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A Girl Like Me

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Recently transplanted from the quiet, green suburbs of Minnesota to the bustling concrete jungle that is Gurgaon, sixteen-year-old Anisha Rai is determined not to take to the new place she must call home. While her irrepressible mom, Isha, thrives on the crazy juggling between a hotshot job and their new home, Annie-desperately clutching on to memories of her father whom s Recently transplanted from the quiet, green suburbs of Minnesota to the bustling concrete jungle that is Gurgaon, sixteen-year-old Anisha Rai is determined not to take to the new place she must call home. While her irrepressible mom, Isha, thrives on the crazy juggling between a hotshot job and their new home, Annie-desperately clutching on to memories of her father whom she lost three years ago-plods through each day with as little enthusiasm as she can. But it's not going to work, is it? Not when she's discovered that her goofy childhood friend Keds has transformed into quite a dude and still remembers their first kiss; that she's been severely infected by her quirky classmates' zest for everything fun despite utmost resistance; that the H-O-T-T college-going theatre enthusiast Kunal wants to teach her a lot more than drama . . . And when her deceptively unassuming neighbours reveal hidden agendas, Annie's life suddenly becomes hotter to handle than she could ever have imagined. Deftly weaving through home and school and the secret places in Annie's world, A Girl Like Me is an unforgettable story, crackling at every turn with the heartbreak and promise-and the breathless exuberance-of teenage life.


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Recently transplanted from the quiet, green suburbs of Minnesota to the bustling concrete jungle that is Gurgaon, sixteen-year-old Anisha Rai is determined not to take to the new place she must call home. While her irrepressible mom, Isha, thrives on the crazy juggling between a hotshot job and their new home, Annie-desperately clutching on to memories of her father whom s Recently transplanted from the quiet, green suburbs of Minnesota to the bustling concrete jungle that is Gurgaon, sixteen-year-old Anisha Rai is determined not to take to the new place she must call home. While her irrepressible mom, Isha, thrives on the crazy juggling between a hotshot job and their new home, Annie-desperately clutching on to memories of her father whom she lost three years ago-plods through each day with as little enthusiasm as she can. But it's not going to work, is it? Not when she's discovered that her goofy childhood friend Keds has transformed into quite a dude and still remembers their first kiss; that she's been severely infected by her quirky classmates' zest for everything fun despite utmost resistance; that the H-O-T-T college-going theatre enthusiast Kunal wants to teach her a lot more than drama . . . And when her deceptively unassuming neighbours reveal hidden agendas, Annie's life suddenly becomes hotter to handle than she could ever have imagined. Deftly weaving through home and school and the secret places in Annie's world, A Girl Like Me is an unforgettable story, crackling at every turn with the heartbreak and promise-and the breathless exuberance-of teenage life.

30 review for A Girl Like Me

  1. 4 out of 5

    Snigdha

    The best part about this book is the writing itself. I am really apprehensive about picking up books from Indian authors other than a select few, but i was at oxford bookstore and looking for something to read so i picked it up. The first thing i noticed about it was MY GOD SHE WRITES SO WELL. It's like every description is smoothly flowing poetic prose that ends exactly at the right moment and never gets overbearing, so it's somewhat like the beautiful mingling of fact and fantasy between the li The best part about this book is the writing itself. I am really apprehensive about picking up books from Indian authors other than a select few, but i was at oxford bookstore and looking for something to read so i picked it up. The first thing i noticed about it was MY GOD SHE WRITES SO WELL. It's like every description is smoothly flowing poetic prose that ends exactly at the right moment and never gets overbearing, so it's somewhat like the beautiful mingling of fact and fantasy between the lines. Moreover, I was pretty pissed WHY is she going off with the creepy older guy rather than Kedar because COME ON Kedar is great, regardless of how funny 'Keds' the name itself sounds. But that was okay because the whole point of the book was this girl feeling lost and coming to terms with a whole lot of things. And if she made all the right and moral choices, why the fuck would she even be a teenager?! Or human, to be honest. So yes, a huge fan of Swati's writing after reading the book, and the story itself was pleasant. The mix of a lot of eccentric and different themes like the issue of Rani, and the man that Isha started hanging out with (can't remember his name) all served to highlight Ani's predicament really. I wish this book were more popular so I wouldn't have to claw my eyes out about the fact that Indian girls are all gaga over Pink or Black and missing A Girl Like Me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Afshan Khan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As and when you start reading the book you realise its not "girlish" even if it is by a woman author. Infact it beautifully and seamlessly reflects each and every persons thoughts - A girl's , a boy's , suppressed , open , closed thoughts and also thoughts of a career oriented mom or a wife who lost trust in his husband - so on so forth. Its all about perspectives , feelings and thoughts. I loved this book so much that I was relishing few "paragraphs" by re reading the lines - for instance the on As and when you start reading the book you realise its not "girlish" even if it is by a woman author. Infact it beautifully and seamlessly reflects each and every persons thoughts - A girl's , a boy's , suppressed , open , closed thoughts and also thoughts of a career oriented mom or a wife who lost trust in his husband - so on so forth. Its all about perspectives , feelings and thoughts. I loved this book so much that I was relishing few "paragraphs" by re reading the lines - for instance the one where Anisha- The protagonist wants to hug Keds as he remembers her favorite strawberry flavor. That is what any one feels like doing when some one whom you like doesn't forget your favorite flavor even after he has a girl friend and passionate make outs! This is called "Friend-ship" and liking each other irrespective of changes in each one's lives !! Some times when a person gets a partner / girl friend they get sweeped out of the world in to some dream land and forget all old relations but people like Keds make you feel good about making friends even if they are annoying at times! Keeping aside Keds and Anisha..the way Gurgaon is described attracted me more towards the book as I am staying here post my wedding .Hence the book is much more realistic to me . When the condos , DPSor silver oaks or the roshini apts or the mehrauli highway are mentioned all the localities just danced infront of my eyes !I could sit in veranda and feel the characters walking around me as I live in the same locality! :) Story-line Anisha's father is expired and it has been 3 years she lived with out him but obviously the lacuna doesnt go off and she loses interests in so many things. They shift to Gurgaon from Minnesota and its quite a culture shock to her and she cannot mingle with the crowd easily and gets more and more lonely when she realises Keds has a girl friend and her busy Mom -Mrs. Rai has no time for her other than the little mid night chat they have eating apples and cheese and sipping diet coke. She makes a friend Rani in the same apartment whom she rescues from her pervert uncle and jumps in joy when Rani starts living with them but in later days she hates the "perfect" Rani, her holier than thou image. This is some thing which happens to any girl when she enters the insecure zone and loses priority! The story unfolds in to many episodes, how she becomes short tempered whenever she faces Rani , how she doesnt like JD much the one who wants to enter in to next stage of relation with MRS. Rai who is a work partner, how she consoles Keds but later on gets rude even with him. The way her heart skips when ever she sees Karan is also so beautifully described. She meets all odds to just meet and spend time with him, all the while with a fact paced heart beat and too many fighting thoughts. The rest of the story tells us if the decisions she made are good for her or not , how human emotions overpower most of the times , how she finally goes to her Dadi's house to find solace but gets sad seeing the plight of her grand mom and how every nook and corner of the house reminds her of her dad! Its almost tearful when she is swinging in the garden and remembering only the smiling face of her dad and nothing else. She tries hard to fade that memory but it just doesnt go! This story is a simple flow of emotions which are natural in every ones day to day life ! Jealousy , love , hatred , to be wanted , not to be wanted and so on so forth ! Go grab the book offline or on flipkart and travel with Anisha which will remind you episodes from your own life! Am sure any girl / boy , man/ woman can connect to this book! Amazing one by Swati Kaushal and waiting for many more from her . My Rating : 4.5/ 5 Good day :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Pooja (On books!)

    More of my reviews at Of books, intense fluff and fluff that's intense. :) It has been a week since I picked up A Girl Like Me by Swati Kaushal and some parts of the book are still so fresh and vivid in my mind! Featuring the typical spoilt, rich girl, the goofy boy who does his own thing and the guy who will always be a little out of your league, A Girl Like Me took me back to school. High school can have its share of sweet and heart wrenching moments as well as moments of angst and confusion. T More of my reviews at Of books, intense fluff and fluff that's intense. :) It has been a week since I picked up A Girl Like Me by Swati Kaushal and some parts of the book are still so fresh and vivid in my mind! Featuring the typical spoilt, rich girl, the goofy boy who does his own thing and the guy who will always be a little out of your league, A Girl Like Me took me back to school. High school can have its share of sweet and heart wrenching moments as well as moments of angst and confusion. This was captured amazingly! WHAT IT’S ABOUT Where does the protagonist, Anisha Rai fit in all of this? Anisha, or Ani, who spent a chunk of her childhood in Minnesota, comes back to Delhi where her mother takes up a job as a creative director of a hotshot company. India brings back memories of her father, who is no more and she is determined to be detached and withdrawn. But in spite of herself, she is reunited with her childhood friend Keds, finds her own group of friends at school and falls for an older guy, college theatre enthusiast Kunal, who may or may not be good for her. In the home front, Anisha befriends the girl next door, triggering unforeseen obstacles that creates a strain in her relationship with her mother. WHAT I THOUGHT well-written . light hearted fun, drama . gut wrenching climax . could’ve done with a little less?! The deceptively light start follows a gut wrenching climax and at the end of the story, Ani’s understanding of herself, the world and the way things were and will be deepens. Overall, A Girl Like Me is a well-written coming of age story. What really stood out were the parts of the book set in school- with the light hearted fun, drama and secondary characters who frankly, I loved more than the main character. But at the same time, it’s the problems at home and Anisha’s relationships outside school that majorly contribute to the intensity of the crux of the plot. While usually in a book you might feel like it lacks that “something more”, with A Girl Like Me, I felt like it could’ve done with a little less. Little less of a certain neighbour subplot. It’s like that 90210 episode that would've worked better without the zillion sociopath characters… though the particular subplot of A Girl Like Me had nothing to do with sociopaths. What I’m trying to say is that while there were some characters who had depth and were lovable, some characters who though three-dimensional were downright unlikable, there was one character whose presence just… irked me. But maybe it’s me being nitpicky. Maybe the book may not have worked without that element of it. Either way, the book did strike an accurate balance between the light hearted and the dark, school and home and made for a mostly relatable and moderately realistic read!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ranjani Rao

    I picked up this gem of a book on a whim. The introduction clearly mentioned that the main character was a 16 year old girl transplanted from USA to India and it seemed like a transatlantic coming of age story. A little too simplistic for my taste, I felt. But I needed a light read and it seemed harmless enough. Once I started reading it, I just kept turning page after page and finished reading the 300-odd pages in a span of 24 hours. I enjoyed the book immensely because I loved all the well-etch I picked up this gem of a book on a whim. The introduction clearly mentioned that the main character was a 16 year old girl transplanted from USA to India and it seemed like a transatlantic coming of age story. A little too simplistic for my taste, I felt. But I needed a light read and it seemed harmless enough. Once I started reading it, I just kept turning page after page and finished reading the 300-odd pages in a span of 24 hours. I enjoyed the book immensely because I loved all the well-etched characters, Keds, Rani, JD, Anisha and Isha. I frankly cannot choose a favorite between Isha and Anisha. The dialog is crisp and the descriptions are outstanding. Here is an example:"The beads of rain that lengthen and drip off the curved rim of the parapet glisten in the crevices of the latticework. They are shot through with pinpricks of light: one moment they are a queen's necklace, the next a shimmering crown. I lie back in my chair and watch them shift shapes, watch the dance of the droplets that collect and swell at the undulating edge of the awning above my head, as they dive down to the puddles in the red brick below them, as they shatter and shimmer and regroup into countless miniature pools." While the book covers the unlikely (but possible) situation of an American-born Indian teenager coming to live in India, it is an extremely balanced view of what India offers to those who come back "home". In the span of a few months in Anisha's life, we see India through new eyes and grow wiser with her as she looks back with a new perspective on her own past. The book ends well, not all neatly tied up as in the movies, but with hope for a future where everyone can make better choices.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Soham Bhadra

    I read this book in June 2019, a good eleven years after its publication. I have read a number of Indian Young Adult books—all written by women, and all narrated by (or, at least, for third-person narratives, from the perspective of) teenage girls—but this is a (strictly comparatively) very lengthy and ornate piece of work. While the language itself is not all that florid, the words are highly descriptive—thereby magnifying every little occurrence or emotion—and the sheer overabundance of semicol I read this book in June 2019, a good eleven years after its publication. I have read a number of Indian Young Adult books—all written by women, and all narrated by (or, at least, for third-person narratives, from the perspective of) teenage girls—but this is a (strictly comparatively) very lengthy and ornate piece of work. While the language itself is not all that florid, the words are highly descriptive—thereby magnifying every little occurrence or emotion—and the sheer overabundance of semicolons and bracketing commas only add to the apparent long-windedness. (Example: So, the marks, the cruel quantifications of an entire term’s worth of incompetence, are handed out, carelessly almost accidentally, you’d think from the teachers’ demeanour, one portentous Wednesday afternoon. Such commafied writing is there throughout the book, and it greatly wearies the reader. Not to mention the excess of She’d and I’d. The past perfect tense is far from perfect here.) Disclaimer: This review will be in much the same style. I quote from the provided blurb and comment on each portion of it. TL;DR at the end of the review (yes, you’ll have to scroll). Recently transplanted from the quiet, green suburbs of Minnesota to the bustling concrete jungle that is Gurgaon, Swati Kaushal quickly and concisely brushes off Anisha’s life in Minnesota: not much by way of information. A bit on her escapades with her neighbours, the Jensen sisters (Jessica and Jaime), and that is all; all other memories of her life there are about her father, the late Sujit Rai. In this regard a book like The Namesake does a far more elaborate job of portraying an Indian family’s life in the U.S.; however, this is only a minor quibble. sixteen-year-old Anisha Rai is determined not to take to the new place she must call home. While her irrepressible mom, Isha, thrives on the crazy juggling between a hotshot job and their new home, Gurgaon in 2006, when the book was set, was the booming image of the new Indian metropolis, as also described in The White Tiger (also published in 2008). Anisha is thrown smack into the middle of a twenty-first-century New Delhi; while Isha, her mother, is bowled over by it, Ani isn’t fooled. Isha is having the time—and job—of her life, but Ani had much rather not be here. She is forced to tag along with Isha from the very day they are put up in the Hyatt, and there is this crushing sense of non-belonging, of not being able to connect with her origins. Annie—desperately clutching on to memories of her father whom she lost three years ago—plods through each day with as little enthusiasm as she can. The city of Bhopal, as you’d expect to be portrayed, is tottering from the apocalypse of 1984. I don’t know if it was intentionally chosen to be the abode of the Rais, or whether it was chosen simply because it is a second-tier Hindi-speaking city. The said apocalypse may also have been why cancer snuffed the life out of Sujit two decades later in the States, though this is not elucidated. It’s clear that he was the favourite of his family, and his ailing mother—Mai—suffers from hallucinations where he is alive. Sujit’s demise has affected his daughter more than any other. While Isha puts up a brave front, pretending nothing has happened, Anisha is unable to. At the end of the book she escapes to Bhopal for some time, because her heart says that is where she belongs, at the ancestral Rai home. This, I think, is only a contrivance—an optional plot-twist—but a nice one all the same, if the least she can do is to make Mai feel like somebody on earth cares for the poor old lady. But it's not going to work, is it? Not when she's discovered that her goofy childhood friend Keds has transformed into quite a dude and still remembers their first kiss; Now this guy I do not understand. Sure, the Vermas (Sunny, Tara and their son Kedar) are longtime friends of the Rais, and Kedar has all grown up, to Isha’s delight, but there are not many character traits shown about him. Only a little is mentioned about his personality: how he split from his demanding girlfriend Nikita (‘Nikki’), how he helps Anisha with schoolwork and, eventually, how he and Rani (more on her in a while) become seemingly inseparable in Anisha’s eyes. His character is not what I would call well-fleshed-out (though he physically very much is). Moreover, his nickname, Keds, sounds like a pair of white sneakers, as they are often called in India. that she’s been severely infected by her quirky classmates’ zest for everything fun despite utmost resistance; Standard XI, division E, is as typical a bunch of high-schoolers as it gets. Besides Nikita and Kedar, you have the vivacious, bubbly Richa, who changes boyfriends as often as she changes outfits, and also Somes(h), who is perfectly nice but nothing to write home about. What they are notable for, though, is their lighting a flame in Anisha: she rediscovers her passion for debating (and this is another place where her father could knock the opposition flat), and also for tennis and badminton. that the H-O-T-T college-going theatre enthusiast Kunal wants to teach her a lot more than drama . . . This is the most despicably weird person in the book. Initially Anisha is repulsed by his innuendos at the café at Delhi University, when he tries to get too close to her for comfort. All of a sudden (as most teenage romances are), she is swept away by the thespian and his charm. She cannot stop lingering on their strawberry milkshakes at MGF Mall, or on their drinks at the rustic, bucolic Chaupal bar. Soon enough, the intellectual pair (as Kaushal puts it) make out in Kunal’s room on the DU campus; while Kaushal has a masterful grip on the pen, her eloquence in chapter 35 (where they get undressed and get intimate) is too much to bear, and the book would be better off without that chapter, lewd as it is. It is only proper that Rani cannot withstand this relationship. How Anisha went from avoiding Kunal like the plague to trying to occupy every free moment with his thoughts, so suddenly at that, is beyond me. To be continued. P.S.: Somehow, I was reminded of the similarly-named A Girl Like That by Tanaz Bhathena. Not too many similarities, but both Kaushal and Bhathena have written, a great deal at that, about 16-year-olds [quote], ‘transplanted’, [unquote] from familiar surrounds to an alien country. For Bhathena’s Zarin, India is the familiar country, as she moves from Mumbai’s Cama Parsi Colony to hot, harsh Jeddah; for Kaushal’s Anisha, India is the alien country, as she has to move home and hearth from Sweet Home Minnesota to the picturesque Roshini apartments, located off the NH8 highway, which are not quite home enough.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vivian

    I thought this book was going to be so much more than i expected it to be. From the title I thought this girl was though, rebellious, and that there was going to be the childhood friend that changes everything again. But no. The girl Ani was dead. i mean i understand that her dad died and he was such an important factor in her life but i really didn't like her character very much. And also the romance was ... i wouldn't say horrible but it was completely not what i expected it to be. I thought I thought this book was going to be so much more than i expected it to be. From the title I thought this girl was though, rebellious, and that there was going to be the childhood friend that changes everything again. But no. The girl Ani was dead. i mean i understand that her dad died and he was such an important factor in her life but i really didn't like her character very much. And also the romance was ... i wouldn't say horrible but it was completely not what i expected it to be. I thought she was going to end up with her childhood friend but instead she likes a college dude who after all is a jerk. Half the time i didn't even know what was going on, i just knew something bad was happening and i completely lost interest in the story after a while. But i was hoping for something good to happen, but nothing really did. At least in this book i see how the death of a loved one affects a young person. Ani was holding back most of the time because of her dad's death, but her mom was moving on and accepting the fact just fine. i can see how that would anger her though but things happen for a reason and you can't ever get a dead person alive so it is best to move on in your life and not keep lingering onto the past.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Prathima Deepak

    This book was my first Novel. Of all the books in the store, I was fortunate enough to pick this one. I read this book when i was a teenager just like the character in the novel. The writing is very gripping and hooks you to the story of a girl who migrates from The USA and tries hard to adjust to the Indian Lifestyle. A must read for all the teenagers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Test1

    The book is refreshing portrayal of Annie's life. It is the story of Annie And her mother's​ move to India from America after her father's death. The language of the book is quite endearing unlike books of other Indian authors. The author paints pictures of Annie's world by means of her words.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Moumita

    Good detailed writing.. what I liked about this book is Isha... she is a strong woman and is calm and capable... The characters are very relatable... it's a good read

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mansi Oza

    A girl like me, needs interesting story to read!!! When my colleague got bunch of books to read, I was really excited to see so many options. I selected the one which was very girly for a change and I ended up reading 'A girl like me by Swati Kaushal'. From beginning only I have perception that Indian authors are not good in creating unique stories and this book proved me wrong. Indian authors not just lack uniqueness in the story but also lack making normal story interesting. So what will be stor A girl like me, needs interesting story to read!!! When my colleague got bunch of books to read, I was really excited to see so many options. I selected the one which was very girly for a change and I ended up reading 'A girl like me by Swati Kaushal'. From beginning only I have perception that Indian authors are not good in creating unique stories and this book proved me wrong. Indian authors not just lack uniqueness in the story but also lack making normal story interesting. So what will be story of this book? A girl like me, is like any ordinary girl who is sad because she shifted from her home in US to India when her father passes away. She ended up living with her mom in Delhi. So what this girl does? Nothing just try and drag on life, since it's sad and miserable and unfair and so on. The pain of new friend, old friend, workaholic mom, and lost passion for sport leads to monotonous life. Also there is childhood love which never got any direction till the end. For those who hate summer of Delhi might find the introduction interesting as it talks about scorching sun. Soon like typical Bollywood movie the twist in tail comes, the entry of bad boy. Bad boy bad boy what you gonna do, what you gonna do with a girl like who? Anyways dark side is for short moment of time and book ends with a question Mark in mind, what the hell happened? The book is boring, ordinary and uninteresting. In the beginnings it picks up little bit late but soon it will start disappointing you. In between I got interest that the book might lead to something interesting but my hopes were crushed. Only saving grace on this book is explanation of the situation but not all the time. It hardly portrait the whole scene. I won't mind reading book by India authors but all I ask for is good story. A girl like me, a boy like u, a story like this, is never new!!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pawan

    http://iandbooks.wordpress.com/ This was another Chicklit book or as it is referred by author as Young Adult genre. I had read “Piece of Cake” by the same author and then went back to read this one. “A Girl Like Me”, is the story of girl who is transported from US to India and how she is trying to adjust to the new surroundings and handling the issues of her own growing up. She is trying to come to terms with the loss of her father. Her childhood friend is now a cool hot guy and some of her past http://iandbooks.wordpress.com/ This was another Chicklit book or as it is referred by author as Young Adult genre. I had read “Piece of Cake” by the same author and then went back to read this one. “A Girl Like Me”, is the story of girl who is transported from US to India and how she is trying to adjust to the new surroundings and handling the issues of her own growing up. She is trying to come to terms with the loss of her father. Her childhood friend is now a cool hot guy and some of her past is coming back to haunt her again. The book is written from the perspective of this young girl and how she sees the world around her. It is about her romantic crushes, her social responsibility and her family life with her mother. I liked the way teenage girl’s life is described in this book. At the same time, I also felt that the life described is probably from Swati Kaushal’s own experiences and hence a bit old. The life of teenagers has undergone a huge amount of change in last few years. I did not find this book as engaging as “Piece of Cake” but the perspective was very interesting. It was also interesting to see the age-old conflict of young-adult fantastical world and moral values that come back to haunt them. The book shows that last moral straw was still existing some time back but probably now it is breaking completely. I still keep on looking for more of such books from young authors and trying to understand the sensibilities of this generation. Very amazing and refreshing at the same time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    A coming of age story about a teenage NRI girl shifting to New Delhi from America and balancing her studies and love life. One would think it would be a chick lit type book but it was written from a sort of realistic point of view about how a girl would experience life in India (post 2012 of course). But the protagonist herself is yawn worthy at most with a devil-may-care attitude to everything in her life due to the death of her father and the move to India. With all the ups and downs she goes A coming of age story about a teenage NRI girl shifting to New Delhi from America and balancing her studies and love life. One would think it would be a chick lit type book but it was written from a sort of realistic point of view about how a girl would experience life in India (post 2012 of course). But the protagonist herself is yawn worthy at most with a devil-may-care attitude to everything in her life due to the death of her father and the move to India. With all the ups and downs she goes through, the protagonist does not really come out as an interesting character but her mother and her best friend seem more warmer and empathetic. I wouldn't say this is a must read book but if anyone wants an Indian young adult fiction book, this would be it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Khyati

    good refreshing story!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Milan Vohra

    Started with great promise and sensitivity...somehow, the narrative just failed to keep me hooked. disappointed. Didn't complete it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Atimhsus

    awesome book 4 a teenager

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shreya

    I expected a lot more from this book..but all i got was a much of emotions.It was good at many parts but her obsession with her father was a little hard to understand.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sonal

  18. 5 out of 5

    Priyadarshini

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vinni Jain

  20. 4 out of 5

    Prutha Patel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nupur

  22. 4 out of 5

    Literaturina

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ria

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charu

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tooba Amin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nandini

  27. 4 out of 5

    Srushti Rana

  28. 5 out of 5

    Surbhi

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aakanksha Singh

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sneha Prabhu

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