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A man battles his addiction to a devastating nanotech drug that steals identities and threatens the survival and succession of mankind as a galactic species. After the Nova-Insanity shattered Earth's civilization, the Genes and Fullerenes Corporation promised to bring humanity back from the brink. Many years later, various factions have formed, challenging their savior and A man battles his addiction to a devastating nanotech drug that steals identities and threatens the survival and succession of mankind as a galactic species. After the Nova-Insanity shattered Earth's civilization, the Genes and Fullerenes Corporation promised to bring humanity back from the brink. Many years later, various factions have formed, challenging their savior and vying for a share of power and control. Glow follows the lives of three very different beings, all wrestling mental instability in various forms; Rex - a confused junkie battling multiple voices in his head; Ellayna - the founder of the GFC living on an orbital satellite station and struggling with paranoia; and Jett - a virtually unstoppable robotic assassin, questioning his purpose of creation. All of them are inextricably linked through the capricious and volatile Glow; an all controlling nano-tech drug that has the ability to live on through multiple hosts, cutting and pasting memories and personas in each new victim. In this tech-crazed world where nothing seems impossible, many questions are posed: what makes us who we are? What is our ultimate purpose and place in this world? And, most frightening of all, what are we capable of doing to survive? File Under: Science Fiction [ Hivemind One More Fix No Escape Run Like Hell ]


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A man battles his addiction to a devastating nanotech drug that steals identities and threatens the survival and succession of mankind as a galactic species. After the Nova-Insanity shattered Earth's civilization, the Genes and Fullerenes Corporation promised to bring humanity back from the brink. Many years later, various factions have formed, challenging their savior and A man battles his addiction to a devastating nanotech drug that steals identities and threatens the survival and succession of mankind as a galactic species. After the Nova-Insanity shattered Earth's civilization, the Genes and Fullerenes Corporation promised to bring humanity back from the brink. Many years later, various factions have formed, challenging their savior and vying for a share of power and control. Glow follows the lives of three very different beings, all wrestling mental instability in various forms; Rex - a confused junkie battling multiple voices in his head; Ellayna - the founder of the GFC living on an orbital satellite station and struggling with paranoia; and Jett - a virtually unstoppable robotic assassin, questioning his purpose of creation. All of them are inextricably linked through the capricious and volatile Glow; an all controlling nano-tech drug that has the ability to live on through multiple hosts, cutting and pasting memories and personas in each new victim. In this tech-crazed world where nothing seems impossible, many questions are posed: what makes us who we are? What is our ultimate purpose and place in this world? And, most frightening of all, what are we capable of doing to survive? File Under: Science Fiction [ Hivemind One More Fix No Escape Run Like Hell ]

30 review for Glow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris Berko

    I've been waiting for this book for about a year and whooooodoggie did it surpass expectations. The story was fresh and exciting, there are detailed descriptions of the characters and environments, and it gets surreal and dream-like in places adding to the complex mystery and plot. Glow is also a dense book, as in it seems bigger than its four hundred pages. There's a couple converging plot lines told through a multitude of character viewpoints and there's a ton of background stuff about not onl I've been waiting for this book for about a year and whooooodoggie did it surpass expectations. The story was fresh and exciting, there are detailed descriptions of the characters and environments, and it gets surreal and dream-like in places adding to the complex mystery and plot. Glow is also a dense book, as in it seems bigger than its four hundred pages. There's a couple converging plot lines told through a multitude of character viewpoints and there's a ton of background stuff about not only the characters but the world and the history of how-we-got-to-where-we-are in the story in general. I loved the action as well. It's big and juicy and some of the weaponry ideas are staggering in their awesomeness. The final thirty percent is one long action sequence that changes locations about a dozen times and includes shit falling to the planet from space after being blown up, a seriously badass one man wrecking crew synthetic organism thing that does some mind-blowing shit to some deserving bad guys, and spectacular reveals that explains just what in the hell had been going on during the previous seventy percent. Did I mention the killer android nuns with dark secrets? Well, yeah, they're in here, too. The author, Tim Jordan, has a strong, clear voice and was able to convey a very intricate and seemingly incoherent mix of happenings into a fun and entertaining read that does not insult the readers intelligence or rely on info dumps to further the story. I knew I was going to like this from about the first page as the writing was rich and concise and it all just seemed so new. A new voice, but one I connected to right away. Thanks to Tim Jordan, Angry Robot, and Netgalley for the review copy, opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    I selected this because my relatively balanced reading diet required a science fiction entry. But found this mostly unpalatable. It’s sad, really, because I’m the first person actually reviewing this on GR and ideally it’s be nice to have nice things to say about the book…so lemme look for some…ok, here goes…my dislike of Glow might not be entirely Glow’s fault. Technically (and I use the word deliberately because it’s such a tech heavy sci fi) it’s a fine book. It has an elaborate plot, intric I selected this because my relatively balanced reading diet required a science fiction entry. But found this mostly unpalatable. It’s sad, really, because I’m the first person actually reviewing this on GR and ideally it’s be nice to have nice things to say about the book…so lemme look for some…ok, here goes…my dislike of Glow might not be entirely Glow’s fault. Technically (and I use the word deliberately because it’s such a tech heavy sci fi) it’s a fine book. It has an elaborate plot, intricate world building and oodles of action. It has idiosyncratic novelties like robot nuns and multiple personalities, but…but…the entire thing is such a plodding convoluted mess and so prolix with it, it takes forever to get through, it’s a drag the entire way and in the end there isn’t much to show for it, outside of checking that science fiction box. Again, this is a very subjective opinion. I read a lot and as such encounter sh*t books with some frequency and this isn’t a sh*t book, it’s just one that really didn’t work for me. It didn’t grab me at first and failed to do so throughout, it didn’t begin to even remotely interest until about fifth of the way in, but even then it was never enough. The only character I remotely cared about/was interested in was rex and it might have been exclusively because of one of his alternate personalities that wasn’t a person. Which is actually directly responsible for the winner of an ending and the only time the book hit the right emotionally engaging notes in 400 pages. Like so many debuts, this was dramatically overwritten and the kitchen sink approach did nothing for it. There are some genuine good thoughts that went into it about immortality and I really love the concept of Forever Friends, but, again, this just highlights how much of a letdown the people and robots of this book were. Tons of tech, tons of jargon, tons of science, but light on fiction or at least the sort of fiction I’m into (think Black Mirror). Basically, I’m more about people stories told in scientifically enhanced worlds, not scientifically enhanced words with some people thrown in. And to answer the obvious question here, I read this one all the way through because of my obsessively completist nature. That was the only reason. Otherwise, it wouldn’t have made it past chapter one and chapter one was meant to be the exciting beginning you can’t put down, it had a guy zip tied chained to a corpse with no memory of getting that way. And honestly, if you can’t sell that… So yeah, a very disappointing, ploddingly slow mess of a read…for me. Might work for some, who knows. Thanks Netgalley.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Terry Madden

    This debut novel takes you on a deep dive into the meaning of consciousness and reality. As our hero, Rex, struggles with the “glow” that commands his subconscious mind, we discover a nefarious underworld of pirated, mind-altering drugs and those who would kill to sap the drug from their victims. This novel has the cerebral wow-factor of a P.K. Dick novel with the pacing and action of Richard Morgan’s “Altered Carbon.” The writing is spectacularly immersive, especially when we are in Rex’s point This debut novel takes you on a deep dive into the meaning of consciousness and reality. As our hero, Rex, struggles with the “glow” that commands his subconscious mind, we discover a nefarious underworld of pirated, mind-altering drugs and those who would kill to sap the drug from their victims. This novel has the cerebral wow-factor of a P.K. Dick novel with the pacing and action of Richard Morgan’s “Altered Carbon.” The writing is spectacularly immersive, especially when we are in Rex’s point of view. A stellar and moving debut by a writer to watch.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McGee

    When I read the description of this book I was pretty excited to read it, unfortunately it didn’t deliver. Set in a depressing futuristic earth this story follows three characters as some eminent threat approaches. Rex, an ex drug addict/human-dog hybrid, is trying to get clean at a rehab center run by robot nuns. Jett, a super hi tech android, was sent to earth to find the source of Glow, a drug made of nano-bots. Ellayna, the founder of some sort of all powerful corporation, lives in space wit When I read the description of this book I was pretty excited to read it, unfortunately it didn’t deliver. Set in a depressing futuristic earth this story follows three characters as some eminent threat approaches. Rex, an ex drug addict/human-dog hybrid, is trying to get clean at a rehab center run by robot nuns. Jett, a super hi tech android, was sent to earth to find the source of Glow, a drug made of nano-bots. Ellayna, the founder of some sort of all powerful corporation, lives in space with the various heads of the company, most of whom exist almost entirely in VR. This def has the makings of an amazing space opera/ action/mystery/ fantasy/ sci-fi thriller, but really it was chaotic mess. I almost DNFed this book but I struggled through hoping that it would get better. The first few chapters were pretty dry and boring. There was a lot of technical jargon and i found myself zoning out. Things didn’t start getting interesting until almost halfway through the book, and by then I just didn’t care anymore. I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elena Linville

    Stars: between 3.5 and 4 out of 5. Review to come and all that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ollie

    This fair and unbiased review originally appeared on my blog, available at www.infinitespeculation.com. It was conducted with gratitude for the free electronic copy of the book which I received from the publisher, Angry Robot. Humanity has stalled. The world-shaking event known as the Nova-Insanity has caused the GFC - manufacturers of the life extending nanotech drug Simmorta - to sequester themselves inside their orbital platform. Once connected to Earth via space elevator, they now live isolat This fair and unbiased review originally appeared on my blog, available at www.infinitespeculation.com. It was conducted with gratitude for the free electronic copy of the book which I received from the publisher, Angry Robot. Humanity has stalled. The world-shaking event known as the Nova-Insanity has caused the GFC - manufacturers of the life extending nanotech drug Simmorta - to sequester themselves inside their orbital platform. Once connected to Earth via space elevator, they now live isolated and in constant fear of infiltration by the powers that be on Earth, as well as by a deadly foe of their own making. Meanwhile, Coriolis City, the manufactured island port for the space elevator, has become a hive of gang activity and criminality, where the memory altering drug known as Glow ravages the increasingly addicted populace. The void spawned assassin known as Jett searches for answers across this decaying landscape, while the mysterious addict known simply as Rex struggles to piece his shattered memories back together and understand his past. In stark contrast to its cosy sounding title, there’s a distinctly grungy feeling to Glow. This isn’t a shimmering, shiny white plastic vision of the future where everything looks like it just rolled off the Apple manufacturing line. No, this is a world of partially collapsed buildings inhabited by increasingly desperate members of society, with acres of the surrounding land scarred into vitrified glass by the devastation of the Nova-Insanity. Things are little better high above Earth, where filthy orbital platforms are occupied by paranoid corporate business leaders like Ellayna, who clutches at her last vestiges of power while jumping at shadows. There’s tons of atmosphere and style here, all with a liberal handful of grime rubbed across it. Tim Jordan does such a wonderful job of setting the scene thanks to the level of detail he provides; indeed, the Nova-Insanity itself could be a book all of its own. When the plans for a microscopic solid-state fusion reactor were released for free to everyone with a 3D printer, the catastrophic consequences of hackers realising they could be rigged to function as devastating weapons of mass destruction brought humanity to the brink of annihilation. The inextricable links between the setting and this succinctly delivered piece of backstory - as well as its impact on humanity’s wary approach to technology in the event’s wake - is a masterfully conceived piece of storytelling. It also ensures that anyone who stands against the technologically advanced voidian known as Jett doesn’t stand much of a chance. Jett is a singularly deadly entity, a biotech being made of fullerene fibres and topped with a leering skull. Able to survive an onslaught capable of destroying a small army, he is sent to Earth by his voidian mentor and fellow adversary of the GFC, Ursurper Gale. Like a cross between Venom and the T-1000, Jett closes on his prey through a variety of means, be they grisly interrogation tactics or all-out, blistering assault, morphing between forms for infiltration, deception or unmitigated carnage in the blink of an eye. His adaptability and combat proficiency keep him far more than one step ahead of most assailants, as he literally rips apart those who get in his way, often before they even realise what’s happening. Amongst the existential probing and the corporate wrangling taking place elsewhere, Jett’s scenes are entertainingly action-packed segments of hyperviolence. That’s not to say, of course, that these other elements of the story are dull - far from it. Rex, with his addiction and seemingly inexplicable resistance to the ravages of Glow, is a veritable treasure trove of mysteries and intrigues. His head is full of the memories and personalities of past addicts, carried along with his gruesomely recycled drug of choice. He’s picked up early on by the Sisterhood of Salvitor, a group of robotic nuns who believe in the coming of an entity known as the Future-Lord, and are eager to nurse the recovering addict back to health. It’s through Rex that some of the deeper philosophical dives take place, with a recurring theme of the fallibility of memory and the consequent ramifications akin to the likes of A Scanner Darkly. He frequently questions his reality, his sense of self and his own mind; at times, it can be a lot to wrap your head around, but clarity comes with hindsight as the storylines converge and weave together in a way that’s both satisfying and highly climactic. Glow is an immensely entertaining and hugely ambitious debut, a tale of technology running riot - quite literally, in some cases - that’s packed with interesting ideas and themes, not to mention visceral action perpetrated by morally grey characters. Tim Jordan has aimed high here, and it’s paid off spectacularly. One to watch.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jane Jordan

    This is not my normal genre, but I enjoyed this book. Glow has lots of interesting ideas and creativity. A story set in the near future that explores the possibility of where humanity could be heading. This is a character-driven story, in which the tech element of sci-fi is ever-present. In this complex world, Tim Jordan defines three main characters, and scenes move along like three separate stories. My favorite character is Rex a drug addict trying to resist Glow, a nanotech futuristic drug, tha This is not my normal genre, but I enjoyed this book. Glow has lots of interesting ideas and creativity. A story set in the near future that explores the possibility of where humanity could be heading. This is a character-driven story, in which the tech element of sci-fi is ever-present. In this complex world, Tim Jordan defines three main characters, and scenes move along like three separate stories. My favorite character is Rex a drug addict trying to resist Glow, a nanotech futuristic drug, that has been instrumental in the downfall of humanity. Rex has an interesting memory bank of other characters that continue to influence him. The most predominant being a dog, and I loved the creativity of the dog’s memory inside a human being. Glow has elements of a space opera with characters far above the earth living in virtual reality, but on the futuristic earth, everything is ruined and people are driven to desperation. Even though this is a depressing world, Tim Jordan drips enough upbeat feeling into the mix in the form of, the forever friends’ sanctuary, robot nuns, and other nuanced characters to keep the reader engaged right to the climatic and emotional end of the story. .

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 2.0 of 5 From the publisher's description, as found on Goodreads: After the Nova-Insanity shattered Earth's civilization, the Genes and Fullerenes Corporation promised to bring humanity back from the brink. Many years later, various factions have formed, challenging their savior and vying for a share of power and control. Glow follows the lives of three very different beings, all wrestling mental instability in various forms; Rex - This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 2.0 of 5 From the publisher's description, as found on Goodreads: After the Nova-Insanity shattered Earth's civilization, the Genes and Fullerenes Corporation promised to bring humanity back from the brink. Many years later, various factions have formed, challenging their savior and vying for a share of power and control. Glow follows the lives of three very different beings, all wrestling mental instability in various forms; Rex - a confused junkie battling multiple voices in his head; Ellayna - the founder of the GFC living on an orbital satellite station and struggling with paranoia; and Jett - a virtually unstoppable robotic assassin, questioning his purpose of creation. ... I think that's all you really need to know, although the description does go on. Three beings wrestling mental instability, including a robotic assassin questioning his purpose. Uhhhh.... That alone would suggest that either this is going to be a wild, Philip K. Dick-like tale or a messy conglomerate of ideas. The possibility of the former is what had me excited to read it, but unfortunately it came across as the latter. There's a lot going on here ... a LOT ... but that shouldn't be a detriment to the story - it should enhance the reader's desire to put it all together. Unfortunately it is a detriment. We get bogged down in the weight of this world and all the information that we have to receive in order to make sense of it all.And somehow there's characters in here, involved in the story, but I never felt I got to know them and I certainly cared even less about them. A big chunk of the plot revolves around 'Glow' - a nanotech drug. While there was a pretty interesting facet of this drug (the ability to survive from host to host, carrying portions of the previous host(s) into the next host), I really couldn't shake the feeling that this was so familiar. Drugs and drug use in science fiction is not a new concept but it does feel as though we've suddenly seen a rash of 'tech drugs' in recent sci-fi and I can name three that have come from publisher Angry Robot (Ramez Naam's Nexus series; Ferrett Steinmetz's Flex series [okay ... not a tech drug, but a high-profile drug around which the series is based]; and Amanda Bridgeman's Salvi Brentt series' drugs). 'Glow' didn't feel new and creative but rather a slightly creative rehash of what has gone (recently) before. Looking for a good book? Glow, by Tim Jordan, is a science fiction novel that tries to encompass too much in a wildly inventive manner and the result is a difficult to read mess. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Criticalsf

    This is an excellent novel. A rather complex story that is well written, well executed and satisfying to read. It is a dark novel as I was expecting from the dystopian setting. So I was not expecting a comedy. Having said that, there were some genuinely laugh-out-loud funny moments, but also moments of tenderness and real sadness. I laughed, cried, pondered existence, and learned a thing or two, so this book covers the full gamut of emotions. This is a complex novel, meaning that there are three This is an excellent novel. A rather complex story that is well written, well executed and satisfying to read. It is a dark novel as I was expecting from the dystopian setting. So I was not expecting a comedy. Having said that, there were some genuinely laugh-out-loud funny moments, but also moments of tenderness and real sadness. I laughed, cried, pondered existence, and learned a thing or two, so this book covers the full gamut of emotions. This is a complex novel, meaning that there are three main characters with a lot going on and lots of new technology to keep track of. Many science fiction novels fall into laziness and use magical thinking and absurd physics. I felt everything happening in Glow was plausible and possible in our near future, but also interesting and most importantly, very original. The book moves at a fast pace with some good twists, and all the threads come together nicely at the end leaving plenty of scope for a sequel. Which I would be very happy to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jojo In

    I really enjoyed this book. Yes, it is heavy on the science and the fiction but that is what I like. Being a nerdy academic, it is refreshing to read a book where the plausible science challenges a scientist. Jordan does a great job of building a world that is rich in gore and grit while being human and vulnerable, a rare find in a hard science fiction book. One review I read was that it reads like a great space opera, and I agree. From its gritty start in a back alley to the unexpected ending, I really enjoyed this book. Yes, it is heavy on the science and the fiction but that is what I like. Being a nerdy academic, it is refreshing to read a book where the plausible science challenges a scientist. Jordan does a great job of building a world that is rich in gore and grit while being human and vulnerable, a rare find in a hard science fiction book. One review I read was that it reads like a great space opera, and I agree. From its gritty start in a back alley to the unexpected ending, the world of nanotech longevity drugs, hacked to create an ever-more addictive product that turns users into chemical repo-men who take back the street version, Glow, is quite a backdrop for everything else that Jordan throws at you, and it's a lot. So start on a Saturday morning and make sure you have some crunchy snacks to sustain you till the end, at least that's how I consumed it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shirleon Benson

    This was a random pick-up at my local Barnes and Noble. I've never heard of the author or the publisher before and it definitely gave me small publisher/self-publisher vibes. Which wasn't a bad thing! I loved just grabbing something that caught my eye. And it ended up being an excellent choice. While I loved the story and the various characters - some more than others (Rex <3) - I did find that it jumped around a little too much and left a little too much either unexplained or explained in a way This was a random pick-up at my local Barnes and Noble. I've never heard of the author or the publisher before and it definitely gave me small publisher/self-publisher vibes. Which wasn't a bad thing! I loved just grabbing something that caught my eye. And it ended up being an excellent choice. While I loved the story and the various characters - some more than others (Rex <3) - I did find that it jumped around a little too much and left a little too much either unexplained or explained in a way that I just should have known what happened. I would have liked a little more history (a flashback chapter or prologue) to explain the Alliance and their deal with the GFC and then maybe a little more about the general lives of people on Coriolis City. In the end, when the war is happening, it felt a little more like (and serious air quotes here) "a war was going on." There was some action with Jet (also <3) but you only saw the action during his moments and not much beyond that. It was a little trippy. Speaking of Jet - his character and personality were so interesting and chilling. Being a non-human you could have easily gone with robotic and have no growth. But there is a constant change that Jet goes through, making him all the more creepy and fascinating. There were a few moments in the book where Jet is dealing with people and then kills them. Except he doesn't just stab them or shot them in the head - he either extends his body into slithering tendrils and pierces the flesh of a person OR he folds them. Yep. FOLDS. I would certainly recommend this book for anyone who likes science fiction and space rings and inhabitants still on Earth. I loved the concept of longevity nanotechnology being used as a drug. This was something I wish we explored a little more between those on Coriolis and upon the ring where it seemed the people who developed this tech resided (?). There was some mention towards the end - "oh, they are using it as a drug? What? Let's look into that." And then nothing... BUT it was a fun ride. I think I'd like to see more of this world or anything else that Jordan puts out.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl Jones

    I was sent a ebook copy of Glow by the publisher in return for an honest review. Glow is the debut novel from Tim Jordan and tells the story of Rex, a man battling his addiction to Glow against the backdrop of a world ravaged by the Nova-Insanity. There’s a corporation who ‘live’ in space, robots and nano-tech seems common place and there seems to be a drug for everything. Oh, and since people can live ‘forever’ so do the dogs 😍 I really enjoyed the world building - the book takes a while to get g I was sent a ebook copy of Glow by the publisher in return for an honest review. Glow is the debut novel from Tim Jordan and tells the story of Rex, a man battling his addiction to Glow against the backdrop of a world ravaged by the Nova-Insanity. There’s a corporation who ‘live’ in space, robots and nano-tech seems common place and there seems to be a drug for everything. Oh, and since people can live ‘forever’ so do the dogs 😍 I really enjoyed the world building - the book takes a while to get going, but the world is very complex so I felt I needed that amount of time to get to grips with what was going on. Rex is an interesting character and I thought the slow revealing of what Glow is and it’s effects was very well done. There is a lot going on in the book and, as much as I felt everything was written well, I did think some parts, like the religious aspects, didn’t add anything to the story. Overall, this is a very well written debut novel. I give it a solid 3 ⭐️. Definitely check this one out if you’re looking for solid world building and some interesting ideas!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Humanity was given an inexpensive, 3d printable fusion reactor. They quickly figured out how to make it explode. Which soon led to chaos as cities were flattened and the orbital stations were cut off from the ground. There are three main characters;: Rex, who is hooked on Glow and just trying to survive the dystopian hell left behind by the Nova Insanity. Ellyana, who is one of the founders of GFC (the corporation that makes the life extending Simmorta) lives on an orbital station and is fightin Humanity was given an inexpensive, 3d printable fusion reactor. They quickly figured out how to make it explode. Which soon led to chaos as cities were flattened and the orbital stations were cut off from the ground. There are three main characters;: Rex, who is hooked on Glow and just trying to survive the dystopian hell left behind by the Nova Insanity. Ellyana, who is one of the founders of GFC (the corporation that makes the life extending Simmorta) lives on an orbital station and is fighting her own paranoia. And my favorite, Jett. Jett is an assassin with a robotic body and nanotech that can change his shape and abilities on the fly. Each of these characters has to face up to what their life means and what, exactly, life is. I highly recommend Glow to those who like sci fi. I was surprised to find out this is a debut novel. The world building is well done and the characters interesting and believable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Morillo

    This story takes place in the future after a nuclear holocaust called the "Nova-insanity" destroyed Earth's civilization. The culprit is an advanced bio-technology called "glow." The corporation that created the advanced technology is holding on to power as an Earth-alliance is looking to overthrow it. There is a lot of action and the end is probably my favorite part of this book. Tim Jordan writes at a very technical level and this is a high concept book but it was a little hard for me to get th This story takes place in the future after a nuclear holocaust called the "Nova-insanity" destroyed Earth's civilization. The culprit is an advanced bio-technology called "glow." The corporation that created the advanced technology is holding on to power as an Earth-alliance is looking to overthrow it. There is a lot of action and the end is probably my favorite part of this book. Tim Jordan writes at a very technical level and this is a high concept book but it was a little hard for me to get through. The plot is a little confusing and I skimmed through the middle of the book. I do give the author credit for his creativity but I was never invested in the characters. The cover is amazing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Cosmi

    Sorry, but I didn't make it to the end of this one. Someone once told me that life is too short to be wasted on mediocre books. The story is told through several different perspectives, and unfortunately all are odd and not easy to follow or tell what exactly is going on. The synopsis has an interesting plot and the writing is good and well written. The story falls where there is so much half hatched far fetched ideas trying to take place and meld into one coherent story. I ultimately gave up fo Sorry, but I didn't make it to the end of this one. Someone once told me that life is too short to be wasted on mediocre books. The story is told through several different perspectives, and unfortunately all are odd and not easy to follow or tell what exactly is going on. The synopsis has an interesting plot and the writing is good and well written. The story falls where there is so much half hatched far fetched ideas trying to take place and meld into one coherent story. I ultimately gave up for that reason. I was halfway through (and struggling to get there) and didn't actually know what was going on and understand half of it, and know or care where the book was going. Hopefully this works for other people because I don't think the author is a bad writer this was just a bad story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Reid Edwards

    Glow was a great novel, with fascinating storylines mixing with interesting characters . Jordan writes inner monologues as well as any author currently working, and his characters develop slowly throughout the story. He drops you into the middle of the action without too much exposition; what you need to know, you learn piece by piece. I had a difficult time putting myself into the shoes of the protagonists, but without a doubt Jordan is one of the better SF writers currently publishing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Keane

    It was alright. I liked the fact that the characters weren't necessarily human, but I think the entire plot on the space station was unneeded, the overall world was unexplored, and the back cover was completely unrelated to the story. It just ended a little lackluster for me. It was alright. I liked the fact that the characters weren't necessarily human, but I think the entire plot on the space station was unneeded, the overall world was unexplored, and the back cover was completely unrelated to the story. It just ended a little lackluster for me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Evans

    I read the first 10% and it wasn't working for me, too far outside my comfort zone - too much I just didn't understand and right now I just don't have enough free brain cells to try.. I read the first 10% and it wasn't working for me, too far outside my comfort zone - too much I just didn't understand and right now I just don't have enough free brain cells to try..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    DNF - not bad but nothing special, not worth my time

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matheus

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Schut

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt Simpson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abbey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Léa Delapierre

  27. 5 out of 5

    James

  28. 4 out of 5

    Órla

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  30. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Martin

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