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Where We Land (The Cuba Press Novella Series, #1)

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A New Zealand Navy frigate torpedoes a boat full of refugees fleeing a drowning country and Nasimul Rahman is one of the few survivors. First he has to reach the shore alive and then he has to avoid the trigger-happy Shore Patrol, on alert to stop climate change refugees entering the country. Donna is new to the Patrol. When word comes through that the Navy has sunk a ship A New Zealand Navy frigate torpedoes a boat full of refugees fleeing a drowning country and Nasimul Rahman is one of the few survivors. First he has to reach the shore alive and then he has to avoid the trigger-happy Shore Patrol, on alert to stop climate change refugees entering the country. Donna is new to the Patrol. When word comes through that the Navy has sunk a ship full of infiltrators and survivors might be making their way ashore, it sounds like she might get to see some action. A tale of desperation and betrayal on a shrinking shore in the not too distant future.


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A New Zealand Navy frigate torpedoes a boat full of refugees fleeing a drowning country and Nasimul Rahman is one of the few survivors. First he has to reach the shore alive and then he has to avoid the trigger-happy Shore Patrol, on alert to stop climate change refugees entering the country. Donna is new to the Patrol. When word comes through that the Navy has sunk a ship A New Zealand Navy frigate torpedoes a boat full of refugees fleeing a drowning country and Nasimul Rahman is one of the few survivors. First he has to reach the shore alive and then he has to avoid the trigger-happy Shore Patrol, on alert to stop climate change refugees entering the country. Donna is new to the Patrol. When word comes through that the Navy has sunk a ship full of infiltrators and survivors might be making their way ashore, it sounds like she might get to see some action. A tale of desperation and betrayal on a shrinking shore in the not too distant future.

31 review for Where We Land (The Cuba Press Novella Series, #1)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tabatha Wood

    Originally published in 2015 under the title ‘Landfall’, cli-fi novella ‘Where We Land’ by Tim Jones is quick to read but slow to leave you.  Focusing on two very different characters — Bengali refugee Nasimul Rahman and young New Zealander Donna, a shop assistant and volunteer for the Shore Patrol — ‘Where We Land’ is set in a time quite possibly not too far ahead of us. Jones describes a future where climate change has seen sea levels rise and cause destruction on a massive scale, including wor Originally published in 2015 under the title ‘Landfall’, cli-fi novella ‘Where We Land’ by Tim Jones is quick to read but slow to leave you.  Focusing on two very different characters — Bengali refugee Nasimul Rahman and young New Zealander Donna, a shop assistant and volunteer for the Shore Patrol — ‘Where We Land’ is set in a time quite possibly not too far ahead of us. Jones describes a future where climate change has seen sea levels rise and cause destruction on a massive scale, including world-wide forced migration and population displacement. To avoid an influx of refugees who are fleeing their inhabitable lands and making the perilous journey across the oceans to Aotearoa, the New Zealand Navy torpedo any foreign boat seen approaching land. However, not everyone is unsympathetic. An underground group of protesters, the Shepherds, are keen to help the refugees in whatever way they can. When Nasimul’s ship is destroyed not far from Manukau Harbour and he takes refuge in an abandoned house by the shore, it is a chance meeting with Donna which will ultimately decide his fate.  ‘Where We Land’ was not quite what I expected. The nods to the impact of climate change were essential to the plot but not unnecessarily laboured. There was no long description of one huge catastrophic event, but instead Jones looks at the results of many, more subtle and interlinked calamities. This fictitious future could all too easily become reality, and the actions and choices made by the characters are completely, if not sometimes depressingly, believable. Jones talks in depth about human resilience and the determination to survive. The ability to keep going even when all seems lost. He examines our humanity; how we respond to threats and challenges, but ultimately how we, as a global species, behave to one another. The tension is high, the characters relatable, and Jones deftly manoeuvres you into bearing witness to the unfolding plot. He places you squarely in both Nasimul and Donna’s shoes. What would you do if...? he asks.  In just sixty-three pages, Jones has managed to paint a brand new future hinged very firmly in our present. He offers a depiction of not what might happen, but what most certainly will, should the wider human race remain apathetic to climate emergency.  I very much enjoyed this story, and my only real criticism is I want to know so much more about Nasimul and Donna’s stories, so deeply did they affect me. I was immediately drawn in to the narrative and found the two distinct voices to be fully realised and nuanced. I suppose it helps that my own political leanings are in line with Jones’s, and as a consequence I found his story to be both satisfying as well as thought-provoking. Others, with opposing view-points might not be as thrilled with how the journey ends. Jones notes in his Afterward that in the four years since his original publication, environmental issues have increased in urgency. I can only hope that if the future does indeed become how Jones depicts it, that we can hold on to our humanity and focus not on violence but on progress. 

  2. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Howe

    This novella set in the near future deals with the human impact of the worsening climate crisis. With crops ruined and river deltas drowned, refugees are streaming out of Asia in unseaworthy boats, only to be turned away or sunk by their overwhelmed neighbours’ navies. The story alternates between the viewpoint of a single survivor of a Bangladeshi ferry headed for New Zealand and a member of a local militia patrolling the shores to repel people like him. Amid societal brutality and xenophobia, This novella set in the near future deals with the human impact of the worsening climate crisis. With crops ruined and river deltas drowned, refugees are streaming out of Asia in unseaworthy boats, only to be turned away or sunk by their overwhelmed neighbours’ navies. The story alternates between the viewpoint of a single survivor of a Bangladeshi ferry headed for New Zealand and a member of a local militia patrolling the shores to repel people like him. Amid societal brutality and xenophobia, there are still a few glimmers of compassion. This was originally published as an ebook under the title Landfall, but is now available in paperback under the new title.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kay Jones

    A human centred but politically very relevant near future story. I felt for the characters and worried about the very real possibility this story presents our future.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    This is a beautifully written novella in the cli-fi genre, set in the frighteningly not-too-distant future in a world in the grips of climate disruption and climate refugees. The characters are compelling and the story gripping. Highly recommend it!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chinaminder

    Poignant and thought-provoking, this timely and topical book is an engrossing read, which can be perused in a single sitting, yet the disturbing (and slightly hopeful) realities and messages of the narrative linger long after you’ve put down the 63-page novella. Originally published in 2015 as ‘Landfall’, ‘Where We Land’ is a well-crafted piece of ‘cli-fi’ (new genre climate fiction) that draws the reader into a New Zealand of the near future, where rising sea levels inundating coastal areas and Poignant and thought-provoking, this timely and topical book is an engrossing read, which can be perused in a single sitting, yet the disturbing (and slightly hopeful) realities and messages of the narrative linger long after you’ve put down the 63-page novella. Originally published in 2015 as ‘Landfall’, ‘Where We Land’ is a well-crafted piece of ‘cli-fi’ (new genre climate fiction) that draws the reader into a New Zealand of the near future, where rising sea levels inundating coastal areas and the fleeing of desperate migrants has created a dystopian world of fear, flight, and fight. Against this bleak yet believable backdrop, the story focuses on two main characters, a Bengali boat refugee and a New Zealand volunteer for 'Shore Patrol’, a home guard against migrants. Deftly set up, and alternating between two perspectives, the tension-filled plot spirals down towards the inevitable collision of these worlds, revealing fate and fortune, as well as choices and consequences. The reader is brought into the book from the outset, with Jones creating a vortex funnel of woven stories which makes it a riveting read. What will happen to Nasimul in his quest to find sanctuary in this strange land? How will Donna go doing her duty to protect these shores? Beyond the dramatic tension of the two characters getting closer to an encounter, there are many questions posed by ‘Where We Land’, not just exploration of what the future might hold in a climate-change ravaged world, but the more personal implications and challenging conundrums of what you would do in the same situation. The work addresses these, exposing more uneasy questions and dilemmas, but by focusing on individual predicaments, it makes the global complexities more personal and local. The strength of ‘Where We Land’ is its subtle and nuanced approach, which gives the reader space to co-create and ponder this new world full of quandaries and conflict. The book doesn’t preach or guilt-trip about human-induced climate change, but it adds to the conversation, by looking at the human-level implications and turning the massive problem into something which we can relate to. ‘Where We Land’, because of its nice-to-hold size, is an easy read, and once you've read it, you will want others to also enter into the world we may fear, where there are glimmers of hope.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    'Where we Land' may be small but it packs a mighty powerful punch. At a scant 75 pages it tells a story so possible, so probable as to be incredibly scary. A boatload of refugees fleeing their country that has been ravaged by climate change. They're trying to land illegally in NZ, and so-call Shepherds are trying to help them. Nasimul survives the water, now all he has to do is survive the Shore Patrol and try to find a new life in this foreign country. This is a story is that hasn't happened... 'Where we Land' may be small but it packs a mighty powerful punch. At a scant 75 pages it tells a story so possible, so probable as to be incredibly scary. A boatload of refugees fleeing their country that has been ravaged by climate change. They're trying to land illegally in NZ, and so-call Shepherds are trying to help them. Nasimul survives the water, now all he has to do is survive the Shore Patrol and try to find a new life in this foreign country. This is a story is that hasn't happened...yet. But that's what makes it so readable, the fact of its plausibility. Give it to climate change skeptics, read it and do something, anything. As Time writes in his afterword, I wish this story had dated. I wish this storyline had become less relevant. I wish the sea would stop rising.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Easthope

    Electrifying and visceral novella, portraying a harrowing vision of climate crisis victims, handled violently by austere and bigoted authorities, who scour the coasts for any sign of refugee survivors. Once again, it is those that have least to lose who offer the most kindness. I hope one day this book becomes a novel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sonja Antonsen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andi C Buchanan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Harvey Molloy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tom Cardy

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Lucas

  15. 4 out of 5

    paul bruce

  16. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  17. 5 out of 5

    MH

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Lemmens

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Ireland

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aristarkh Tikhonov

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jana Flynn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  23. 5 out of 5

    Urvashi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rosalie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt Arnold

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ulysse

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Horrocks

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amberlen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alex Guo

  31. 5 out of 5

    Susan

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