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Making Work Pay: America After Welfare

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In the four years since Congress acted to "end welfare as we know it", millions of people have been forced out of government assistance programs into low-wage, dead-end jobs with few, if any, benefits. Making Work Pay brings together the foremost thinkers in the fields of social policy and public affairs to examine the effects of the new national prosperity on the working In the four years since Congress acted to "end welfare as we know it", millions of people have been forced out of government assistance programs into low-wage, dead-end jobs with few, if any, benefits. Making Work Pay brings together the foremost thinkers in the fields of social policy and public affairs to examine the effects of the new national prosperity on the working poor -- to ask what happened to the second half of President Bill Clinton's welfare reform, which was supposed to "make work pay".As Robert Reich notes in his introduction, "like other ideas that have had the misfortune of becoming political slogans, 'making work pay' went from obscurity to meaninglessness without any intervening period of coherence". This book, which originated as a special double issue of The American Prospect magazine, brings coherence to the original notion, and updates it for a new century. In Making Work Pay, leading policy analysts and journalists examine the broad fallout of welfare reform: Marcia Meyers shows how welfare offices undermine welfare reform; Naomi Barko reveals how the gender gap in wages hits low-income workers hardest; Harold Meyerson describes the growing movement to organize low-wage workers; and Michael Massing details welfare-to-work programs that actually work. Arriving as Congress considers the reauthorization of welfare reform, and including reports of state programs, Making Work Pay is a timely contribution to a pressing debate.


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In the four years since Congress acted to "end welfare as we know it", millions of people have been forced out of government assistance programs into low-wage, dead-end jobs with few, if any, benefits. Making Work Pay brings together the foremost thinkers in the fields of social policy and public affairs to examine the effects of the new national prosperity on the working In the four years since Congress acted to "end welfare as we know it", millions of people have been forced out of government assistance programs into low-wage, dead-end jobs with few, if any, benefits. Making Work Pay brings together the foremost thinkers in the fields of social policy and public affairs to examine the effects of the new national prosperity on the working poor -- to ask what happened to the second half of President Bill Clinton's welfare reform, which was supposed to "make work pay".As Robert Reich notes in his introduction, "like other ideas that have had the misfortune of becoming political slogans, 'making work pay' went from obscurity to meaninglessness without any intervening period of coherence". This book, which originated as a special double issue of The American Prospect magazine, brings coherence to the original notion, and updates it for a new century. In Making Work Pay, leading policy analysts and journalists examine the broad fallout of welfare reform: Marcia Meyers shows how welfare offices undermine welfare reform; Naomi Barko reveals how the gender gap in wages hits low-income workers hardest; Harold Meyerson describes the growing movement to organize low-wage workers; and Michael Massing details welfare-to-work programs that actually work. Arriving as Congress considers the reauthorization of welfare reform, and including reports of state programs, Making Work Pay is a timely contribution to a pressing debate.

31 review for Making Work Pay: America After Welfare

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A very good collection of essays investigating the ramifications of welfare reform and the policy opportunities that value work in the 21st century.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Radhika

  3. 4 out of 5

    Timothy McCluskey

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caricia

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angel

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gina

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erica Reichert

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Widner

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hakija

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Jo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pammy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamon Foster

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary Sweet robinson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Foxglove Zayuri

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Villasenor

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  23. 5 out of 5

    V.

  24. 5 out of 5

    A.j. Medlock

  25. 5 out of 5

    David

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robyn Eason

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zee

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Grant

  29. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anik

  31. 4 out of 5

    Gazmend Kryeziu

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