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Olive Cotton

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A landmark biography of a singular and important Australian photographer, Olive Cotton, by an award-winning writer - beautifully written and deeply moving. Olive Cotton was one of Australia's pioneering modernist photographers, whose significant talent was recognised as equal to her first husband, the famous photographer Max Dupain. Together, Olive and Max were an Australia A landmark biography of a singular and important Australian photographer, Olive Cotton, by an award-winning writer - beautifully written and deeply moving. Olive Cotton was one of Australia's pioneering modernist photographers, whose significant talent was recognised as equal to her first husband, the famous photographer Max Dupain. Together, Olive and Max were an Australian version of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera or Ray and Charles Eames, and the photographic work they produced in the 1930s and early 1940s was bold, distinctive and quintessentially Australian. But in the mid-1940s Olive divorced Max, leaving Sydney to live with her second husband, Ross McInerney, and raise their two children in a tent on a farm near Cowra - later moving to a cottage that had no running water, electricity or telephone for many years. Famously quiet, yet stubbornly determined, Olive continued her photography despite these challenges and the lack of a dark room. But away from the public eye, her work was almost forgotten until a landmark exhibition in Sydney in 1985 shot her back to fame, followed by a major retrospective at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 2000, ensuring her reputation as one of the country's greatest photographers. Intriguing, moving and powerful, this is Olive's story, but it is also a compelling story of women and creativity - and about what it means for an artist to try to balance the competing demands of their art, work, marriage, children and family. 'Absorbing ... illuminating and moving' Inside Story


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A landmark biography of a singular and important Australian photographer, Olive Cotton, by an award-winning writer - beautifully written and deeply moving. Olive Cotton was one of Australia's pioneering modernist photographers, whose significant talent was recognised as equal to her first husband, the famous photographer Max Dupain. Together, Olive and Max were an Australia A landmark biography of a singular and important Australian photographer, Olive Cotton, by an award-winning writer - beautifully written and deeply moving. Olive Cotton was one of Australia's pioneering modernist photographers, whose significant talent was recognised as equal to her first husband, the famous photographer Max Dupain. Together, Olive and Max were an Australian version of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera or Ray and Charles Eames, and the photographic work they produced in the 1930s and early 1940s was bold, distinctive and quintessentially Australian. But in the mid-1940s Olive divorced Max, leaving Sydney to live with her second husband, Ross McInerney, and raise their two children in a tent on a farm near Cowra - later moving to a cottage that had no running water, electricity or telephone for many years. Famously quiet, yet stubbornly determined, Olive continued her photography despite these challenges and the lack of a dark room. But away from the public eye, her work was almost forgotten until a landmark exhibition in Sydney in 1985 shot her back to fame, followed by a major retrospective at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 2000, ensuring her reputation as one of the country's greatest photographers. Intriguing, moving and powerful, this is Olive's story, but it is also a compelling story of women and creativity - and about what it means for an artist to try to balance the competing demands of their art, work, marriage, children and family. 'Absorbing ... illuminating and moving' Inside Story

44 review for Olive Cotton

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert Watson

    How wonderful. An exceptional insight into Olive Cotton’s life and work. The descriptions of the chosen images add greatly to our understanding of this woman’s rare gift of capturing the emotion and depth in her subjects. A real joy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  3. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Gins

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anne Peeters

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sally Clowes

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Millard

  10. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

  11. 4 out of 5

    Biro Tomodachi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

  13. 5 out of 5

    Annika Harding

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Mackay

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annie-JoElizabeth

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jane Mulligan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mairi De Vries

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  24. 4 out of 5

    Snitterfield

  25. 5 out of 5

    TMR

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ashton Higgins

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Silvana

  31. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  32. 4 out of 5

    Janine

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jane Holmes

  34. 5 out of 5

    Julia Gilchrist

  35. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Page

  36. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

  37. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

  38. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

  39. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Williams

  40. 4 out of 5

    David Walsh

  41. 4 out of 5

    Denise Lawry

  42. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Bedford

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Favelle

  44. 4 out of 5

    Shanti

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