that has helped fuel the bloodshed. Paralleling the repeal with that of Prohibition in the 20th century, Lichtman shows how it would work and which actors would need to stand tall. He ends with a post-repeal America and the need to tighten or create laws to keep America from falling into the hands of the NRA or their apparent abyss of money. Whether it will work is another question, but it is always nice to speculate. When I was asked to read this book by the publisher, I could not wait to sink my teeth into it. These were the arguments I had long made in my own discussions of the Second Amendment and I found myself agreeing with a lot of what Lichtman had to say. The tome is full of wonderful facts embedded into an easy to comprehend narrative. While there are aspects that have academic explorations, Lichtman keeps the arguments simple enough that anyone could understand. He does not hide his bias, though I cannot see how one could remain entirely neutral on this topic, offering up some fiery criticisms of those who stand idly by and spout vapid sentiments when people—children especially—are dying in senseless ways. While the chapters are not massive, the information encapsulated within them makes for an impactful read and kept me nodding throughout. I was especially interested in Lichtman’s proposal to repeal the Second Amendment, knowing how difficult a process it is (as any constitutional change should be) and where the pitfalls lie with enemies waiting. This is a sobering read for anyone looking to stir up a little controversy at the dinner table or amongst those with strong opinions. If only a discussion could be had where both sides agree on the wording of the topic at hand, leaving well-rounded and firmly grounded ideas to sway opinions. Kudos, Mr. Lichtman, for not shying away from the controversy. This will take longer than November 3, 2020 to make America great again, but if we can oust the clown, surely this circus can be quelled. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Robert Case

    I recently rode a touring bicycle across the USA. It was a journey completed in two stages, the western half during the summer of 2017 and the eastern half, the following summer. Sometimes I rode with other riders and other times solo. Throughout, I carried nothing more lethal than bear spray, a pocket-knife, and my wits. In the middle of North Dakota, I met a friendly and engaging man who was interested in more than just why a solitary cyclist would be pedaling a bicycle loaded down with campin I recently rode a touring bicycle across the USA. It was a journey completed in two stages, the western half during the summer of 2017 and the eastern half, the following summer. Sometimes I rode with other riders and other times solo. Throughout, I carried nothing more lethal than bear spray, a pocket-knife, and my wits. In the middle of North Dakota, I met a friendly and engaging man who was interested in more than just why a solitary cyclist would be pedaling a bicycle loaded down with camping supplies down the streets of Mandan, his hometown. He asked me his questions from behind the wheel of an air-conditioned black Mercedes, talking with me through the open passenger window, a cell phone in one hand, and keeping his speed under 10 mph. His face was younger than mine. He carried a lot of extra pounds. Would I follow him to his office…it was just up ahead…and talk some more? My planned destination that day was a state campground on the Missouri River and not that far ahead. Learning of it, my friend offered me dinner and conversation, and a place to stay that night…on the condition that I also use his laundry room to wash out the long-sleeved polyester jersey on my back, the one that had been protecting me from the North Dakota sun and wind for several days, and any other clothes that might be in need of attention. It was too good an offer to refuse; including his observation that my shirt smelled badly. That’s what good friends do. In writing, Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for a Safer America, author Allan Lichtman writes like a good friend. He’s created a well-researched and insightful book about a narrow niche in current American political history, including his observation that something about our country smells bad. It is the rank odor coming from the ongoing massacres taking place in our schools, churches, and theaters, even our military installations. He concludes his book with a plan to remedy the problem. That’s what good friends do. Allan Lichtman has a long and distinguished career as a history professor at American University, a teacher of long standing with a specialty in US presidents and presidential succession. He has written extensively on these topics and now focuses on an issue that will likely loom large in the upcoming presidential election, firearm policy and legislation. The book’s first half explains in thoughtful detail the history of guns and their regulation by both state and federal government. The second half tells the history of the NRA and its rise as both political powerhouse and public relations machine, one whose nightmarish vision intends that every man, woman, and child own and carry a gun. In two riveting chapters, Iron Triangle and Follow the Money, the book describes the gun lobby’s acquisition of power and influence, its ties to multinational manufacturers of guns and weapons, and the army of lobbyists and politicians on its payroll. After reading these chapters the reader will have an understanding not of why, but how, the undeclared wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have gone on and on for decades without resolution. Professor Lichtman credits James Madison with drafting the Constitution’s original Bill of Rights and describes the various forms its Second Amendment took in the early drafts. He describes the Constitution’s early framers as unanimous in their desire to safeguard the federal government with its own militia, so that it could defend itself against internal uprisings. The words that made the final cut, approval of the Continental Congress in 1789 and ratification by the states in 1791, comprise this single sentence: “A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” It has yet to be modified by amendment. According to Madison, the essential rights contained in the Constitution were four: Trial by jury, freedom of conscience (worship), freedom of speech, and freedom of the press. The gun lobby’s contention that the Second Amendment somehow supports all the other rights, is one of many PR myths. Lichtman’s book makes an eloquent case that the NRA of my youth…the one that ran the marksmanship and safe hunter programs…has been corrupted beyond recognition by the wealth of its donors and morphed into a multifaceted, tax dodging chameleon, consisting of multiple charitable foundations and political action committees that pay no taxes, but direct millions into the election campaigns of tractable politicians that dance to their tune. These elected officials ignore the stench of bloody massacres at home, in order to parrot the needs of the NRA’s major donors. That’s how large corporations like Beretta, Colt, Smith & Wesson, Sturm Ruger & Co, and Glock purchase policy and legislation that frees them from regulation or oversight. They profit from the ability to sell their lethal products to any buyer in unregulated markets, to drug cartels and dictatorial regimes, criminal gangs and terrorist cells, even jihadists in distant lands. It makes no sense that corporations headquartered in Austria (Glock) and Italy (Beretta) should have a stronger voice in American government than the individual citizen with a right to vote. Most of the changes to the NRA have come about since the election of Wayne LaPierre as CEO in 1996. Wearing his Beverly Hills suits, designer glasses, and coiffed hair, all purchased through a lavish expense account, he reframed the NRA’s message and then escalated it. Coincidently, this change in NRA leadership took place about one year after the Oklahoma City massacre at a large federal office building in which 168 died, including small children, all of it fashioned by a single disenfranchised white male who once proclaimed to an elected official, “I’m the NRA.” Before LaPierre took over, there was a chance that the victims of these massacres, places like the Aurora Theater, Sandy Hook, and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, could take weapons manufacturers and arms dealers to court and hold them responsible for the death and destruction caused by their products. That remedy was legislatively stricken in 2005 by President George W Bush when he signed the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA) into law. Sponsored by a Senator from Idaho who claimed it would “stop junk lawsuits,” it has since killed off virtually every lawsuit brought in federal court against the gun industry. I am grateful to live in a country where an aging individual is free to follow their personal dream of riding a bicycle across the continent, to live in a nation in which the borders between states aren’t blocked by checkpoints and uniformed guards, and where people on both sides of those borders share a common language and monetary system. This country is not the danger-filled place the NRA would have us believe. Speaking of beliefs, I believe that the time for holding the gun industry and its dealers accountable and liable for the carnage and crimes committed with their lethal products, is long overdue. That is just one of the reforms proposed by Professor Lichtman in his timely new book: Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for a Safer America. There are ten more sound recommendations identified in the closing chapters. I highly recommend his book to anyone who wants to live in a safe community, where children and grandchildren can walk without fear and live out their dreams. Robert William Case, JD MS

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karma♥Bites ^.~

    Curious as to how repeal of Second Amendment would affect/control gun violence in US. Would making X verboten = reduction in Y? Perhaps in straight stats, but what’s the tougher/more critical issue—gun used or violence done? Or more pertinently, the reasons/causes underlying &/or triggering such violence? After all, oft-quoted argument = ‘guns don’t kill people; people kill people’, no? (IMHO, said argument is trite & utterly discounts fact that guns make wounding & killing people so much easier & Curious as to how repeal of Second Amendment would affect/control gun violence in US. Would making X verboten = reduction in Y? Perhaps in straight stats, but what’s the tougher/more critical issue—gun used or violence done? Or more pertinently, the reasons/causes underlying &/or triggering such violence? After all, oft-quoted argument = ‘guns don’t kill people; people kill people’, no? (IMHO, said argument is trite & utterly discounts fact that guns make wounding & killing people so much easier & faster. Frex, highly doubt use of a blade weapon -vs- semi-auto would result in same level of injuries &/or casualties.) _______ A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed. If ever an argument for demanding clarity & precision in writing, amiright? Oh, the problems a comma (or missing word) or two can cause... And WTH happened in 2008 w/ Heller?? Background: On 25 September 1789, First Congress proposed 12 amendments to US Constitution. Of 12 contained in 1789 Joint Resolution of Congress, 10 were ratified on 15 December 1791 (yup, 2 yrs later) = US Bill of Rights. (Note that ‘Article the fourth’ became Second Amendment.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    pennyg

    With its admittedly provocative title, this book probably won't be read by those that should; those unaware or unwilling to accept the truth about the true intent of the second amendment or have been duped or under the influence of the gun mythology perpetuated by the NRA but will be instead read by people like me who are already convinced of the absolute necessity of strict, immediate gun safety regulations in the US or maybe read by people outside the US who wonder if we've gone crazy. Lichtma With its admittedly provocative title, this book probably won't be read by those that should; those unaware or unwilling to accept the truth about the true intent of the second amendment or have been duped or under the influence of the gun mythology perpetuated by the NRA but will be instead read by people like me who are already convinced of the absolute necessity of strict, immediate gun safety regulations in the US or maybe read by people outside the US who wonder if we've gone crazy. Lichtman is a professor and some of the book is a bit dense, reading like a master class, with chapters ranging from the effects of gun violence, the history of the 2nd amendment and the Heller ruling, Congress, money, and politicians ( Republican party), and the gun industry and the NRA role in the perpetuation of guns and gun deaths in America. He also includes list of and answers to the most common arguments/ platitudes) by gun lobbyist( now is not the time, guns don't kill people, people kill people, slippery slope, etc.) And a list of practical gun safety reforms ( regulate ghost guns, ban assault weapons, red flag laws, background checks), A nice mix of intellectual and practical. Professor Lichtman lastly makes a credible case for repeal of the amendment, arguing the constitution is not a static document, amendments and repeals have occurred before, citing repeal of the 18 amendment. However, I doubt few will be convinced of this course of action. This is a book I wish everyone in America would read. Gun rights are not God given, as the familiar phrase goes. The lack of historical perspective and gross misinformation regarding the 2nd amendment is so entrenched in the American psyche, I think it will take at least another generation to right itself. If as a country, for what ever reason, we fail to actively protect even babies from gun violence, where the individual rights or commerce supersedes the safety of the whole , we are doomed. Gun Advocates that rely and praise Scalia for making his landmark ruling in Heller fail to recognize this added clause: ' Like most rights, the Second Amendment right is not unlimited. it is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever and for whatever purpose: For example, concealed weapons prohibitions have been upheld under the Amendment or state analogues. The Court's opinion should not be taken to cast doubt on the long-standing prohibition on the possession of firearms by felons and the mentality ill, or laws forbidding the carrying of firearms in sensitive places such as schools and government buildings, or laws imposing conditions and qualifications on the commercial sale of arms'

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bakertyl

    This book is childish... it's well-written, impressively well-researched, and an interesting read. But I don't think it fulfilled its goal of convincing a reader that America should repeal the 2nd Amendment. So while worth reading (doesn't matter if you support the goal or not, every American should read this book) I say the book is childish because it complains about a problems without offering a practical solution. To be upfront, I support responsible gun ownership. A firearm is the only way I This book is childish... it's well-written, impressively well-researched, and an interesting read. But I don't think it fulfilled its goal of convincing a reader that America should repeal the 2nd Amendment. So while worth reading (doesn't matter if you support the goal or not, every American should read this book) I say the book is childish because it complains about a problems without offering a practical solution. To be upfront, I support responsible gun ownership. A firearm is the only way I can see my wife can protect herself and our children against even an unarmed grown man, and the only way I can see myself protecting my family from more than one. That said, I know that guns are a problem in the U.S., and this book will hopefully start more conversations. In college, I bought a gun from a friend of a friend to go hunting... it was an illegal gun sale by today's standards, but until Lichtman offers an idea of how to prevent this exact sale from happening now, I want my gun. Most of the book is academic whining... Lichtman does a great job of introducing why guns are a problem, but I don't see an instance of him offering a *practical* solution. He offers statistics from the U.S. (good), from other countries (not especially helpful, since different cultures don't compare well, just look at differing immigration and health care laws within the same countries Lichtman offers as example of "good" gun laws), and literally 150 year old statistics (I don't think gun laws from the Old West are applicable Allan, I think the stats are valid but I don't think you can compare them to now. I still think this book is worth reading, by everyone. If you can't read something that disagrees with your viewpoints, I think your viewpoints are immature at best, and wrong at worst.

  7. 5 out of 5

    KEN

    Freedom and liberty are two words that are not synonymous with Repeal the Second Amendment. This review must be written much like Lichtman states as the beginning of his book. While it appears Lichtman did some clever research, one might not hear the whole picture when he represents firearm owners as alien and lizard people believing savages or when he refers to gun-rights groups as “militant”. I can attest that not all firearm aficionados are as previously stated. Firstly, Lichtman depicts “Gun Freedom and liberty are two words that are not synonymous with Repeal the Second Amendment. This review must be written much like Lichtman states as the beginning of his book. While it appears Lichtman did some clever research, one might not hear the whole picture when he represents firearm owners as alien and lizard people believing savages or when he refers to gun-rights groups as “militant”. I can attest that not all firearm aficionados are as previously stated. Firstly, Lichtman depicts “Guns in Early America”. He discussed how the British established a precedent for gun control in pre-1776 America that was adopted by American colonies at that time. American Patriots did not want to be under British rule, hence, the American Revolution. Why would those same standards still exist after American Independence? They would not exist is the answer. Freedom means to rid oneself of those repulsive standards. I surely would not want to be under tyrannical British rule today. Time after time, Lichtman tries to portray how firearms rights are a collective right, not an individual right to bear arms. American values and customs were built on the rugged individualism mentality. When the Federalist Papers were written, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison describe why the American public should adopt the Constitution. They made it clear that they did not want a federal government to intrude on liberty. What was the guard against such an intrusion? The cure was a non-professional militia made up of individual citizens with the private right to bear arms with the word “People” included in the Second Amendment. For further clarification, read Federalist Papers #28 and #29. I need to thank Lichtman for recognizing that the National Rifle Association (NRA) needs reform. It is necessary to put people in power with integrity. Lichtman points out that how he feels that the NRA is a well-funded political organization. Last time I checked, I have not found a billionaire donating to the gun-rights movement. The gun-rights groups are small individual donors. The militant Moms Demand Action and Everytown for Gun Safety do have a billionaire donor. If you do happen to find a billionaire wanting to donate to preserving freedom, that would be swell. Let us talk about violence. That is the basic premise of wanting to enact gun control. Lichtman’s audience refers to this violence as “gun violence”. I did not find any recommendations mentioned helpful because one cannot trust a liar. On page 241, the real Lichtman appears with the following statement, “Lawmakers need not worry that any reforms proposed here involves the confiscation of firearms…”. Buybacks of firearms is mentioned. The word “buyback” is associated with confiscation because one cannot buyback an item that is not for sale without confiscating stated item. In summary, Lichtman’s idea of abolishing the Second Amendment is dangerous to the upmost degree. A similar idea would be to abolish private property rights protected in the Constitution. If you fear firearms and crime, do not ever call the police to come save you because they have a firearm as well. Instead, I challenge you to go to a gun range and shoot a firearm. When you take some responsibility for yourself and tell yourself that you can accomplish your goals, you will not feel powerless in the face of adversity.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca DeWolf

    “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” How did a once inconsequential, dismissed, and somewhat forgotten, sliver of the United States Constitution become such a hotbed of political strife and the source of overwhelming, mass violence? In Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for a Safer America, Allan Lichtman, a distinguished professor of history at American University, draws upon a weal “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” How did a once inconsequential, dismissed, and somewhat forgotten, sliver of the United States Constitution become such a hotbed of political strife and the source of overwhelming, mass violence? In Repeal the Second Amendment: The Case for a Safer America, Allan Lichtman, a distinguished professor of history at American University, draws upon a wealth of source material and meticulous historical research to explain how the National Rifle Association (NRA) has hijacked the history of the Second Amendment. In an effort to convince gun control advocates that they must pursue the repeal of the Second Amendment, Lichtman probes the history of firearms and gun regulations from colonial times to the present to detail the ways in which the NRA has manufactured a distorted history of gun ownership in America. Lichtman argues that the “iron triangle” of the gun lobby, the gun industry, and an array of pro-gun (mostly Republican) politicians have used a twisted and misleading history of the Second Amendment to advance their own interests, and enrich their pockets, while entrapping Americans into an endless cycle of gun violence. To solve American’s gun violence problem, Lichtman concludes, the Second Amendment must be repealed. In Lichtman’s view, gun control advocates have been fighting a losing battle because they have fallen too eagerly into a defensive position that attempts to support the Second Amendment as a measure protecting a private right to own guns while also advocating for effective gun control measures. “By playing not to lose,” Lichtman explains, “the gun control movement has been losing. It wins only by becoming as bold and uncompromising as the gun lobby.” As Lichtman contends, it is time for gun control reformers to inspire a different political reality and set the terms for a fresh debate regarding gun violence and responsible gun ownership in America. That debate begins by recapturing the more accurate but, nonetheless, neglected history of the Second Amendment. Lichtman’s brilliantly thorough and precise research in Repeal the Second Amendment shows how the work of historians, and other scholars, can engage a wider stream of audiences and guide public debate towards a more productive pathway for inciting essential change. In 2019 alone there were 419 mass-shooting incidents and almost 40,000 deaths related to gun violence. That madness needs to stop. The lunacy around the historically inaccurate and deceitfully contrived notion of an absolute, ungovernable private right to keep and bear any and all firearms needs to stop. As Lichtman persuaively argues, the insidious gun violence crisis that has plagued the United States can only be attended to once gun control reformers reclaim the Second Amendment’s history and move towards the amendment’s repeal.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Burr

    A one sided view that totally makes assumptions and then presents them as facts. He doesn't acknowledge any worth for gun ownership, only saying that gun owners have them to take down our oppressive government (a hard core radical idea) or to hunt with. He ignores data that conflicts with his ideas. (The right does this too). I agree something's must be done but repel the 2nd amendment is crazy. He made a good case against the NRA which I'm against but he goes way to far. A one sided view that totally makes assumptions and then presents them as facts. He doesn't acknowledge any worth for gun ownership, only saying that gun owners have them to take down our oppressive government (a hard core radical idea) or to hunt with. He ignores data that conflicts with his ideas. (The right does this too). I agree something's must be done but repel the 2nd amendment is crazy. He made a good case against the NRA which I'm against but he goes way to far.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Juliet

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  14. 5 out of 5

    Niko Ingoglia

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hill Krishnan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joey Krueger

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Szombathy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben Schierman

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thea Pagel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew McNeely

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Jordan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mia Stevenson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Veda Massanari-Thatcher

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jaq

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tate Quinton

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