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To Have and Have Not is the dramatic story of Harry Morgan, an honest man who is forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of keeping his crumbling family financially afloat. His adventures lead him into the world of the wealthy and dissipated yachtsmen who throng the region, and involve him in a strange and unlikely love affair. Harshly realistic, To Have and Have Not is the dramatic story of Harry Morgan, an honest man who is forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of keeping his crumbling family financially afloat. His adventures lead him into the world of the wealthy and dissipated yachtsmen who throng the region, and involve him in a strange and unlikely love affair. Harshly realistic, yet with one of the most subtle and moving relationships in the Hemingway oeuvre, To Have and Have Not is literary high adventure at its finest.


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To Have and Have Not is the dramatic story of Harry Morgan, an honest man who is forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of keeping his crumbling family financially afloat. His adventures lead him into the world of the wealthy and dissipated yachtsmen who throng the region, and involve him in a strange and unlikely love affair. Harshly realistic, To Have and Have Not is the dramatic story of Harry Morgan, an honest man who is forced into running contraband between Cuba and Key West as a means of keeping his crumbling family financially afloat. His adventures lead him into the world of the wealthy and dissipated yachtsmen who throng the region, and involve him in a strange and unlikely love affair. Harshly realistic, yet with one of the most subtle and moving relationships in the Hemingway oeuvre, To Have and Have Not is literary high adventure at its finest.

30 review for To Have and Have Not

  1. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    This is not at all the Nazi romp of Bogie and Bacall fame. There might be some external similarities, but they seem fleeting. If you put your lips together to whistle here, the likelihood would be that it would be to warn someone that the police were coming. Life can be tough in The Conch Republic. Harry Morgan is a hard man in a hard time. He owns and operates his own fishing boat, out of Key West, catering to those who Have and want an ocean-going adventure. When Harry is stiffed out of almost This is not at all the Nazi romp of Bogie and Bacall fame. There might be some external similarities, but they seem fleeting. If you put your lips together to whistle here, the likelihood would be that it would be to warn someone that the police were coming. Life can be tough in The Conch Republic. Harry Morgan is a hard man in a hard time. He owns and operates his own fishing boat, out of Key West, catering to those who Have and want an ocean-going adventure. When Harry is stiffed out of almost three weeks of costs by a boorish client, he immediately becomes a Have Not, is faced with some tough choices, and agrees to transport some illegal Chinese immigrants in from Cuba, a mere 90 miles away. He will go on to smuggle more materials and people over the course of the story. Hemingway at the helm of his boat, Pilar - image from Hemingway Home Desperation is a frequent visitor on these remote shores. Harry is far from alone in feeling the impact of the Depression. One shipmate is a drunk who has seen the last of his good days. A sometimes hire is desperately trying to catch a job anywhere, just to feed his family. The illegals Harry transports are as desperate as working class illegals often are. Even one of the women here is shown in some detail contemplating her grim prospects after her husband has died. One group with whom Harry has dealings is Cuban revolutionaries. Harry, echoing Hemingway, offers a bit of support for their desires, their ideals, but faced with the reality of their actions, he sees beneath the plating to something a bit less glittery. There are crooks aplenty afloat here, whether a corrupt lawyer, a murderous coyote, a tax cheat, a welcher, and the odd homicidal revolutionary. Come visit. The book has the feel of something that was thrown together, or at least done in jumps. Turns out that is indeed the case. The first chunk was originally published in Cosmopolitan Magazine in 1934 under the title “One Trip Across.” Part Two of the book first appears in Esquire, February 1936, as “The Tradesman’s Return.” The narration voice varies, from Harry’s to an omniscient narrator, to the voice of sundry others later in the book. This is not necessarily a problem, but does make things feel a bit disjointed. Contributing to this is that, while the travails of Harry Morgan occupy most of the novel, he vanishes for a considerable swath towards the end, and our focus turns to several have characters, only a few of whom we have met before. Bogie and Bacall in the film - image from Film Noir Blonde Hemingway offers us a look at the sorts of desperation these haves experience. A wealthy grain trader rues a decision made in greed some years back, as the feds circle. A ne’er do well trust fund kid is a kid no more, his holdings have been hit hard by the Wall Street crash and the sorts of banking criminality that have become far too familiar, so he has to do what he has to do to keep up at least the veneer of wealth. “The eternal jackpot. I’m playing a machine now that doesn’t give jackpots anymore. Only tonight I just happened to think about it. Usually I don’t think about it." Harry had risked his life to provide for his family, but the haves seem at a loss when faced with a loss of workless income. the money on which it was not worth while for him to live was one hundred and seventy dollars more a month than the fisherman Albert Tracy had been supporting his family on… One particular wanderer in here is Richard Gordon, a character clearly intended as a Hemingway stand-in, a writer of renown in a troubled marriage, something Ernest knew a little something about. There is a local married lady who “collects writers as well as their books,” disdaining a husband who may be impotent. Overall, there is a dark caste here. Part of that is the times, the Depression, when it was tough to bask in the glow of much of anything. It makes sense that the characters Hemingway portrays reflect the struggles of the era. While he clearly has little sympathy for the haves, he hardly paints the have nots with halos. There is plenty of hardship, and plenty of corruption to go around. I have not read much Hemingway, so lack the sort of insights one might acquire from a broader and deeper reading of his work. Man testing his mettle vs the world is one we know about though and that is present in abundance here. Harry is screwed by the world so does what he has to do, which includes considerable physical risk. Others prostrate themselves in other ways to get what they need. Are they any less active in taking on the world? Or is it only that it is their methods that differ? Things do not work out all that great for Harry. Maybe there are better approaches to his problem. Then, maybe there are not, and the world just sucks. The world shown here certainly fits into the trope “Life’s a bitch and then you die. Have a nice day.” Is this great literature? I am open to being corrected and I did think more of it before getting down to actually writing, but I would say “nah.” Interesting certainly, bleak, but too much a Frankenstein beast, parts cadged together, however expertly, that make for a less than successful merger. To Read or Read Not? I would take the plunge. It might illuminate themes and other specifics in Hemingway's later works, while providing a dark look at a dark time. You never can tell when a dark time might come around. PS - it is impossible, even though the character Harry Morgan bears no physical resemblance to Bogart, to keep that voice and delivery out of one's head while reading this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    615. To Have And Have Not, Ernest Hemingway To Have and Have Not is a novel by Ernest Hemingway (publ. 1937) about Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain out of Key West, Florida. The novel depicts Harry as an essentially good man, who is forced by dire economic forces beyond his control into the black-market activity of running contraband between Cuba and Florida. A wealthy fishing charter customer (one of the "Have's") tricks Harry by slipping away without paying after a three-week fishing trip, 615. To Have And Have Not, Ernest Hemingway To Have and Have Not is a novel by Ernest Hemingway (publ. 1937) about Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain out of Key West, Florida. The novel depicts Harry as an essentially good man, who is forced by dire economic forces beyond his control into the black-market activity of running contraband between Cuba and Florida. A wealthy fishing charter customer (one of the "Have's") tricks Harry by slipping away without paying after a three-week fishing trip, leaving Harry destitute. Harry then makes a fateful decision to smuggle Chinese immigrants into Florida from Cuba to make ends meet in supporting his family. Harry begins to regularly ferry different types of illegal cargo between the two countries, including alcohol and Cuban revolutionaries. The Great Depression features prominently in the novel, forcing depravity and hunger on the poor residents of Key West (the "Have Not's") who are referred to locally as "Conchs". عنوان: داشتن و نداشتن؛ اثر: ارنست همینگوی؛ انتشاراتیها: (امیرکبیر، اردیبهشت، اکباتان، نیکا، اژدهای طلایی، افق، گهرشید، بوتیمار، هرمس، ناژ)؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سوم ماه آوریل سال 2003 میلادی عنوان: داشتن و نداشتن؛ اثر: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: پرویز داریوش؛ تهران، کتابهای جیبی، 1340؛ در 206 ص؛ تهران، امیرکبیر، 1380؛ در 251 ص؛ شابک: 9640007692؛ عنوان: داشتن و نداشتن؛ اثر: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: فریدون رضوانیه؛ تهران، اردیبهشت، 1363؛ در 200 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1368؛ در 200 ص؛چاپ دیگر: تهران، اکباتان، 1396؛ در 232 ص؛ شابک: 9786006608686؛ مترجم: مهدی غبرائی؛ تهران، نیکا، 1389؛ در 256 ص؛ شابک: 9786005906134؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران، اژدهای طلایی، 1393، در 231 ص؛ شابک: 9789648630787؛ مترجم: خجسته کیهان؛ تهران، افق، چاپ دوم 1392؛ در 277 ص؛ شابک: 9789643695439؛ چاپ سوم 1392؛ مترجم: علیرضا کچوئیان؛ تهران، گهرشید، 1393؛ در 273 ص؛ شابک: 9789649398709؛ مترجم: احسان لامع؛ مشهد، بوتیمار، 1393؛ در 248 ص؛ شابک: 9786006938615؛ مترجم: احمد کسائی پور؛ تهران، هرمس، 1394؛ در 315 ص؛ شابک: 9789643638436؛ مترجم: منیژه جلالی؛ تهران، ناژ، 1394؛ در 289 ص؛ شابک: 9786006110219؛ رمان «داشتن و نداشتن»، روایت زندگی «هری مورگان»، ناخدای یک کشتی ماهیگیری ست. رمان، همچو بیشتر کارهای همینگوی، «جزئی نگر» و «دیالوگ محور» است، و پرداخت صحنه‌ ها، یگانه و شورانگیز است. از صحنه‌‌ های به یاد ماندنی رمان، صحنه‌ ای ست که ناخدا «هری»، ناغافل و با خونسردی، چینی قاچاقچی انسان را، روی عرشه کشتی‌ خویش می‌کشد. رمان سه فصل دارد. فصل نخست رمان، یعنی «بهار» را خود ناخدا «هری مورگان»، روایت می‌کند، و فصل بعدی، یعنی «پاییز» را دانای کل، و بخشهایی از «زمستان» (که بلندترین بخش رمان است) را «آلبرت»، و بخشهایی را «هری»، روایت میکند. ا. شربیانی

  3. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Sutton

    Well before the midway point, Ernest Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not turns into a different sort of book. At least, that’s the way it felt to me. It begins as the very straightforward story of an out of luck ship captain who turns to crime in order to support his family. Nothing is that simple in Hemingway. While connecting to the current political and economic climate (which included an incipient revolution in Cuba), Hemingway transforms this personal tragedy into something infinitely more com Well before the midway point, Ernest Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not turns into a different sort of book. At least, that’s the way it felt to me. It begins as the very straightforward story of an out of luck ship captain who turns to crime in order to support his family. Nothing is that simple in Hemingway. While connecting to the current political and economic climate (which included an incipient revolution in Cuba), Hemingway transforms this personal tragedy into something infinitely more complex and more universal. In itself, that’s not surprising; however, I’m not sure that had been the plan. Even as To Have and Have Not becomes more interesting (and more Hemingwayesque), it begins to feel increasingly disjointed. I found this an enjoyable read, but the shifting perspectives could make it challenging to stay engaged. 3.5 Stars rounded up.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    Guns and testosterone on the ocean waves. To Have and Have not is without question the most macho of the Hemingway novels I've read so far. It's mean, it's brute, it's rum-soaked, and it's also quite miserable. Especially for the women. I wouldn't be surprised if he wrote this under a dark cloud of Alcoholism. Thankfully, his no nonsense simple prose that doesn't try to do anything fancy is here, but, when I think of novels like The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms, this just wasn't as pleas Guns and testosterone on the ocean waves. To Have and Have not is without question the most macho of the Hemingway novels I've read so far. It's mean, it's brute, it's rum-soaked, and it's also quite miserable. Especially for the women. I wouldn't be surprised if he wrote this under a dark cloud of Alcoholism. Thankfully, his no nonsense simple prose that doesn't try to do anything fancy is here, but, when I think of novels like The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms, this just wasn't as pleasing on the eye. I was surprised to learn that this is the only novel Ernest Hemingway set on American soil, and marked perhaps the only time in his writing career that he chose to follow prevalent literary trends rather than creating his own. Whilst the main protagonist; the washed-up and aggressive boat captain Harry Morgan was indeed a memorable one, the narrative overall ran into problems. The novel is told awkwardly using third and first-person narration, and there is clear reason for that, as it's really made up of two short stories - Originally called 'One Trip Across and 'The Tradesman’s Return' plus a novella loosely linked, added to the longer part of the book. This just didn't flow like a proper novel should, and was distinctly inferior to the other two Hemingway novels I mentioned above. Criticized for its fragmented form, its hard-boiled obsession with cojones, and its ham-fisted approach to politics, it wasn't received well, and in several places, including Detroit, was even banned for being classed as too obscene. This might be my least favourite Hemingway, but he did capture really well the economic ravages and desperation of trying to stay afloat during the depression era, and the setting of Key West and Cuba was a refreshing change from what I've been used to. Whilst there is a lot of action taking place in boats on the Florida Straits, my favourite scenes, even though they made me feel sad, were those taking place in bars. Man, how I miss the bars & restaurants. I look forward to the day so much when I can drink like a fish in a bar. I will likely at some point watch Howard Hawks' movie starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, and I wouldn't be surprised if it turned out better than the book. Even if it isn't, at least I'll get to see Lauren Bacall in her prime.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm

    Meh. It starts very strongly -- good character development, definite Hemingway commentary tone -- lots of Hemingway Southern Hemisphere fun in Cuba. But midway -- he just sort of wanders off and starts pointing his Hemingway at anything that moves. He introduces secondary and tertiary characters with incredible detail, but with no discernible purpose. It's not one of his better books, and ends leaving you wondering how much better it would have been if the writing from about the second third on was Meh. It starts very strongly -- good character development, definite Hemingway commentary tone -- lots of Hemingway Southern Hemisphere fun in Cuba. But midway -- he just sort of wanders off and starts pointing his Hemingway at anything that moves. He introduces secondary and tertiary characters with incredible detail, but with no discernible purpose. It's not one of his better books, and ends leaving you wondering how much better it would have been if the writing from about the second third on was more substantially interconnected. What's great about this book, if you want to enjoy it/study it/comment on it -- is that he really does scatter shot his Hemingway. You could tear out just about any page of this book, and it's pure him. His meaningless meandering details are done with true depth and edge ... but they really never imbue the reader with any concern for the characters that he sort of follows randomly. It would be the equivalent of going to a train station, closing your eyes, opening them, writing something about the first person you see, closing them for another hour, opening them again, writing about the first person you see and so on ... but meanwhile, there's a CRITICAL character standing off to the side smoking a cigarette doing absolutely nothing. Go read The Old Man and the Sea -- or "For Whom the Bell Tolls" ... leave this for the poor sots at school who are forced to read everything by him.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    "In the old days he would not have worried, but the fighting part of him was tired now, along with the other part, and he was alone in all of this now and he lay on the big, wide, old bed and could neither read nor sleep." It seems like there is always enough to worry about in the world, no matter what times you live though, and once you hit the age when you lose the "fighting part" of your inner rebel spirit and it fades into a tired "nah - I don't like that!" instead of "I AM GOING TO RAISE HE "In the old days he would not have worried, but the fighting part of him was tired now, along with the other part, and he was alone in all of this now and he lay on the big, wide, old bed and could neither read nor sleep." It seems like there is always enough to worry about in the world, no matter what times you live though, and once you hit the age when you lose the "fighting part" of your inner rebel spirit and it fades into a tired "nah - I don't like that!" instead of "I AM GOING TO RAISE HELL ABOUT THIS!". And it also seems the stupid worrying invariably comes with a loss of sleep and reading ability - which is even more annoying than the worrying as such. My cure more often than not is to revisit old favourite authors - preferably those who died a long time before the specific kind of worrying I am indulging in at any given moment showed up uninvited - and to force-feed my mind with the kind of literature that makes me think of other things to worry about than those that actually haunt me in real life. Making sense? Maybe not, but Hemingway's problems - to me - are at the same time very relatable and very much not MY current problems, and therefore his stories are soothing even in their most laconically bleak moments. So to have or not to have the ability to hide from reality, that is the question, and the answer is a strong MAYBE! Hemingway says it with the usual eloquence...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    If you've never read Hemingway, this isn't the book for you. If you don't like experimentation, this isn't the book for you. If you're turned off by violence, this isn't the book for you. If you're an opponent of socialism, this isn't the book for you. If you want happy endings, this isn't the book for you. If, however, you have dabbled in Hemingway and you want a challenge, this is the book for you. If you dig experimental literature, then this is the book for you. If you can stomach violence or If you've never read Hemingway, this isn't the book for you. If you don't like experimentation, this isn't the book for you. If you're turned off by violence, this isn't the book for you. If you're an opponent of socialism, this isn't the book for you. If you want happy endings, this isn't the book for you. If, however, you have dabbled in Hemingway and you want a challenge, this is the book for you. If you dig experimental literature, then this is the book for you. If you can stomach violence or you recognize its primacy in the human experience, this book is for you. If you are a socialist, this book is for you. If you hate happy endings, this book is for you. There're probably other things I can add, but mostly I want to say that this book is for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Algernon (Darth Anyan)

    "a man ... ain't got no ... hasn't got any ... can't really ... isn't any way out. No matter how ... a man alone ... ain't got no bloody chance." Harry Morgan A novel of the Depression Era, To Have and Have Not follows the struggle of Harry Morgan to make ends meet, to live a decent life. He is a boat owner sailing the waters between Cuba and Key West, renting out to rich tourists lookinh for the thrill of big fish chasing. The novel opens with a spectacular gunfight in front of a bar in Hava "a man ... ain't got no ... hasn't got any ... can't really ... isn't any way out. No matter how ... a man alone ... ain't got no bloody chance." Harry Morgan A novel of the Depression Era, To Have and Have Not follows the struggle of Harry Morgan to make ends meet, to live a decent life. He is a boat owner sailing the waters between Cuba and Key West, renting out to rich tourists lookinh for the thrill of big fish chasing. The novel opens with a spectacular gunfight in front of a bar in Havana and continues with an episode of marlin fishing in the Gulf Stream. Harry is one of the 'have nots' and, after one of the 'haves' pulls a fast one on him and disappears without paying for renting the boat, he is forced to accept shady jobs on the wrong side of the law. He has a wife and three girls to provide for. Smuggling persons and hard liquor in and out of Cuba is not for the faint hearted, and Harry Morgan is forced to get tough in order to survive. All I have is my cojones to peddle. . But his luck has turned against him and everything he tries seems to end badly. The story is told through internal monologues and hard edged dialogue with Hemingway signature spare prose and with his typical protagonist of few words and brooding visage. The timeline is broken into separate episodes in Harry's career outside the law, each one illustrating another step down on the ladder of respectability and success. For the good parts, I really liked the time spent on the sea and the way the relationship of Harry with his wife is described. Most of the problems I had with the story come in the second half of the novel, where the author loses the focus and starts to write about a lot of secondary characters loafing around Key West and having little to no connections with Harry's story. I suspect Hemingway was on a deadline, had only enough material for a novella and filled in the required pages with several unconnected episodes from his work in progress pile. These additions have a strong autobiographical vibe, especially the episode of the alcoholic writer who has a row with his wife. An interesting literary device has the author jumping from ship to ship in the Key West harbour and look inside each cabin at the thoughts of the owners as each contemplate failure, despair, suicide, anguish, ill health, loneliness. I could see Hemingway lounging in his own boat on an evening, looking around at his neighbours in the marina and imagining their life stories, putting everything down in his notebook for future use. Another bother is that my edition always uses the N word for the black characters in the book, and to make matters worse these black characters are rather poorly constructed and illustrate an uncomfortable level of prejudice in an author I greatly admired in my youth. My dissapointment may have another source : I have seen the movie version three or four times, and I was expecting something along the lines of Casablanca with a cool cucumber Bogey, Lauren Bacall swinging her hips with a wicked smile while she sings a jazz tune and some idealistic anti-Nazi message. The novel is instead closer to the theme of futile struggle against fate from The Old Man and the Sea and to the social militancy of The Pearl by Steinbeck.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fiona MacDonald

    I feel slightly less guilty knowing that Hemingway himself thought this was the worst book he had ever written, but even so, I must be missing something major because I found the prose dull, stilted, unemotional and simply boring. I couldn't connect with any of the characters and that was a big problem. A couple of pages were of interest, but overall I was desperate to finish and celebrating when I did.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ted Hovey

    Hemingway is still my favorite writer. I've enjoyed all of his books, and I've learned from his style - minimal use of adverbs - maximum use of one-syllable words - clarity of expression - all of that and more. So why did I rate this book down, as 4 stars instead of 5? I had a hard time cheering for Harry, a criminal and a killer. I understand that Hemingway wrote in the "modernist" mode. That is to say, there are no happy endings in Hemingway's books. That is true in this book, for sure. Still, Hemingway is still my favorite writer. I've enjoyed all of his books, and I've learned from his style - minimal use of adverbs - maximum use of one-syllable words - clarity of expression - all of that and more. So why did I rate this book down, as 4 stars instead of 5? I had a hard time cheering for Harry, a criminal and a killer. I understand that Hemingway wrote in the "modernist" mode. That is to say, there are no happy endings in Hemingway's books. That is true in this book, for sure. Still, I would like the protagonist be a person I can root for, even if he doesn't win in the end.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Julie Christine

    Florida Keys. 1937. Harry Morgan, husband to a former prostitute, disappointed father, erstwhile deep sea fishing guide. Broke. Desperate. Surrounded by wasted, depressed, angry, hopeless characters. Welcome to Hemingway. How can a protagonist who refers to blacks as "niggers", who writes his own moral code with little regard for law or ethics, who regrets his daughters, and who has a dismal outlook on life even on his best days get under your skin? How can a writer, whose phrases are bleak, who Florida Keys. 1937. Harry Morgan, husband to a former prostitute, disappointed father, erstwhile deep sea fishing guide. Broke. Desperate. Surrounded by wasted, depressed, angry, hopeless characters. Welcome to Hemingway. How can a protagonist who refers to blacks as "niggers", who writes his own moral code with little regard for law or ethics, who regrets his daughters, and who has a dismal outlook on life even on his best days get under your skin? How can a writer, whose phrases are bleak, whose characters are mean, and who has a dismal outlook on life even on his best days make you tremble? Welcome to Hemingway. When I turned the final page, I couldn't decide if this was one of the most awful stories I'd read or one of the most brilliant. So, I settled on both as true. The story is dark, wet, brutal, discombobulating. The writing is dark, wet, brutal and freaking amazing. The narrative shifts from Harry as first person narrator, allowing the reader to become intimately connected to the "have-nots"- Harry, his wife and family, his hired-as-needed crew- to the third person omniscient, forcing us to observe at a distance the "haves"- the idle rich and educated who moor their yachts and slum at the bars with the locals. In between is Harry's story told in third-person narrative. This manipulation of style breaks the reader from being within the story to observing it, as if to say we're no longer a part of what Harry is doing, we're just watching him from a seat off-stage... Fortunately, the writing is classic Hemingway- spare and powerful and so, so sad. The scene between Harry and his wife, Marie, is tender and tragic, juxtaposing a black-hearted opportunist with a flawed but loving man. Unfortunately, the writing is classic Hemingway: every character sounds exactly alike, the flow, regardless of point of view, does not change. Although the causes of misery vary between characters, their responses are identical: caustic and wretched. Only Marie Morgan shows spirit and vulnerability. And lest we think Hemingway is getting soft, he cleaves away her dignity in one short scene. At least he leaves her ignorant of the insult. The disjointed narrative reads like two novellas joined by loosely-intersecting characters and the story suffers from the relentless grind of depravity. There is no redemption, no growth, no character transformation. In the bleak era during which this was written- the Depression- perhaps the tone fit the times. This was Hemingway's first long work after an eight-year hiatus. It feels like a giant fuck-you by Hemingway to the literary establishment and to his readers. Although Harry Morgan declares "A man.. one man alone ain't got...No man alone now... No matter how a man alone ain't got no bloody--chance." To Have and Have Not reads very much like a man who has declared himself to be alone, and not giving a damn.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    This book is widely considered one of Hemingways worst, and there's even a tale floating around that he told director Howard Hawks that he thought it was a pile of shit. It's not, though. It's neither his worst nor a pile of shit. Nor is it his best. But there is much to admire in To Have and Have Not, and those things are amplified by Will Patton's award worthy vocal performance in the audio version. Patton's quiet, simmering rhythm, and his hushed tones -- even in the most violent moments -- b This book is widely considered one of Hemingways worst, and there's even a tale floating around that he told director Howard Hawks that he thought it was a pile of shit. It's not, though. It's neither his worst nor a pile of shit. Nor is it his best. But there is much to admire in To Have and Have Not, and those things are amplified by Will Patton's award worthy vocal performance in the audio version. Patton's quiet, simmering rhythm, and his hushed tones -- even in the most violent moments -- bring out the story's melancholy, its hopelessness, its pity, its hope. And it makes it much easier to see the love and respect Hemingway has for his characters in a way that might not be so clear when the words are sitting stagnant on a page. It really feels like this book, more than any except The Old Man and the Sea, was meant to be heard. Pick up your copy and read yourself Chapter 12, then flip over and read yourself Chapter 19 right away. Read it slowly and calmly. Can you feel the intentional flow? Can you feel the way Hemingway loves Marie? He does. Hemingway loves Marie the way he loves Pilar in For Whom The Bell Tolls, and it is beautiful -- especially the way its read by Will Patton. For me, this time, To Have and Have Not was about Marie, and by the end I am sure she's going to be just fine. I really wish Hemingway had gone and told us more about Marie Morgan. But I love what he have.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    I'm all over the map on how to rate this one. It's better than 3 stars, but probably not worth 4 (but I'll round up). I was surprised to find that this was Hemingway's first "novel" in eight years. Is it a novel? On one hand, you could probably view this as a collection of short stories and a novella, with the connective thread being that Middled Aged Man of the Sea: Harry Morgan. But there are connective threads here (the Depression being the main one) where the reader can discern a beginning t I'm all over the map on how to rate this one. It's better than 3 stars, but probably not worth 4 (but I'll round up). I was surprised to find that this was Hemingway's first "novel" in eight years. Is it a novel? On one hand, you could probably view this as a collection of short stories and a novella, with the connective thread being that Middled Aged Man of the Sea: Harry Morgan. But there are connective threads here (the Depression being the main one) where the reader can discern a beginning to end storyline arc. So yeah, it's a novel, but it's one that's also an experiment in form (in a clunky sort of way). What To Have and Have Not does have going for it, is Harry Morgan. He's a great character. Hemingway tough, even brutal, but throughout the book you will see little flashes that show Morgan as a man of Conradian duty and honor. These qualities are most visible when he's in the presence of his (ex-prostitute) wife and children, and on occasion with a few other men in the town that he respects as stand up guys. The novel opens with Harry rejecting an attempt to enlist him in illegally getting some men out of Cuba (I think -- or is it the other way around?). It means big bucks, but it's also dangerous work. Harry is trying to keep things legal in hard times (with Revolution in the air), so running human cargo is definitely out. Besides, Harry has been engaged in a weeks long fishing charter with a supposedly rich customer who wants to catch the big one. The rich guy hasn't paid up yet, but Harry isn't too worried. To underscore the seemingly safe wisdom of Harry's choice, is a really violent (and well done) gun battle in the book's first pages. But the rich guy walks the check and Harry is left with a heavy debt. Another opportunity to run human cargo comes up, which allows Harry to recover his loss, but at a heavy price -- murder. It's probably true that Harry just beat his victim (a well dressed Chinese businessman with too much money to spend) to the lethal punch, but you're never really sure. I liked the fact that Hemingway kept things murky here, but Harry's amoral (and desperate) character really comes into sharp focus. He's not really a good guy, but just a guy capable of doing hard things. You are left with the distinct sense that Harry, if events had of unfolded badly, would of killed everyone on his boat, which would of included his drunken "friend," Eddy, and twelve Chinese trying to get to the U.S. The second, and shortest, section of the book has Harry shot up on his boat, a liquor run gone bad. At this point, it's apparent that Harry has gone over to smuggling as a way to make ends meet. This section is interesting, because you get a glimpse of what Hemingway must of thought of the New Deal, as he has Harry spotted by an official with the government who happens to be on another boat. The official is an an ass, and makes a point of turning Harry in, causing Harry to lose this boat (and thus his livelihood). And Harry, due to his wound, also loses his arm. What follows, in section three, is a bizarre mix of story and literary feud. Harry gets involved with a bunch of revolutionary bank robbers, and you can see where this is all going to end. It's at this point that Hemingway introduces a number of other characters, with the primary one being Richard Gordon. Gordon is a stand in for John Dos Passos. Hemingway is at his most nasty here. This should have sunk the book, but strangely it doesn't. The Gordons, and others arrival at Key West, shows them to be clueless and decadent. Contrasting this, in the preceding pages, is Harry's last night with Marie. A night filled with lovemaking and prime Hemingway speak. "Do you want to?" "Yes. Now." "I was asleep. Do you remember when we'd do it asleep." "Listen, do you mind the arm? Don't it make you feel funny?" "You're silly. I like it. Any that's you I like. Put it across there. Put it along there. Go on, I like it, true." Hemingway is probably the only writer I know that can both move me and make me laugh when I read passages like this. It's seems so stylized, but is it? Whatever the case, it's this section that redeemed Harry for me. Not so true are Gordon and his wife. Hemingway spends considerable time (in a short novel) applying the wrecking ball to their lives, while offstage Harry, a true man of action, is fighting and dying. I found this effective. The reader is constantly aware of Harry's slow return (as if on his shield) from his mortal shootout, without it being mentioned much. Hemingway ratchets things up by omission, with all the empty bar talk, cheating, and fights, etc. In the book's last pages, he has Harry's fishing boat, with Harry on board raving and bleeding out, contrasted against the rich yachts and empty lives of those on board them. Overall, it's not a great book, but it's certainly an interesting one. Those looking for signs of Hemingway's decline, probably need to look elsewhere. If anything, this odd novel (with it's fascinating historical context) has me appreciating more the accomplishment of For Whom the Bell Tolls, which would be Hemingway's next novel.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    I want to start out by saying that I love Ernest Hemingway. I think The Old Man and the Sea is one of the greatest books ever written, and I have not even read many of his best novels yet, like The Sun Also Rises and For Whom the Bell Tolls, so it's possible his work gets even better than what I've already experienced. That being said, I highly doubt any of his remaining fiction can get any worse than To Have and Have Not, which is a complete dumpster fire. The novel tells the story of Harry Morg I want to start out by saying that I love Ernest Hemingway. I think The Old Man and the Sea is one of the greatest books ever written, and I have not even read many of his best novels yet, like The Sun Also Rises and For Whom the Bell Tolls, so it's possible his work gets even better than what I've already experienced. That being said, I highly doubt any of his remaining fiction can get any worse than To Have and Have Not, which is a complete dumpster fire. The novel tells the story of Harry Morgan, a fisherman who gets down on his luck and eventually starts smuggling human beings and liquor between Cuba and the Florida Keys. The main problem with To Have and Have Not, and it's an enormous one, is that the story is basically completely finished at page 150 (my edition is 219 pages, so I am referring to that length throughout this review). If Hemingway had taken the first 150 pages and glued onto them the last few pages of the book, which also deal with concluding the story from the first 150 pages, this would probably have been a 3.5 star book. The problem is that Hemingway didn't do that. The 70 or so pages between page 150 and the last few pages are filled with completely meaningless content. I'm not even joking; it's 70 pages of random people getting drunk in bars every night, cheating on their wives, beating each other up, and then a random profiling of a bunch of different groups of people on different boats that happen to be parked at the same dock. None of it involves the main characters in the book, or the main storyline. It writes a lot like Hemingway was contracted to write a full length novel, but finding himself completely finished the story at the length of a novella added a bunch of random garbage onto the end to fulfill the length of a full novel and thus the terms of his contract. On top of that, this is the most racist and misogynistic book I've ever read. There is even a Publisher's Note in my edition to warn the reader about this! The n-word is said in this book probably at least thirty times, there is heavy racism against people of colour, Asians, and Jewish people, many of whom are treated like animals in the story. Wives are cheated on, physically abused, and ordered around like they are sub-human servants. And as if all of that wasn't enough, the main character is also a complete a** hole, being not only a huge racist and misogynist but also a bully, bullying every person he comes into contact with over the course of the book. I don't even know what else to say. I'm so disappointed in Ernest Hemingway for this novel, for so many reasons. This is one of the ten worst books I have ever read, and might actually be in the top five.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Edita

    I don't know, Marie Morgan was thinking, sitting at the dining-room table. I can take it just a day at a time and a night at a time, and maybe it gets different. It’s the goddamned nights. [...] I’ve got to get started on something. Maybe you get over being dead inside. I guess it don’t make any difference. I got to start to do something anyway. It’s been a week today. I’m afraid if I think about him on purpose I’ll get so I can’t remember how he looks. That was when I got that awful panic when I don't know, Marie Morgan was thinking, sitting at the dining-room table. I can take it just a day at a time and a night at a time, and maybe it gets different. It’s the goddamned nights. [...] I’ve got to get started on something. Maybe you get over being dead inside. I guess it don’t make any difference. I got to start to do something anyway. It’s been a week today. I’m afraid if I think about him on purpose I’ll get so I can’t remember how he looks. That was when I got that awful panic when I couldn’t remember his face. I got to get started doing something no matter how I feel. [...] That’s the only feeling I got. Hate and a hollow feeling. I’m empty like an empty house. Well, I got to start to do something. [...] Ain’t nobody going to come back any more when they’re dead. [...] Nobody knows the way you feel, because they don't know what it's all about that way. I know. I know too well. And if I live now twenty years what am I going to do? Nobody’s going to tell me that and there ain't nothing now but take it every day the way it comes and just get started doing something right away. That's what I got to do. But Jesus Christ, what do you do at nights is what I want to know. How do you get through nights if you can't sleep?I guess you find out how it feels to lose your husband. I guess you find out all right. I guess you find out everything in this goddamned life. I guess you do all right. I guess I'm probably finding out right now. You just go dead inside and everything is easy. You just get dead like most people are most of the time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Earl Gray

    This was my third time reading it. The first was in 1999, borrowed from the local library when I read/re-read a lot of his books for his 100th birthday. The second was when I bought a copy with a Border's gift certificate that my wife had given me in 2007. This time was when I brought it with me to read during a trip to Key West for my birthday because he wrote it there and it takes place there. The highlight of reading it this time was reading it in our Key West hotel room on the Sunday that Is This was my third time reading it. The first was in 1999, borrowed from the local library when I read/re-read a lot of his books for his 100th birthday. The second was when I bought a copy with a Border's gift certificate that my wife had given me in 2007. This time was when I brought it with me to read during a trip to Key West for my birthday because he wrote it there and it takes place there. The highlight of reading it this time was reading it in our Key West hotel room on the Sunday that Isaac blew through town. We were just a couple of blocks from the Southernmost Point. This is one of his most noir books, powerfully first person, and uniquely so in that he speaks through the minds of many of the characters. It is everyday people dealing with the desperation of everyday life, in powerfully frank ways. It was interesting going to Captain Tony's, the original spot for Sloppy Joe's, and sitting in the place that doesn't seemed to have changed much since Hemingway wrote about it and put several of the characters there in the book. Often jarring in its depiction of hard lives in hard times, this may not be one of his critically acclaimed novels, but it has so much power that it continues to deserve to be read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zeek

    Considered Hemmingway’s worst- To Have and Have Not is almost shocking to read with modern eyes. Either he was a racist pig- likely; or he was documenting the sad state of racial affairs in the 1930’s when this was written- unlikely- but true, however inadvertedly. Even if I give him the benefit of the doubt, he probably was showing his ass as well. The first section of this decidedly short novel is told from Harry Morgan’s POV. I found the first section to be the most engaging, although this is Considered Hemmingway’s worst- To Have and Have Not is almost shocking to read with modern eyes. Either he was a racist pig- likely; or he was documenting the sad state of racial affairs in the 1930’s when this was written- unlikely- but true, however inadvertedly. Even if I give him the benefit of the doubt, he probably was showing his ass as well. The first section of this decidedly short novel is told from Harry Morgan’s POV. I found the first section to be the most engaging, although this is where the majority of derogatory racial epithets show up. For some reason the rest of the novel seems to fall apart without Harry’s narration- which says something about the character. Harry is a gruff, typical don't show your emotions 30’s man, just trying to get by. When a man stiffs Harry after chartering his boat, Harry decides to take on the riskier, but more profitable, business of ferrying people and contraband, from Cuba to Florida and back again. Yeah, that’s trouble. And Harry’s life turns to crapola from that day forward. The book is nothing at all like the iconic Bogie and Bacall version of it. (“Ya know how to whistle donchya? You just put your lips together and blow.”) Rumor has it, the producer of the movie was on a boat one day with Hemingway and informed the author he needs to make more money to support the lifestyle he had become accustomed to, attempting to persuade Hemmingway to make one of his novels into a movie. “When Hemingway indicated no interest in Hawks's proposal, the filmmaker reportedly responded by boasting that he could make a film out of Hemingway's worst book, which Hawks felt was To Have and Have Not.” The end result is the movie being very little like the book- and probably overshadowing it. Despite it’s flaws, I liked reading TH&HN. Not for the story, which is tragic to say the least, but for Hemingway’s style. Okay, confession time. I never finished a Hemingway before. When I was a teenager I picked up The Sun Also Rises, but never got into it. Never picked him up again-until now. After reading TH&HN, and discovering I think I may like his style- I think I’m gonna give the racist pig another shot. Say what you will about him as a person, he had what I call “the juice”. That certain something that makes a person sparkle when they do what they do. Makes him worth investigating some more in my eyes. I think I'm going to try A Moveable Feast. I've been dying to read it ever since Nick Cage extolled Hemingway's virtues in City of Angels. I can’t say I reccomend TH&HN. But it may be fun to read the first 25 pages or so. Everyone needs to be reminded the MLK really did make a difference.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Edita

    How do you get through nights if you can’t sleep? I guess you find out like you find out how it feels to lose your husband. I guess you find out all right. I guess you find out everything in this goddamned life. I guess you do all right. I guess I’m probably finding out right now. You just go dead inside and everything is easy. You just get dead like most people are most of the time. I guess that’s how it is all right. I guess that’s just about what happens to you. Well, I’ve got a good start. I How do you get through nights if you can’t sleep? I guess you find out like you find out how it feels to lose your husband. I guess you find out all right. I guess you find out everything in this goddamned life. I guess you do all right. I guess I’m probably finding out right now. You just go dead inside and everything is easy. You just get dead like most people are most of the time. I guess that’s how it is all right. I guess that’s just about what happens to you. Well, I’ve got a good start. I’ve got a good start if that’s what you have to do. I guess that’s what you have to do all right. I guess that’s it. I guess that’s what it comes to. All right. I got a good start then. I’m way ahead of everybody now. Outside it was a lovely, cool, sub-tropical winter day and the palm branches were sawing in the light north wind. Some winter people rode by the house on bicycles. They were laughing. In the big yard of the house across the street a peacock squawked. Through the window you could see the sea looking hard and new and blue in the winter light. A large white yacht was coming into the harbor and seven miles out on the horizon you could see a tanker, small and neat in profile against the blue sea, hugging the reef as she made to the westward to keep from wasting fuel against the stream.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emily Luba

    Oh I really wanted to love this book! I'm very aware that Hemingway is a literary genius and writes fabulous novels, but this book had me scratching my head. Basically I could summarize it in one sentence "A man drives his boat between Florida and Cuba and runs into violent and illegal happenings." And that. Is. It. I was really looking forward to reading Hemingway, as I never have before, and he is my Dad's favourite author but I just didn't get it the point of this novel. I'm not sure if there Oh I really wanted to love this book! I'm very aware that Hemingway is a literary genius and writes fabulous novels, but this book had me scratching my head. Basically I could summarize it in one sentence "A man drives his boat between Florida and Cuba and runs into violent and illegal happenings." And that. Is. It. I was really looking forward to reading Hemingway, as I never have before, and he is my Dad's favourite author but I just didn't get it the point of this novel. I'm not sure if there was some deeper meaning and I just missed it or if it was one of those realism stories, but not much went on at all. It was also very violent, and a lot of people were murdered. Which could be a positive if you like that kind of thing, but I do not. And at times the main character, Harry Morgan just bugged me! I didn't understand why he was so obsessed with his boat and refused to get a more stable and safer job. To sum it all up, I'm glad I tried this genre, but the lack of plot and obscene violence was a strange mixture between confusion and disgust that made it a very bizarre reading experience.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    This book is rather difficult to review. Granted, it was written in 1937 and speech patterns and certain words were acceptable at that time. But the way this story reads offended me right from the start. I had a hard time with it and I was going to just put it away and not finish. But, the completist that I am, made me finish it. So a word of a caution, the language of this book is rather off putting.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    The last Hemingway book I read was The Garden of Eden. To Have and Have Not has made me appreciate that last book a bit more. Comparing the books is unfair. Both are extremely different. Eden was unique. This book felt predictable, chaotic, and unrelateable. It almost felt as though it were two rough drafts thrown together. I did not like the turn of the structure near the end. I did not like the dialogue or the characters. I had high hopes after the first chapter. Even though I did not like Har The last Hemingway book I read was The Garden of Eden. To Have and Have Not has made me appreciate that last book a bit more. Comparing the books is unfair. Both are extremely different. Eden was unique. This book felt predictable, chaotic, and unrelateable. It almost felt as though it were two rough drafts thrown together. I did not like the turn of the structure near the end. I did not like the dialogue or the characters. I had high hopes after the first chapter. Even though I did not like Harry, I was interested in his fate, though his fate was evident early on. I wish I had been able to relate to him more as his actions and choices were interesting. But he practically disappeared by the end of the book. By the final third section, I could not get the insidious idea out of my head that Graham Greene could have written the story better, involving the rich and malcontent couple at least. The story lost me when they were introduced and I could have cared less about their fate. Once the Greene idea entered my head, the entire book was doomed. Even Hemingway's way with setting, the waters and fishing boats, was not enough. I had a terrible time finishing the book and can not recommend it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    James Tingle

    Maybe not his best (that I've read- not got through them all yet) but still pretty good I thought when I gave it a go a while back. Harry Morgan, the main character, is memorable and is one of those gruff, snarling, no nonsense, messed up characters you used to see in the old movies. Not someone you'd want round for dinner maybe- he'd probably punch a guest and then turn over the table- but great to read about from the safety of a comfy armchair. It all starts quite slowly and then really heats Maybe not his best (that I've read- not got through them all yet) but still pretty good I thought when I gave it a go a while back. Harry Morgan, the main character, is memorable and is one of those gruff, snarling, no nonsense, messed up characters you used to see in the old movies. Not someone you'd want round for dinner maybe- he'd probably punch a guest and then turn over the table- but great to read about from the safety of a comfy armchair. It all starts quite slowly and then really heats up later and turns into a bit of an action/thriller, with a load of mayhem and terror on the high seas... Its nowhere near as good as The Old Man and the Sea or For Whom the Bell Tolls, and isn't as well constructed or as artistic as those works and some of his others, but its still pretty readable and has some great moments of tension and drama. I remember the end of the book being quite unusual and slightly confusing, but overall, I found this slim novel to be an entertaining little thriller, if not quite in line quality-wise with some of Ernie's greater works.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Daren

    Published in 1937, this book contains three stand alone, but interconnected stories, all revolving around the same character - Harry Morgan. The first two stories are very short, and were originally published in magazines, the third is novella length. The stories are very nautical - those with an interest in boats will take more from the detailed boat descriptions than others. The writing style varies from story to story, as does the narration which doesn't remain consistent throughout - sometime Published in 1937, this book contains three stand alone, but interconnected stories, all revolving around the same character - Harry Morgan. The first two stories are very short, and were originally published in magazines, the third is novella length. The stories are very nautical - those with an interest in boats will take more from the detailed boat descriptions than others. The writing style varies from story to story, as does the narration which doesn't remain consistent throughout - sometimes Harry, sometimes others. There are aspects of stream of consciousness thrown in too. Set in Key West and Cuba, Harry Morgan is a hard drinking tough guy who makes a living running fishing charters, and running grog and other contraband to Cuba. As a tough guy he dishes out some pain, but is not a bulletproof hero - he is damaged in some way in each story, and reading this book the reader gets the feeling Harry is on a one way road. Harry has to constantly take risks to break even, and keep his family in food. At odds with Customs, only hard evidence keeps him from a prison sentence. Married to an ex-prostitute, with two daughters he doesn't seem to care much about, his fondness for his wife is a surprise. For me the first two stories were high octane - quick reads containing speeding boats, guns, contraband and the smuggling of illegal immigrants. For this type of action read they were 4 stars. The third story was strange, and I expected more when I got to the end. For some unknown reason, Hemingway continually introduced characters to the story who had no real involvement. At one point he spends 3 or 4 pages identifying each person in each boat in the marina, with a brief explanation about why they were there. Most of them did not even see the coastguard towing a boat into port, which was the actual subject of the story... Similarly there was a side story about an author with a cheating wife - there were numerous chapters about their activities and interactions around the town, which didn't add any value to the story. This story had potential, but floundered with the unnecessary. 2.5 stars. Overall, 3 stars. Unsurprisingly Hemingway is quoted as not rating this work very highly.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mahdie

    Realy high literally style. With alot of decent descriptions. But the reader would be missed to infer whats the main lesson because the author had tried not to judge and say his own ideas in this book.The main thing that I have learned from this book was that love can cause everything.Sometimes people who loves sb does anything to make (in this book the t main character`s wife)satisfied.That caused his death.And how his wife could survive living without him... کتابی پر از توصیفات ساده و پربار از اص Realy high literally style. With alot of decent descriptions. But the reader would be missed to infer whats the main lesson because the author had tried not to judge and say his own ideas in this book.The main thing that I have learned from this book was that love can cause everything.Sometimes people who loves sb does anything to make (in this book the t main character`s wife)satisfied.That caused his death.And how his wife could survive living without him... کتابی پر از توصیفات ساده و پربار از اصطلاحات کاملا ادبی. روزمرگی و توصیفات جزیی که گاهی باعث بی حوصله کردن خواننده میشد در عین حال زیبا بود.مهم ترین نکته ای که توجه من رو جلب کرد این بود که نویسنده هیچ قضاوتی راجع به رفتاد شخصیت ها بیان نکرده بود و هیچ اثری از اعتقادات شخصی در کتاب نبود.درسی که حس کردم این کتاب به من داد این بود که عشق خطیره.عاشق گاهی به خاطر خوش حال کردن معشوق هر کاری می کنه.چه بسا تامین مادیات باشه و ریسکی که به قیمت زندگیش تموم شه و صفحات پایانی کتاب بعد از مرگ هری مورگان (شخصیت اصلی ) به این پرداخته که همسرش چطوری میتونه از غم از دست دادنش نجات پیدا کنه و ادانه بده به زندگی ای بی روح بی معنا...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    I see why people say this is Hemingway's worst novel. It's not just the revolting racial epithets scattered everywhere like rat turds. It's the unintentionally hilarious dialogue between super-macho Harry and his big blonde, blowzy wife. ("I get excited just looking at you Harry. Do it to me again, that's all I want. That's all I care about!") On the other hand, there are some good gun fights and interesting background on Florida in the Depression. And the opening chapter, where the rich tourist I see why people say this is Hemingway's worst novel. It's not just the revolting racial epithets scattered everywhere like rat turds. It's the unintentionally hilarious dialogue between super-macho Harry and his big blonde, blowzy wife. ("I get excited just looking at you Harry. Do it to me again, that's all I want. That's all I care about!") On the other hand, there are some good gun fights and interesting background on Florida in the Depression. And the opening chapter, where the rich tourist wrecks the fishing boat while the poor captain stands there tearing his hair out, is really pretty funny, in a crude, sadistic, Ring Lardner sort of way. See, Papa, you really did learn something from him after all!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Million

    This book is sort of a mess. I am not really sure quite what to think of it. Hemingway alternates from first person narrative of one character, to a narrator, to first person narrative of someone else, then back to narration. It is sort of confusing. The scene of action also shifts, adding to the confusion. Some of the novel takes place in Havana, some of it in Key West, and some of it out on the Gulf in between the two locations. The ostensible main character is Harry Morgan, who really comes a This book is sort of a mess. I am not really sure quite what to think of it. Hemingway alternates from first person narrative of one character, to a narrator, to first person narrative of someone else, then back to narration. It is sort of confusing. The scene of action also shifts, adding to the confusion. Some of the novel takes place in Havana, some of it in Key West, and some of it out on the Gulf in between the two locations. The ostensible main character is Harry Morgan, who really comes across as a jerk. He seems amoral - not really caring about life or morality. He has a somewhat day-to-day existence eeking out a living by chartering himself and his boat out for fishing. But he is always on the lookout for making more cash, and the method doesn't seem to give him too many qualms. Inhabiting a violent world, he has no compunction about killing people, perhaps because he knows that he too could easily be killed. We see his wife, Marie, later in the book, and in fact she is the first person character at the end. But up until then she is not in much of the novel save for one scene. Also, later in the book Harry is a minor player, which is surprising given how Hemingway starts the book. Hemingway's language is crude, vulgar, racist. In fact, if you are easily offended, you might want to pass this one by. On page 6, the n-word appears, and it is used A LOT in this book. On page 7, people begin dying, and that continues up to the end. So, this is not an upbeat story. Obviously, I do not like the coarse and racist language. However, I think that when one reads something that was written eighty years ago, the reader has to take the time and place into context. That doesn't mean I approve of the language. I don't. Not at all. However I do understand that society and culture was much different then (1930s) than it is now, and that this also took place against a far different backdrop (alcohol smuggling, avoiding government agents) than what my life consists of. I would hope that, if Hemingway were writing today, he would not use those incendiary words. Then again, Hemingway did things his own way, and it is not wise to try to take a historical figure out of his/her time element and put that person into our own. They simply would not fit anymore than I would fit in 1930s Florida. One thing I found interesting was a a few paragraphs concerning suicide. Hemingway was writing about a person contemplating suicide. Given that he himself eventually did commit suicide, it seemed a bit macabre reading it. If there is an overarching theme here, it is loss. Loss of life, loss of hope, loss of humanity, loss of money, loss of pride. Overall this is not a long read. But, you have to be willing to get past the racism, or at least tolerate it. And even if you do, the story still swerves around, especially later when there is a long drunken bar scene that is somewhat painful to get through. I have read some other works of Hemingway that I thought were better than this, but this one will not keep me from picking him up again. Grade: C-

  27. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    As allways I enjoyed Hemingway’s writing. This is a very recognizable and typical Hemingway in some ways. At the same time, it is a book to read a few times: the story is not very coherent, there is a lot of shifting of POV, and the tone of the story is very different in the first part vs the second part. Also, I think Hemingway is a real male chauvenist:-) But I can forgive him, if I see him as a child of his time. But I’m allways prepared when reading his books for the typical tough guy stuff. D As allways I enjoyed Hemingway’s writing. This is a very recognizable and typical Hemingway in some ways. At the same time, it is a book to read a few times: the story is not very coherent, there is a lot of shifting of POV, and the tone of the story is very different in the first part vs the second part. Also, I think Hemingway is a real male chauvenist:-) But I can forgive him, if I see him as a child of his time. But I’m allways prepared when reading his books for the typical tough guy stuff. Don’t read this book if you only like the traditional style books with happily ever afters. Re1d this if you feel connected to existantialism, doubts, melancholy and despair or at least are prepared to read about it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anne (Booklady) Molinarolo

    I can see Papa walking the cat walk leading to his his studio. By 1937 he was growing tired of Pauline. Their marriage was on the rocks and Hemingway resented her money. He did question the rich and their attitudes somewhat, but his feelings about the rich was really about Pauline. He enjoyed his money. He thought To Have and Have Not was shit and really didn't care how Hollywood treated this small book. And Hollywood did treat the book differently. The Becall and Bogart movie was nothing like t I can see Papa walking the cat walk leading to his his studio. By 1937 he was growing tired of Pauline. Their marriage was on the rocks and Hemingway resented her money. He did question the rich and their attitudes somewhat, but his feelings about the rich was really about Pauline. He enjoyed his money. He thought To Have and Have Not was shit and really didn't care how Hollywood treated this small book. And Hollywood did treat the book differently. The Becall and Bogart movie was nothing like the novel Hemingway wrote. And that's why many people don't like the book. To Have and Have Not has wonderful dialogue in it. The story is mediocre, my least favorite Hemingway novel. And don't look for a happy ending - you won't find it. The ending was expected because of the novel's spectacular opening scene. Harry Morgan is one of the Have Nots trying to support his wife and three daughters during the depression. He does what he has to do, even if it means losing his goodness and becoming a bad man. His character is well developed and the reader can see his morals slip away each season.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    I fell in love with this book! Not one of Hemingway's better known books, but I am not sure why because I thought it was beautiful in a rough, real way. As Harry Morgan's luck dwindles we get to know him, and his wife, Marie through several sets of eyes in the book. My favorite scene (not a spoiler) was when Marie was remembering the first time she had her hair dyed blonde in Havana. Each word drew me in and in until I couldn't imagine a more beautiful passage. Exquisite.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    Film director Howard Hawks was once quoted as saying that Hemingway thought this novel was "a bunch of junk." If that is true, I agree with Hemingway.

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