counter create hit False Premise, False Promise: The Disastrous Reality of Medicare for All - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

False Premise, False Promise: The Disastrous Reality of Medicare for All

Availability: Ready to download

American health care is at a crossroads. Health spending reached $3.5 trillion in 2017. Yet more than 27 million people remain uninsured. And it's unclear if all that spending is buying higher-quality care. Patients, doctors, insurers, and the government acknowledge that the healthcare status quo is unsustainable. America's last attempt at health reform -- Obamacare -- did American health care is at a crossroads. Health spending reached $3.5 trillion in 2017. Yet more than 27 million people remain uninsured. And it's unclear if all that spending is buying higher-quality care. Patients, doctors, insurers, and the government acknowledge that the healthcare status quo is unsustainable. America's last attempt at health reform -- Obamacare -- didn't work. Nearly a decade after its passage in 2010, Democrats are calling for a government takeover of the nation's healthcare system -- Medicare for All. The idea's supporters assert that health care is a right. They promise generous, universal, high-quality care to all Americans, with no referrals, copays, deductibles, or coinsurance. With a sales pitch like that, it's no wonder that seven in ten people now support Medicare for All. Doctors, especially young ones, are coming around to the idea of single-payer, too. Democrats, led by the progressive wing of the party, hope to capitalize on this enthusiasm. In 2017, they introduced companion legislation in the House and Senate that would establish Medicare for All. They have already promised to do the same when the next Congress convenes in 2019. More than 70 House Democrats have joined a new Medicare for All Caucus. Senator Bernie Sanders is effectively already on the presidential campaign trail, making his case for single-payer. If Democrats take the White House and Senate in 2020, and hold onto the House, a Medicare for All bill could be among the first pieces of legislation presented to the new president for a signature. In this book, Sally C. Pipes, a Canadian native, will make the case against Medicare for All. She'll explain why health care is not a right -- and how progressives pressing for single-payer are making a litany of promises they can't possibly keep. Evidence from government-run systems in Canada, the United Kingdom, and other developed countries proves that single-payer forces patients to withstand long waits for poor care at high cost. First, she'll unpack the Medicare for All plans under consideration in Congress. She'll explain how radical they truly are. Medicare for All will not save $5 trillion, as some of its proponents claim. It will cost about $32 trillion over 10 years, according to analyses from the Urban Institute and the Mercatus Center. It will outlaw private health insurance. It will raise taxes by trillions of dollars. It will cut pay for doctors to the rates paid by Medicare and thereby exacerbate our nation's shortage of physicians. And it will ration care. Then, Sally will detail the horrors of single-payer. She'll start in Canada, whose single-payer system most closely resembles the one progressives have in mind for the United States. Analyses of the government-run systems in the United Kingdom and a few other developed countries will follow, with particular focus on the problems that these systems pose for patients and doctors. To substantiate her indictment of single-payer, Sally will marshal both quantitative and qualitative evidence. She'll highlight how Americans fare better than their peers in Canada and the United Kingdom on the health outcomes that are directly linked to the quality of a healthcare system, including survival rates for patients with cancer and cardiovascular issues. She'll also explain why the health outcomes where the United States performs poorly relative to other nations, like infant mortality and life expectancy, tell us little about our healthcare system. Sally will pepper her text with heart-wrenching stories of the human costs of single-payer -- of people who were injured, were forced to remain in pain, or even died because their government-run healthcare system delayed or denied care. Too often, evangelists for free markets limit their arguments to facts and statistics -- and fail to appeal to the public's emotions. Sally will feature the stories of individuals and families who have been victims of single-payer systems. These vignettes...


Compare

American health care is at a crossroads. Health spending reached $3.5 trillion in 2017. Yet more than 27 million people remain uninsured. And it's unclear if all that spending is buying higher-quality care. Patients, doctors, insurers, and the government acknowledge that the healthcare status quo is unsustainable. America's last attempt at health reform -- Obamacare -- did American health care is at a crossroads. Health spending reached $3.5 trillion in 2017. Yet more than 27 million people remain uninsured. And it's unclear if all that spending is buying higher-quality care. Patients, doctors, insurers, and the government acknowledge that the healthcare status quo is unsustainable. America's last attempt at health reform -- Obamacare -- didn't work. Nearly a decade after its passage in 2010, Democrats are calling for a government takeover of the nation's healthcare system -- Medicare for All. The idea's supporters assert that health care is a right. They promise generous, universal, high-quality care to all Americans, with no referrals, copays, deductibles, or coinsurance. With a sales pitch like that, it's no wonder that seven in ten people now support Medicare for All. Doctors, especially young ones, are coming around to the idea of single-payer, too. Democrats, led by the progressive wing of the party, hope to capitalize on this enthusiasm. In 2017, they introduced companion legislation in the House and Senate that would establish Medicare for All. They have already promised to do the same when the next Congress convenes in 2019. More than 70 House Democrats have joined a new Medicare for All Caucus. Senator Bernie Sanders is effectively already on the presidential campaign trail, making his case for single-payer. If Democrats take the White House and Senate in 2020, and hold onto the House, a Medicare for All bill could be among the first pieces of legislation presented to the new president for a signature. In this book, Sally C. Pipes, a Canadian native, will make the case against Medicare for All. She'll explain why health care is not a right -- and how progressives pressing for single-payer are making a litany of promises they can't possibly keep. Evidence from government-run systems in Canada, the United Kingdom, and other developed countries proves that single-payer forces patients to withstand long waits for poor care at high cost. First, she'll unpack the Medicare for All plans under consideration in Congress. She'll explain how radical they truly are. Medicare for All will not save $5 trillion, as some of its proponents claim. It will cost about $32 trillion over 10 years, according to analyses from the Urban Institute and the Mercatus Center. It will outlaw private health insurance. It will raise taxes by trillions of dollars. It will cut pay for doctors to the rates paid by Medicare and thereby exacerbate our nation's shortage of physicians. And it will ration care. Then, Sally will detail the horrors of single-payer. She'll start in Canada, whose single-payer system most closely resembles the one progressives have in mind for the United States. Analyses of the government-run systems in the United Kingdom and a few other developed countries will follow, with particular focus on the problems that these systems pose for patients and doctors. To substantiate her indictment of single-payer, Sally will marshal both quantitative and qualitative evidence. She'll highlight how Americans fare better than their peers in Canada and the United Kingdom on the health outcomes that are directly linked to the quality of a healthcare system, including survival rates for patients with cancer and cardiovascular issues. She'll also explain why the health outcomes where the United States performs poorly relative to other nations, like infant mortality and life expectancy, tell us little about our healthcare system. Sally will pepper her text with heart-wrenching stories of the human costs of single-payer -- of people who were injured, were forced to remain in pain, or even died because their government-run healthcare system delayed or denied care. Too often, evangelists for free markets limit their arguments to facts and statistics -- and fail to appeal to the public's emotions. Sally will feature the stories of individuals and families who have been victims of single-payer systems. These vignettes...

44 review for False Premise, False Promise: The Disastrous Reality of Medicare for All

  1. 5 out of 5

    Prashanth

    Right wing propaganda that cherry picks exceptional cases while ignoring important context, and generalizing that to the whole concept of universal healthcare. The explanation on why healthcare was not a basic right was awfully unempathetic. Books like these serve as mouthpieces for propagating and legitimizing exclusionary thought.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris White

    I legitimately can't, in one review, express just how hilariously garbage the arguments made in this book are. Three highlights from the first chapter-and-a-half: * Sally tries to make a false equivalence between current Medicare and "Medicare for All" (so named because it's a familiar name, not because one program is even tangentially related to the other). * She claims healthcare is not a right after a gallon of word soup containing semantic arguments based on how "nobody can truly define" what I legitimately can't, in one review, express just how hilariously garbage the arguments made in this book are. Three highlights from the first chapter-and-a-half: * Sally tries to make a false equivalence between current Medicare and "Medicare for All" (so named because it's a familiar name, not because one program is even tangentially related to the other). * She claims healthcare is not a right after a gallon of word soup containing semantic arguments based on how "nobody can truly define" what a right to healthcare would be. * She managed to put the idea that "many will lose their job in the insurance market" and "the government will have to hire thousands to work on M4A" two sentences apart without managing to connect the dots. The entire final 3/4 of the book is a parade of arguments from emotion, cherry-picking people who had unfortunate experiences in Canadian and UK healthcare, ignoring that both countries' programs are largely loved by their populations; nobody claims that the healthcare systems in those countries are perfect and her exaggerations rarely seem to coincide with stories about how US healthcare is better than either in any way. It's the conservative ideology of not believing things deserve regulation unless they can be 100% perfect at its finest, and a hilarious ignorance of the literal millions of similar and worse stories you could find within current American healthcare simply by checking twitter for a minute. This is a tangled mess of arguments, false equivalences and philosophical dreck that presents such terrible information that it would require an entire other book to debunk sufficiently.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Darren Gray

    Many will be unhappy with the results and conclusion within this book. However the author has been smart to back up all her claims with the book containing 36 pages of citations! As a public health student I personally understand both sides of the argument. I personally think that a 100% single-payer “Medicare-for-all” system would come at a great cost to the American population. In addition she also address the counter arguments. Regardless of your stance this is a great book outlining some of Many will be unhappy with the results and conclusion within this book. However the author has been smart to back up all her claims with the book containing 36 pages of citations! As a public health student I personally understand both sides of the argument. I personally think that a 100% single-payer “Medicare-for-all” system would come at a great cost to the American population. In addition she also address the counter arguments. Regardless of your stance this is a great book outlining some of the issues of single-payer systems with focus on the UK and Canada! Overall great read!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stan Sienkiewicz

    While the individual stories provide an example of various points in the book. The opposition view could do the same. Also can find one case opposite any opinion. I’m not criticizing the author but want to state a fact. The book does show at a macro level how much of the media has misinformed the public. What we need is more open discussion of the facts and not statements to elicit emotional reaction. I would love to see a five page talking points of this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Don

    So bad.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Hood

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jim Hussey

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ward Johnson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Mitchum

  11. 5 out of 5

    Buddy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Raiyan Ahsan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Devin Eastman

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Bubrow

  16. 5 out of 5

    Irene

  17. 5 out of 5

    Evan Lee

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Joseph W. Stubbs

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andy Biggs

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Eplin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Donald Forster

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  27. 5 out of 5

    Salman Ahmed

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fivewincs

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Hoffman

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erik

  31. 4 out of 5

    Clyde Macalister

  32. 4 out of 5

    Angela Karnes

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sam Sharpe

  34. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Estes

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sms

  36. 5 out of 5

    Robert Cassman

  37. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Risher

  38. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Patti

  40. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

  41. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Whitmer

  42. 5 out of 5

    Donna Montero

  43. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Honcoop

  44. 4 out of 5

    Julia

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.