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With an Introduction by Max Allan Collins The author of Get Carter returns to his greatest invention, a smooth-operating hardcase named Jack Carter, who is about to burn a city down in order to silence an informant London. The late 1960s. It's Christmastime and Jack Carter is the top man in a crime syndicate headed by two brothers, Gerald and Les Fletcher. He’s also a worri With an Introduction by Max Allan Collins The author of Get Carter returns to his greatest invention, a smooth-operating hardcase named Jack Carter, who is about to burn a city down in order to silence an informant London. The late 1960s. It's Christmastime and Jack Carter is the top man in a crime syndicate headed by two brothers, Gerald and Les Fletcher. He’s also a worried man. The fact that he’s sleeping with Gerald’s wife, Audrey, and that they plan on someday running away together with a lot of the brothers’ money, doesn’t have Jack concerned. Instead it’s an informant—one of his own men—that has him losing sleep. The grass has enough knowledge about the firm to not only bring down Gerald and Les but Jack as well. Jack doesn’t like his name in the mouth of that sort. In Jack Carter’s Law Ted Lewis returned to the character that launched his career and once again delivered a hardboiled masterpiece. Jack Carter is the ideal tour guide to a bygone London underworld. In his quest to dismantle the opposition, he peels back the veneer of English society and offers a hard look at a gritty world of pool halls, strip clubs and the red lights of Soho nightlife. From the Trade Paperback edition.


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With an Introduction by Max Allan Collins The author of Get Carter returns to his greatest invention, a smooth-operating hardcase named Jack Carter, who is about to burn a city down in order to silence an informant London. The late 1960s. It's Christmastime and Jack Carter is the top man in a crime syndicate headed by two brothers, Gerald and Les Fletcher. He’s also a worri With an Introduction by Max Allan Collins The author of Get Carter returns to his greatest invention, a smooth-operating hardcase named Jack Carter, who is about to burn a city down in order to silence an informant London. The late 1960s. It's Christmastime and Jack Carter is the top man in a crime syndicate headed by two brothers, Gerald and Les Fletcher. He’s also a worried man. The fact that he’s sleeping with Gerald’s wife, Audrey, and that they plan on someday running away together with a lot of the brothers’ money, doesn’t have Jack concerned. Instead it’s an informant—one of his own men—that has him losing sleep. The grass has enough knowledge about the firm to not only bring down Gerald and Les but Jack as well. Jack doesn’t like his name in the mouth of that sort. In Jack Carter’s Law Ted Lewis returned to the character that launched his career and once again delivered a hardboiled masterpiece. Jack Carter is the ideal tour guide to a bygone London underworld. In his quest to dismantle the opposition, he peels back the veneer of English society and offers a hard look at a gritty world of pool halls, strip clubs and the red lights of Soho nightlife. From the Trade Paperback edition.

30 review for Jack Carter's Law

  1. 5 out of 5

    Israel

    Vuelve Carter, esta vez en un ambiente más urbano, pero que no pierde esa pátina de sitio decadente, horrible y caduco que es marca registrada de la casa. Al igual que ocurría en la primera novela, no esperéis encontrar aquí personajes de grandes convicciones morales, o inmersos en una historia "más grande que ellos mismos"; las páginas de esta "Ley de Carter" están pobladas de ramerillas de tres al cuarto, maricas locas, matones descerebrados, mafiosos de poca monta y, en general, de una caterv Vuelve Carter, esta vez en un ambiente más urbano, pero que no pierde esa pátina de sitio decadente, horrible y caduco que es marca registrada de la casa. Al igual que ocurría en la primera novela, no esperéis encontrar aquí personajes de grandes convicciones morales, o inmersos en una historia "más grande que ellos mismos"; las páginas de esta "Ley de Carter" están pobladas de ramerillas de tres al cuarto, maricas locas, matones descerebrados, mafiosos de poca monta y, en general, de una caterva de personajes hundidos en una vida gris y, quizá sea este el adjetivo adecuado, grasienta como el típico fish & chips inglés. Leer a Carter es como meterse en una pelea de bar, donde las cosas no son bonitas, y lo más posible es que acabes tirado en el suelo, con un vaso reventado en la cara, y las pelotas doloridas por una o varias patadas. Pero da igual, aunque duela, aunque sea sucio, devorarás página tras página, disfrutando, incluso de forma culpable, las "aventuras" de este hijo de la gran puta tan odioso que es Jack Carter.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    Many years ago I read the excellent novel Jack's Return Home by Ted Lewis, which became the classic film Get Carter in 1971. It was only recently that I realised he had written two other books featuring Carter. Lewis writes good, hard hitting prose & it was great to see this prequel back in publication. Although I didn't find it as gripping as Jack's Return Home it was good to see the character back in action, & I'm pleased that the very underrated Ted Lewis may now attract some new fans. Many years ago I read the excellent novel Jack's Return Home by Ted Lewis, which became the classic film Get Carter in 1971. It was only recently that I realised he had written two other books featuring Carter. Lewis writes good, hard hitting prose & it was great to see this prequel back in publication. Although I didn't find it as gripping as Jack's Return Home it was good to see the character back in action, & I'm pleased that the very underrated Ted Lewis may now attract some new fans.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I'd be lying if I said this was as good as 'Jack's Return Home'. That novel's use of a revenge plot gave it a moral centre - Carter was a bastard, but other bastards were much worse. There was also a lot of evocative local detail, some sharp dialogue (much of which survives in the screenplay of 'Get Carter'), and a very dramatic finale. Yes, it's misogynistic and nasty, but that's British noir for you. 'Jack Carter's Law' doesn't have the same sense of wild justice running through it, and as Car I'd be lying if I said this was as good as 'Jack's Return Home'. That novel's use of a revenge plot gave it a moral centre - Carter was a bastard, but other bastards were much worse. There was also a lot of evocative local detail, some sharp dialogue (much of which survives in the screenplay of 'Get Carter'), and a very dramatic finale. Yes, it's misogynistic and nasty, but that's British noir for you. 'Jack Carter's Law' doesn't have the same sense of wild justice running through it, and as Carter searches for a grass in the snowy streets of London in the run-up to Christmas 1970, I found it hard to care whether he caught him or not. There's bent coppers, massage parlours, blaggers, perhaps even more misogyny than the original novel, and the occasional good one-liner or turn of phrase, but Lewis seems to be bulldozing through the action and there's no space for the nuances that made 'JRH' so entertaining. It's interesting to learn more about Carter, though the version of him here seems much more 'London' than the one in the sequel. At times, I wondered if Lewis could have done with a more assertive editor to pull him into line a little. Reading recently about his drinking habits, I'm sure booze dulled the book's edge (and don't try to match Carter drink for drink in this one, kids). I like this novel and I like Lewis's work, but I think there is a perceptible decline here from the novel which made his name.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Body count and Menace!! ...Jack Carter works for some nasty people, and the people that know, know that he is dangerous, when things start to go wrong for his firm its up to Jack to put things right, and the body count mounts rapidly. Better then "Get Carter" I believe, Ted is off and running now Jack book 2, this is an exciting read with wonderfully NON politically correct bad language lots of smoking, drinking and sawn off shot guns, set around the 60's no mobile phones etc. But imagine - Pale Body count and Menace!! ...Jack Carter works for some nasty people, and the people that know, know that he is dangerous, when things start to go wrong for his firm its up to Jack to put things right, and the body count mounts rapidly. Better then "Get Carter" I believe, Ted is off and running now Jack book 2, this is an exciting read with wonderfully NON politically correct bad language lots of smoking, drinking and sawn off shot guns, set around the 60's no mobile phones etc. But imagine - Pale Beige Corduroy suit, Lavender Shirt, carefully knotted brown silk tie, with a pair of off white suede slip-ons and socks to match the colour of the tie- nice! Ted Lewis draws you in with a great read and, well! very sad and angry for Lesley

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jiří Pavlovský

    Pokud jste viděli film Get Carter (ideálně v původní verzi s Michaelem Cainem), tak tohle je jeho pokračování (i když podle předmluvy spíš předkračování). Jack Carter tady ještě stále pracuje pro dva poměrně idiotské zločinecké šéfy a řeší jejich problémy. A teď má problém jako noha - jeden z jejich lidí byl zatčený policií a je odhodlaný naprášit všechny a všechno. Je zapotřebí ho zlikvidovat... ovšem ještě předtím je nutné ho najít, protože ani jeden ze zkorumpovaných poldů (a že jich je) netu Pokud jste viděli film Get Carter (ideálně v původní verzi s Michaelem Cainem), tak tohle je jeho pokračování (i když podle předmluvy spíš předkračování). Jack Carter tady ještě stále pracuje pro dva poměrně idiotské zločinecké šéfy a řeší jejich problémy. A teď má problém jako noha - jeden z jejich lidí byl zatčený policií a je odhodlaný naprášit všechny a všechno. Je zapotřebí ho zlikvidovat... ovšem ještě předtím je nutné ho najít, protože ani jeden ze zkorumpovaných poldů (a že jich je) netuší, kde by mohl být. Jo a do toho Carter spí s milenkou jednoho ze svých šéfů. Kniha byla napsána v sedmdesátých letech a opět dokazuje, jak byla sedmdesátá léta cool. Je to hezké čtení zvláště po přečtení Programu pro stážisty, kde je hrdina nájemný zabiják - a v podstatě celou knihu dělí mezi vysvětlování, jak moc je zlý... a zabíjení pouze opravdu zlých lidí. Doba pokročila, dneska jsou i nájemní vrazi hotoví mazlíci. Tady se hrdina ničím takovým nezatěžuje. Nemá zapotřebí své jednání jakkoliv omlouvat - snad jen tím, že to dělá, protože je v tom prostě dobrý. Je to typický anglický hrdina, jeden z těch tipů, co nemají moc emoce, vazby na ostatní lidi ani morálku. Cool stylem je to i napsané, plné mimochodných hlášek a ironických popisů, které celkem plynule vyplývají z děje, nemáte z nich pocit, že se autor snažil být vtipný. Pravda, chce to nejprve se chytnout ve slangu, protože autor nic nevysvětluje, ale člověk rychle zjistí, co znamená "filth" či "Old Bill". A samozřejmě, chce to akceptovat svět, kde se stále kouří, pije a je jen správné trochu proplesknout ženu, když dělá problémy. O nějakém zabíjení lidí ani nemluvím.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ugotthemoney Igotthesoul

    Pese a que Ted Lewis lo escribió después de ‘Carter’, cuenta las andanzas previas de esta colosal figura de la literatura criminal inglesa. . Con ese ritmo tan cinematográfico, Lewis nos sumerge con elegancia en los tejemanejes de Jack Carter para encontrar a Jimmy Swann, un miembro de su clan mafioso que podría estar yéndose de la lengua. En ese periplo por los bajos fondos de Londres intercambia impresiones y lo que no son impresiones con travestis, chicas en busca de dinero fácil, sicarios bravu Pese a que Ted Lewis lo escribió después de ‘Carter’, cuenta las andanzas previas de esta colosal figura de la literatura criminal inglesa. . Con ese ritmo tan cinematográfico, Lewis nos sumerge con elegancia en los tejemanejes de Jack Carter para encontrar a Jimmy Swann, un miembro de su clan mafioso que podría estar yéndose de la lengua. En ese periplo por los bajos fondos de Londres intercambia impresiones y lo que no son impresiones con travestis, chicas en busca de dinero fácil, sicarios bravucones y por supuesto, mafiosos que dictan las verdaderas leyes de la ciudad. . De moral caprichosa, chulería con clase, obstinado instinto de supervivencia, humor de agujero negro y audacia superior, leer las fechorías de Jack Carter es uno de los ejercicios más evasivos y placenteros que pueden realizar aquellos que, como yo, disfrutan las historias del lumpenproletariado.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Aunque la mayoría de la gente piensa que el nivel de La ley de Carter es menor que el de su predecesora, la ley de Carter es una digna secuela que sigue la misma estructura narrativa (plantea un conflicto inicial para cuya resolución Jake Carter deberá ir contactando con tal y cual persona, como en un juego de dominó) y que muestra un nivel de complejidad de la trama algo mayor, aunque puede que el ritmo sí caiga en algún momento puntual.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    Although "Jack Carter's Law" is the second of the Jack Carter trilogy, it's actually a prequel to "Get Carter" (aka "Jack's Return Home"). "Jack Carter's Law" is all set in London and, for those like me, who grew up in 1970s Britain, it's a familiar trawl through an era when crime was all about blags, boozers, brasses, snouts, shooters, and grasses. Bent coppers rub shoulders with villains and nobody emerges with much credit. "Jack Carter's Law" is not as accomplished as "Get Carter" but it's sti Although "Jack Carter's Law" is the second of the Jack Carter trilogy, it's actually a prequel to "Get Carter" (aka "Jack's Return Home"). "Jack Carter's Law" is all set in London and, for those like me, who grew up in 1970s Britain, it's a familiar trawl through an era when crime was all about blags, boozers, brasses, snouts, shooters, and grasses. Bent coppers rub shoulders with villains and nobody emerges with much credit. "Jack Carter's Law" is not as accomplished as "Get Carter" but it's still a great read. The set pieces are suitably uncompromising and violent, however what makes the book special is the character of Jack Carter. He's a professional, and generally one step ahead of those he deals with, including his inept bosses. The set up is such that he cannot walk away from his bosses. Many of the same characters from "Get Carter" reappear in "Jack Carter's Law" which adds to the enjoyment - especially with some of the insights the reader gains from "Get Carter". "Jack Carter's Law" nails 1970's Soho and London more generally: the seediness, the squalor, the boozers, the snooker halls, and the endemic corruption. If you enjoyed "Get Carter" then this will doubtless hit the spot too. I'm looking forward to the third and final part of the Jack Carter trilogy - "Jack Carter and the Mafia Pigeon"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Money apart, it’s rarely a good idea to write a sequel to a successful book. Whatever you come up with, it’s pretty much bound to compare poorly with the original. Having said that, Jack Carter’s Law is not half bad. The narrative – busy and violent – bustles along briskly enough, but it’s the writing that makes it worthwhile. Ted Lewis’s characters, his ear for dialogue, and his eye for closely observed detail plunge us deep into the seamy underside of late sixties’ London. Jack moves between p Money apart, it’s rarely a good idea to write a sequel to a successful book. Whatever you come up with, it’s pretty much bound to compare poorly with the original. Having said that, Jack Carter’s Law is not half bad. The narrative – busy and violent – bustles along briskly enough, but it’s the writing that makes it worthwhile. Ted Lewis’s characters, his ear for dialogue, and his eye for closely observed detail plunge us deep into the seamy underside of late sixties’ London. Jack moves between penthouse suites where successful villains try to impress with Swedish decor, smart cars, and designer clothes, to squalid dives where the less successful try to cadge a beer and a bacon sandwich. Read a line like: “The remaining strands of hair on top of his head glisten with Brylcreem under the naked light-bulbs” and you know which side of London you’re on. It seems like even the least character in a Ted Lewis novel – a bouncer or a passer-by – is caught and animated in a few pen strokes. Jack Carter’s Law may lack the impetus and drive of Get Carter, but just read it for these pinpoint sketches of people and locales. They’re pitch perfect.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Warren Stalley

    Gang land enforcer and all-round hard man Jack Carter descends through the murky Seventies London underworld in search of Police informer Jimmy Swann, who threatens the illegal business empire of his employers Gerald and Les Fletcher. Author Ted Lewis returns to his most famous literary creation Jack Carter. Lewis expertly manages to evoke a grey world of adult themes – treachery, violence, blackmail and deceit wrapped up in cigarette smoke, alcohol, grease, grime and sawn-off shotguns. Although Gang land enforcer and all-round hard man Jack Carter descends through the murky Seventies London underworld in search of Police informer Jimmy Swann, who threatens the illegal business empire of his employers Gerald and Les Fletcher. Author Ted Lewis returns to his most famous literary creation Jack Carter. Lewis expertly manages to evoke a grey world of adult themes – treachery, violence, blackmail and deceit wrapped up in cigarette smoke, alcohol, grease, grime and sawn-off shotguns. Although Jack Carter’s Law is a compelling crime novel for me it doesn’t quite have the same emotional impact as Jack’s Return Home (aka Get Carter) or GBH. Any readers wishing to seek out the most impressive work from Ted Lewis would be best advised to start with Jack’s Return Home or GBH first before considering Jack Carter’s Law.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Martin Stanley

    A solid piece of British Crime fiction by one of its masters. Not as good as Jack's Return Home but still a cracking thriller with a nicely evoked London setting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve Aldous

    Jack Carter’s Law is Ted Lewis’ follow-up to his highly influential Jack’s Return Home, which was filmed as, and later retitled, Get Carter. This second book in the series is set prior to the first. Whereas Jack’s Return Home gave Lewis’ anti-hero a personal vendetta as motivation for the ensuing mayhem, here Carter is acting in his role as fixer/enforcer for one of London’s biggest criminal gangs. As such, there is little for the reader to root for in a cast of characters that have few, if any, Jack Carter’s Law is Ted Lewis’ follow-up to his highly influential Jack’s Return Home, which was filmed as, and later retitled, Get Carter. This second book in the series is set prior to the first. Whereas Jack’s Return Home gave Lewis’ anti-hero a personal vendetta as motivation for the ensuing mayhem, here Carter is acting in his role as fixer/enforcer for one of London’s biggest criminal gangs. As such, there is little for the reader to root for in a cast of characters that have few, if any, redeeming qualities. That said, Lewis masterfully keeps you engaged through his first-person perspective. Written in the present tense, not a popular style but effective here, the action feels immediate and the tension is kept high. Lewis also has a penchant for long descriptive paragrpahs, punctuated by salty and humorous dialogue. The book is not for the faint-hearted – there are several moments of brutality and cruelty – but for fans of gritty pulp fiction this is a great example of the genre. Lewis became something of a cult figure in the world of gritty crime fiction and unfortunately died young (aged only 42) after a battle with alcoholism.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Medina

    Ojalá me hubiese gustado el libro, pero no es mi tipo de libro.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Gómez

    MI RESEÑA en Cruce de Caminos MI RESEÑA en Cruce de Caminos

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karl O'

    Hardcore 60s Brit Noir at its best. Ted Lewis deserved such a bigger audience.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Javier

    Se me ha hecho algo perezoso de leer en algunos momentos. El final es como el del primer libro de la saga y por eso quizás no me lea el tercero.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex Gherzo

    Presumably to avoid marring the ambiguity of his novel's ending, Ted Lewis' followups to Get Carter/Jack's Return Home are prequels, showing the London fixer at work for his underworld bosses. Jack Carter's Law, while not as good as its predecessor, is a fun trudge through the London crime scene of the late 60's and early 70's with England's most ruthless gangster as your guide. As Christmas approaches, Jack Carter is tasked with hunting down a traitor looking to send Carter's associates to pris Presumably to avoid marring the ambiguity of his novel's ending, Ted Lewis' followups to Get Carter/Jack's Return Home are prequels, showing the London fixer at work for his underworld bosses. Jack Carter's Law, while not as good as its predecessor, is a fun trudge through the London crime scene of the late 60's and early 70's with England's most ruthless gangster as your guide. As Christmas approaches, Jack Carter is tasked with hunting down a traitor looking to send Carter's associates to prison -- along with Carter himself. Spoilers... While the previous book showed Carter on a personal mission of vengeance, Jack Carter's Law has him on the job, muscling every crook in London to search for a "grass" who can do his bosses, Gerald and Les Fletcher, irreparable damage. Carter is a consummate professional, knowing exactly how to play every step of his manhunt. Most of the people he interrogates are suitably coerced into cooperation with very subtle threats, but when he comes across a tougher customer, Carter knows just how far to push them. His professionalism is contrasted by the ineptitude of his partners. Even the best of them don't have Carter's deft touch, and more than once Carter considers killing one of them (Peter the Dutchman, which is funny considering the events of Get Carter; it's strange, knowing what happens later, to see Peter and Con as his sidekicks in this one). Several pieces, including the introduction to this edition of the book, have compared Jack Carter to Richard Stark's Parker -- a favorite of mine -- and I can see the similarities (although I still like Parker better, and take umbrage with Max Allan Collins when he says, "Carter makes Parker look like Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm;" balderdash, Parker is at least as ruthless and efficient as Carter, and would most certainly have killed Peter right then and there, and he wouldn't have shown half the concern for Lesley's well-being that Carter does). Carter's a nasty fellow, and his trek through London's seedy underbelly is a fun ride. The insights into his personality aren't as plentiful as they were in Get Carter (part of what makes that book superior to this one), but when they do show up they're interesting. He's not overly concerned with Gerald and Les, for example, and would be content to let them rot in prison -- as he made off with Gerald's wife Audrey, with whom he's having an affair -- but Jimmy Swann has implicated Carter as well, so he has to fix the problem whether he wants to or not. More than just Audrey, though, he resents Gerald and Les because they aren't very bright, or at least not as bright as he is. The syndicate, it seems, would fall apart without Carter to keep it intact, and it angers him that he is constantly having to clean up the messes his superiors make. It puts his affair with Audrey into a bit of perspective as well; it's a very dangerous situation in which to place himself (one that catches up with him come Get Carter), but Gerald and Les are so incompetent he has no doubt he'll get away with it. Moreover, he explains why Audrey is so different from all the other girls he could have, and it makes sense that he would go to such great lengths to be with her (I also like how Audrey herself is characterized -- like Carter, she's smarter than Gerald and Les, and capable of running the business herself when the brothers spirit themselves away to avoid the law). Getting in Carter's mind is my favorite part of these books, because he's such an interesting character. The pace is very similar to Get Carter, starting off slow (slower this time; to be honest, in the beginning parts of the book drag a bit too much) and steadily quickening in pace until Carter is fighting for his life constantly. I liked how the plot gets bigger and bigger as well, from a lone traitor looking to save himself to his being in league with corrupt cops to a rival mob faction looking to supplant Gerald and Les as the kingpins of London crime, with their desperate gamble mirroring Carter's own with Audrey. There's also a tremendous amount of British slang, much of which had me looking up terms online as I read (Collins, in his introduction, says that many of them are relics of the time in which the book was written, so it might not just be my American sensibilities), which adds to the flavor. Get Carter is better, but Jack Carter's Law is still a good hard-boiled crime novel. After working all year to be on Santa's nice list, it's cathartic to get a little naughty with Jack Carter.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Though not quite the classic that "Get Carter" is, Jack Carter's Law is a great read, and a more entertaining one than its predecessor. For obvious reasons, this book is a prequel to Ted Lewis's first Carter novel, following the London mafia fixer through a few very rough days in "The Big Smoke." While his and his bosses' livelihoods come under serious attack, we get to follow Jack around as he muscles and mouths his way around and through various obstacles set up throughout the criminal underwo Though not quite the classic that "Get Carter" is, Jack Carter's Law is a great read, and a more entertaining one than its predecessor. For obvious reasons, this book is a prequel to Ted Lewis's first Carter novel, following the London mafia fixer through a few very rough days in "The Big Smoke." While his and his bosses' livelihoods come under serious attack, we get to follow Jack around as he muscles and mouths his way around and through various obstacles set up throughout the criminal underworld. And it's a blast. While we get to see some of Jack's whip-crack sarcasm in the original book, his mission was a bit too grim and personal for things to get too humorous. In "Law," there are great lines from start to finish, as Jack offers us readers his snide insights on his fellow criminals - nearly all of whom he considers intellectual cripples and incompetant doorknobs. The fact that he calls them out right to their faces and dares them to argue makes for plenty of laughs. The story is the stuff of basic noir - a convoluted plot that only the protagonist manages to navigate is the backdrop. As usual, it's more of an excuse for Carter to do his thing, despite occassionally being thrown off kilter. As with "Get Carter," there's more than a dash of misogyny, as female characters are basically there for either sex or abuse (or both). This is a bit distasteful, but it does fit right in with the sordid nature of the entire setting. If you liked "Get Carter," rest assured that you'll like this one. Don't be surprised if you actually enjoy it a little more, too.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Koltnow

    Ted Lewis put crime back in the hands of the professionals, the ones who do it for a living. While this is no GET CARTER, it does have the pace and the feel of a crime classic. Lewis is actually a fine writer. He shares Ian Fleming's realism and draws the mechanics of action beautifully. He is as tough as Spillane and as good at conveying a time and place as James Ellroy. Lewis's fiction is not for the faint of heart; His books are about villains doing bad things to each other. However, Jack Car Ted Lewis put crime back in the hands of the professionals, the ones who do it for a living. While this is no GET CARTER, it does have the pace and the feel of a crime classic. Lewis is actually a fine writer. He shares Ian Fleming's realism and draws the mechanics of action beautifully. He is as tough as Spillane and as good at conveying a time and place as James Ellroy. Lewis's fiction is not for the faint of heart; His books are about villains doing bad things to each other. However, Jack Carter has something of a code of honor, and as such he becomes the nominal hero in this tale of betrayal. Carter does what needs to be done with efficiency and relentlessness. His bosses don't deserve him. Soho Syndicate will be reissuing all of the Jack Carter books later in 2014. This is a public service for readers of tough guy fiction.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In 1970s London Soho, the legendary gangland enforcer has to uncover a grass. Phil Daniels reads Ted Lewis' gritty thriller. Michael (my name's Michael) Caine played the eponymous lead in Get Carter (1971) Loadsa sexism here, worse than The Sweeney lol. Shouts of "Oy Slag" but one rooting-tooting soundtrack In 1970s London Soho, the legendary gangland enforcer has to uncover a grass. Phil Daniels reads Ted Lewis' gritty thriller. Michael (my name's Michael) Caine played the eponymous lead in Get Carter (1971) Loadsa sexism here, worse than The Sweeney lol. Shouts of "Oy Slag" but one rooting-tooting soundtrack

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    Lewis was a damned master. Not much more I can say.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Good stuff from a proper crime writer, with typewriter and habits as bad as his characters. A walk in the good old bad days in England. I'd hate to live there.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy H Maentz

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fernando

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jésus García Sancho

  26. 5 out of 5

    Scott Hunter

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  28. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristopher Triana

  30. 4 out of 5

    Philip Bunton

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