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In the vein of Tavis Smiley's The Covenant with Black America, veteran radio and television personality Ed Gordon offers an unvarnished collection of essays about the state of Black America, drawn from his time on the road interviewing some of today's most prominent African American leaders and influencers, including Maxine Waters, Joy Ann Reid, Angela Rye, Ben Crump, Brya In the vein of Tavis Smiley's The Covenant with Black America, veteran radio and television personality Ed Gordon offers an unvarnished collection of essays about the state of Black America, drawn from his time on the road interviewing some of today's most prominent African American leaders and influencers, including Maxine Waters, Joy Ann Reid, Angela Rye, Ben Crump, Bryan Stevenson, and more. Gordon tackles vital topics in the Trump era such as the troubled intersection of race and politics the gains and regression of Black inclusion living with functioning White nationalism navigating the far-right's co-opting of free speech surviving Trump's xenophobia and restrictive immigration tactics the role of Black female leadership in America (re)defining Blackness in today's pop culture Hard-hitting and inspiring, Gordon will reveal a new blueprint for navigating race in a divisive America. He concludes that in spite of slavery, Jim Crow, the school to prison pipeline, and all the other injustices African Americans face, there remains a deep connection and loyalty to each other and the United States. Through strengthening politics, finances, and advocacy, victory will be revealed again and again. In Conversations in Black, Gordon embarks on the rigorous journey with a mighty team of black intelligentsia to define and outline a plan for what individual and collective leadership must be today.


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In the vein of Tavis Smiley's The Covenant with Black America, veteran radio and television personality Ed Gordon offers an unvarnished collection of essays about the state of Black America, drawn from his time on the road interviewing some of today's most prominent African American leaders and influencers, including Maxine Waters, Joy Ann Reid, Angela Rye, Ben Crump, Brya In the vein of Tavis Smiley's The Covenant with Black America, veteran radio and television personality Ed Gordon offers an unvarnished collection of essays about the state of Black America, drawn from his time on the road interviewing some of today's most prominent African American leaders and influencers, including Maxine Waters, Joy Ann Reid, Angela Rye, Ben Crump, Bryan Stevenson, and more. Gordon tackles vital topics in the Trump era such as the troubled intersection of race and politics the gains and regression of Black inclusion living with functioning White nationalism navigating the far-right's co-opting of free speech surviving Trump's xenophobia and restrictive immigration tactics the role of Black female leadership in America (re)defining Blackness in today's pop culture Hard-hitting and inspiring, Gordon will reveal a new blueprint for navigating race in a divisive America. He concludes that in spite of slavery, Jim Crow, the school to prison pipeline, and all the other injustices African Americans face, there remains a deep connection and loyalty to each other and the United States. Through strengthening politics, finances, and advocacy, victory will be revealed again and again. In Conversations in Black, Gordon embarks on the rigorous journey with a mighty team of black intelligentsia to define and outline a plan for what individual and collective leadership must be today.

30 review for Conversations in Black: On Power, Politics, and Leadership

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    What a powerful book ! I don't think I truly knew what I was getting myself into when I decided to pick up this book. At first it was just cover appeal especially when I saw all the names that I recognized. However, from the moment that I opened this book my read became so much more. A lot of the topics discussed in this book are things that I often discuss with my friends and family. In fact, I'm not sure there are many black people who haven't discussed the issues brought forth in this book. G What a powerful book ! I don't think I truly knew what I was getting myself into when I decided to pick up this book. At first it was just cover appeal especially when I saw all the names that I recognized. However, from the moment that I opened this book my read became so much more. A lot of the topics discussed in this book are things that I often discuss with my friends and family. In fact, I'm not sure there are many black people who haven't discussed the issues brought forth in this book. Gordon does a spectacular job of addressing some of the most important topics as they relate to the black community. Readers will find that this book isn't one sided. Everyone doesn't agree. In fact, you'll find times during the narrative that designated speakers will actively engage in conversations where they have different opinions and insight. It was such a beautiful thing to watch because I think that sometimes we get lost in this narrative that black people must agree on all topics that relate to the black community and that's just not true. One thing that everyone did seem to agree on was the fact that the black community needs to actively engage in coming up with new strategies to address the educational, political, and economic disparities that black people face day after day and year after year. While we can acknowledge the methods and strategies that have gotten us to this point, it's time for new ideas that can help in this day and age. Some of my favorite discussion from the book included: Obama, Trump, Black Girl Magic, Mo Money Mo Problems, The Madea Dilemma, and Am I Black Enough For YA. For some reasons these specific topics resonated with questions and ideas that I've had about myself and the black community for some time. There were a great number of perspectives that I agree with and others that I didn't agree with. However, they all gave me better ideas of how I could be better supporting my community. Whether you're black or not this is an important book to read and one that really asks some difficult questions of the black community. I didn't have my own copy of this book so I plan on purchasing it and re-reading it and annotating it. This is one of the important non-fiction books that I have read this year.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Starlah

    OH EM EF GE. This is literally a book of conversations that we ALL need to be having. I absolutely LOVED how this book was structured! I didn't feel like reading a book but more like watching a round table discussion. And with so many questions asked, even some directed towards the reader, it did an amazing job of pulling the reader into the conversation. Amazing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    5.0 I do not think I have ever highlighted a book, or thought more deeply throughout a book in my entire life. I cannot recommend this book enough! If you are someone who is serious about trying to understand the current state of black America today and place it in a historical context, then I urge you to read this book. This book is vastly superior to so many books out there that are trying to send a message to all the guilt ridden people who want to alleviate their guilt by reading a mainstream 5.0 I do not think I have ever highlighted a book, or thought more deeply throughout a book in my entire life. I cannot recommend this book enough! If you are someone who is serious about trying to understand the current state of black America today and place it in a historical context, then I urge you to read this book. This book is vastly superior to so many books out there that are trying to send a message to all the guilt ridden people who want to alleviate their guilt by reading a mainstream book or reposting catchy phrases through social media. Those mediums all have their place and pointing out that there is horrific systemic racism in this country is definitely the first step, but it is going to take a consistent concerted effort by many to undue generations of mistreatment. My fear is that people will do enough to alleviate their guilt, momentarily feel like part of a movement and then move on with their lives. There must be creative and concrete ideas that bring about real change throughout the country. It was so powerful hearing the voices of so many black leaders give their opinions, often conflicting, about major issues facing our country today in Conversations in Black by media legend, Ed Gordon. It helps to drive home the point that there is not one black voice or point that represents the call for change, but a multitude of different views that must be woven together to create real and lasting change. The structure of the book models the important point that serious discourse from varying leaders and people is absolutely critical in building real equal opportunities in this country and that listening to just one voice can be misguided. I also really enjoyed when Ed Gordon infused his personal experiences and beliefs throughout the chapters. Ed's experienced voice was a real strength and I wish he gave himself an even bigger canvas to discuss the issues of each chapter. This book left me wanting to hear the opinions of so many other black leaders, but also the voices of the millions of those regular people living all throughout the United States who are impacted daily by systematic racism.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abby Suzanne

    Conversations in Black was recommended to me by a friend and it was an excellent, excellent read. Reading it felt like I'd been invited to a really cool party I wouldn't otherwise have been invited to, and learning and reading the perspectives of Black leaders from different backgrounds and generations on a whole range of topics was really incredible. If you haven't read this one, definitely definitely pick it up.

  5. 5 out of 5

    LeeTravelGoddess

    YAAAAAALLLLLLLL, LISTEN... So, initially i was like... wait WHET?? And once I got into the groove of the book I was in THE GROOVE OF THE BOOK!!! This book is so monumental to me in so many regards, from so many different perspectives. I learned so much from this one piece of literature-- my knowledge was bolstered, strengthened and even tested FROM THIS ONE piece of literature!! This book should be on our coffee tables and in our hearts; as a people, this should be required reading just so that YAAAAAALLLLLLLL, LISTEN... So, initially i was like... wait WHET?? And once I got into the groove of the book I was in THE GROOVE OF THE BOOK!!! This book is so monumental to me in so many regards, from so many different perspectives. I learned so much from this one piece of literature-- my knowledge was bolstered, strengthened and even tested FROM THIS ONE piece of literature!! This book should be on our coffee tables and in our hearts; as a people, this should be required reading just so that we get on one page. I. MEAN. we are more powerful than we know, more influuential than we can ever imagine and while some may say that we can't move on or that we should do better as a people... they have not lived our lives, walked in our shoes or taken blow after blow AFTER a 450 year headstart!!! I also wan't to say that we should just say Thank You to President Barack Obama and be done with it. He did not nor does he currently owe US ANYTHING AS A RACE. NOT NOTHING!!! How dare you out a human being on a pedistal and hope that they wipe away 450 years of damage in 8 years... HOW DARE WE!!! I think that he did what he set out to do, with style, grace, charm wits and most importantly education. PLEASE STOP and take a look in the mirror, that man made HISTORY with his family's life in balance and you criticize him for not doing the menial things that you JUST came to grips with... an idea that you just made up and thought it best for our entire race. SHUT UP cause i dont see you running AND WINNING the highest office in the land... just shush! And then the book goes into how "we needed 45" to see what America is really about but no we didn't, never did so, kill that noise too. Fourty-Four didn't make your impossible dreams come true but 45 has allowed you to truly see the light? Nah, get off your butt and make things happen in your life, town, city, country... as the old addige says, change begins with you! Moving on to the rest of the book... I am inspired to do more and to not only do that but to also live my best life while I am doing more! There are so many nuggets of wisdon strewn throughout each page that I simply could not keep up, names, organizations, ideas and even truths that I have acquired from this book. I have passed it on to my family and colleagues and look forward to the conversation that we will have in the near future. I love, love, love the questions at the end of each chapter-- I'm just so proud of what we have risen from and are on the road to... This book is a wonderful beginning for most and I hope that this furthers the conversation, increases our leverage in the world and most of all provides us with a solid foundation of winning collectively and continuing those wins for generations to come! Its a tops guys and if you buy one book in the month of March... let this one be it!!! 💚💚💚

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katie Bruell

    I love the idea of this book, but I'm not sure how well it played out. The conversations are more like disjointed quotes--you feel, reading them, that you're left out of most of the discussion. Also, I see a lot of what seems to this white outsider as blaming the victim. For example, in the discussion of representation in movies, there's a lot of talk about characters that black actors play or write or both that reflect stereotypes or reflect badly on black people as a whole. But isn't that the I love the idea of this book, but I'm not sure how well it played out. The conversations are more like disjointed quotes--you feel, reading them, that you're left out of most of the discussion. Also, I see a lot of what seems to this white outsider as blaming the victim. For example, in the discussion of representation in movies, there's a lot of talk about characters that black actors play or write or both that reflect stereotypes or reflect badly on black people as a whole. But isn't that the fault of a society that doesn't let black people be individuals? You don't see white people talking about how they shouldn't have made The Joker because that character reflects badly on white people. Just my two cents. I really love the questions at the end of each chapter, and the diversity of voices that is included in the book. I especially liked the parts written by Ed Gordon.

  7. 5 out of 5

    E.S.

    Insightful, challenging, and unique, Conversations In Black is presented as a Q&A. Author Ed Gordon picks a diverse panel featuring Black Americans from all walks of life, including Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter; former Republican lieutenant governor Michael Steele; rapper and activist Killer Mike; and #MeToo Founder Tarana Burke. Throughout the book, Ed presents a series of questions to his panel as well as a list of questions for the reader to use to start conversations in the Insightful, challenging, and unique, Conversations In Black is presented as a Q&A. Author Ed Gordon picks a diverse panel featuring Black Americans from all walks of life, including Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter; former Republican lieutenant governor Michael Steele; rapper and activist Killer Mike; and #MeToo Founder Tarana Burke. Throughout the book, Ed presents a series of questions to his panel as well as a list of questions for the reader to use to start conversations in their communities. Ed asks questions such as: What is the state of Black America today? and What does it mean to be black in America? Throughout the book, the reader will benefit from hearing multiple opinions on questions related to blackness and current politics. Representing women, men, Democrats, and Republicans, the panel offers a deep perspective into the issues facing Black America, including mass incarceration, police brutality, black-on-black violence, and lack of funding for historically black colleges. Readers, especially white, who are unaware of these issues, will gain a better understanding of how to help Black America, and can take the questions Ed presents at the end of each chapter to engage his or her communities to find common ground, create a political agenda, and unionize to make America a better place (for everyone).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Seth Lancaster

    A great way to hear a diverse perspective of the issue affecting the Black Community from blacks. As a white person, I learned a lot. Many of the ideas and questions are ones I have heard in conversation with my friends and coworkers, but most at least had another deeper level or perspective in their answers. I encourage anyone looking to continue (or start) conversations of their own about racism in America and what things we might be able to do to end some (hopefully all) of these injustices. T A great way to hear a diverse perspective of the issue affecting the Black Community from blacks. As a white person, I learned a lot. Many of the ideas and questions are ones I have heard in conversation with my friends and coworkers, but most at least had another deeper level or perspective in their answers. I encourage anyone looking to continue (or start) conversations of their own about racism in America and what things we might be able to do to end some (hopefully all) of these injustices. Therefore, I recommend it for everyone! And talk to me about it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tyra

    I need a physical copy ASAP! This feels less like book and more like I’m involved in a round table discussion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Love-Day

    The conversations are ones that are needed to create the change. This book is for everyone to read. I think it is important that we talk and have generational change for the Black community. I love the set up and book flow. I have tabbed and highlighted and it has motivated me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quinton Lopez

    Reading this book allowed me to look into the lens of black America from multiple perspectives. We are better off than we were 50, 30, and 20 years ago but there is more that needs to be done to move people of color forward to equality. A partnership between the previous generation and tactics paired with the methods and energy of the newer generation will bring forward change that we desperately need. "A crucial part of this advancement requires taking new approaches to wealth building." Educat Reading this book allowed me to look into the lens of black America from multiple perspectives. We are better off than we were 50, 30, and 20 years ago but there is more that needs to be done to move people of color forward to equality. A partnership between the previous generation and tactics paired with the methods and energy of the newer generation will bring forward change that we desperately need. "A crucial part of this advancement requires taking new approaches to wealth building." Education is a huge part of the success for the future. Representation in all facets of life are crucial to the development of our community and owning the narrative ensures our perspective is told. The power of change lies in our own hands and this book has inspired me to take action.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Clark

    Great insight read and I love the fact he asked questions throughout the book. All around amazing book I really recommend it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rl

    Centers around issues facing black Americans today from red-lining to mass incarceration, from economic disparity to what it means to be black in today's America. Takes the form of dialogues with "experts" in given disciplines and "successful" people within their fields to shed light on these issues. This is a fine discussion on relevant topics but I wonder if some if not most of the people taking part in these discussions are too far removed from certain issues to truly relate? They are certain Centers around issues facing black Americans today from red-lining to mass incarceration, from economic disparity to what it means to be black in today's America. Takes the form of dialogues with "experts" in given disciplines and "successful" people within their fields to shed light on these issues. This is a fine discussion on relevant topics but I wonder if some if not most of the people taking part in these discussions are too far removed from certain issues to truly relate? They are certainly not the common everyday people.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pascal

    This book is right on time! I loved the candid and open dialogue throughout the book. Whether you agree with some of their point of views or not, this book urges you to start having the conversations. This book forces you to have what might seem as uncomfortable conversations. Lets start to be comfortable with the uncomfortable. Maybe we will make some progress. I think Conversations In Black, just might steer us in right direction.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jsmithtomorigmail.Com

    Indeed a true conversation starter. CIB allows you to take a sneak peak into the actual conversations that existed with Ed Gordon and his guest and walk away with either additional questions and/or a new perspective. Terrific material to delve into if you are considering a book club or embarking upon good intelligent, intellectual conversations with friends. -JST

  16. 4 out of 5

    Briar

    I could spend hours telling you all the lessons I learned from this collection of interviews. We could then spend months dissecting the proposed solutions and opinions, the generational gaps, the coloration exchanges, the highs and the lows of Black America. But I won’t. There are some books that need to speak for themselves and some conversations that need to happen organically because of them, and this is one of those books. . . “No monolithic thought can be—or should be— reached by all African A I could spend hours telling you all the lessons I learned from this collection of interviews. We could then spend months dissecting the proposed solutions and opinions, the generational gaps, the coloration exchanges, the highs and the lows of Black America. But I won’t. There are some books that need to speak for themselves and some conversations that need to happen organically because of them, and this is one of those books. . . “No monolithic thought can be—or should be— reached by all African Americans in any subject. Our beliefs on how best to achieve the goal of equality are shaped by, among other things, our experiences, backgrounds, education, and social status. However, we can and should work toward building consensus.” ~Ed Gordon . . If you have read it, let’s chat! If you have not read it and you are genuinely interested in being a solution to racial inequities, then this title should move to the forefront of your TBR. . . #conversationsinblack #edgordan #blackreads #diversespines #nonfiction #blacklivesmatter #wellreadblackgirl #booksofig #ownvoices

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    This book isn't intended for white readers, which is not a negative thing. All cultural groups need books intended to speak directly to them in their own voices. I enjoyed the variety of people who contributed to the book, coming from different backgrounds and different generations to weigh in on topics of current relevance to the African-American community (and everyone else too). The varied perspectives were really interesting, especially as they wove together to provide a much broader and nuan This book isn't intended for white readers, which is not a negative thing. All cultural groups need books intended to speak directly to them in their own voices. I enjoyed the variety of people who contributed to the book, coming from different backgrounds and different generations to weigh in on topics of current relevance to the African-American community (and everyone else too). The varied perspectives were really interesting, especially as they wove together to provide a much broader and nuanced way to look at things. It's helpful that the book has quick bios in the back. The two chapters on gender roles were especially interesting to me. I also feel like I learned a lot about HBCUs, which even though I come from metro Atlanta, I had never thought about very much. Also, having conservative opinions as well as more progressive voices rounded out the discussions really well. Each chapter ends with thoughtful questions intended to start conversations. Most surprising thing: I found that like and agree with Al Sharpton on a lot of things. Overall, a really good read for anyone who is curious about what leaders in the African-American community think about a wide array of topics; however, for people who are not from that community, expect to feel some discomfort at times. This is ultimately healthy; keep reading. Possibly a good book club choice.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Austin Martin

    I absolutely loved this book! It was like reading an historical analysis of the Black experience in America in regards to different subjects such as civil rights, education, wealth building and more. My favorite chapters in this book was Chapter 2 on President Obama; Chapter 9 on education; and Chapter 10 on the economics of being black. This is the book I would want to keep for my personal library and it has inspired me to tell my own story about my own journey in life. I reiterate, I loved rea I absolutely loved this book! It was like reading an historical analysis of the Black experience in America in regards to different subjects such as civil rights, education, wealth building and more. My favorite chapters in this book was Chapter 2 on President Obama; Chapter 9 on education; and Chapter 10 on the economics of being black. This is the book I would want to keep for my personal library and it has inspired me to tell my own story about my own journey in life. I reiterate, I loved reading this book and would highly recommend it to others who care about the progress that minorities have made and what needs to be done to continue that fight toward equality.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

    Excellent questions to begin an open and honest community conversation.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marquis Cooper

    Such a great conversation starter nook with great insight from some modern day titans.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marva C Southall

    This books forces me to wander, what do white people really think about other races?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vidu

    This was an amazing piece of truly collaborative work. It is very timely in its discussion of present-day issues and how various black people across influential positions in America feel about them. It was a really absorbable, easy to read non-fiction, but it also didn't shy away from heavy, brutal issues either. It wasn't really interested in rooting through a lot of data or delving through the past. The book touched on those aspects, of course, but it really put the spotlight on the people tha This was an amazing piece of truly collaborative work. It is very timely in its discussion of present-day issues and how various black people across influential positions in America feel about them. It was a really absorbable, easy to read non-fiction, but it also didn't shy away from heavy, brutal issues either. It wasn't really interested in rooting through a lot of data or delving through the past. The book touched on those aspects, of course, but it really put the spotlight on the people that experience these issues and what they themselves have to say about. I do appreciate the representations of various industries here, and I think each speaker brought interesting things to the table. I couldn't help noticing though that the vast majority were people who had already attained success and power, and already had a platform to discuss these issues. I wouldn't want any of these people to be replaced by any means, but I think for the type of project that Gordon sought to do, he could have also given some space to more local community organizers or leaders that are doing a lot of unseen work. It definitely would have fit in really well, and strengthened the conversations on some of the topics within the text. As well, I also felt like many of these speakers danced around and briefly acknowledged intersections of race and LGBTQ+ experiences without actually addressing it. It was a little reminiscent of tokenism, where it was mentioned out of obligation, rather than examination. Regardless, I think that this was a really important book that I needed to read. It was highly relevant to our society today, and made me see things like economic buying power, cancel culture, gender roles, media representations, etc.., in new ways. Even if I (or other speakers) didn't necessarily agree with some arguments, I think that it was important to understand how others opinions were made and the nuances that come into their line of thinking. Overall, an excellent book written in a style that I haven't really read much of. I'm really glad I picked it up!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    “Conversations in Black” by @edlgordon features Black leaders discussing everything from police brutality to the economics of being Black to Madea.⁣ ⁣ I appreciated the range of Black voices in the book. It was nice to hear from familiar names (Maxine Waters, Alicia Garza, Jemele Hill) and engage with those that are new to me (Rev. William Barber, Jitu Brown, Brittney Cooper).⁣ ⁣ I was especially drawn in by reflections about Obama’s legacy, activism and voting, the economics of being Black, and Bla “Conversations in Black” by @edlgordon features Black leaders discussing everything from police brutality to the economics of being Black to Madea.⁣ ⁣ I appreciated the range of Black voices in the book. It was nice to hear from familiar names (Maxine Waters, Alicia Garza, Jemele Hill) and engage with those that are new to me (Rev. William Barber, Jitu Brown, Brittney Cooper).⁣ ⁣ I was especially drawn in by reflections about Obama’s legacy, activism and voting, the economics of being Black, and Black representation in the media.⁣ ⁣ I was disappointed by the complete lack of discussion about LGBTQ+ issues in the Black community, especially the alarming epidemic of Black trans people being murdered.⁣ ⁣ Was this due to the inclusion of people who have made public homophobic remarks? (Charlamagne tha God, D.L. Hughley, T.I.)⁣ ⁣ While lively, the conversations in this book were often too restrained and polite for me.⁣ ⁣ However, this book is an accessible introduction to key concerns for the Black community. So it’s worth a read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Donna Bijas

    4.5 stars for a book I purchased thinking it would add to things I’ve learned from other nonfiction books by Black authors. This book was written for Black people in America today. The book is amazing in its breadth and depth of history, arts, politics, movies, journalism, all of which how it affects the lives of Black people and representation. Chapters on important issues discussed in some great detail by notable Black people in all areas such as Eric Holder, Alicia Garza, Al Sharpton, Stacey 4.5 stars for a book I purchased thinking it would add to things I’ve learned from other nonfiction books by Black authors. This book was written for Black people in America today. The book is amazing in its breadth and depth of history, arts, politics, movies, journalism, all of which how it affects the lives of Black people and representation. Chapters on important issues discussed in some great detail by notable Black people in all areas such as Eric Holder, Alicia Garza, Al Sharpton, Stacey Abrams and many others in different industries. It read as if they were sitting right in my living room discussing how to create future Black leadership and how to get there. Fabulous. Changed by rating to 5 stars bc I felt the book wasn’t meant for me; however, even if it’s not, everyone can learn something here. I thank my friend Gerry for challenging me on this one. Gave it great thought.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I enjoyed reading the conversations in this collection and the various topics (from movies, to politics, wealth, and education) from several well known voices in the Black community. One group of voices I didn’t necessarily see represented was anyone from the Black LGBTQIA+ community. Be that as it may, the points of view that were included were interesting and I learned quite a bit The different perspectives were pretty eye-opening and informative. Took lots of notes and did some additional res I enjoyed reading the conversations in this collection and the various topics (from movies, to politics, wealth, and education) from several well known voices in the Black community. One group of voices I didn’t necessarily see represented was anyone from the Black LGBTQIA+ community. Be that as it may, the points of view that were included were interesting and I learned quite a bit The different perspectives were pretty eye-opening and informative. Took lots of notes and did some additional research on some of the topics discussed. Overall a book that is very much worth your time.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Corey Archambault

    Recently there was a flood in news, opinions, etc., about racism and how to think about it. I'm happy that our country is having this discourse and it's definitely overdue, by much more than 400 years. This book was a bit of fresh air because it recognizes that there are many viewpoints, and takes the time to express a few of them. Each chapter is dedicated to a topic and has like 5 or so celebrities, politicians, and activists providing their take on the subject. As a reader, some opinions appe Recently there was a flood in news, opinions, etc., about racism and how to think about it. I'm happy that our country is having this discourse and it's definitely overdue, by much more than 400 years. This book was a bit of fresh air because it recognizes that there are many viewpoints, and takes the time to express a few of them. Each chapter is dedicated to a topic and has like 5 or so celebrities, politicians, and activists providing their take on the subject. As a reader, some opinions appealed to me and some didn't do so as much, and that was OKAY because it was the whole point. Read this book if you're looking to join the conversation but are still trying to figure out what you believe in a world where everybody else is telling you how to think.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Harry Patrick

    An interesting premise. Ed Gordon gives a bit of background on various topics, then asks questions of a diverse group of prominent voices in black America today. I have to confess that some of these names are new to me & I have to do more research on how these individuals are. What I like is at the end of each chapter there are a number of discussion questions meant for further small group discussions. The book definitely points out that black community is not monolithic. An interesting premise. Ed Gordon gives a bit of background on various topics, then asks questions of a diverse group of prominent voices in black America today. I have to confess that some of these names are new to me & I have to do more research on how these individuals are. What I like is at the end of each chapter there are a number of discussion questions meant for further small group discussions. The book definitely points out that black community is not monolithic.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hailey

    If you’re a centrist or a republican, you might like this. It was definitely too right wing for my views. I suppose it was good for me to gain a different perspective than I’m used to, but it did not sway my viewpoint at all and honestly made me roll my eyes a ton (especially when Eric Holder argued for “blue lives matter,” yeah, okay lol). It was an easy/quick read, but I don’t particularly recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zach Freeman

    The snippets of conversation around each topic often feel a little more like isolated and edited comments rather than a full conversation with commenters building off of each other, but there is a lot of great perspective here.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Benson

    Excellent read. Great conversation. Certainly there are others who would have served as excellent contributors to this narrative but, the conversation was needed and is well done. I like that many viewpoints were showcased from various industries and generations. Well done.

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