counter create hit In Watermelon Sugar - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

In Watermelon Sugar

Availability: Ready to download

iDEATH is a place where the sun shines a different colour every day and where people travel to the length of their dreams. Rejecting the violence and hate of the old gang at the Forgotten Works, they lead gentle lives in watermelon sugar. In this book, Richard Brautigan discovers and expresses the mood of the counterculture generation.


Compare
Ads Banner

iDEATH is a place where the sun shines a different colour every day and where people travel to the length of their dreams. Rejecting the violence and hate of the old gang at the Forgotten Works, they lead gentle lives in watermelon sugar. In this book, Richard Brautigan discovers and expresses the mood of the counterculture generation.

30 review for In Watermelon Sugar

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    393 From 1001 Books - In Watermelon Sugar, Richard Brautigan In Watermelon Sugar is an American post-apocalyptic novel by Richard Brautigan written in 1964 and published in 1968. Set in the aftermath of a fallen civilization, it focuses on a commune organized around a central gathering house which is named "iDEATH". In this environment, many things are made of watermelon sugar (though the inhabitants also use pine wood and stone for building material and fuel made from trout oil). The landscape o 393 From 1001 Books - In Watermelon Sugar, Richard Brautigan In Watermelon Sugar is an American post-apocalyptic novel by Richard Brautigan written in 1964 and published in 1968. Set in the aftermath of a fallen civilization, it focuses on a commune organized around a central gathering house which is named "iDEATH". In this environment, many things are made of watermelon sugar (though the inhabitants also use pine wood and stone for building material and fuel made from trout oil). The landscape of the novel is constantly in flux; each day has a different colored sun which creates different colored watermelons, and the central building also changes frequently. The novel's narrator, who is left unnamed, claims to be writing an investigative book on his experiences at iDEATH. در قند هندوانه - ریچارد براتیگان (چشمه)؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز بیست و سوم ماه جولای سال 2012میلادی عنوان: در قند هندوانه؛ نویسنده: ریچارد براتیگان؛ مترجم: مهدی نوید؛ تهران، نشر چشمه، 1384؛ در 184ص؛ چلپ دوم 1386؛ چپ چهارم 1387؛ شابک 9789643622183؛ چاپ پنجم 1389؛ چاپ هفتم 1394؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان ایالات متحده آمریکا - سده 20م مترجم: مهراداد واشقانی فراهانی؛ تهران، کوله پشتی، 1392؛ در 143ص؛ شابک 9786009310197؛ این اثر داستان یک کمون است که درباره ی یک خانه ی محفلی، که «آی‌دث (نوعی باغ عدن)» نام دارد، ساخته و پرداخته شده است؛ در آن فضا، بسیاری از چیزها از شیره ی قند استخراج ‌شده از هندوانه، یا از چوب کاج، ساخته می‌شود؛ چشم‌ انداز طبیعی محیط، مدام دیگر می‌شود و هر یک از روزهای هفته به یکی از رنگ‌های هندوانه‌ هایی است که مردم کمون پرورش می‌دهند؛ روایتی دیگر از عشق آغازین آدم و حواست نقل از متن: مارگریت را دیدم که از یک درخت سیب در کنار کلبه اش بالا میرفت؛ گریه میکرد، و یک روسری دور گردنش گره زده بود؛ طرف دیگر روسری را که رها بود، گرفت، و به یکی از شاخه ها، که پر از سیبهای کال بود، بست؛ شاخه را رها کرد، و بعد در هوا معلق شد؛ دیگر به مجسمه ی آیینه ها نگاه نکردم؛ به قدر کافی برای آنروز دیده بودم؛ روی نیمکت کنار رودخانه نشستم، و به برکه ی عمیقی که در آنجا بود، خیره شدم؛ مارگریت مرده بود؛ پایان نقل تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 14/08/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

    I almost can't believe how dazzling this book is. In Watermelon Sugar is 138 pages long — many of which are half pages at best — and yet manages to whip up a stunning, strange, surreal little world, full of sad, sweet characters and shockingly beautiful images. It's the simplest little story: two lovers, a scorned ex-girlfriend, an old-timer who lights the lanterns on the bridges, a chef who cooks nothing but carrots. The whole book takes place in a few days, in a tiny little town where everythi I almost can't believe how dazzling this book is. In Watermelon Sugar is 138 pages long — many of which are half pages at best — and yet manages to whip up a stunning, strange, surreal little world, full of sad, sweet characters and shockingly beautiful images. It's the simplest little story: two lovers, a scorned ex-girlfriend, an old-timer who lights the lanterns on the bridges, a chef who cooks nothing but carrots. The whole book takes place in a few days, in a tiny little town where everything (houses, statues, dishes, clothes, etc.) is made of watermelon sugar. Oh, and the sun shines a different color every day of the week, so the watermelon sugar is different colors depending on the day it was made. On Sundays the sun is not only black but soundless, and everything is silent until the sun sets. In addition to the statues of vegetables all around the town, there's a trout hatchery, the Forgotten Works, the abandoned bridge, a restaurant, and a huge lake, with couches on the beach. When anyone in town dies, they are put in a glass coffin which is lined with foxfire and sunk into the lake, where it glows and glows and glows. I know a lot of people hate Brautigan pretty rabidly, but those people are obviously missing some kind of cog or other soul mechanism that fosters the appreciation of strange, sad beauty.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Bizarre and surreal pretty much sums this up and I know many people see this as utopian, a Garden of Eden setting in what seems to be a post-apocalyptic world. Brautigan indicated that Bolinas, the town in California where he lived for a while, provided something of a template. It is notoriously reclusive and the abode of poets, artists and ecologists. The commune is called iDEATH and the narrator has a shack nearby and a room in the commune. There's his girlfriend Pauline, an ex-girlfriend Marg Bizarre and surreal pretty much sums this up and I know many people see this as utopian, a Garden of Eden setting in what seems to be a post-apocalyptic world. Brautigan indicated that Bolinas, the town in California where he lived for a while, provided something of a template. It is notoriously reclusive and the abode of poets, artists and ecologists. The commune is called iDEATH and the narrator has a shack nearby and a room in the commune. There's his girlfriend Pauline, an ex-girlfriend Margaret, a chef who cooks mainly carrots and various assorted others. The sun is a different colour each day, most things are made of watermelon sugar and pine and there is little room for books. Nearby there is a vast rubbish dump full of forgotten things from previous times. Margaret is thought of as odd as she goes and collects these things. There is also a rogue element led by inBOIL and his friends who live in shacks and make whiskey from forgotten things. I haven't even mentioned the watermelontrout oil, the talking tigers (now extinct) and the trout (Brautigan liked trout). There is a very comfortable and comforting communal way of life which is very simple and has inspired lots of positives and was very much appreciated in the 60s and 70s. However there is a moral vacuum at the heart of iDEATH and the message is that you must conform. Margaret's untimely death and the undercurrent of violence is disturbing. There is one classic scene, which is really the centrepoint of the book which is pure Monty Python; remember the scene in Life of Brian where Brian is on the cross and thinks he is about to be rescued, but the rescuers commit mass suicide? I wonder if this is where the writers got the idea. Love and death are central themes here. Paradise is not all it seems and the main characters whilst at peace with nature are narrow and parochial with no sense of wanting to learn or know; no sense of adventure. Lots of hidden messages and warnings for such a short book

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mario the lone bookwolf (semi reviewing hiatus )

    One of the worst books I have ever read, completely overrated, this seems to be one of these cases of a too subtle, culturally important, snob, hyped by pseudo-intellectuals novels without any real worth. Don´t read it, it will disappoint, it makes no sense, it has no plot, red line, inner logic, is instead full of inconsistency, nothing, I was really disappointed after reading it. I see the same thing happen in movies too when the general public loves a great, "just" entertaining masterpiece an One of the worst books I have ever read, completely overrated, this seems to be one of these cases of a too subtle, culturally important, snob, hyped by pseudo-intellectuals novels without any real worth. Don´t read it, it will disappoint, it makes no sense, it has no plot, red line, inner logic, is instead full of inconsistency, nothing, I was really disappointed after reading it. I see the same thing happen in movies too when the general public loves a great, "just" entertaining masterpiece and the so-called critics deem it unworthy. But when a work is so unconventional that it is a mess to watch and read, the so-called critics go bonkers cause of the hidden depth and sh$3 and each normal human being just thinks: "When there are certain, great concepts for making movies and books work, why is it so hyper to bore everyone and make something everyone could do by just writing and directing anything in a creative juice floating mega climax. Then anyone could say, look, I wrote something without concept." The funny thing is, in music and art (not modern lol) one would immediately recognize that all makes no sense because it is dissonant or looks just ridiculous. With literature, it seems to be legit. Even (Nobel) prices are given for creating cruelties like that, while evil mainstream or low, junk, light fiction gets ignored. I love those state founded literature prices where just boring, horrible stuff gets honored, but no great works of fiction. If it is pseudointellectual, contemporary, strictly without any evil fantasy or fiction, it is ok. I wouldn´t even wipe my... mouth with this medley, cause I would be afraid that it could contaminate me, get into my bloodstream, infect my brain and I would begin talking senseless stuff just I understand and completely lose the hold on a topic whenever I want and change to something else without even telling anyone about it and thinking that I am so freaking clever. What I really hate about stuff like that is if people start to hate reading because something like this is given to them, probably Ayn Rand Atlas Shrugged too and the trauma is completely understandable. I probably wouldn´t have continued reading if someone would have done such cruel things to me, nearly tortured me with force-reading, when I was still young. As an excuse, if readers are high all the time, everything may be great and I believe much of the average and very bad hippie and beatnik literature of the 60s to 80s has this problem. If I would drink 6 to 8 beer (Austrian beer has up to over 5 volume percent alcohol and is in 0,5 liter bottles) and be able to read without getting an alcohol poisoning or start smoking weed, I would probably find this great too. This is what happens when art, creativity without order, writing without training, is hyped by enough people to become a so-called masterpiece (of sh§$). Real, aspiring authors that work hard, train, read autodidactic literature, visit creative writing courses, read much in general and are brilliant can´t get published because worthless literature like that takes the space. I had to get these thoughts about some overrated books out of my system, now I feel much better. A wiki walk can be as refreshing to the mind as a walk through nature in this, yuck, ugh, boo, completely overrated real-life outside books: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudop... https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pseudo... https://www.urbandictionary.com/defin... Tropes show how literature is made and which mixture of elements makes works and genres unique: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.ph...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    Softly we are Richard Brautigan and we have nothing to do with hippies and we fish for trout and keep some of the trout in there because we are Richard and we like to look at them. It suits us to have this mustache and to touch it periodically like one might touch a butterfly sitting there and wipe the crumbs away from something special that we have just eaten and enjoyed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vit Babenco

    In the hippie world life obeys its own laws. And those who live in a watermelon fairytale are lucky because watermelon sugar is a universal stuff that can serve all purposes in life and satisfy all far-out wishes. I once had a dream about the aqueduct being a musical instrument filled with water and bells hanging by small watermelon chains right at the top of the water and the water making the bells ring. There’s no need to bother for food either… Al cooked up a mess of carrots again. He broiled t In the hippie world life obeys its own laws. And those who live in a watermelon fairytale are lucky because watermelon sugar is a universal stuff that can serve all purposes in life and satisfy all far-out wishes. I once had a dream about the aqueduct being a musical instrument filled with water and bells hanging by small watermelon chains right at the top of the water and the water making the bells ring. There’s no need to bother for food either… Al cooked up a mess of carrots again. He broiled them with mushrooms and a sauce made from watermelon sugar and spices. There was hot bread fresh from the oven and sweet butter and glasses of ice-cold milk. About halfway through dinner, Fred started to say something that looked as if it were important, but then he changed his mind and went back to eating his carrots. And it is indispensable in rites… Margaret was dressed in death robes made from watermelon sugar and adorned with beads of foxfire, so that the light would shine forever from her tomb at night and on the black, soundless days. This one. Watermelon sugar is the alchemical substance saturated with poetry in its pure essential form and In Watermelon Sugar is poesy itself.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Russell

    What if the opening line of Richard Brautigan's novella read, "In hard drugs the deeds were done and done again as my life is done in hard drugs," rather than " In watermelon sugar the deeds were done and done again as my life is done in watermelon sugar," setting the tone for "hard drugs" replacing "watermelon sugar" throughout? I just did finish my second read through the novella as well as listening to the audio book. One thing is for sure - if we see watermelon sugar as a hard drug - heroin, What if the opening line of Richard Brautigan's novella read, "In hard drugs the deeds were done and done again as my life is done in hard drugs," rather than " In watermelon sugar the deeds were done and done again as my life is done in watermelon sugar," setting the tone for "hard drugs" replacing "watermelon sugar" throughout? I just did finish my second read through the novella as well as listening to the audio book. One thing is for sure - if we see watermelon sugar as a hard drug - heroin, crack, cocaine, crystal meth, mescaline - the entire tale assumes a much different cast. Immediately all the talk of iDEATH and the tigers can send shivers up a reader's spine. By way of example, two quotes - "The tigers and how they lived and how beautiful they were and how they died and how they talked to me while they ate my parents, and how I talked back to them and how they stopped eating my parents, though it did not help my parents any, nothing could help them by then, and we talked for a long time and one of the tigers helped me with my arithmetic, then they told me to go away while they finished eating my parents, and I went away. I returned later that night to burn the shack down. That's what we did in those days." "I will tell you. This place stinks. This isn't iDEATH at all. This is just a figment of your imagination. All of you guys here are just a bunch of clucks, doing clucky things at your clucky iDEATH. "iDEATH—ha, don't make me laugh. This place is nothing but a claptrap. You wouldn't know iDEATH if it walked up and bit you. "I know more about iDEATH than all of you guys, especially Charley here who thinks he's something extra. I know more about iDEATH in my little finger than all you guys know put together. "You haven't the slightest idea what's going on here. I know. I know. I know. To hell with your iDEATH. I've forgotten more iDEATH than you guys will ever know. I'm going down to the Forgotten Works to live. You guys can have this damn rat hole." Every chapter of Richard Brautigan's hippy farm tale takes us deeper, deeper into Benzedrine Bill's Interzone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    This is hands down my favorite book of all time. I wish I could give it more stars than five. It's written by a beat poet but sometimes feels more like Science Fiction crossed with stream of consciousness. The first line of the book "In Watermelon Sugar, the deeds were done and done again, as my life is done in Watermelon Sugar." sets the mood of the book. You're never really sure if it's all happening on Earth but in a different time or just in the mind of the author. The sun shines a different This is hands down my favorite book of all time. I wish I could give it more stars than five. It's written by a beat poet but sometimes feels more like Science Fiction crossed with stream of consciousness. The first line of the book "In Watermelon Sugar, the deeds were done and done again, as my life is done in Watermelon Sugar." sets the mood of the book. You're never really sure if it's all happening on Earth but in a different time or just in the mind of the author. The sun shines a different color everyday, there are talking tigers, missing things and bandits in this wonderful book. What I like the most about it is the calm gentle interactions between the characters. They love potatoes and no one cares about much beyond the present. It's life like you imagine it with all the bullshit stripped away.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    In Watermelon Sugar serves as a kind of free-verse poetry, and it's one of the strangest but ultimately most wonderful books of poetry I've ever read. Bleakly nostalgic and bittersweet, it's a thought-provoking work, but one that as a reader it's best not to try and think too hard about, and instead to be immersed in. It's a surreal and quite off-beat work, and it certainly won't appeal to every reader, but In Watermelon Sugar captures in a memorable way perhaps the substance and depth of nothin In Watermelon Sugar serves as a kind of free-verse poetry, and it's one of the strangest but ultimately most wonderful books of poetry I've ever read. Bleakly nostalgic and bittersweet, it's a thought-provoking work, but one that as a reader it's best not to try and think too hard about, and instead to be immersed in. It's a surreal and quite off-beat work, and it certainly won't appeal to every reader, but In Watermelon Sugar captures in a memorable way perhaps the substance and depth of nothingness, and the underlying violence and silence necessary for collective peace, perhaps a message my generation needs to hear in an era where the digital natives are barking out their middle-class suburban cries for democratic socialism and forced environmentalism. The book follows a number of characters in a strange and beautiful little place where even death is pretty, and everything is made of watermelon sugar. The sun changes colours, this world seems to hearken back to the idealism of a quaint village reminiscent of the 1970's film The Wicker Man (the dark undercurrent is shared there, too), and there's a sense throughout that something isn't quite right, but all the same it manages to still be whimsical and simple and a deeply visual utopia. What this book is trying to say to its readers is up for interpretation. I've heard many say it's a dystopia poking fun at the hippies, others who say it's an exploration of how society tries to pretend that anything unpleasant isn't, and various other theories. I suppose it could mean any one of those things, or nothing, or everything. It is, as many have said for decades, quite a bizarre but enjoyable novel.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ian "Marvin" Graye

    Rustic Utopia This is Richard Brautigan at his most sugar-coated and romantic. "In Watermelon Sugar" has been described as a post-apocalyptic novel, although there's no express mention of an apocalypse in the text. It's set in a rustic town or village that might be called Watermelon Sugar. If anything, it's more Arcadian or Utopian, even if there is a dispute between the townsfolk, on the one hand, and inBoil and his no good gang of followers, on the other hand. The Raw Materials The novel abounds w Rustic Utopia This is Richard Brautigan at his most sugar-coated and romantic. "In Watermelon Sugar" has been described as a post-apocalyptic novel, although there's no express mention of an apocalypse in the text. It's set in a rustic town or village that might be called Watermelon Sugar. If anything, it's more Arcadian or Utopian, even if there is a dispute between the townsfolk, on the one hand, and inBoil and his no good gang of followers, on the other hand. The Raw Materials The novel abounds with lists of the raw materials from which it's constructed. There are piney woods, fields of watermelons, stones and rivers full of trout. The townsfolk reduce watermelon juices down until they solidify into what they use as building materials like timber and glass. Roads lined with pines and stones lead to the limits of their dreams. There's no suggestion of a society beyond the town. The townsfolk live in modest shacks on the edge of the village made out of pine, watermelon sugar and stones. They blend watermelon juice and trout oil to burn in their lanterns at night. We learn much about the workings of their society in the manner of Ursula LeGuin's "Always Coming Home", although in a shorter and much more lyrical style. Margaret Versus Pauline There's a large residence, refectory and restaurant called IDEATH, where Pauline works as a part-time cook. The anonymous narrator ("I am one of those who do not have a regular name. My name depends on you. Just call me whatever is in your mind.") has recently separated from Margaret, and started a relationship with Pauline (once a close friend of Margaret, who is now heartbroken). The narrator isn't overly concerned: "I wish Margaret would leave me alone." In Watermelon Sugar, he's kind, generous and well-liked. "I have a gentle life," he confides in us, though he's not quite a hippy. He attributes his happiness to Pauline. Watermelon Sugar Book The narrator is a writer and sculptor. He makes things out of watermelon sugar "including this book being written near iDEATH". In a subtle nod to meta-fiction, this book might be the novel we're reading. The Time of the Tigers The narrator measures the past in terms of statues, one of which was "made a long time ago in the time of the tigers." The tigers are now extinct, having been killed by townsfolk and hunters. "I was six years old when they killed the last one...They had beautiful voices." Twenty years ago, the tigers had killed and eaten the narrator's parents. Nevertheless, they reassured him, "We don't hurt children... We tigers are not evil. This is just a thing we have to do." A Victim of the Forgotten Works If there's anybody who's evil, it's inBOIL. He guards the Forgotten Works, and makes whiskey with the equipment he finds there. This whiskey proves to be the downfall of inBOIL and his gang, even if the rest of the townsfolk can't comprehend what transpired. The narrator forewarns us on page 9 "how quiet and nice things are around here now that they are dead." SOUNDTRACK: (view spoiler)[ Klaxons - "Forgotten Works" https://youtu.be/cMsKHvc7fmo Neko Case - "Margaret Versus Pauline" https://youtu.be/cU3xh55g5yY (hide spoiler)]

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emily B

    This quote hit me ‘Everything is reflected in the statue of mirrors if you stand there long enough and empty your mind of everything else but the mirrors, and you must be careful not to want anything from the mirrors. They just have to happen. An hour or so passed as my mind drained out. Some people cannot see anything in the statue of mirrors, not even themselves’

  12. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Remarkable imagination. At times funny yet dark overall. Poetic yet simple lines. One of the two books that I am planning to re-read again and again. Richard Brautigan (1935-1984), born in Tacoma, Washington, wrote this novella only for around 60 days in 1964, the year I was born. However, this was only published in 1968. In Watermelon Sugar was his 3rd novel after he earlier got noticed with his first, A Confederate General From Big Sur and got catapulted to international fame with his second, T Remarkable imagination. At times funny yet dark overall. Poetic yet simple lines. One of the two books that I am planning to re-read again and again. Richard Brautigan (1935-1984), born in Tacoma, Washington, wrote this novella only for around 60 days in 1964, the year I was born. However, this was only published in 1968. In Watermelon Sugar was his 3rd novel after he earlier got noticed with his first, A Confederate General From Big Sur and got catapulted to international fame with his second, Trout Fishing in America. These three books were published in the 60's at the height of Cold War, The Beatle's popularity, hippies and the Anti-Vietnam war movements. Brautigan was one of those young men who seemed to have been caught in the counterculture revolutions sweeping the youths in the 60's. Like the other literary greats, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Plath, Hunter S. Thompson and Yukio Mishima, Richard Brautigan also committed suicide. Like Hemingway, he shot himself in the head. He was 49 years old. Someone has said: their minds are just too beautiful to age and rot in this world. To date, I have already read around 340 books. Still, my favorite is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900-1944). I did not know exactly why. I first read it in elementary school when I was 8 years old but was not able to finish it. I still remember the elephant inside the boa constrictor and I was scared but I heard stories of snakes swallowing whole chicken so I did not see any metaphor or allusion on that. The next time I read it was when I was in college and it was the first required reading in our World's Literature class. That was when I appreciated the whole story as we were required to go through the plot, theme, characters, quotes, lessons, etc. For me, In Watermelon Sugar is the continuation of The Little Prince. Surreal settings. Ethereal characters. It is as if the child-like characters of Saint-Exupery became real people, grew up but continued to live not on their individual planets but this time in a make-believe world where Watermelon Works, Forgotten Works and iDeath were. Unlike the Little Prince who does not grow up or old, in Brautigan's novella, his quirky characters are dark, fall in love, fall out of love, cheat, cook and eat breakfast and commit suicide. But after burying their dead, they go to the plaza and dance their sadness away. Brautigan taught me why I like De Saint-Exupery: some novels were written by authors for themselves. Perhaps they just would like to test the limit of their creativity. Perhaps during those 60 days, creative thoughts came rushing through Brautigan's brilliant mind and he had to write them. Some authors would just only want us to watch their characters. To wonder about them. To cheer for them. But not be them. Their worlds will never be ours and those characters could never be us. They are the figments of their creators' fertile imagination. These brilliant novelists, most of them committed suicide, have minds that are too beautiful for us to understand. Their beauty are not for us to grasp and contain in our mortal minds. Life imitates art. Most of their characters killed themselves. Like Brautigan's Margaret, INBOIL and his minions. Their are too beautiful to age and rot in this world of ours.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brent Legault

    This is the book that made me realize that Brautigan was a sham writer. I had my suspicions after reading Revenge of the Lawn and Trout Fishing in America, but this one put him forever in my private slush pile. I don't understand the reputation that has been handed him and I don't think he deserves it for the folderal he manufactured. His poetry is all right, at least I remember The Pill Versus the Springhill Mine Disaster as not entirely without worth. Some of it makes me laugh at least. But hi This is the book that made me realize that Brautigan was a sham writer. I had my suspicions after reading Revenge of the Lawn and Trout Fishing in America, but this one put him forever in my private slush pile. I don't understand the reputation that has been handed him and I don't think he deserves it for the folderal he manufactured. His poetry is all right, at least I remember The Pill Versus the Springhill Mine Disaster as not entirely without worth. Some of it makes me laugh at least. But his fiction is false, dead and dreary. I've never been so bored as when I was in In Watermelon Sugar and I can no longer pretend his work is important just because so many other people think it is.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    I was absolutely besotted with this book and now I can't remember why, but I carried it around with me in high school and just thumbed through it and soaked it up. I suppose it was everything I wanted, but couldn't have - freedom on all levels for a small-town girl stuck in a small school full of small people. This was my mantra for escape and it opened up many doors - some good and some bad, but all leading to the same right place and that was my own mind and my own opinions. For that alone, I I was absolutely besotted with this book and now I can't remember why, but I carried it around with me in high school and just thumbed through it and soaked it up. I suppose it was everything I wanted, but couldn't have - freedom on all levels for a small-town girl stuck in a small school full of small people. This was my mantra for escape and it opened up many doors - some good and some bad, but all leading to the same right place and that was my own mind and my own opinions. For that alone, I rate this a 5. Also, I loved the picture on the cover - I wanted that hair, that hippie happy dream look. Oh, the even remembering of this time makes me giggle. We were all so earnest then. sigh. ( and boy, do I date myself!)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    A short, but beautiful novel. Or is it poetry? The overall feeling is sadness and loss, the book makes you ache for things and people you don’t know. It’s obvious why it is on the 1001 books list. I’m pretty sure I’ll reread this one more than once. This book is not for too rational people who dislike symbolism, fantasy or fairytales. To all the others I say ‘you won’t regret visiting ‘watermelon sugar’ ‘

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nadine Larter

    Definitely one of the strangest but most original books I have ever read. Strange that it is such an old story when it seems so contemporary. I can't quite explain the absolute weirdness of it. It's sort of a book about the writing of the book itself. Usually I find that kind of thing quite obnoxious but it just worked with this one. To the character Margaret: I loved you the most. To the unnamed narrator: you chose the wrong girl.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hermes

    Sad, strange beauty, like staring at a silent black stone thrown into the stream, and the circles which follow, soundless.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    a friend and I read this book aloud to one another in the hallway of a dilapidated residence hotel over a few hours. after whcih, whatever was broken in my imagination was amiably mended..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Abby Hagler

    I return to this book a lot. Recently, I think I offended a friend by being nosy about their previous name before they legally changed it. I read this chapter and mulled over my mistake: MY NAME I guess you are kind of curious as to who I am, but I am one of those who do not have a regular name. My name depends on you. Just call me whatever is in your mind. If you are thinking about something that happened a long time ago: Somebody asked you a question and you did not know the answer. That is my I return to this book a lot. Recently, I think I offended a friend by being nosy about their previous name before they legally changed it. I read this chapter and mulled over my mistake: MY NAME I guess you are kind of curious as to who I am, but I am one of those who do not have a regular name. My name depends on you. Just call me whatever is in your mind. If you are thinking about something that happened a long time ago: Somebody asked you a question and you did not know the answer. That is my name. Perhaps it was raining very hard. That is my name. Or somebody wanted you to do something. You did it. Then they told you what you did was wrong - "Sorry for the mistake," - and you had to do something else. That is my name. Perhaps it was a game that you played when you were a child or something that came idly into your mind when you were old and sitting in a chair near the window. That is my name. Or you walked someplace. There were flowers all around. That is my name. Perhaps you stared into a river. There was somebody near who loved you. They were about to touch you. You could feel this before it happened. Then it happened. That is my name. Or you heard someone calling from a great distance. Their voice was almost an echo. That is my name. Perhaps you were lying in bed, almost ready to go to sleep and you laughed at something, a joke unto yourself, a good way to end the day. That is my name. Or you were eating something good and for a second forgot what you were eating, but still went on, knowing it was good. That is my name. Or you felt bad when she said that thing to you. She could have told it to someone else: Somebody who was more familiar with her problems. That is my name. Perhaps the trout swam in the pool but the river was only eight inches wide and the moon shone on iDEATH and the watermelon fields glowed out of proportion, dark and the moon seemed to rise from every plant. That is my name. And I wish Margaret would leave me alone.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mon

    The rating is much harder than the actual book. The process of critical assessment is far too logical for this madly surreal, withdrawn, disassociated schizoid novella. You can compare it to a high-brow indie cross-genre EP on Pitchfock, completely incomprehensible but pretty nonetheless. I don't understand any of it, but here's a bunch of artwork that sort of look like the visual imagery, if it can be compared to anything else. Owl by David Noonan or make myself a space to inhabit too by Del Kar The rating is much harder than the actual book. The process of critical assessment is far too logical for this madly surreal, withdrawn, disassociated schizoid novella. You can compare it to a high-brow indie cross-genre EP on Pitchfock, completely incomprehensible but pretty nonetheless. I don't understand any of it, but here's a bunch of artwork that sort of look like the visual imagery, if it can be compared to anything else. Owl by David Noonan or make myself a space to inhabit too by Del Karthryn-Barton Lemure Heads by Franz West There can be no arguments by Karla Black Sultry Moon by Charles Burchfield Hen and Chickens by Imogen Cunningham You get it now? Well, at least you're not the only one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jr Bacdayan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. “In Watermelon Sugar the deeds were done and done again as my life is done in watermelon sugar.” This is quite probably the strangest book I've ever read. Richard Brautigan's wunderkind of novel is set in bizarre and zany world. A world where almost everything is made of Watermelon Sugar, where the sun shines a different color each day and the stars are all red. A world where tigers can talk to humans, even teach Arithmetic. A world of forgotten things, vegetable statues, one-inch rivers and sta “In Watermelon Sugar the deeds were done and done again as my life is done in watermelon sugar.” This is quite probably the strangest book I've ever read. Richard Brautigan's wunderkind of novel is set in bizarre and zany world. A world where almost everything is made of Watermelon Sugar, where the sun shines a different color each day and the stars are all red. A world where tigers can talk to humans, even teach Arithmetic. A world of forgotten things, vegetable statues, one-inch rivers and staring trouts. A world that's so out of this world. Brautigan writes it in a very simple, very basic prose, something even 10 year-olds could understand. He peppers it with seriousness about strange things and mindless dialogue that results in a very potent mix for a comedy. I had quite a few laughs. Now, the trouble with this book is if you take it literally, and people easily fall for that, when they do, this can be treated as a piece of hippie-junk. Don't fall for that, because the underlying meaning, the metaphors and ironies are so mischievously crafted to ignore. The name iDeath, the mass-suicide done by inBOIL and his evil gang, Margaret hanging herself on an apple tree. All these are gelled by something I can't explain, something I think I quite know but quite don't. It's like Deja vu. It's like the protagonist's name. It makes me feel like I understand the book, but when I try to dig deeper, I'm at a loss of words. “I guess you are kind of curious as to who I am, but I am one of those who do not have a regular name. My name depends on you. Just call me whatever is in your mind. If you are thinking about something that happened a long time ago: Somebody asked you a question and you did not know the answer. That is my name. Perhaps it was raining very hard. That is my name. Or somebody wanted you to do something. You did it. Then they told you what you did was wrong—“Sorry for the mistake,”—and you had to do something else. That is my name. Perhaps it was a game you played when you were a child or something that came idly into your mind when you were old and sitting in a chair near the window. That is my name. Or you walked someplace. There were flowers all around. That is my name. Perhaps you stared into a river. There as something near you who loved you. They were about to touch you. You could feel this before it happened. Then it happened. That is my name.” In watermelon sugar is the allegory of those things we don't understand. Why we love, why we fall out of love, why people kill themselves, why we live. The story is strange, yes, but then again, isn't our world? How is In Watermelon Sugar different from reality? The specifics maybe, but the stranger world is really the one we live in. At least, they all get to dance.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben Loory

    this should really be 4.5 stars because i think the very last page is wrong... or stops just a second shy of where it should. i'm still hanging there, waiting for what must necessarily follow........ right? right, richard? right? in any case, this is a pretty great book. it's brautigan poem-world in the guise of some kind of post-apocalyptic hippie nightmare-fantasyland. takes a little while to adjust to it, it kinda just throws you in, and the adjustment period is a little traumatic, what with i this should really be 4.5 stars because i think the very last page is wrong... or stops just a second shy of where it should. i'm still hanging there, waiting for what must necessarily follow........ right? right, richard? right? in any case, this is a pretty great book. it's brautigan poem-world in the guise of some kind of post-apocalyptic hippie nightmare-fantasyland. takes a little while to adjust to it, it kinda just throws you in, and the adjustment period is a little traumatic, what with iDEATH and all that, but once you're in it's a whole little world that makes perfect sense and is frightening and beautiful and more real than real like all the best fantasylands. unlike Trout Fishing in America, this is serious brautigan, leaving behind funny to take on the big issues (while still always being amusing(ly sad)). good stuff. tombs, tigers, black clocks of silent black watermelon sugar... The Hawkline Monster A Gothic Western is still six years away, but you can see it on the horizon from here. if he'd stopped writing after this, brautigan'd still be one of my favorites, but i sure am glad he kept going.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nate D

    Reads with odd smoothness, going down like watermelon sugar. But that easy flow of words disguises something dark and bitter, something that creeps up over the narrative no matter to what degree the characters disavow that anything could be wrong with their minimal, controlled world of statues, rivers, bridges, and watermelon. Singular American weird -- I should have gotten around to this one ages ago.

  24. 5 out of 5

    نیلوفر رحمانیان

    What can i say when a book is just simply perfect. And it was written in just 2 months. I love How everything is a sign in the book, how everything has been deconstructed. How everything is empty of meaning in iDEATH yet full of meaning to the reader. The history, the originality, the nature being burned and forgotten, how minority is rejected totally and even their roar is treated by silence. How the only way to remind people of the truth is self destruction and how even it can not help a thing What can i say when a book is just simply perfect. And it was written in just 2 months. I love How everything is a sign in the book, how everything has been deconstructed. How everything is empty of meaning in iDEATH yet full of meaning to the reader. The history, the originality, the nature being burned and forgotten, how minority is rejected totally and even their roar is treated by silence. How the only way to remind people of the truth is self destruction and how even it can not help a thing. The knives speak, the symbol of masculinity and being subjective cuts first parts of the body then the shawl that Margaritte hung herself from apple tree. (What does apple tree remind you of?) and how enev the chapters names are repeated, as their daily life as the routinem full of Again and Again ... thank you Mr Brautigan, Sir, for being so creative, so lovely, and so dreamy.

  25. 5 out of 5

    framptonhollis

    Cry. Laugh. Cry and laugh. The sentences are written simply and they convey emotions both simple and awfully complicated. The story is deliberately strange and surreal but within it lies some odd reliability. The characters come across as being mildly detached and alien, but they still feel pain and love. Brautigan creates a whole new world in a hundred pages and it's breathtaking, funny, groundbreaking, depressing, and bleakly beautiful. It's like nothing else...and it's fucking perfect.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    6/2016 Yes. Again, and always. Water in the desert, this. 12/2015 My boy brought this to me tonight because he was certain I needed it. Oh, how right he was. 1/2012 This one is a touchstone for me, and I'm not sure exactly why. Perhaps because it is so very gentle, so loving, so open. Ostensibly, it's a few days in a commune in some mythical world that used to have beautiful, man-eating, talking tigers. A world where everything is made from watermelon sugar. But it's always struck me as a meditat 6/2016 Yes. Again, and always. Water in the desert, this. 12/2015 My boy brought this to me tonight because he was certain I needed it. Oh, how right he was. 1/2012 This one is a touchstone for me, and I'm not sure exactly why. Perhaps because it is so very gentle, so loving, so open. Ostensibly, it's a few days in a commune in some mythical world that used to have beautiful, man-eating, talking tigers. A world where everything is made from watermelon sugar. But it's always struck me as a meditation on the art of the possible. It helps me to remember how to live, in the words of Annie Dillard, "yielding at every moment to the perfect freedom of single necessity." It's an imperfect science, embracing the given, but one I try to improve at. This book also tastes like my late childhood and early adolescence, when all the world was in love with love, or so it seemed to me. We were all going to be hippies and live on communes and everyone was going to take a turn doing dishes. This review makes almost as little sense as the book. I'm okay with that. 10/2005 As much as Brautigan repelled me in person, this book is a transcendent thing. It glows softly in my hands, the pages made from watermelon sugar. On the face of it, it's some hippie post-apocalyptic nonsensical rantage. But it is lyrical, and sweet, and good.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mat

    Breathtakingly original, this surrealist short novel by Brautigan was like reading about a perfect acid or mushroom trip - perfect in the sense that there is no paranoia or upset stomach. In this story, people live in Watermelon Sugar and many objects, such as planks and even windows, are made out of (golden) watermelon sugar. People are buried in tombs on the bottom of trout-filled rivers and there is a place called The Forgotten Works where all the forgotten things lie piled up for millions of Breathtakingly original, this surrealist short novel by Brautigan was like reading about a perfect acid or mushroom trip - perfect in the sense that there is no paranoia or upset stomach. In this story, people live in Watermelon Sugar and many objects, such as planks and even windows, are made out of (golden) watermelon sugar. People are buried in tombs on the bottom of trout-filled rivers and there is a place called The Forgotten Works where all the forgotten things lie piled up for millions of miles. Only Brautigan could think up something so crazy, so out-of-this-world. This novel is a beautiful escape from reality and I would have worshipped this book if I had known it back in high school. Brautigan writes in a simple, slightly terse but beautifully innocent style, like a child's daydream that is wispy and ephemeral, like a cloud ready to be blown away and disappear forever at the slightest gust of wind. Brautigan definitely has his own place within American literature, somewhere between the beats and the hippies and In Watermelon Sugar, many would contend, and I am not ready to disagree although there are many of his novels I haven't read yet, just might be his masterpiece.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    The weirdest book I've ever read!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Overmark

    ... the mood of the counterculture generation. I see ... not exactly Burroughs, more like Lewis Carroll building imaginary worlds inhabiting them with not-that-ordinary people. I believe we can safely replace any mentioning of watermelon sugar with chrystal meth or similar stimuli.

  30. 4 out of 5

    kL7kqlLYGD0Y

    "Well, I've got to get back to work," Fred said. "The plank press calls. What are you going to do?" "I think I'll go write," I said. "Work on my book for a while." "That sounds ambitious," Fred said. "Is the book about weather like the schoolteacher said?" "No, it's not about weather." "Good," Fred said. "I wouldn't want to read a book about weather." "Have you ever read a book?" I said. "No," Fred said. "I haven't, but I don't think I'd want to start by reading one about clouds."

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.