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Tant que couleront les rivières: Roman jeunesse illustré - Prix du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction

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Prix du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 Sélection First Nation Communities Read, 2006 Sélection du Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choice, 2004 Lauréat du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 En 1944, Larry Loyie, alors connu sous le nom de Lawrence, avait dix ans et vivait avec sa famille crie près de Slave Lake, dans le n Prix du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 Sélection First Nation Communities Read, 2006 Sélection du Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choice, 2004 Lauréat du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 En 1944, Larry Loyie, alors connu sous le nom de Lawrence, avait dix ans et vivait avec sa famille crie près de Slave Lake, dans le nord de l’Alberta (Canada). Tant que couleront les rivières s’inspire de son dernier été avec ses proches, avant son départ obligatoire pour le pensionnat indien. L’histoire d’un été qui se révèle plein d’aventures, de découvertes et de partage, la peinture d’un quotidien qui recrée la relation privilégiée avec la nature. Il faut profiter de la belle saison pour faire des réserves de nourriture pour l’hiver : cueillette, pêche et chasse, Lawrence a beaucoup à apprendre de ses aînés. Mais il y a certaines aventures qu’on n’ose imaginer, de celles qui vous méritent le nom d’Oskiniko, jeune homme en cri. L’album est suivi d’un épilogue abordant le thème des écoles résidentielles, ou pensionnats indiens, accompagnés de photos d’époque. Traduction de l’album As long as the rivers flow.


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Prix du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 Sélection First Nation Communities Read, 2006 Sélection du Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choice, 2004 Lauréat du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 En 1944, Larry Loyie, alors connu sous le nom de Lawrence, avait dix ans et vivait avec sa famille crie près de Slave Lake, dans le n Prix du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 Sélection First Nation Communities Read, 2006 Sélection du Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choice, 2004 Lauréat du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction, 2003 En 1944, Larry Loyie, alors connu sous le nom de Lawrence, avait dix ans et vivait avec sa famille crie près de Slave Lake, dans le nord de l’Alberta (Canada). Tant que couleront les rivières s’inspire de son dernier été avec ses proches, avant son départ obligatoire pour le pensionnat indien. L’histoire d’un été qui se révèle plein d’aventures, de découvertes et de partage, la peinture d’un quotidien qui recrée la relation privilégiée avec la nature. Il faut profiter de la belle saison pour faire des réserves de nourriture pour l’hiver : cueillette, pêche et chasse, Lawrence a beaucoup à apprendre de ses aînés. Mais il y a certaines aventures qu’on n’ose imaginer, de celles qui vous méritent le nom d’Oskiniko, jeune homme en cri. L’album est suivi d’un épilogue abordant le thème des écoles résidentielles, ou pensionnats indiens, accompagnés de photos d’époque. Traduction de l’album As long as the rivers flow.

30 review for Tant que couleront les rivières: Roman jeunesse illustré - Prix du Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Non-Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    This is just a stunning picture book both in terms of the story and illustrations as Larry Loyie documents the last summer he and his family spent at their summer camp before Larry and his siblings were taken to residential school Jan/14 Each time I read this, I find new wonders in it - Loyie is such a nuanced and gentle chronicler of his childhood - and as always, when the soft green and brown watercolours are suddenly replaced by the stark black and white photos of Larry and his siblings at the This is just a stunning picture book both in terms of the story and illustrations as Larry Loyie documents the last summer he and his family spent at their summer camp before Larry and his siblings were taken to residential school Jan/14 Each time I read this, I find new wonders in it - Loyie is such a nuanced and gentle chronicler of his childhood - and as always, when the soft green and brown watercolours are suddenly replaced by the stark black and white photos of Larry and his siblings at the Residential School they were forced to attend, a chill comes over me - while Larry survived, how many weren't so lucky! Jan/15 - I find this such a powerful book as I have noted above - this year I paired it with Margaret Pokiak-Fenton and Christy Fenton-Jordan's picture book, When I Was Eight - there are such depths here in terms of how beautifully Loyie creates a portrait of his family and the way that Cree children learned the world - if one of the reasons children go to school is to learn the ways to negotiate the adult world, Larry Loyie received a far better education than most children in schools! Stunning as always

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Short chapter book dealing with an indigenous boy's life leading up to the time he is taken away to residential school. As the book ends with him being loaded into the truck and his family's helplessness to keep him, it is a harsh ending, though foreshadowing shouldn't make it feel too out of place. Photos and an epilogue tell a little bit more about author Larry Loyie and his life. The book works primarily to create the sense of loss over what young Larry was losing. While he did make it back to Short chapter book dealing with an indigenous boy's life leading up to the time he is taken away to residential school. As the book ends with him being loaded into the truck and his family's helplessness to keep him, it is a harsh ending, though foreshadowing shouldn't make it feel too out of place. Photos and an epilogue tell a little bit more about author Larry Loyie and his life. The book works primarily to create the sense of loss over what young Larry was losing. While he did make it back to his family in time, some things were never the same, a common legacy of the residential schools.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Worldview: Universally Acceptable Age Read Aloud - 8 yrs + Independent Reader - 10 yrs + Setting: Location - Slave Lake, Alberta Time Period - 1940s Review: This is a very simple, bittersweet picture book. The lovely nostalgic artwork brings to life the story of the author’s last summer before he and his siblings were taken to a residential school. He has done a wonderful job of conveying the aboriginal culture, while giving a strong feeling of long summer days full of adventure that any child can Worldview: Universally Acceptable Age Read Aloud - 8 yrs + Independent Reader - 10 yrs + Setting: Location - Slave Lake, Alberta Time Period - 1940s Review: This is a very simple, bittersweet picture book. The lovely nostalgic artwork brings to life the story of the author’s last summer before he and his siblings were taken to a residential school. He has done a wonderful job of conveying the aboriginal culture, while giving a strong feeling of long summer days full of adventure that any child can relate to. The story ends with the heart breaking scene of the children being loaded into the back of a truck by strangers, who forcefully take them away from their home. Rather than focusing on the experiences of the residential school itself, this book focuses on what was lost. The cultural genocide of the First Nations people is a great tragedy of this dark part of Canadian history. This is a beautiful and accessible way to introduce children to a shameful period in our past. It is also a wonderful way to begin discussions on the importance of culture and how cultural diversity is valued and needs to be protected in our country. We need to read books like this with our children to ensure these kinds of acts are never repeated. An afterward shows photos of the author and his family at home and in the school system. Teacher Application: This book is a wonderful choice to open up discussions of the residential schools in Canada. It doesn’t get into the abuses some children suffered, but does introduce the wrongness of the situation. The author doesn’t need to “tell” how wrong this situation was as it is easy for a student to recognize this through Lawrence’s experiences. Parental Warning: This book is about the residential school system. It is not in any way inappropriate, but adult input and discussion will be needed to help children understand the implications of the story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Debbie Reese’s Blog Recommended for Middle School This book is about the last summer of a family before they had to give up their children to send them to a residential school. The parents had no choice and could be jailed for failing to send their children. This practice happened in both Canada and the US from around the 1880’s for about one hundred years. Lawrence, his sister, and brother spend a great summer with his family. First, they rescue an abandoned owl and learn to take care of it. He Debbie Reese’s Blog Recommended for Middle School This book is about the last summer of a family before they had to give up their children to send them to a residential school. The parents had no choice and could be jailed for failing to send their children. This practice happened in both Canada and the US from around the 1880’s for about one hundred years. Lawrence, his sister, and brother spend a great summer with his family. First, they rescue an abandoned owl and learn to take care of it. He watches family members sew moccasins and smoke hides for clothing. He goes with the adults in his family to the bush where they hunt and gather berries and plants. He even is there when his grandmother kills a grizzly bear with one shot. This is a good book for showing the importance of family to Native American families. The story is based on the life of the author, who was 10 years old when taken to the school. The illustrations are very expressive and help to tell the story. They are beautiful watercolors. This book is recommended for middle school students, or grades 5-8 to understand the customs and feel empathy for Lawrence and his siblings who are all younger.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Wolki

    Name: East Three 10 Title: My Review The title offers an important perspective about the situation. I really liked this book because it displays beautiful illustrations, it's also a overwhelming book. I can understand at an emotional view of what it would be like to leave home for Residential school. Larry Loyie shares a personal but great story of his last summer before he and his siblings were taken away from their family. Most of the story focuses on what was otherwise a normal seasonal routin Name: East Three 10 Title: My Review The title offers an important perspective about the situation. I really liked this book because it displays beautiful illustrations, it's also a overwhelming book. I can understand at an emotional view of what it would be like to leave home for Residential school. Larry Loyie shares a personal but great story of his last summer before he and his siblings were taken away from their family. Most of the story focuses on what was otherwise a normal seasonal routine for the Cree people of that era, also with the family moving from their cabin to their summer camp for a few days. Apart from the separation, this spring to summer event was interesting by the opportunity for the children to care for an orphaned baby owl, and come across with one of the biggest grizzly bears ever shot in North America. All of the day-to-day detail, close family bonding, and unexpected adventure draws me as a reader comfortably into the 10-year-old Lawrence’s experience. The final pages are all the more of a sad feeling for me as I picture myself being one of the children. When the children learn that they must go to school or their parents will be put in jail, and they are physically put into the back of a truck by two strange men, my feeling of separation and loss is keenly felt. The age group I'd recommend this book to is all ages because it can easily be understood and read to.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    The illustrations and narrative really bring the story to life. It's more than just a story, though, because interwoven are the traditions that Lawrence learned as a boy, such as flipping the berries over so they would dry faster, and thanking the grizzly for giving up its spirit. I think this would be another great addition to a classroom collection. This is Lawrence just appreciating life as it should be. The ending detailing the residential school experience is a fairly generic description, I The illustrations and narrative really bring the story to life. It's more than just a story, though, because interwoven are the traditions that Lawrence learned as a boy, such as flipping the berries over so they would dry faster, and thanking the grizzly for giving up its spirit. I think this would be another great addition to a classroom collection. This is Lawrence just appreciating life as it should be. The ending detailing the residential school experience is a fairly generic description, I'm guessing because Loyie didn't want it to overshadow the book's true intention, to show what he lost by being forced to attend school. As a side note, it also reminded me of Owls in the Family, a story by Farley Mowat where he rescues some baby owls and takes care of them. I feel like Ooh-Hoo would probably have been around the family as long as he lived. I feel kind of silly in wanting to know what happened to Ooh-Hoo!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janice Forman

    This book is in a recommended reading list for Aboriginal Resources for young people. I decided that I would read all the books in the list -- for my own interest and simply to take a look at the reading information available to young readers. "As Long as the Rivers Flow" is an account of the author's last summer before he and his siblings were taken away to residential school. It was 1944 and Larry Loyie is ten, on the brink of learning from his extended family how to survive and live off the la This book is in a recommended reading list for Aboriginal Resources for young people. I decided that I would read all the books in the list -- for my own interest and simply to take a look at the reading information available to young readers. "As Long as the Rivers Flow" is an account of the author's last summer before he and his siblings were taken away to residential school. It was 1944 and Larry Loyie is ten, on the brink of learning from his extended family how to survive and live off the land. Loyie's account of his last summer before residential school is an excellent resource to learn about the life of aboriginal children and their culture. The book contains an epilogue with an account of Larry Loyie's life and accomplishments, overcoming his feelings of not belonging to become a writer. The epilogue contains pictures that really help the reader see these children as victims of an ill-conceived plan. Good resource for children.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    A powerful story with wonderful illustrations about a family and their children at their summer camp before going away to Indian Residential School. As an Anishnaabe I would recommend this book to all readers as an act of reconciliation. Hear the stories. Build connection in the poignant retelling of this brutal time in Canada’s history.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    This was a beautiful story about a First Nations boy before he was sent to a government residential school. He writes about his last summer at home. He had a pet owl and observed his grandmother shoot a grizzly with a twenty-two. A lovely book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trina Crawford

    A vivid picture book/story of a young man's last summer before being taken to a residential school. An excellent resource for classrooms in teaching Treaty Education and supporting Truth and Reconciliation lessons. A vivid picture book/story of a young man's last summer before being taken to a residential school. An excellent resource for classrooms in teaching Treaty Education and supporting Truth and Reconciliation lessons.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fahula

    This story is a much different approach to showing us the impact of residential schools. It shares about the simple beauty, the fullness of life, experienced with a sense of family and community just prior to the impact of residential schooling for the children in this retelling. It is useful in teaching students about indigenous ways of life. They can get a better understanding for the extent of what was lost when the children were taken from their families and what remained lost even after the This story is a much different approach to showing us the impact of residential schools. It shares about the simple beauty, the fullness of life, experienced with a sense of family and community just prior to the impact of residential schooling for the children in this retelling. It is useful in teaching students about indigenous ways of life. They can get a better understanding for the extent of what was lost when the children were taken from their families and what remained lost even after they returned. The illustrations are beautifully drawn, with a lovely sense of nostalgia. They invite discussion and offer students opportunities to increase understanding and empathy. I appreciate the photos and notes provided in the back of the book, bringing real life faces to the events for these people from the Slave Lake, Alberta area. Chapter 4 mentions how we work together to “care for this land of ours” - a good prompt for further discussion and learning. After some patient and brave actions, the boy in the story is given the name meaning ‘ young man’. This could also lead into discussions around the significance of naming and ceremony. The reference to the elder”s story about learning from traveling in all four directions is another useful prompt to encourage learning from those around us.

  12. 5 out of 5

    C. Janelle

    This sad and beautiful picture book tells a fictionalized story about the days before the author and his siblings were taken away to residential schools for Native American children. It feels like the author is using the story to try to recapture a time of freedom, innocence, family, and community that he lost when he was taken away. My 11yo said he liked it but that the ending was abrupt.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    A beautiful and sad book about a native Canadian child learning from his elders and nature at age 10 until he's taken away to an Indian Residential School in Alberta. A beautiful and sad book about a native Canadian child learning from his elders and nature at age 10 until he's taken away to an Indian Residential School in Alberta.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennybeast

    Beautiful book about the last summer before being taken away to a residential school. Moving, sad. Picture book format, but also chapters/high text.

  15. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnn

    Heartbreaking memoir of Cree Indian family in 1944.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marci Laevens

    An excellent illustration of the closeness and culture that children were torn from when required to attend residential schools.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Koplen

    2.5

  18. 5 out of 5

    T.E.

  19. 4 out of 5

    K.T

  20. 5 out of 5

    Irina

  21. 4 out of 5

    Malavika Malanthara

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nuzhat

  23. 5 out of 5

    Booklover11

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emilee Layden

  25. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Körner

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyanna Elliot

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Laver

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vee

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