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The Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story

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Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, celebrates the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, "The Night of the Moon" (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illustrations that evoke Islamic art, this beautiful story offers a window into modern Muslim culture—and into the ancient roots from within its traditions have grown. Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, celebrates the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, "The Night of the Moon" (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illustrations that evoke Islamic art, this beautiful story offers a window into modern Muslim culture—and into the ancient roots from within its traditions have grown.


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Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, celebrates the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, "The Night of the Moon" (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illustrations that evoke Islamic art, this beautiful story offers a window into modern Muslim culture—and into the ancient roots from within its traditions have grown. Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, celebrates the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, "The Night of the Moon" (Chaand Raat), and Eid. With lush illustrations that evoke Islamic art, this beautiful story offers a window into modern Muslim culture—and into the ancient roots from within its traditions have grown.

30 review for The Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    A gentle, prettily-illustrated description of a family's month-long celebration of Ramadan. Most of the description relates to practice -- what is eaten, when various events fall -- rather than the historical or religious meaning, which I would have liked to see a bit more of. I assume the intended audience is non-Muslim children who are having the holiday explained to them. For the purpose of making Islam seem comprehensible and not scary to kids who are probably growing up hearing it demonized A gentle, prettily-illustrated description of a family's month-long celebration of Ramadan. Most of the description relates to practice -- what is eaten, when various events fall -- rather than the historical or religious meaning, which I would have liked to see a bit more of. I assume the intended audience is non-Muslim children who are having the holiday explained to them. For the purpose of making Islam seem comprehensible and not scary to kids who are probably growing up hearing it demonized I think the book does an excellent job of presenting from a child's perspective, which is similar to the perspective of a kid from any not-super-pious family: the little girl is mostly interested in the gifts, special foods, visiting relatives, parties, etc.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Expecting a bedtime story one night, Yasmeen is instead surprised to find her mother drawing her over to the window, and pointing out the new crescent moon. It is the beginning of Ramadan - the Muslim month of fasting - and many exciting experiences are before her! Explaining the season to her friends and classmates at school, enjoying the post-dusk meals with her family, attending special events - like the barbecues thrown by friends, or the "Night of the Moon" celebration at the mosque - Yasme Expecting a bedtime story one night, Yasmeen is instead surprised to find her mother drawing her over to the window, and pointing out the new crescent moon. It is the beginning of Ramadan - the Muslim month of fasting - and many exciting experiences are before her! Explaining the season to her friends and classmates at school, enjoying the post-dusk meals with her family, attending special events - like the barbecues thrown by friends, or the "Night of the Moon" celebration at the mosque - Yasmeen has a wonderful month, tracking the waxing and waning of the moon throughout. But the best thing of all comes last, in the form of a special Eid present from her parents... A lovely picture-book celebration of Ramadan and Eid, Hena Khan's Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story is a warmhearted family tale, full of love and joy. It offers a wonderful portrait, not just of a very special time of year in the Muslim calendar, but of a close-knit Pakistani-American family and their diverse community. The accompanying illustrations by Julie Paschkis, inspired by Islamic art, are lovely, particularly the tile-like borders and accents. All in all, a very pleasing holiday tale, one I recommend to anyone looking for good picture-books about Ramadan and Eid.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dana Al-Basha

    This is such a cute book, with illustrations inspired by the Islamic 2D style, it's about Ramadan, and how Yasmeen, a 7-year-old girl, learns more about her religion Islam and the phases of the moon during the month. The book is titled Night of the Moon because it's leading to the last day of Ramadan and the celebration part of the Muslim nation celebrate before the day of Eid Al Fater Al Saeed, like Yasmeen's family who is originally from Pakistan but lives in America. This is such a cute book, with illustrations inspired by the Islamic 2D style, it's about Ramadan, and how Yasmeen, a 7-year-old girl, learns more about her religion Islam and the phases of the moon during the month. The book is titled Night of the Moon because it's leading to the last day of Ramadan and the celebration part of the Muslim nation celebrate before the day of Eid Al Fater Al Saeed, like Yasmeen's family who is originally from Pakistan but lives in America.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    I absolutely loved the illustrations in this book--such rich varieties of blue, perfect for a book about a Muslim holiday centering around the moon. Yasmeen is a 7-year-old Pakistani American girl who is celebrating Ramadan with her family. Through dialogue with Yasmeen and various family members and friends the reader learns the origins of the holiday and many of the customs. An author's note at the back of the book and a glossary provide further explanations. The emphasis here is on celebratin I absolutely loved the illustrations in this book--such rich varieties of blue, perfect for a book about a Muslim holiday centering around the moon. Yasmeen is a 7-year-old Pakistani American girl who is celebrating Ramadan with her family. Through dialogue with Yasmeen and various family members and friends the reader learns the origins of the holiday and many of the customs. An author's note at the back of the book and a glossary provide further explanations. The emphasis here is on celebrating with family and friends. It sounds like so much fun! I especially like all the food, such as moon cakes--my favorite! Combine this with Mary Matthews' Magid Fasts for Ramadan and Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith's Celebrating Ramadan, though I think Khan's book is by far the better of the three.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rummanah (Books in the Spotlight)

    Yasmeen's mother points out the little sliver of the crescent moon to remind her of the beginning of a new month of Ramadan. The significance of the moon is directly correlated to the lunar Islamic calendar. As Yasmeen moves through the month and the moon changes its shape, she learns the lessons of the celebration. Night of the Moon expertly captures the spirit of observing Ramadan, the holiest month of the Islamic calendar, and celebrating Eid Al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramada Yasmeen's mother points out the little sliver of the crescent moon to remind her of the beginning of a new month of Ramadan. The significance of the moon is directly correlated to the lunar Islamic calendar. As Yasmeen moves through the month and the moon changes its shape, she learns the lessons of the celebration. Night of the Moon expertly captures the spirit of observing Ramadan, the holiest month of the Islamic calendar, and celebrating Eid Al-Fitr, the festival that marks the end of Ramadan. I loved how the author weaves information about the cultural traditions of Ramadan and Eid along with Yasmeen's love of her family and growing understanding of her role in the outside world. The gentle and reflective text reflects the simple arc of the month focusing on the spirit rather than being bogged down to the minute details. The illustrations are colorful and stunning incorporating a lot of Islamic art. The Night of the Moon is a warm, lovely, educational read and highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Esther

    Published in 2008 by Chronicle Books Interest Level: 5th-7th Grade This picture book is a great explanation and representation of Ramadan. It no only shows Muslim traditions, but also puts it into a modern context through following Yasmeen through her daily life and Ramadan activities. I think this is a culturally authentic account of Ramadan that is sensitive to Muslim tradition and holds the integrity of the author and illustrator. Each page is interesting, detailed, and reverent of a Middle Eas Published in 2008 by Chronicle Books Interest Level: 5th-7th Grade This picture book is a great explanation and representation of Ramadan. It no only shows Muslim traditions, but also puts it into a modern context through following Yasmeen through her daily life and Ramadan activities. I think this is a culturally authentic account of Ramadan that is sensitive to Muslim tradition and holds the integrity of the author and illustrator. Each page is interesting, detailed, and reverent of a Middle Eastern background. Also, through the inclusion of Arabic words (with a glossary at the end) the reader can discover new words that are related to the Islamic faith. Overall, a good representation of Ramadan that both is reverent and respectful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

    #spirituality #ramadan Picturebook explaining the month of Ramadam in simple language for children

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Loved the art! A really great intro to Ramadan, complete with glossary.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bibi Larson

    What a little gem this book was. It is an excellent way to communicate the Islamic tradition. Loved the simplicity and the graphic was amazing!! Excellent!!’

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nan

    I love Hena Khan but I wasn’t impressed with the prose here. This fills a needed space in my library-I don’t have enough picture books on Muslim families and holidays, but I don’t think students will find it very engaging. There is no story arc. It’s just a list of things the family does during Ramadan.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Perry

    It's a perfect vehicle to explain Ramadan to children. Hey, even I learned something new! The illustrations are great too. Love the vibrant colors. It's a perfect vehicle to explain Ramadan to children. Hey, even I learned something new! The illustrations are great too. Love the vibrant colors.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin Salahuddin

    A great children's book about a community that is consistently left in the dark. READ IT! Representation matters! A great children's book about a community that is consistently left in the dark. READ IT! Representation matters!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Baby Bookworm

    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello friends, and Ramadan Mubarak! Today marks the first day of the month of Ramadan, and since we wanted to learn more about this Muslim holy month, our book today was Night Of The Moon, written by Hena Khan and illustrated by Julie Paschkis. This story teaches the reader about Ramadan as seen through the eyes of a young girl named Yasmeen. Yasmeen is seven years old, Pakistani-American, and M This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello friends, and Ramadan Mubarak! Today marks the first day of the month of Ramadan, and since we wanted to learn more about this Muslim holy month, our book today was Night Of The Moon, written by Hena Khan and illustrated by Julie Paschkis. This story teaches the reader about Ramadan as seen through the eyes of a young girl named Yasmeen. Yasmeen is seven years old, Pakistani-American, and Muslim. One night, her mother shows her the bare sliver of the new moon and explains that this begins Ramadan, a holy month of fasting and celebration for people of Islamic faith. As the new moon waxes and wanes, Yasmeen and her family attend celebrations with friends and relatives and services at their mosque. They practice kindness and community, and Yasmeen’s parents fast during the day to reflect on their blessings. Then, after the end of the month, the family and their community celebrate Eid, a festival filled with gifts, treats, and a brand new moon. This was a fantastic book to introduce Ramadan and it’s customs to those just learning about it. Yasmeen and her family provide a wonderful narrative through the eyes of a child, relating the various celebrations, traditions, and beliefs in a concise and simple way. I especially loved how the passage of time was marked by the phases of the moon. The illustrations, heavily inspired by traditional Islamic art, are rich with color and design, and create a ton of visual interest for little readers. The length was fine, and JJ really liked this one, especially the art. This is a fantastic story about Ramadan, perfect for Muslim and non-Muslim readers alike to learn about and celebrate. Baby Bookworm approved! Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I really appreciated this book's explanation of the relation of the moon to Ramadan -- despite Under the Ramadan Moon 's emphasis on the Ramadan moon in its text (and art -- and now I'm curious to look at it again and see if the moon in the artwork tracks through the month like it should [spoilers: I was disappointed and would recommend this book over that one]), I didn't really get a sense of what the connection was. Whereas in this book the moon provides a frame for the month (Islam uses a I really appreciated this book's explanation of the relation of the moon to Ramadan -- despite Under the Ramadan Moon 's emphasis on the Ramadan moon in its text (and art -- and now I'm curious to look at it again and see if the moon in the artwork tracks through the month like it should [spoilers: I was disappointed and would recommend this book over that one]), I didn't really get a sense of what the connection was. Whereas in this book the moon provides a frame for the month (Islam uses a lunar calendar) and carries our protagonist (and thus us) along through the month in a way that feels like a well-done narrative device, not a heavy-handed etc. teaching moment. I liked the Islamic feeling illustrations -- and appreciated the two-page spread of the Night of the Moon celebration full of Muslims of a variety of presentations (women in hijab and women uncovered, darker-skinned people and lighter-skinned people) along with text subtly reminding us that Islam is a global religion (India, Turkey, etc.) and that different parts of the world have their own unique cultural offerings.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This paper version of the previous hardcover picture book features gouache illustrations incorporating tile art and giving it a culturally authentic appearance. The impressively detailed images and simple text provide an introduction to Ramadan when healthy Muslims are expected to fast. In the story Yasmeen's mother points out the changing moon over the course of the month and explains its significance. I liked how the special time is mentioned in Yasmeen's class as well as at home and how the a This paper version of the previous hardcover picture book features gouache illustrations incorporating tile art and giving it a culturally authentic appearance. The impressively detailed images and simple text provide an introduction to Ramadan when healthy Muslims are expected to fast. In the story Yasmeen's mother points out the changing moon over the course of the month and explains its significance. I liked how the special time is mentioned in Yasmeen's class as well as at home and how the author captures the young girl's eager anticipation of Eid and all the delicious foods and presents that will come her way. While it might have been important to focus more on the religious significance of this time, by not doing so, the author provides an authentic child's view of Ramadan and Eid but also takes care to point out that the fasting is a way to practice patience and feel gratitude for life's bounties. Youngsters unfamiliar with this special time will be interested in the book's contents, which make the experience quite accessible, while youngsters whose family members celebrate Eid and practice fasting during Ramadan will be pleased to see some of their own cultural experiences depicted here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    The story of Ramadan is told through the eyes of a young, Pakistani-American girl named Yasmeen. The text depicts a family's celebration of Ramadan told through the thoughts and emotions experienced by Yasmeen. Readers are introduced to the meaning and elements of this important Islamic holiday. Illustrations are colorful, detailed and supportive of the text. Key content-specific vocabulary is bold, with plenty of context to further explain their meanings. The book also features a helpful glossa The story of Ramadan is told through the eyes of a young, Pakistani-American girl named Yasmeen. The text depicts a family's celebration of Ramadan told through the thoughts and emotions experienced by Yasmeen. Readers are introduced to the meaning and elements of this important Islamic holiday. Illustrations are colorful, detailed and supportive of the text. Key content-specific vocabulary is bold, with plenty of context to further explain their meanings. The book also features a helpful glossary of these terms at the back for easy reference, along with a personal note from the author. This book can be paired with Nabeel's New Pants: An Eid Talesince it expands on the festivities and preparation of Eid, the holiday following Ramadan, when this book leaves off. This story lends itself to text-to-self connections allowing students to relate and discuss how they celebrate particular holidays with their own families.

  17. 5 out of 5

    LtLEGOReads

    As someone who observes the fasting month of Ramadan, finding this book at the library was timely. If you have kids who are just learning about fasting and the beautiful month of Ramadan, this book is perfect as a bedtime read to introduce these concepts in a simple to understand manner that most kids can relate to. Children can easily identify with seven-year-old Yasmeen of Pakistani-American descent, who is observing Ramadan and all its traditions with her family and friends, through the sightin As someone who observes the fasting month of Ramadan, finding this book at the library was timely. If you have kids who are just learning about fasting and the beautiful month of Ramadan, this book is perfect as a bedtime read to introduce these concepts in a simple to understand manner that most kids can relate to. Children can easily identify with seven-year-old Yasmeen of Pakistani-American descent, who is observing Ramadan and all its traditions with her family and friends, through the sighting of the various phases of the moon. Written in simple language, and accompanied with beautiful 'painting-like' illustration, the book briefly mentions other Muslim populations from India and Turkey. It does not however carry mentions of other Muslim populations, from Asia, China or even Europe - a point that is often sorely lacking in Muslims fiction children books. Overall, this book emanates warmth and joy, and makes an excellent resource for parents and teachers seeking to teach young ones to understand about Islam's holiest month and its history and traditions.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leen Turki

    “Night of the moon” talks about Muslim traditions, like the celebration of Ramadan and Eid. This is an informative text and the reason I chose to add this book is because it shows how important it is to be thankful for all your blessings and give back. This is very important in many countries in the middle east and it exposes the reader to their values and perspectives. It also talks about the significance of the moon and the Islamic calendar. This book includes how she adapts in a school settin “Night of the moon” talks about Muslim traditions, like the celebration of Ramadan and Eid. This is an informative text and the reason I chose to add this book is because it shows how important it is to be thankful for all your blessings and give back. This is very important in many countries in the middle east and it exposes the reader to their values and perspectives. It also talks about the significance of the moon and the Islamic calendar. This book includes how she adapts in a school setting while fasting Ramadan, which is something that all Muslim Americans go through. This book is appropriate for middle-upper level elementary students to read. The illustrations in this book help visualize Muslim culture better for the reader and enhances the story. The story is detailed and does not simplify the Muslim culture and there seems to be no negative stereotypes. This book is written by Hena Khan who is a Pakistani-American who was born and raised in Maryland, and she writes many books about her culture.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mariela Alfaro

    Summary This book is about a little girl named Yasmeen and her family during Ramadan. It starts by intruding the importance of the moon and how the new moon meant a new month in the Islamic calendar. And the upcoming month was ramadan. The book talks about what a traditional Ramadan is like which fasting, parties, prayer delicious foods, and presents. Theme Family and religious traditions Personal Response It was very interesting reading about Islamic traditions about the moon and Ramadan since I di Summary This book is about a little girl named Yasmeen and her family during Ramadan. It starts by intruding the importance of the moon and how the new moon meant a new month in the Islamic calendar. And the upcoming month was ramadan. The book talks about what a traditional Ramadan is like which fasting, parties, prayer delicious foods, and presents. Theme Family and religious traditions Personal Response It was very interesting reading about Islamic traditions about the moon and Ramadan since I did not know about it very much. Illustrations where also different it resembles islamic patterns. Recommendation I would definitely recommend this book it was a very informational book and easy to understand. It is a great for teaching different holidays or religions and what they do on them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Camille Andrews

    Night of the Moon is a traditional literature book. This book is a book most Muslims use to teach their kids about the Ramadan holiday. The book is overall a great book to introduce the Ramadan holiday to kids. The book also give kids the ability to ask questions and also compare the Muslim holiday to the holiday they celebrate. The characters are realistic and convincing characters that allows the students to engage more in the story. The book also includes some of the Muslim word, allowing the Night of the Moon is a traditional literature book. This book is a book most Muslims use to teach their kids about the Ramadan holiday. The book is overall a great book to introduce the Ramadan holiday to kids. The book also give kids the ability to ask questions and also compare the Muslim holiday to the holiday they celebrate. The characters are realistic and convincing characters that allows the students to engage more in the story. The book also includes some of the Muslim word, allowing the students to connect more with the Muslim culture. The story line of the book, goes into details of the whole activities associated with the holiday. The author Hena Khan is part of the Muslin group.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Air

    This book was an amazing introduction to the Muslim holiday of Ramadan with a brief overview/explanation of various traditions and the Night of the Moon finale! Beautiful, Islamic inspired artwork, and presented in a way that makes it accessible to multiple age groups, this book is an incredible jumping board for further research and understanding. I really appreciated the explanation about how different groups of Muslims can have slightly different traditions, just like the various forms of Chr This book was an amazing introduction to the Muslim holiday of Ramadan with a brief overview/explanation of various traditions and the Night of the Moon finale! Beautiful, Islamic inspired artwork, and presented in a way that makes it accessible to multiple age groups, this book is an incredible jumping board for further research and understanding. I really appreciated the explanation about how different groups of Muslims can have slightly different traditions, just like the various forms of Christianity have different traditions. I highly recommend this book to pretty much everyone - if you are Muslim then it is a fun holiday book, if you aren't, then it is a great introduction to understanding.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is overall an excellent package--the text is very well written and comprehensive for any child learning about the Islamic holiday Eid (for both Muslim and non-Muslim children alike). The author, Hena Khan, is a Pakistani American who ascribes her own joy for the festival in her writing. Readers will relate to young Yasmeen's curiosity about the holy month and her anticipation of the celebration. The colorful and playful art, done by Julie Paschkis, was inspired by the decorations of Islamic This is overall an excellent package--the text is very well written and comprehensive for any child learning about the Islamic holiday Eid (for both Muslim and non-Muslim children alike). The author, Hena Khan, is a Pakistani American who ascribes her own joy for the festival in her writing. Readers will relate to young Yasmeen's curiosity about the holy month and her anticipation of the celebration. The colorful and playful art, done by Julie Paschkis, was inspired by the decorations of Islamic tiles. The illustrations seem illuminated on every page, very well done in context of the Moon's importance during Ramadan.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jonah G

    This was an amazingly illustrated and told story about a 7 year old Pakistani-American girl and her confusion about the date that the Muslim holiday Ramadan falls on. She is taught that the differences in the dates are based on a lunar calendar versus a solar one (what we typically use). This book has a lot of potential in the classroom. Number one, it humanizes Muslims and dispels many myths and prejudices about them, their religion, and culture. Two, it has a science element involved with the This was an amazingly illustrated and told story about a 7 year old Pakistani-American girl and her confusion about the date that the Muslim holiday Ramadan falls on. She is taught that the differences in the dates are based on a lunar calendar versus a solar one (what we typically use). This book has a lot of potential in the classroom. Number one, it humanizes Muslims and dispels many myths and prejudices about them, their religion, and culture. Two, it has a science element involved with the discussion of the calendar differences. The lunar/solar calendar topic could lead into a lunar cycle lesson, a history lesson about calendar changes, or a cultural discussion about holidays.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jose Juan

    The main character Yasmeen is a Pakistani- American girl, who is seven years old. Yasmeen, her family, and friends have an amazing time celebrating the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Eid is a very felicitous day for Muslims all around the world. In this story we follow Yasmeen through the month of Ramadan an witness some of the activities that her and her family do during this celebration. It is the tracking of the moon that drives Ramadan celebration. Many terminology having to do with this Musl The main character Yasmeen is a Pakistani- American girl, who is seven years old. Yasmeen, her family, and friends have an amazing time celebrating the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Eid is a very felicitous day for Muslims all around the world. In this story we follow Yasmeen through the month of Ramadan an witness some of the activities that her and her family do during this celebration. It is the tracking of the moon that drives Ramadan celebration. Many terminology having to do with this Muslim celebration is introduced through out the story. The cartoon like illustrations by Paschkis capture the spirit of Ramadan. The moon plays an important role in the illustrations of this book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emily Walker

    Summary This book is about Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, who is celebrating the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, The Night of the Moon (Chaand Raat), and Eid. Evaluation I loved this book. It did a great job of explaining the holidays, while still being an engaging story. The illustrations are beautiful as well. Teaching Idea I would use this book when we are learning about other cultures, as a way of exploring the Muslim holidays. After reading, students could research the Summary This book is about Yasmeen, a seven-year-old Pakistani-American girl, who is celebrating the Muslim holidays of Ramadan, The Night of the Moon (Chaand Raat), and Eid. Evaluation I loved this book. It did a great job of explaining the holidays, while still being an engaging story. The illustrations are beautiful as well. Teaching Idea I would use this book when we are learning about other cultures, as a way of exploring the Muslim holidays. After reading, students could research the holidays more in-depth and we could bring in typical foods, play games, or practice some of the other traditions discovered.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    A really well done story about Ramadan. Yasmeen, a Pakistani-American girl, asks about Ramadan and shares with her classmates (and us) all she learns and experiences during the holiday. The art, inspired by Islamic tiles, is dredged in rich colors and enhances the mystical beauty of a holiday interwoven with the moon. A well told story clearly explaining a holiday many are interested in learning about, illustrated with beautiful art, and an author's note and a glossary at the end, what more coul A really well done story about Ramadan. Yasmeen, a Pakistani-American girl, asks about Ramadan and shares with her classmates (and us) all she learns and experiences during the holiday. The art, inspired by Islamic tiles, is dredged in rich colors and enhances the mystical beauty of a holiday interwoven with the moon. A well told story clearly explaining a holiday many are interested in learning about, illustrated with beautiful art, and an author's note and a glossary at the end, what more could you want?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sam Grace

    I thought this was delightful. Nothing dour about it, but not superficial either. It wasn't just an account of the holiday from the little girl's perspective, it was filled with things to notice - like the moon, of course, which is a passage of time accessible to children like little else. And like snacks versus getting to fast. And the depiction of fasting as not necessarily easy but definitely rewarding. But again, still accessible. I loved the moon and the borders, but I wasn't a huge fan of I thought this was delightful. Nothing dour about it, but not superficial either. It wasn't just an account of the holiday from the little girl's perspective, it was filled with things to notice - like the moon, of course, which is a passage of time accessible to children like little else. And like snacks versus getting to fast. And the depiction of fasting as not necessarily easy but definitely rewarding. But again, still accessible. I loved the moon and the borders, but I wasn't a huge fan of the way people were painted - it's just not my favorite style. Good book though!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crista

    Based on the Islamic Celebration of Ramadan, this story is a great way to introduce students of all cultures to this Muslim holiday story. The reader discovers new words, traditions, religious symbols as young Yasmeen, and her family, celebrates the month of Ramadan and the Night of the New Moon. I love how the illustrator keeps with the blues and greens throughout the story. This helps add to the power of the moon and its symbolism in the story. This would be a great story when in December and di Based on the Islamic Celebration of Ramadan, this story is a great way to introduce students of all cultures to this Muslim holiday story. The reader discovers new words, traditions, religious symbols as young Yasmeen, and her family, celebrates the month of Ramadan and the Night of the New Moon. I love how the illustrator keeps with the blues and greens throughout the story. This helps add to the power of the moon and its symbolism in the story. This would be a great story when in December and discussing traditional celebrations around the world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I love reading books by Hena Khan. This special Ramadan book has lush Islamic art illustrations. Children are sure to intrigue by art full with rich colors inside this book. Hena Khan goes into great details about the rituals of Ramadan, she talks about the Ramadan party (Iftar), and also discusses Eid celebration. The illustrations at the end shows lot of diversity, as Muslims from different countries gather for Eid festivities. I would highly recommend this book, as children will learn a lot o I love reading books by Hena Khan. This special Ramadan book has lush Islamic art illustrations. Children are sure to intrigue by art full with rich colors inside this book. Hena Khan goes into great details about the rituals of Ramadan, she talks about the Ramadan party (Iftar), and also discusses Eid celebration. The illustrations at the end shows lot of diversity, as Muslims from different countries gather for Eid festivities. I would highly recommend this book, as children will learn a lot of things about Ramadan and Eid.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mehreen

    Khan does a wonderful job walking readers through Ramadan with the experience of Little Yasmeen (the protagonist). The illustrations are so vibrantly blue emphasized with traditional Islamic Art. I believe the intended audience is for Muslim & Non-muslims alike. The text provides learning of common Ramadan customs & traditions for readers. I felt waves of nostalgia reading it as little Yasmeen's story felt so relatable. (Don't forget to check out the glossary and authors note at the back for fur Khan does a wonderful job walking readers through Ramadan with the experience of Little Yasmeen (the protagonist). The illustrations are so vibrantly blue emphasized with traditional Islamic Art. I believe the intended audience is for Muslim & Non-muslims alike. The text provides learning of common Ramadan customs & traditions for readers. I felt waves of nostalgia reading it as little Yasmeen's story felt so relatable. (Don't forget to check out the glossary and authors note at the back for further details about Ramadan).

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